History Trivia / StarTrekVItheUndiscoveredCountry

5th Feb '18 2:55:38 AM jormis29
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* DeletedScene: Rene Auberjonois filmed a small role as a Starfleet member initially presented as being an ally to Kirk and Spock, [[spoiler: only to be revealed as an aid to the conspirators]]. His scenes were cut for the theatrical release, reinstated for the VHS and DVD, only to be cut again on the Blu-Ray.

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* DeletedScene: Rene Auberjonois Creator/ReneAuberjonois filmed a small role as a Starfleet member initially presented as being an ally to Kirk and Spock, [[spoiler: only to be revealed as an aid to the conspirators]]. His scenes were cut for the theatrical release, reinstated for the VHS and DVD, only to be cut again on the Blu-Ray.



** Rene Auberjonois, who appears as Colonel West in a deleted scene, would later be cast in the regular role of Odo in ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine''. Notably, Auberjonois uses the same voice for West (his natural voice being higher-pitched and more nasal) that he would later use for Odo.

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** Rene Auberjonois, Creator/ReneAuberjonois, who appears as Colonel West in a deleted scene, would later be cast in the regular role of Odo in ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine''. Notably, Auberjonois uses the same voice for West (his natural voice being higher-pitched and more nasal) that he would later use for Odo.
25th Jan '18 12:08:04 PM StarTropes
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** David Warner previously played St. John Talbot, a disgruntled Federation diplomat, in Star Trek V. His role as Gorkon is substantially more important here. He also later played Gul Madred in TNG, who tortures a captured Picard.

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** David Warner previously played St. John Talbot, a disgruntled Federation diplomat, in Star Trek V. His role as Gorkon is substantially more important here. He also later played Gul Madred in TNG, who tortures a captured Picard.Picard.
** The first of three times in ''Franchise/StarTrek'' that Creator/KurtwoodSmith wants to [[Series/That70sShow put his foot in someone's ass]].
18th Jan '18 4:22:29 PM gjjones
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* InMemoriam: The film was dedicated to Creator/GeneRoddenberry, who died of a cardiac arrest a few weeks before the film's release.



** Hold it, Creator/KurtwoodSmith as somebody that's ''not'' a JerkAss or evil?

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** Hold it, Creator/KurtwoodSmith as somebody that's ''not'' a JerkAss {{Jerkass}} or evil?
11th Dec '17 3:27:23 PM AnotherGuy
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** Creator/JackPalance turned down the role of Gorkon so he could star in ''Film/CitySlickers''.

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** Creator/JackPalance turned down the role of Gorkon so he could star in ''Film/CitySlickers''. [[AcademyAward It worked out well for him.]]
5th Nov '17 5:51:13 AM Brainbin
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** Perhaps the most famous WhatCouldHaveBeen element of the film was that [[spoiler: the role of Valeris in the final film was originally written as Saavik. This would have packed a ''much'' greater emotional wallop, as Saavik had previously appeared in three films and her betrayal would have been a huge shock. Creator/GeneRoddenberry, though in ailing health and near death, was able to apply ExecutiveVeto against this - even though Nicholas Meyer, the director and (uncredited) screenwriter of ''ST:II'', created Saavik and unsuccessfully argued that he knew her better than Roddenberry. Before this veto was applied, the production team attempted to entice Alley to return for the role (Robin Curtis, who replaced her for ''ST:III'' and ''ST:IV'', was apparently never considered); Alley was busy filming ''Series/{{Cheers}}'' at the time but both properties were owned by Paramount and the studio could have easily arranged a way for her to appear in both. She declined anyway before Roddenberry's veto made the point moot, but had Saavik reappeared she would have been played by a ''third'' actress in just four films.]]

