History Trivia / ThePriceIsRight

1st Jan '17 1:47:43 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
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*** Similarly, Tom Bergeron (''Series/TheHollywoodSquares'', ''Series/DancingWithTheStars'') claims in his autobiography that CBS offered him the job at one point, but he didn't want to relocate from his home base in the NYC metro area. CBS then discussed ''relocating the entire show to New York'' just for him, but he said he didn't want to uproot the show's longtime staff.

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*** Similarly, Tom Bergeron (''Series/TheHollywoodSquares'', ''Series/DancingWithTheStars'') claims in his autobiography that CBS offered him the job at one point, but he didn't want to relocate from his home base in the NYC metro area. CBS then discussed ''relocating the entire show to New York'' just for him, but he said he didn't want to uproot the show's longtime staff. The fact that CBS was willing to relocate the show for Bergeron, but not for O'Donnell, shows how much they were enthusiastic about having him as host.
21st Dec '16 1:17:30 PM WarioBarker
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** People often refer to the bidding portion as "Contestant's Row", "Item Up For Bid", or aren't even aware it has a name; the proper title for the bidding game is "One Bid" (to be fair, this wasn't largely known until after Barker retired).

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** People often refer to the bidding portion as "Contestant's Row", "Item Up For Bid", Bids", or aren't even aware it has a name; the proper title for the bidding game is "One Bid" (to be fair, this wasn't largely known until after Barker retired).



** Dennis James. Despite spending the first five years alongside Barker, helping to cement the show's popularity among those who were not able to watch the daytime version, GSN never aired any of his nighttime run. The official reason, given by on-air host Laura Chambers, was that the network felt it pointless since less than 50 episodes did ''not'' contain a fur coat/stole; the real number, according to former ''Price'' staffer Scott Robinson in his findings from the show's archives about the 1972-80 nighttime version, is at most '''five'''! Ouch -- no wonder GSN didn't bother! In 1997, a James-hosted episode aired (twice!) in tribute following his death, albeit a daytime one (originally aired December 25, 1974) where he was substituting for Barker.

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** Dennis James. Despite spending the first five years alongside Barker, helping to cement the show's revival's popularity among those who were not able to watch the daytime version, GSN never aired any of his nighttime run. run (or any of Barker's three nighttime seasons, for that matter). The official reason, given by on-air host Laura Chambers, was that the network felt it pointless since less than 50 episodes did ''not'' contain a fur coat/stole; the real number, number of non-fur shows, according to former ''Price'' staffer Scott Robinson in his findings from the show's archives about the 1972-80 nighttime version, is at most '''five'''! Ouch -- no wonder GSN didn't bother! In 1997, GSN aired a James-hosted episode aired (twice!) in tribute following his death, albeit a daytime one (originally aired December 25, 1974) where he was substituting for Barker.



** Dennis James, who had been picked for the revival long before CBS (and as a result, Barker) got involved. It says volumes when Doug Davidson, who did just 80 episodes across half a season, is better-known for hosting ''Price'' amongst those under the age of about 40 or so (excluding die-hard game show fans) that a guy who did 200 episodes across five seasons.

to:

** Dennis James, who had been picked for the revival long before CBS (and as a result, Barker) got involved. It says volumes when Doug Davidson, who did just 80 episodes across half a season, is better-known for hosting ''Price'' amongst those under the age of about 40 or so (excluding die-hard game show fans) that than a guy who did 200 episodes across five seasons.
21st Dec '16 1:12:02 PM WarioBarker
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** If Roger Dobkowitz's Facebook page and his appearances on Radio/StusShow are anything to go by, he isn't too thrilled with the way the show is currently run. An example of this occurred when Triple Play was won for the first time in eight years on December 21, 2015. Roger was quick to point out that the staff should not treat it as a milestone and that it was shameful the way Drew acknowledged it on the air.
** While he was still working with the show, Rich [=DiPirro's=] first strike against the show's staff came when he considered bringing the Plinko sign back. Once management got word of what he was doing, it was "mysteriously" destroyed. Rich was not happy when he heard about this.
* DevelopmentHell: Some pricing games have been subject to this. The most common explanation for pricing games disappearing is that they are "being refurbished" when fans have pointed out other games (such as Any Number and Temptation) returning with brand new sets in ''much'' less time.
** Barker's Bargain Bar's set was dismantled a few playings into the 37th season. The game eventually returned on April 10, 2012, renamed the Bargain Game.
** Check Game was retired after the 37th season and returned on June 20, 2013.

