History Trivia / SaturdayNightLive

17th Sep '17 9:17:51 AM nombretomado
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* UnintentionalPeriodPiece: Inevitable for such a topical show. The sketches and musical guests will date an episode to the year and even the very week it aired. Sometimes, this borders on WereStillRelevantDammit, but, much like ''SouthPark'' and ''MAD Magazine'' in its heyday, this show tries to avoid being behind the times.

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* UnintentionalPeriodPiece: Inevitable for such a topical show. The sketches and musical guests will date an episode to the year and even the very week it aired. Sometimes, this borders on WereStillRelevantDammit, but, much like ''SouthPark'' ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' and ''MAD Magazine'' in its heyday, this show tries to avoid being behind the times.
16th Sep '17 3:18:23 PM ClintEastwood
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* HostilityOnTheSet:
** Creator/ChevyChase was disliked by his costars, particularly when he got famous (it got to the point where everyone hid so they wouldn't have to share an elevator with him). He had a rivalry with Creator/JohnBelushi that went back to their days on ''National Lampoon Radio'' and by the time he left, he couldn't even get on with Creator/LorneMichaels. When he returned to host the show in the third season, Belushi allegedly egged Creator/BillMurray into provoking Chase. This resulted in the two hurling insults at each other, which escalated into a near brawl moments before they went onstage that was broken up by Belushi and Creator/DanAykroyd. Chase's antagonistic behaviour towards his coworkers when he hosted in 1985 and 1997 resulted in him being banned from hosting the show.
** In a 2011 interview, Creator/JaneCurtin accused Belushi of being a misogynist who sabotaged sketches by female writers by not performing them to his full capacity. She described him and Aykroyd as the "bully boys" of the show.
** Murray and Gilda Radner had an affair that ended so badly that they couldn't be in the same room together. Tellingly, she only mentions him once in passing in her autobiography.
** The 1986-7 season was plagued with dramatic behind-the-scenes ego battles, and tensions eventually forced out Creator/NoraDunn. Creator/VictoriaJackson has been critical of Creator/JanHooks and especially Dunn, who was romantically involved with Lorne Michaels at the time.



** Creator/NorahDunn was fired after boycotting the show following Creator/AndrewDiceClay's appearance. Creator/JonLovitz discussed her boycott of the show in detail during an episode of ďThe ABCís of SNLĒ with director Creator/KevinSmith:

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** Creator/NorahDunn Creator/NoraDunn was fired after boycotting the show following Creator/AndrewDiceClay's appearance. Creator/JonLovitz discussed her boycott of the show in detail during an episode of ďThe ABCís of SNLĒ with director Creator/KevinSmith:
9th Sep '17 1:34:41 AM AaronHong
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Added DiffLines:

** References to Kenan Thompson's time on Nickelodeon and ''Film/GoodBurger'' are practically OnceASeason.
1st Sep '17 4:00:28 PM nombretomado
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* '''Kenan Thompson''' (2003 season onward): From Nickelodeon in his youth (''AllThat'' and ''KenanAndKel''), he is the first cast member to be born after the show debuted (Thompson was born in 1978; ''SNL'' first came on in 1975), the first cast member to get his start on a Nickelodeon kids' show, and now surpasses Tim Meadows[[note]]who was on the show from 1990 to 2000, but became prominent between 1995 and 2000[[/note]] as the longest-tenured black male cast member.

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* '''Kenan Thompson''' (2003 season onward): From Nickelodeon in his youth (''AllThat'' (''Series/AllThat'' and ''KenanAndKel''), ''Series/KenanAndKel''), he is the first cast member to be born after the show debuted (Thompson was born in 1978; ''SNL'' first came on in 1975), the first cast member to get his start on a Nickelodeon kids' show, and now surpasses Tim Meadows[[note]]who was on the show from 1990 to 2000, but became prominent between 1995 and 2000[[/note]] as the longest-tenured black male cast member.
28th Aug '17 5:31:48 AM Grrrrrrrrrrrrrr
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* ProductionPosse / ThoseTwoActors: Chances are if a ''SNL'' cast member is working on a movie or television show, one or more other people associated with the show will be involved as well. In fact, there have been a number of collaborative duos and groups that have come about because of ''SNL''. Some noteworthy examples are:

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* ProductionPosse / ThoseTwoActors: Chances are if a ''SNL'' cast member is working on a movie or television show, one or more other people associated with the show ''SNL'' will be involved as well. In fact, there have been a number of collaborative duos and groups that have come about because of ''SNL''. Some noteworthy examples are:



* RomanceOnTheSet: Creator/BillMurray and Gilda Radner had an affair that ended badly.