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** Perhaps the most famous WhatCouldHaveBeen element of the film was that [[spoiler: the role of Valeris in the final film was originally written as Saavik. This would have packed a ''much'' greater emotional wallop, as Saavik had previously appeared in three films and her betrayal would have been a huge shock. Creator/GeneRoddenberry, though in ailing health and near death, was able to apply ExecutiveVeto against this - even though Nicholas Meyer, the director and (uncredited) screenwriter of ''ST:II'', created Saavik and unsuccessfully argued that he knew her better than Roddenberry. Before this veto was applied, the production team attempted to entice Kirstie Alley to return for the role (Robin Curtis, who replaced her for ''ST:III'' and ''ST:IV'', was apparently never considered); Alley was busy filming ''Series/{{Cheers}}'' at the time but both properties were owned by Paramount and the studio could have easily arranged a way for her to appear in both. She declined anyway before Roddenberry's veto made the point moot, but had Saavik reappeared she would have been played by a ''third'' actress in just four films.]]
5th Nov '17 5:50:10 AM Brainbin
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** Perhaps the most famous WhatCouldHaveBeen element of the film was that [[spoiler: the role of Valeris in the final film was originally written as Saavik. This would have packed a ''much'' greater emotional wallop, as Saavik had previously appeared in three films and her betrayal would have been a huge shock. Creator/GeneRoddenberry, though in ailing health and near death, was able to apply ExecutiveVeto against this - even though Nicholas Meyer, the director and (uncredited) screenwriter of ''ST:II'', created Saavik and unsuccessfully argued that he knew him better than Roddenberry. Before this veto was applied, the production team attempted to entice Alley to return for the role (Robin Curtis, who replaced her for ''ST:III'' and ''ST:IV'', was apparently never considered); Alley was busy filming ''Series/{{Cheers}}'' at the time but both properties were owned by Paramount and the studio could have easily arranged a way for her to appear in both. She declined anyway before Roddenberry's veto made the point moot, but had Saavik reappeared she would have been played by a ''third'' actress in just four films.]]

to:

** Perhaps the most famous WhatCouldHaveBeen element of the film was that [[spoiler: the role of Valeris in the final film was originally written as Saavik. This would have packed a ''much'' greater emotional wallop, as Saavik had previously appeared in three films and her betrayal would have been a huge shock. Creator/GeneRoddenberry, though in ailing health and near death, was able to apply ExecutiveVeto against this - even though Nicholas Meyer, the director and (uncredited) screenwriter of ''ST:II'', created Saavik and unsuccessfully argued that he knew him her better than Roddenberry. Before this veto was applied, the production team attempted to entice Alley to return for the role (Robin Curtis, who replaced her for ''ST:III'' and ''ST:IV'', was apparently never considered); Alley was busy filming ''Series/{{Cheers}}'' at the time but both properties were owned by Paramount and the studio could have easily arranged a way for her to appear in both. She declined anyway before Roddenberry's veto made the point moot, but had Saavik reappeared she would have been played by a ''third'' actress in just four films.]]
5th Nov '17 5:49:41 AM Brainbin
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** And if they'd gone with [[spoiler:Saavik as the one to betray Starfleet, ''and'' if the film versions of ''The Wrath of Khan'' and ''The Search for Spock'' had followed the novelizations by having Saavik and David fall in love, it would have provided an excellent personal reason for Saavik to wish the Klingons dead.]]

to:

** Perhaps the most famous WhatCouldHaveBeen element of the film was that [[spoiler: the role of Valeris in the final film was originally written as Saavik. This would have packed a ''much'' greater emotional wallop, as Saavik had previously appeared in three films and her betrayal would have been a huge shock. Creator/GeneRoddenberry, though in ailing health and near death, was able to apply ExecutiveVeto against this - even though Nicholas Meyer, the director and (uncredited) screenwriter of ''ST:II'', created Saavik and unsuccessfully argued that he knew him better than Roddenberry. Before this veto was applied, the production team attempted to entice Alley to return for the role (Robin Curtis, who replaced her for ''ST:III'' and ''ST:IV'', was apparently never considered); Alley was busy filming ''Series/{{Cheers}}'' at the time but both properties were owned by Paramount and the studio could have easily arranged a way for her to appear in both. She declined anyway before Roddenberry's veto made the point moot, but had Saavik reappeared she would have been played by a ''third'' actress in just four films.]]
***
And if they'd gone with [[spoiler:Saavik as the one to betray Starfleet, ''and'' if the film versions of ''The Wrath of Khan'' and ''The Search for Spock'' had followed the novelizations by having Saavik and David fall in love, it would have provided an excellent personal reason for Saavik to wish the Klingons dead.]]
25th Oct '17 2:23:49 PM KJMackley
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** While Brock Peters reprises his role of Admiral Cartwright from the fourth film, he too would later pop up on [=DS9=], as Sisko's father, Joseph.