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** If Roger Dobkowitz's Facebook page and his appearances on Radio/StusShow ''Radio/StusShow'' are anything to go by, he isn't too thrilled with the way the show is currently run.run (not too surprising, given he was fired so Fremantle could take it in a "new direction"). An example of this occurred when Triple Play was won for the first time in eight years on December 21, 2015. Roger was quick to point out that the staff should not treat it as a milestone and that it was shameful the way Drew acknowledged it on the air.
** While he was still working with the show, director Rich [=DiPirro's=] first strike against the show's staff came when he considered bringing the Plinko sign back.back as part of a new intro for the game. Once management got word of what he was doing, it was "mysteriously" destroyed. Rich was not happy when he heard about this.
* DevelopmentHell: Some pricing games have been subject to this. The most common explanation for pricing games disappearing is that they are "being refurbished" when fans have pointed out other games (such as Any Number and Temptation) returning with brand new brand-new sets in ''much'' less time.
** Barker's Bargain Bar's set was dismantled a few playings into Season 37 because the 37th season. word "Barker" was in there (yes, they can really be that petty). The game eventually returned on April 10, 2012, renamed the Bargain Game.
** Check Game was retired after the 37th season removed during Season 37 and returned on June 20, 2013.



*** The daytime show (February 21, 1957; incorrectly listed in liner notes as March 10) and ABC nighttime finale (September 11, 1964; not seen on GSN and incorrectly listed as September 4) are on the DVD set. Shokus Video has five shows in their compilation volumes [[note]](NBC daytime May 31/July 5/July 12, 1957; NBC nighttime finale September 6, 1963 {aired on GSN}; ABC daytime January 4, 1965 {widely and incorrectly listed as 1964})[[/note]], while nighttime shows from November 26, 1962 and August 28, 1964 are on the trading circuit along with three March 1965 episodes sub-hosted by Jack Clark (one being March 22). A daytime show from June 19, 1964 with Johnny Gilbert as sub-host is now on YouTube (intro and first bidding game missing).
*** Three nighttime episodes unaired by GSN (December 25, 1961, to January 8, 1962) surfaced in August 2011 and can be seen [[http://www.youtube.com/user/KMBCGeno/videos here.]]

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*** The daytime show (February 21, 1957; incorrectly listed in liner notes as March 10) and ABC nighttime finale (September 11, 1964; not seen on GSN and incorrectly listed as September 4) are on the DVD set. Shokus Video has five shows in their compilation volumes [[note]](NBC daytime May 31/July 5/July 12, 1957; NBC nighttime finale September 6, 1963 {aired on GSN}; ABC daytime January 4, 1965 {widely and incorrectly listed as 1964})[[/note]], while nighttime shows from November 26, 1962 and August 28, 1964 are on the trading circuit along with three March 1965 episodes sub-hosted by Jack Clark (one being March 22).Clark. A daytime show from June 19, 1964 with Johnny Gilbert as sub-host is now on YouTube (intro and first bidding game missing).
*** Three nighttime episodes unaired by GSN (December 25, 1961, 1961 to January 8, 1962) surfaced in August 2011 and can be seen [[http://www.youtube.com/user/KMBCGeno/videos here.]]



*** Long-forgotten clips and episodes still turn up from time to time by way of contestants or collectors, such as [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AjOMs5t83Ik the debut of Double Bullseye]] (September 19, 1972); [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vps0g9H5UFk audio of Johnny Olson's audience warmup before #1685D]] (show aired November 21, 1975); [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_LPA3rFl2nk parts of Rick Tanzi's last show]] (February 25, 1976); [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_fJE1XfpmCo slate, partial opening, and various clips including Card Game]] (December 27, 1976); [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ugn3wRr7UWg partial opening, most of Segment 3, and part of Showcase Showdown #1]] (1977-78, with red walls on Big Wheel but yellow squares); [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wJpO9d4jMgE Three Strikes and a Showcase Showdown]] (1978, post-yellow squares); [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vVuVhq8gcVY an opening]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ISw1ZqbIkGg Three Strikes, and Showcase Showdown #2 through credits]] (1978, post-yellow squares); and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=20v2y1Uu37A the slate and open from #4904D]] (April 28, 1983).