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* RomanceOnTheSet: RomanceOnTheSet:
** Brad Hall and Julia Louis-Dreyfus became the only cast members who married each other.
**
Creator/BillMurray and Gilda Radner had an affair that ended badly.
27th Aug '17 5:56:47 PM ClintEastwood
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* AccidentallyCorrectWriting:
** The season 34 episode had a sketch about people who would benefit from the 2008 bailout that happened when the global economic meltdown was still fresh. Darrell Hammond and Casey Wilson played a couple named [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herb_Sandler Herbert]] and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marion_Sandler Marion Sandler]] (no relation to Creator/{{Adam|Sandler}}) who screwed Wachovia Bank out of a lot of money and profited from the economic meltdown. Now, considering that there were two other fictional characters introduced before them, you'd expect Herbert and Marion to be fakes, too, right? Not in this case: turns out Herbert and Marion Sandler were real people who did exactly what the sketch said they did (Creator/LorneMichaels didn't realize this until after the sketch aired), making the brief clip of them being described as "People who should be shot" by a lower-third graphic tasteless (which explains why the NBC website video and the televised reruns got rid of that scene in the "2008 Bailout" sketch. When Netflix aired the sketch as part of their ''Saturday Night Live'' 2000s collection, they aired the scene with Herbert and Marion Sandler, but got rid of the "People who should be shot" lower-third and removed Herbert's line thanking the government for [[KarmaHoudini letting them get away with their crime]]).
** Creator/ChevyChase had a joke on Weekend Update about the murder of performer "Professor Backwards" (who was able to read, write and speak backwards written words). Chase said he wasn't saved because people ignored his cries of "Pleh Pleh". Chase later apologized, saying he had no idea there was such a performer and that he had actually been murdered.



** When Creator/RichardDreyfuss hosted, there was, naturally, a ''Film/{{Jaws}}'' reference.



* DawsonCasting: Many sketches in which the cast members play teens or children (usually if they're making fun of a live-action kids' show or have a sketch featuring a family with kids or a sketch about kids or teens). Obviously unavoidable, but it has become prevalent in latter-day seasons where most of the cast members currently hired are younger than the show itself (starting with Kenan Thompson, who was born three years after ''SNL'' premiered).
** One of Creator/AmyPoehler's recurring characters was Kaitlin, who is supposed to be ten years old ([[NotAllowedToGrowUp and remained that age for several years]]).



* CreatorBacklash: Creator/EddieMurphy refuses to acknowledge his characters from the show (Gumby as a faded, Jewish comedian, Mr. Robinson[[note]]a squatter and petty thug who hosted an inner city take on ''Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood''[[/note]], Buckwheat, etc), though they are some of his most enduring legacy.
** It's probably because of a 1995 "Weekend Update" sketch in which Creator/DavidSpade, as part of his "Hollywood Minute" segment, made a brutal TakeThat at Murphy's (then-)lackluster career, saying "Look, kids, a falling star! Make a wish!", that ''[[DudeNotFunny really]]'' [[BerserkButton pissed Murphy off]].
*** Spade [[TheDogBitesBack got a taste of his own medicine]] when Creator/SteveMartin showed up on "Hollywood Minute" unexpectedly and simply said "Hey, look at me! I'm a guy who's never had a career making fun of people who have!". The audience, who had been finding Spade's rants too mean-spirited, cheered their approval.
** Also due to fans asking Murphy to do those sketches for them when they meet him. [[TakeThatAudience Allegedly, he wrote the SNL sketch where Buckwheat is assassinated for this reason]].
* DawsonCasting: Many sketches in which the cast members play teens or children (usually if they're making fun of a live-action kids' show or have a sketch featuring a family with kids or a sketch about kids or teens). Obviously unavoidable, but it has become prevalent in latter-day seasons where most of the cast members currently hired are younger than the show itself (starting with Kenan Thompson, who was born three years after ''SNL'' premiered).
** One of Creator/AmyPoehler's recurring characters was Kaitlin, who is supposed to be ten years old ([[NotAllowedToGrowUp and remained that age for several years]]).