to:

** While Brock Peters reprises his role of Admiral Cartwright from the fourth film, he too would later pop up on [=DS9=], as Sisko's father, Joseph.Joseph.
** David Warner previously played St. John Talbot, a disgruntled Federation diplomat, in Star Trek V. His role as Gorkon is substantially more important here. He also later played Gul Madred in TNG, who tortures a captured Picard.
1st Oct '17 4:00:02 AM OlfinBedwere
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** Sulu was slated to become captain of his own ship as far back as Star Trek II, in large part due to the campaigning of Creator/GeorgeTakei (he argued that Sulu had an awfully high rank for a helmsman). A line in that film has Kirk mention that Sulu is only with them for a few more weeks, a remnant of that subplot. That premise was considered for every film but eventually abandoned for one reason or another. InUniverse, Sulu WAS about to take his own command at that point in Star Trek II, but was an accomplice to Kirk's defiance of Starfleet orders in Star Trek III. Even though he was ultimately pardoned for the crime in Star Trek IV, it still caused a career set-back and it took him a few years to get back on track. Takei himself said he had given up trying to get that character promotion, and was delighted to see it finally happen in this film.

to:

** Sulu was slated to become captain of his own ship as far back as Star Trek II, in large part due to the campaigning of Creator/GeorgeTakei (he argued that Sulu had an awfully high rank for a helmsman). A line in that film has Kirk mention that Sulu is only with them for a few more weeks, a remnant of that subplot. That premise was considered for every film but eventually abandoned for one reason or another. InUniverse, Sulu WAS about to take his own command at that point in Star Trek II, but was an accomplice to Kirk's defiance of Starfleet orders in Star Trek III. Even though he was ultimately pardoned for the crime in Star Trek IV, it still caused a career set-back and it took him a few years to get back on track. Takei himself said he had given up trying to get that character promotion, and was delighted to see it finally happen in this film.film.
* YouLookFamiliar:
** Rene Auberjonois, who appears as Colonel West in a deleted scene, would later be cast in the regular role of Odo in ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine''. Notably, Auberjonois uses the same voice for West (his natural voice being higher-pitched and more nasal) that he would later use for Odo.
** While Brock Peters reprises his role of Admiral Cartwright from the fourth film, he too would later pop up on [=DS9=], as Sisko's father, Joseph.
18th Sep '17 10:35:52 PM KJMackley
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* {{Blooper}}: An amusing subversion. During the climactic fight, [=McCoy=] makes a distinctive comment to Spock, "bet you wished you ''stood'' in bed," as though he meant to say "wished you ''stayed'' in bed." The novelization expands on the line, and says it was an intentional {{malaprop|er}} because of the stress of the moment and Spock, being Spock, corrects him.

to:

* {{Blooper}}: An amusing subversion. During the climactic fight, [=McCoy=] makes a distinctive comment to Spock, "bet you wished you ''stood'' in bed," as though he meant to say "wished you ''stayed'' in bed." The novelization expands on the line, and says it was an intentional a {{malaprop|er}} because of the stress of the moment and Spock, being Spock, corrects him.


Added DiffLines:

* DevelopmentGag:
** The subtitle "The Undiscovered Country" was one of the proposed titles for Star Trek II, also written and directed by Nicolas Meyer. It should be noted that the title is a reference to Shakespeare, and unlike the film's claim that it means the future, it actually was a euphemism for ''death''. Knowing that, the title would have made more sense for Star Trek II rather than this film.
** Sulu becoming the Captain of his own ship was in the works as far back as Star Trek II.
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