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*** Long-forgotten clips and episodes still turn up from time to time by way of contestants or collectors, such as [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AjOMs5t83Ik the debut of Double Bullseye]] (September 19, 1972); [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vps0g9H5UFk audio of Johnny Olson's audience warmup before #1685D]] (show aired November 21, 1975); [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_LPA3rFl2nk parts of cameraman Rick Tanzi's last show]] (February 25, 1976); [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_fJE1XfpmCo slate, partial opening, and various clips including Card Game]] (December 27, 1976); [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ugn3wRr7UWg partial opening, most of Segment 3, and part of Showcase Showdown #1]] (1977-78, with red walls on Big Wheel but yellow squares); [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wJpO9d4jMgE Three Strikes and a Showcase Showdown]] (1978, post-yellow squares); [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vVuVhq8gcVY an opening]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ISw1ZqbIkGg Three Strikes, and Showcase Showdown #2 through credits]] (1978, post-yellow squares); and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=20v2y1Uu37A the slate and open intro from #4904D]] (April 28, 1983).



** When Rod mysteriously stopped appearing on-camera in Season 31, some fans assumed that it owed to Rod's declining health, while Creator/FremantleMedia claimed that they had implemented a policy to keep all their game show announcers from being seen. However, this claim was promptly debunked when several substitutes appeared on-camera and Rich himself did the same...and by Season 37, Rich and his successors started getting as much face time as Rod did in the early days. It was further debunked in [[http://retroalitytv.blogspot.com/2009/10/remembering-rod-roddy-live-out-loud.html an interview]] given by Holly Halstrom, who remained friends with Rod even after she left the show — the ''real'' reason Rod stopped appearing on-camera was arguments over salary between him and Bob.
** In 1995, during a taping of the show, someone in the audience asked Barker what happened to Holly. Barker said that [[NeverMyFault "Holly retired".]] But anyone who knows Barker better than anyone else would know the ''real'' reason for that.
** Barker also said that he retired on his own terms, when he announced such a thing on October 31, 2006. However, some people believe that was just a smoke screen all this time. They suspect that the real reason was because CBS and Creator/FremantleMedia had grown disgusted with his backstage behavior. Furthering the suspicions of longtime viewers is the fact that earlier in 2006, he signed a contract to host the series for five more years...then, all of a sudden, he announced he was "retiring". This sounds far less suspicious when you look at some of the episodes Barker taped right before he announced his retirement. In one of them [[note]](taped Oct. 23, 2006, aired Dec. 12, 2006)[[/note]] he asked to reveal the second number in Dice Game, forgetting it was already revealed. In another [[note]](taped Oct. 26, 2006, aired Dec. 15, 2006)[[/note]], Barker prematurely revealed the correct price in Cover Up, resulting in a technical win. He probably figured if he was going to make so many mistakes, it was time to hang it up.

to:

** When Rod mysteriously stopped appearing on-camera in Season 31, some fans assumed that it owed to Rod's declining health, while Creator/FremantleMedia claimed that they had implemented a worldwide policy to keep all their game show announcers from being seen. However, this claim was promptly debunked when several substitutes appeared on-camera and Rich himself did the same...and by Season 37, Rich and his successors started getting as much face time as Rod did in the early days. It was further debunked in [[http://retroalitytv.blogspot.com/2009/10/remembering-rod-roddy-live-out-loud.html an interview]] given by Holly Halstrom, who remained friends with Rod even after she left the show — the ''real'' reason Rod stopped appearing on-camera was arguments over salary between him and Bob.
** In 1995, during a taping of the show, someone in the audience asked Barker what happened to Holly. Barker said that [[NeverMyFault "Holly retired".]] retired"]]. But anyone who knows Barker better than anyone else would know the ''real'' reason for that.
** Barker also said that he retired on his own terms, when he announced such a thing on October 31, 2006. However, some people believe that was just a smoke screen all this time. They time and suspect that the real reason was because CBS and Creator/FremantleMedia had finally grown disgusted with his backstage behavior. Furthering the suspicions of longtime viewers is was the fact that earlier in 2006, he signed a contract to host the series for five more years...then, all of a sudden, he announced he was "retiring". This "retiring".
*** In fairness, this all
sounds far less suspicious when you look at some of the episodes Barker taped right before he announced his retirement. In one of them [[note]](taped Oct. October 23, 2006, 2006 and aired Dec. 12, 2006)[[/note]] December 12)[[/note]], he asked to reveal the second number in Dice Game, forgetting it was already revealed. In another [[note]](taped Oct. 26, 2006, October 26 and aired Dec. 15, 2006)[[/note]], December 15)[[/note]], Barker prematurely revealed the correct price in Cover Up, resulting in a technical win. He probably figured if he was going to make so many mistakes, it was time to hang it up.



** The pricing game "Check Game" was originally called "Blank Check" until it was realized that Creator/JackBarry-Dan Enright productions had a [[Series/BlankCheck show of the same name]] in 1975 and supposedly threatened a lawsuit.