** Creator/JaneaneGarofalo described her time on the show as the most miserable of her life, citing the sexist, juvenile and homophobic humour of the sketches as why she left midway through season twenty. On an {{Creator/{{HBO}} special, she said it was like "...being the Indian who was given the smallpox-infested blankets by the white settlers").



** Tim Herlihy/Adam Sandler/Rob Schneider/Robert Smigel

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** Tim Herlihy/Adam Sandler/Rob Schneider/Robert SmigelSmigel.
* RoleEndingMisdemeanor:
** Creator/NorahDunn was fired after boycotting the show following Creator/AndrewDiceClay's appearance. Creator/JonLovitz discussed her boycott of the show in detail during an episode of ďThe ABCís of SNLĒ with director Creator/KevinSmith:
-->Anyway, itís the second to last episode of the season, and Nora, uh, you know, she caused a lot of trouble and she was very hard to get along with, so [SNL] wasnít going to ask her back, anyway. And itís the [second to] last show, and she goes to the press and says, Iím not doing this show. Heís against women, and Iím not doing it. And this is how the press works, and Iím telling you, Iím on the inside of this. They donít know this story. They donít know sheís just doing it to get press. Itís her last hurrah. Theyíre not asking her back on the show.
** Comedy writer Katie Rich was fired from the show after Tweeting a joke that President UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump's son Barron would become "the world's first homeschool shooter." Rich later deleted the tweet and apologized, but the backlash from Trump's supporters forced NBC to fire her. Fortunately for her, Creator/DanHarmon swooped in and hired her as a writer on ''Series/RickAndMorty'', all the while arguing the irony that the same people that voted for Trump to rally against political correctness also wanted her fired, and that they considered Rich's comments to be worse than Trump's even though the office of President was held to a ''much'' higher standard than that of a comedy TV writer.
* RomanceOnTheSet: Creator/BillMurray and Gilda Radner had an affair that ended badly.
27th Aug '17 8:00:06 AM Grrrrrrrrrrrrrr
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* PostScriptSeason: More of a ''mid''-script season if there's such a thing. The infamous and memetic political upheavals of early 2017 led to the SNL crew making a special half-hour Summer Edition of ''Weekend[[note]][[ArtifactTitle Shouldn't it be Mid-Year instead?[[/note]] Update'' well before the actual premiere of season 43.

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* PostScriptSeason: More of a ''mid''-script season if there's such a thing. The infamous and memetic political upheavals of early 2017 led to the SNL crew making a special half-hour Summer Edition of ''Weekend[[note]][[ArtifactTitle Shouldn't it be Mid-Year instead?[[/note]] instead?]][[/note]] Update'' well before the actual premiere of season 43.
27th Aug '17 7:57:18 AM Grrrrrrrrrrrrrr
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Added DiffLines:

* ProductionPosse / ThoseTwoActors: Chances are if a ''SNL'' cast member is working on a movie or television show, one or more other people associated with the show will be involved as well. In fact, there have been a number of collaborative duos and groups that have come about because of ''SNL''. Some noteworthy examples are:
** Dan Aykroyd/John Belushi
** Chris Farley/David Spade
** Will Ferrell/David Koechner/Adam [=McKay=]
** Tina Fey/Amy Poehler
** Tim Herlihy/Adam Sandler/Rob Schneider/Robert Smigel
26th Aug '17 2:57:20 PM mlsmithca
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* TroubledProduction: The fifth and sixth seasons together count as this:
** At the beginning of the fifth season, despite the departure of Creator/DanAykroyd and Creator/JohnBelushi, the show was still riding high, one of NBC's few successes at the time. However, all was not well with the cast and crew. Many were burned out from four very intense years and the fame they had accumulated in the process, secretly hoping this season would be the last, at least for a while. Creator/LorneMichaels took the unusual step of scheduling a preseason retreat at Mohonk Mountain House in upstate New York. Significantly, though, none of the major cast members or writers attended.
** With Aykroyd and Belushi gone, the show relied a great deal on Creator/BillMurray to carry the load. This stressed him out a great deal, and he often used the role to do deals with Lorne ... he'd do, say, another Nick the Lounge Singer sketch ''if'' Lorne agreed to another sketch he wanted to do, or booked this band or that guest host. Despite this star power, Murray would often succumb to fits of Irish temper, walking off the set during blocking sessions on Friday or even on Thursdays, saying he was quitting ... only to return in time for dress rehearsal on Saturday, and nailing his performance live.
** He [[TakeThat took out his anger]] with Belushi and Aykroyd in a ''Weekend Update'' review of ''Film/NineteenFortyOne'' in December. Noting that Creator/CarrieFisher and Creator/ChristopherLee, "two old friends of mine" who had previously appeared on the show, were in the cast, he excoriated them for doing the movie, wondered what they had been thinking and said they should have never left the show, to much knowing laughter from the audience. Instead of seeing their movie, he recommended audiences go see ''Film/{{Meatballs}}'', his successful debut from the previous summer, again.
** Murray wasn't the only one who missed Aykroyd and Belushi. During the infamous vomitorium sketch, considered the nadir of the show's first five seasons, Creator/AlFranken nearly missed his cue to come on as a bratty young boy because he was musing aloud offstage as to how this would have been a perfect part for John.
** Creator/HarryShearer had been added to the cast and writing staff as a replacement. He quickly clashed with Lorne and alienated the other writers over his vision for the show, which he felt, in the absence of two big stars, should focus more on the sort of ensemble-based humor that he did in his later movies and his second stint in the cast a few years later, rather than the kind of recurring-character, CatchPhrase-based humor it had come to specialize in. While no one agreed with him exactly, the show's writers eventually did try to rise to the challenge and take more risks as a way of making up for the loss of Aykroyd and Belushi.[[note]]One of them even remembers the time as "our bravest season"[[/note]]
** The heavy drug use that later claimed Belushi's life was also taking its toll on the cast and crew. Where they had during earlier seasons generally relaxed and developed their comedy surrounded by clouds of pot smoke, now to keep up with the pace they worked at they snorted line after line of coke during the day ... with the attendant effect on everyone's temper and ego. Creator/GarrettMorris was heavy into freebasing, sometimes going on paranoid rants during rehearsals and at one point convinced an invisible robot was controlling him. Creator/LaraineNewman, on the other hand, cooped herself up in her dressing room where she slept off her drug binges, emerging only for blocking, dress, and the show. Creator/GildaRadner's bulimia only got worse. By Christmas, almost everyone involved with the show was hoping [[FinaleSeason this season would be the last]].