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** The pricing game "Check Game" was originally called "Blank Check" until it was realized that Creator/JackBarry-Dan Enright productions Creator/JackBarry Productions had a [[Series/BlankCheck show of the same name]] in 1975 and Dan Enright supposedly threatened a lawsuit.



** Dennis James, to the point where Doug Davidson is better-known for hosting ''Price'' amongst those under the age of about 40 or so (excluding die-hard game show fans). There's something wrong when said under-40s will know the guy who did ''80'' episodes far more often than the guy who did ''200'', and it certainly doesn't help that about 40 episodes of Davidson's run circulate on video vs. exactly '''nine''' episodes of James' tenure. And then in September 2012, the official [=YouTube=] account posted the aforementioned video of Pamela, making sure the world knew a little more about Dennis.

to:

** Dennis James, to who had been picked for the point where revival long before CBS (and as a result, Barker) got involved. It says volumes when Doug Davidson Davidson, who did just 80 episodes across half a season, is better-known for hosting ''Price'' amongst those under the age of about 40 or so (excluding die-hard game show fans). There's something wrong when said under-40s will know the fans) that a guy who did ''80'' 200 episodes far more often than the guy who did ''200'', and it certainly doesn't help that about 40 episodes of Davidson's run circulate on video vs. exactly '''nine''' episodes of James' tenure. And then in September 2012, the official [=YouTube=] account posted the aforementioned video of Pamela, making sure the world knew a little more about Dennis.across five seasons.



** Drew Carey is a ''huge'' Bob Barker fan, and leapt at the chance to succeed him.

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** Drew Carey is a ''huge'' Bob Barker fan, and leapt at the chance to succeed him. him...provided he didn't have to audition.



** Any Number and the original Bullseye were actually ''one'' board, with three four-digit displays and lights with the numbers 1-10. The games only ''looked'' different because they had different faceplates.
** The same prop also got a clock on its top half for the first three playings of Clock Game. In April 1973, the board got a unique four-sided faceplate and became Double Digits.

to:

** Any Number and the original Bullseye were actually ''one'' board, with three four-digit displays and lights with the numbers 1-10. The games only ''looked'' different because they had different faceplates.
**
faceplates. The same prop also got a clock on its top half for the first three playings of Clock Game. In April 1973, the board got Game, and a unique four-sided faceplate and became for the short-lived Double Digits.



** The Barker Silver Dollars for "Balance Game '84" were reused when "Balance Game '06" debuted.
** The "bonus money" cards for Clock Game during the 1986 Specials occasionally showed up in Barker's Bargain Bar as the "difference" card.

to:

** The Barker Silver Dollars for "Balance used in the 1980s Balance Game '84" were reused when "Balance a different Balance Game '06" debuted.
debuted in 2006.
** The "bonus money" cards used for Clock Game during winners on the 1986 Specials nighttime specials occasionally showed up in Barker's Bargain Bar as the "difference" card.



** The "$1,000,000" sign used in the back of the audience for Million-Dollar Spectaculars was cut down a bit, and is now the "$100,000" sign for Pay The Rent's intro.

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** The "$1,000,000" sign used in the back of the audience for Million-Dollar Spectaculars was cut down a bit, and is now the "$100,000" sign for Pay The Rent's intro.



* ScrewedByTheLawyers: Safe Crackers originally used [[RealSongThemeTune the theme from]] ''Franchise/ThePinkPanther'' which required Mark Goodson Productions to pay royalties for the music. For this reason in 1992, the theme was dropped and replaced by a generic cue.

to:

* ScrewedByTheLawyers: Safe Crackers originally used [[RealSongThemeTune the theme from]] ''Franchise/ThePinkPanther'' ''Franchise/ThePinkPanther'', which required Mark Goodson Productions to pay royalties for the music. For this reason in 1992, reason, the theme was dropped and replaced by a generic cue in 1992. (The Tom Kennedy version of ''Price'', which aired during the 1985-86 season, used a separate cue.)



** The original ''Price'' on NBC was holding its own in daytime, but the nighttime sponsors were playing around too much with it in other timeslots. It flourished at 8:30 PM Eastern Wednesdays, then in 1961 was moved to Mondays at 8:30 PM. A year later, it was moved to 9:30 PM Mondays where ''The Andy Griffith Show'' clobbered it, then again at midseason to Fridays at 9:30 PM. NBC wanted to skew younger than ''Price'' sponsors wanted and optioned a sitcom called ''Harry's Girls'', but ABC [[NetworkToTheRescue stepped in]] and offered more for ''Price'' than NBC was willing to pony up.

to:

** The original ''Price'' on NBC was holding its own in daytime, but the nighttime sponsors were playing around too much with it in other timeslots. It flourished at 8:30 PM Eastern Wednesdays, then in 1961 was moved to Mondays at 8:30 PM. A year later, it was moved to 9:30 PM Mondays where ''The Andy Griffith Show'' clobbered it, then again at midseason to Fridays at 9:30 PM. NBC wanted to skew younger than ''Price'' sponsors wanted and optioned a sitcom called ''Harry's Girls'', but ABC [[NetworkToTheRescue stepped in]] and offered more for ''Price'' than NBC was (probably half-heartedly) willing to pony up.



** Credit Card hasn't been played in quite some time; while some games have been put on hiatus in the past, this one has gone so long without being played that it's essentially retired. However, the staff has been rather careful in choosing its words so as to give absolutely no clue whether the game has been permanently retired — the official explanation is that it's "being refurbished", which falls flat since Any Number and Temptation were refurbished in far less time.
** Step Up has been getting the same treatment after its last playing in Fall 2014. It and Credit card were mentioned in an April 2016 tweet by Drew Carey, saying "Well there’s always a chance they’ll come back. But don’t hold your breath".

to:

** Credit Card hasn't been played in quite some time; since late 2008; while some games have been put on hiatus in the past, this one has gone so long without being played that it's essentially retired. However, the staff has been rather careful in choosing its words so as to give absolutely no clue whether the game has been permanently retired — the official explanation is that it's "being refurbished", which falls flat since Any Number and Temptation were refurbished in far less time.
** Step Up has been getting the same treatment after its last playing in Fall 2014. It and Credit card Card were mentioned in an April 2016 tweet by Drew Carey, saying "Well there’s always a chance they’ll come back. But don’t don't hold your breath".breath."



** The episode aired March 3, 1989 had ''two'' pricing games won due to production errors: one contestant got the top prize of $10,000 because they forgot to put a slip in one of the Punch-a-Bunch holes, and another won a car because One Away had a wrong number loaded into it, resulting in an {{Unwinnable}} setup.

to:

** The episode aired March 3, 1989 had ''two'' pricing games won due to production errors: one contestant got the top prize of $10,000 because they forgot to put a slip in one of the Punch-a-Bunch Punch-A-Bunch holes, and another won a car because One Away had a wrong number loaded into it, resulting in an {{Unwinnable}} setup.



** Bill Cullen stated in a January 23, 1972 [[http://userdata.acd.net/ottinger/cullen/more/article12.jpg interview]] that he was in negotiations with Goodson-Todman to do the ''New'' show in syndication and "We've hit a snag ... the price, so far, hasn't been right for me." While his polio would've made it all but impossible for him to helm a show where the host is required to move around a lot, keep in mind that nothing had really been ironed out about the format at this point. Also noted is that Bill was in New York City at the time as a regular panelist on ''Series/ToTellTheTruth'' and host of ''Series/ThreeOnAMatch''.[[note]] On a similar note, Bill was to have guest-hosted ''Series/TheTonightShow'' during the week of July 22, 1963. A dispute between Frigidaire (''Price'' sponsor) and Hotpoint (''Tonight'' sponsor) scuttled the appearance. Arlene Francis filled in for Johnny Carson that week.[[/note]]

to:

** Bill Cullen stated in a January 23, 1972 [[http://userdata.acd.net/ottinger/cullen/more/article12.jpg interview]] that he was in negotiations with Goodson-Todman to do the ''New'' show revival in syndication and "We've hit a snag ... the price, so far, hasn't been right for me." While his polio would've made it all but impossible for him to helm a show where the host is required to move around a lot, keep in mind that nothing had really been ironed out about the format at this point. Also noted is that Bill was in New York City at the time as a regular panelist on ''Series/ToTellTheTruth'' and host of ''Series/ThreeOnAMatch''.[[note]] On a similar note, Bill was to have guest-hosted ''Series/TheTonightShow'' during the week of July 22, 1963. A dispute between Frigidaire (''Price'' sponsor) and Hotpoint (''Tonight'' sponsor) scuttled the appearance. Arlene Francis filled in for Johnny Carson that week.[[/note]]