** During the latter half of the season, Lorne became preoccupied with his contract renegotiations, despite being upset slightly with his manager for also representing one of the creators of ABC's competing ''Series/{{Fridays}}'', and at NBC for having forced Herb Schlosser, ''SNL''[='=]s best friend in the executive ranks, out when Fred Silverman had taken over the previous year. He was hoping to be able to take at least a year off, along with others, with the possibility of doing some specials. NBC wanted the show to continue for a sixth season as it was not only doing poorly in the ratings, it had taken a huge financial hit when President Carter chose to boycott that summer's Olympics. If the show did go on, Michaels wanted the season to start only after that fall's election, as it had in 1976, and would commit to no more than six episodes (NBC in turn wanted at least 17). He was pushing them toward hiring either James Downey or Franken & Davis as producers as they were writers, and the show's producer ''had'' to be able to understand its writers. The network put the talks on the back burner as NBC was focusing on keeping Creator/JohnnyCarson, who had publicly expressed his discontent with the current state of affairs, on board.
** After they succeeded at that, they turned to Lorne. All they seemed interested in doing was offering him more money, incensing Lorne and his manager, who had given NBC plenty of time to go over their much more specific demands. NBC was also upset that Gilda Radner nixed Fred Silverman's idea for a VarietyShow she would host, since she did not want to leave ''SNL'' and could not handle two shows at once.
** In May 1980 Lorne requested a meeting with Silverman. The network head put it off because he had stayed up all night the night before putting together the fall schedule for a presentation to the affiliates' board of governors, which did ''not'' go well for him. Lorne gave the network 24 hours to come up with a final offer. He was able to meet with Silverman briefly to start working things out, and they scheduled another meeting for the next week.
** But during the ensuing show that Saturday night, Franken rewrote his "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Limo_For_A_Lame-O A Limo for A Lame-O]]" ''Update'' commentary into an even stronger TheReasonYouSuckSpeech directed at Silverman ''after'' Barbara Gallagher, the NBC executive in charge of comedy and late-night programming, had asked him to tone it down, because Franken, unaware of the specifics of the situation, felt Silverman had deliberately blown Lorne off. After it aired, Silverman called the studio in a fury, looking for the other executives, and then canceled his meeting with Michaels, assuming Lorne had let Franken deliver the speech on purpose as retaliation for the missed meeting.
** Postcards requesting Franken be provided with limo service in response to his commentary flooded Silverman's office the next week. Silverman, who did not appreciate Belushi's take on him but tolerated it because of the comedian's talent, had no such ambivalence toward Franken, whose humor he had always considered somewhat mean. He refused to accept Franken's apology and has reportedly never forgiven him.
** That also ended Franken and Davis's chance of producing the show in Lorne's absence. That season's [[SeasonFinale last episode]], two weeks later, had some of the hallmarks of a SeriesFinale. While Creator/BuckHenry promised the show would go on in his opening monologue, he also introduced a purported "new cast",[[note]]actually longtime backstage employees of the show[[/note]] and in the final shot of the end credits the "On Air" sign was shown flickering out. NBC had no intention of allowing that to happen, and continued to look for a new producer. Gallagher suggested her friend, the show's longtime associate producer Jean Doumanian, and after being offered the job on the provision she not disclose it if she accepted, she did so.
** When Michaels, who not only had been trying to recruit Doumanian to work for him but had warned the network that not only was she not a writer as he had suggested a replacement be, no one presently associated with the show's creative side would work for her if she ''was'' the producer,[[note]]Franken in particular hated her for insisting on a writing credit during that season's Radio/BobAndRay [[ChristmasEpisode Christmas special]] after she added two lines to one sketch[[/note]] found out a month later that not only had the network disregarded his advice but had provisionally hired Doumanian while still making a last-ditch effort to bring him back, he went ballistic, both at NBC and Doumanian, whom he has reportedly never spoken to since, much less forgiven.
* Thus started the show's sixth season, widely remembered as ''SNL''[='=]s first DorkAge:
** The cast, all severely burnt out, left. Whether the writers did so as well or were fired depends on who tells the story. Some of them have said the word came down that Doumanian wanted them all out by the end of July, while she says that three writers who agreed to stay on under her changed their minds once Lorne found out she had been hired. In any event, the offices were stripped bare by August ... Creator/JoePiscopo recalled that not even the pencils had been left behind.
** To be fair to the oft-maligned Doumanian, she thus had only ten weeks to put together a new writing staff and cast, a task which Lorne had had almost a year to do before the show's first season. And she had to do this on a third of the budget the show's fifth season had had, since not only was NBC pinching pennies, she had no established stars. Nonetheless, she managed to pass on up-and-coming talent like Creator/JimCarrey and Creator/JohnGoodman, and only hired Creator/EddieMurphy after others lobbied her hard for him.
** However, that's as far as fairness goes. The putative stars of her cast - Denny Dillon, Gilbert Gottfried and Charles Rocket - acted like they had it made just by virtue of being on ''Saturday Night Live'', and to others it showed. At the end of a meeting after the cast and writers had worked on material for several weeks, Doumanian asked if anyone had any comments or suggestions. Piscopo, dismayed by what he had seen so far, was about to suggest she fire everyone and start over, until Dillon spoke up that she didn't like having white wine in her dressing room and wanted a bottle of red instead. At that point he realized the problem went all the way to the top.
** Dillon's request pointed to Lorne's concerns about Doumanian, her associate producer credit notwithstanding, not being a writer as having been on target. She had mainly been responsible for guest relations during the previous five seasons, and the care she devoted to their needs assured that no guest ever refused to return because they had been neglected in that department. But she was at sea with the writers. Many recall her notes primarily being limited to "make it funnier" or "It isn't hip enough" (and no, those aren't paraphrases, they are ''direct quotes''); many writers seriously wondered if she was even reading what they sent her, based on the size of the pile on her desk. At one point she handed down a requirement that every sketch have three jokes ''per page''. Unlike Lorne, she also decided to actively enforce NBC's policy forbidding drug use on company property, even posting signs to this effect, further alienating those who felt more comfortable writing after they had smoked a joint or two. Barry Blaustein recalls that he had barely settled into his desk on his first day when another writer came into his office with a petition demanding Doumanian be fired.
** The season got off to a bad start with critics[[note]]deservedly, considering it was rife with the sort of humor exemplified by a sketch in the season premiere about an Army unit of gay soldiers stationed at ... [[LamePun Fort Dix]]![[/note]] and didn't get better, as Rocket's ''Weekend Update'' appearances, despite his background doing that sort of spoof news, were often so devoid of laughs as to be painful, and sketches like the "Leather Weather" bit that made the previous season's vomitorium sketch look inspired in comparison. Doumanian insisted on booking Creator/MalcolmMcDowell as host despite the network's concern that he was (at the time) too obscure for most of the audience.
** About two-thirds of the way through the season, the cast started to gel as Dillon, Rocket and Gottfried realized that comedy was something that, like the original cast, they had to work at no matter how talented they were. An episode hosted by Karen Black managed to be consistently funny. Murphy started to emerge.
** But then came the infamous show hosted by ''Series/{{Dallas}}''[='=]s Charlene Tilton, which had a RunningGag parodying the "Who Shot J.R." plotline of her show with brief intercuts in which every cast member supposedly had a reason to kill Rocket, and he was finally shot just before the last commercial break. With, unusually, a few minutes more left than expected, they gathered on stage and [[ThrowItIn improvised]] before [[TheReveal learning who had shot Rocket]]. Tilton asked a wheelchair-bound Rocket how he felt, and he answered "I'd like to know [[PrecisionFStrike who the fuck]] did it" ... on ''live air''.
** That sealed Doumanian's fate. Three weeks later, on what would be the last show she produced, Murray returned as the first member of the original cast to guest host. The show went well enough, but at the end, he apologized to all his former castmates, even Belushi and Aykroyd, for what he had just done. Afterwards, he refused to embrace all of the cast except Murphy, quite blatantly turning away from Rocket in the process.
** Dick Ebersol was hired to replace Doumanian; he fired all the cast except Piscopo and Murphy, and all the writers except Blaustein. After almost two months, he was able to produce one show, hosted by Creator/ChevyChase. Its most notable moment was [[BookEnds another]] ''Weekend Update'' commentary by Franken, in which he recounted the events of the past year and proposed another write-in campaign to NBC, this time telling them to "put this tired old format to sleep", until Chevy "reminded" him that he and Davis were due to host the show next week (actually, as they both knew, that was the end of the season as that year's writer's strike was imminent).