** Sometime between the pitchfilm and early August, the idea was hatched to use '''three''' Showcases per episode, so all onstage players could have a chance at more. This was dropped before August 19.
** The extensive list of those who auditioned to replace Bob Barker in 2007 included Doug Davidson (1994 nighttime version), George Hamilton (actor and 1998 ''Series/MatchGame'' panelist), Todd Newton (''[[Series/{{Whammy}} Whammy! The All-New Press Your Luck]]'', ''Series/FamilyGameNight''), John O'Hurley (''Series/FamilyFeud'', ''Series/ToTellTheTruth''), Dave Price (''The Early Show''), Marco Antonio Regil (host of the Mexican version), Mike Richards (''Series/BeautyAndTheGeek'' and ''TPIR''[='s=] future executive producer), Mark Steines (''Series/EntertainmentTonight''), Marc Summers (''[[Series/DoubleDare1986 Double Dare]]'', ''[[Series/WhatWouldYouDoNickelodeon What Would You Do]]''), Mark L. Walberg (''Series/ShopTilYouDrop'', ''Free 4 All'', ''Series/RussianRoulette''), and Ian Ziering (''Series/BeverlyHills90210'', ''WesternAnimation/TheMightyDucks'' and ex-husband of former TPIR model Nikki Ziering). Many online fans campaigned for Newton, Roger Dobkowitz pushed for Walberg, and CBS (after originally eyeing Price) were rumored to have preferred Steines, but Drew Carey eventually came onto the radar and got the gig after his hosting of CBS' short-lived primetime game show ''Power of 10'' attracted positive attention (though he at first turned down the offer).

to:

** Sometime between the pitchfilm and early August, the idea was hatched to use '''three''' Showcases per episode, so all onstage players could have a chance at more. This was dropped before August 19.
by mid-August.
** The extensive list of those who auditioned to replace Bob Barker in 2007 included Doug Davidson (1994 nighttime version), George Hamilton (actor and 1998 ''Series/MatchGame'' panelist), Todd Newton (''[[Series/{{Whammy}} Whammy! The All-New Press Your Luck]]'', ''Series/FamilyGameNight''), John O'Hurley (''Series/FamilyFeud'', ''Series/ToTellTheTruth''), Dave Price (''The Early Show''), Marco Antonio Regil (host of the Mexican version), Mike Richards (''Series/BeautyAndTheGeek'' and ''TPIR''[='s=] future executive producer), Mark Steines (''Series/EntertainmentTonight''), Marc Summers (''[[Series/DoubleDare1986 Double Dare]]'', ''[[Series/WhatWouldYouDoNickelodeon What Would You Do]]''), Mark L. Walberg (''Series/ShopTilYouDrop'', ''Free 4 All'', ''Series/RussianRoulette''), and Ian Ziering (''Series/BeverlyHills90210'', ''WesternAnimation/TheMightyDucks'' and ex-husband of former TPIR ''TPIR'' model Nikki Ziering). Many online fans campaigned for Newton, Roger Dobkowitz pushed for Walberg, and CBS (after originally eyeing Price) were rumored to have preferred Steines, but Drew Carey eventually came onto the radar and got the gig after his hosting of CBS' short-lived primetime game show ''Power of 10'' attracted positive attention (though he at first turned down the offer).offer).
*** Marc Summers (''[[Series/DoubleDare1986 Double Dare]]'', ''[[Series/WhatWouldYouDoNickelodeon What Would You Do]]'') never even got a chance to audition, with CBS never giving Roger a reason. Then-announcer Rich Fields never got an audition, either, but that was because Fremantle was planning to kick him out after Season 35.



*** There were also short-lived talks surrounding Rosie O'Donnell becoming the new host (partially bolstered by Bob Barker himself in interviews). Rosie and CBS did have talks about the idea, but Rosie wanted the series to relocate to New York permanently, which largely ended any future discussion.

to:

*** There were also short-lived talks surrounding Rosie O'Donnell becoming the new host (partially bolstered by Bob Barker himself in interviews). Rosie and CBS did have talks about the idea, but Rosie wanted the series to relocate to New York permanently, which largely ended any future discussion.



** Back to host speculation: at one point Dennis James was considered for hosting both the daytime and nighttime versions of The Price is Right when the game show was revived in 1972; but Creator/{{CBS}} wanted ([[ExecutiveMeddling and got]]) Bob Barker for the daytime version.

to:

** Back to host speculation: at one point Dennis James was considered for hosting both the daytime and nighttime versions of The Price is Right when the game show was revived in 1972; but Creator/{{CBS}} wanted ([[ExecutiveMeddling and got]]) expressed interest in doing a daytime revival in 1972, Bud Grant picked Bob Barker to host...except Bob didn't want any part of the show, feeling it could be produced better and wanting to do one of the quizzes CBS was also picking up for the daytime version.Fall '72 (''Series/{{Gambit}}'' or ''Series/TheJokersWild'') instead.



** Drew had to make several accommodations for a stretch of Season 37 episodes due to foot surgery. Most notably, he spent several episodes walking with a cane, and had the models carry him out on a prize at the top of the show. They also handled some of the pricing game props that he normally would. In Season 40, he spent several episodes in a sling after receiving shoulder surgery.

to:

** Drew had to make several accommodations for a stretch of Season 37 episodes due to foot surgery. Most notably, he spent several episodes walking with a cane, and had the models carry him out on a prize at the top of the show. They also handled some of the pricing game props that he normally would.would (one of these alterations, turning the trilons in One Away, actually became permanent). In Season 40, he spent several episodes in a sling after receiving shoulder surgery.



** The producers not wanting to deal with this is often cited as a reason why Bill Cullen wasn't asked to host the 1972 revival.
22nd Nov '16 6:44:39 PM Gimere
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** The show is one of the ''many'' sources that violate the [[InsistentTerminology Nintendo Style Guide]] by having the word "UsefulNotes/{{Wii}}" preceded by the word "Nintendo".

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** The show ''Price'' is one of the ''many'' sources that violate the [[InsistentTerminology Nintendo Style Guide]] by having the word "UsefulNotes/{{Wii}}" preceded by the word "Nintendo".


Added DiffLines:

* OutOfOrder: Not always the most obvious, usually manifesting itself in minute set changes that seem to disappear and reappear, sometimes within the week. This also can result in the host making reference to a past event as if it were upcoming, or vice versa (e.g., saying that a contestant is the first to play a new pricing game when, due to another episode being moved, they are actually the second). And in 2003 and 2010's announcer searches, it led to the substitute announcer post frequently changing mid-week.
12th Nov '16 3:53:56 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
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** The Dennis James version, partly due to offering a ''lot'' of furs, hasn't been seen very much since 1977 minus three prominent examples [[note]](a pair of brief clips in ''Game Show Moments Gone Bananas'' {circa 1974 where Dennis trips on the Turntable; circa 1976 with a problematic Clock Game player}, a daytime episode where he subbed for Barker {December 25, 1974; aired twice by GSN in 1997}, and a Lucky Seven playing shown during the 1979 Peter Falk film ''The In-Laws'' {which leads to a discussion between the leads about ''Price''})[[/note]]. Only five episodes (including the pitchfilm) circulate, and approximately 30 episodes from 1973-75 were recorded onto audio cassette (heard [[http://j-shea.com/TPIR/nighttime/index.html here]] and [[http://j-shea.com/TPIR/cues/index.html here]]).

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** The Dennis James version, partly due to offering a ''lot'' of furs, hasn't been seen very much since 1977 minus three prominent examples examples. [[note]](a pair of brief clips in ''Game Show Moments Gone Bananas'' {circa 1974 where Dennis trips on the Turntable; circa 1976 with a problematic Clock Game player}, a daytime episode where he subbed for Barker {December 25, 1974; aired twice by GSN in 1997}, and a Lucky Seven playing shown during the 1979 Peter Falk film ''The In-Laws'' {which leads to a discussion between the leads about ''Price''})[[/note]]. ''Price''})[[/note]] Only five episodes (including the pitchfilm) circulate, and approximately 30 episodes from 1973-75 were recorded onto audio cassette (heard [[http://j-shea.com/TPIR/nighttime/index.html here]] and [[http://j-shea.com/TPIR/cues/index.html here]]).


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*** Dennis James himself reportedly recorded his own copies of nearly every episode of seasons 1 to 3 (1972-75) as well as selected episodes of seasons 4 and 5 (1975-77), but the seasons 1-3 recordings were done on Cartrivision, V-Cord and VX tapes, early VCR formats which have long-since fallen into obscurity. (James must've been a very enthusiastic early adopter of home video recording.)
18th Oct '16 6:34:30 PM themisterfree
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** Supposedly, Creator/PhilHartman auditioned for the announcer's role after Johnny Olson died. Hartman's only turn as announcer was on the short-lived ''Pop 'N Rocker Game'' in 1983.

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** Supposedly, Creator/PhilHartman auditioned for the announcer's role after Johnny Olson died. Hartman's only turn as announcer was on the short-lived ''Pop 'N Rocker Game'' in 1983. (He also auditioned for the announcer/sidekick role for season 2 of ''[[Series/LetsMakeADeal The All-New Let's Make A Deal]]'', but lost out to [[Series/HighRollers Dean Goss]].)
22nd Sep '16 8:30:56 PM Gimere
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Added DiffLines:

* LongRunners: The CBS version has run nonstop since 1972, giving it the longest contiguous run by far for any American game show. It's also one of the longest-running game shows in the world. The nine years the original series ran was no small feat in itself, considering how critics considered it the end of civilization as we know it.
4th Sep '16 10:23:51 PM erforce
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* ScrewedByTheLawyers: Safe Crackers originally used [[RealSongThemeTune the theme from]] ''Film/ThePinkPanther'' which required Mark Goodson Productions to pay royalties for the music. For this reason in 1992, the theme was dropped and replaced by a generic cue.

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* ScrewedByTheLawyers: Safe Crackers originally used [[RealSongThemeTune the theme from]] ''Film/ThePinkPanther'' ''Franchise/ThePinkPanther'' which required Mark Goodson Productions to pay royalties for the music. For this reason in 1992, the theme was dropped and replaced by a generic cue.
28th Aug '16 5:04:59 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
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** Dick Van Dyke turned down hosting the original the NBC version.

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** Dick Van Dyke turned down hosting the original the NBC version.
28th Aug '16 12:04:03 PM mlsmithca
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* LyingCreator: When Rod mysteriously stopped appearing on-camera in Season 31, some fans assumed that it owed to Rod's declining health, while Creator/FremantleMedia claimed that they had implemented a policy to keep all their game show announcers from being seen. However, this claim was promptly debunked when several substitutes appeared on-camera and Rich himself did the same...and by Season 37, Rich and his successors started getting as much face time as Rod did in the early days. It was further debunked in [[http://retroalitytv.blogspot.com/2009/10/remembering-rod-roddy-live-out-loud.html an interview]] given by Holly Halstrom, who remained friends with Rod even after she left the show — the ''real'' reason Rod stopped appearing on-camera was arguments over salary between him and Bob.

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* LyingCreator: LyingCreator:
**
When Rod mysteriously stopped appearing on-camera in Season 31, some fans assumed that it owed to Rod's declining health, while Creator/FremantleMedia claimed that they had implemented a policy to keep all their game show announcers from being seen. However, this claim was promptly debunked when several substitutes appeared on-camera and Rich himself did the same...and by Season 37, Rich and his successors started getting as much face time as Rod did in the early days. It was further debunked in [[http://retroalitytv.blogspot.com/2009/10/remembering-rod-roddy-live-out-loud.html an interview]] given by Holly Halstrom, who remained friends with Rod even after she left the show — the ''real'' reason Rod stopped appearing on-camera was arguments over salary between him and Bob.



** Barker also said that he retired on his own terms, when he announced such a thing on October 31, 2006. However, some people believe that was just a smoke screen all this time. They suspect that the real reason was because CBS and Creator/FremantleMedia had grown disgusted with his backstage behavior. Furthering the suspicions of longtime viewers is the fact that earlier in 2006, he signed a contract to host the series for five more years...then, all of a sudden, he announced he was "retiring".
*** This sounds far less suspicious when you look at some of the episodes Barker taped right before he announced his retirement. In one of them [[note]](taped Oct. 23, 2006, aired Dec. 12, 2006)[[/note]] he asked to reveal the second number in Dice Game, forgetting it was already revealed. In another [[note]](taped Oct. 26, 2006, aired Dec. 15, 2006)[[/note]], Barker prematurely revealed the correct price in Cover Up, resulting in a technical win. He probably figured if he was going to make so many mistakes, it was time to hang it up.
* MilestoneCelebration: Every ''x'',000th episode features tons of big prizes and special decorations. Too bad every single one until #7,500 was celebrated at the wrong time.

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** Barker also said that he retired on his own terms, when he announced such a thing on October 31, 2006. However, some people believe that was just a smoke screen all this time. They suspect that the real reason was because CBS and Creator/FremantleMedia had grown disgusted with his backstage behavior. Furthering the suspicions of longtime viewers is the fact that earlier in 2006, he signed a contract to host the series for five more years...then, all of a sudden, he announced he was "retiring".
***
"retiring". This sounds far less suspicious when you look at some of the episodes Barker taped right before he announced his retirement. In one of them [[note]](taped Oct. 23, 2006, aired Dec. 12, 2006)[[/note]] he asked to reveal the second number in Dice Game, forgetting it was already revealed. In another [[note]](taped Oct. 26, 2006, aired Dec. 15, 2006)[[/note]], Barker prematurely revealed the correct price in Cover Up, resulting in a technical win. He probably figured if he was going to make so many mistakes, it was time to hang it up.
* MilestoneCelebration: MilestoneCelebration:
**
Every ''x'',000th episode features tons of big prizes and special decorations. Too bad every single one until #7,500 was celebrated at the wrong time.
This list shows the last 10 events of 184. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Trivia.ThePriceIsRight