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* TroubledProduction: The fifth and sixth seasons together count as this:
this.
** The fifth season, the last to feature any of the original cast members as regulars, was very nearly the series' last ever.
***
At the beginning of the fifth season, despite the departure of Creator/DanAykroyd and Creator/JohnBelushi, the show was still riding high, one of NBC's few successes at the time. However, all was not well with the cast and crew. Many were burned out from four very intense years and the fame they had accumulated in the process, secretly hoping this season would be the last, at least for a while. Creator/LorneMichaels took the unusual step of scheduling a preseason retreat at Mohonk Mountain House in upstate New York. Significantly, though, none of the major cast members or writers attended.
** *** With Aykroyd and Belushi gone, the show relied a great deal on Creator/BillMurray to carry the load. This stressed him out a great deal, and he often used the role to do deals with Lorne ... he'd do, say, another Nick the Lounge Singer sketch ''if'' Lorne agreed to another sketch he wanted to do, or booked this band or that guest host. Despite this star power, Murray would often succumb to fits of Irish temper, walking off the set during blocking sessions on Friday or even on Thursdays, saying he was quitting ... only to return in time for dress rehearsal on Saturday, and nailing his performance live.
** *** He [[TakeThat took out his anger]] with Belushi and Aykroyd in a ''Weekend Update'' review of ''Film/NineteenFortyOne'' in December. Noting that Creator/CarrieFisher and Creator/ChristopherLee, "two old friends of mine" who had previously appeared on the show, were in the cast, he excoriated them for doing the movie, wondered what they had been thinking and said they should have never left the show, to much knowing laughter from the audience. Instead of seeing their movie, he recommended audiences go see ''Film/{{Meatballs}}'', his successful debut from the previous summer, again.
** *** Murray wasn't the only one who missed Aykroyd and Belushi. During the infamous vomitorium sketch, considered the nadir of the show's first five seasons, Creator/AlFranken nearly missed his cue to come on as a bratty young boy because he was musing aloud offstage as to how this would have been a perfect part for John.
** *** Creator/HarryShearer had been added to the cast and writing staff as a replacement. He quickly clashed with Lorne and alienated the other writers over his vision for the show, which he felt, in the absence of two big stars, should focus more on the sort of ensemble-based humor that he did in his later movies and his second stint in the cast a few years later, rather than the kind of recurring-character, CatchPhrase-based humor it had come to specialize in. While no one agreed with him exactly, the show's writers eventually did try to rise to the challenge and take more risks as a way of making up for the loss of Aykroyd and Belushi.[[note]]One of them even remembers the time as "our bravest season"[[/note]]
** *** The heavy drug use that later claimed Belushi's life was also taking its toll on the cast and crew. Where they had during earlier seasons generally relaxed and developed their comedy surrounded by clouds of pot smoke, now to keep up with the pace they worked at they snorted line after line of coke during the day ... with the attendant effect on everyone's temper and ego. Creator/GarrettMorris was heavy into freebasing, sometimes going on paranoid rants during rehearsals and at one point convinced an invisible robot was controlling him. Creator/LaraineNewman, on the other hand, cooped herself up in her dressing room where she slept off her drug binges, emerging only for blocking, dress, and the show. Creator/GildaRadner's bulimia only got worse. By Christmas, almost everyone involved with the show was hoping [[FinaleSeason this season would be the last]].
** *** During the latter half of the season, Lorne became preoccupied with his contract renegotiations, despite being upset slightly with his manager for also representing one of the creators of ABC's competing ''Series/{{Fridays}}'', and at NBC for having forced Herb Schlosser, ''SNL''[='=]s best friend in the executive ranks, out when Fred Silverman had taken over the previous year. He was hoping to be able to take at least a year off, along with others, with the possibility of doing some specials. NBC wanted the show to continue for a sixth season as it was not only doing poorly in the ratings, it had taken a huge financial hit when President Carter chose to boycott that summer's Olympics. If the show did go on, Michaels wanted the season to start only after that fall's election, as it had in 1976, and would commit to no more than six episodes (NBC in turn wanted at least 17). He was pushing them toward hiring either James Downey or Franken & Davis as producers as they were writers, and the show's producer ''had'' to be able to understand its writers. The network put the talks on the back burner as NBC was focusing on keeping Creator/JohnnyCarson, who had publicly expressed his discontent with the current state of affairs, on board.
** *** After they succeeded at that, they turned to Lorne. All they seemed interested in doing was offering him more money, incensing Lorne and his manager, who had given NBC plenty of time to go over their much more specific demands. NBC was also upset that Gilda Radner nixed Fred Silverman's idea for a VarietyShow she would host, since she did not want to leave ''SNL'' and could not handle two shows at once.
** *** In May 1980 Lorne requested a meeting with Silverman. The network head put it off because he had stayed up all night the night before putting together the fall schedule for a presentation to the affiliates' board of governors, which did ''not'' go well for him. Lorne gave the network 24 hours to come up with a final offer. He was able to meet with Silverman briefly to start working things out, and they scheduled another meeting for the next week.
** *** But during the ensuing show that Saturday night, Franken rewrote his "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Limo_For_A_Lame-O A Limo for A Lame-O]]" ''Update'' commentary into an even stronger TheReasonYouSuckSpeech directed at Silverman ''after'' Barbara Gallagher, the NBC executive in charge of comedy and late-night programming, had asked him to tone it down, because Franken, unaware of the specifics of the situation, felt Silverman had deliberately blown Lorne off. After it aired, Silverman called the studio in a fury, looking for the other executives, and then canceled his meeting with Michaels, assuming Lorne had let Franken deliver the speech on purpose as retaliation for the missed meeting.
** *** Postcards requesting Franken be provided with limo service in response to his commentary flooded Silverman's office the next week. Silverman, who did not appreciate Belushi's take on him but tolerated it because of the comedian's talent, had no such ambivalence toward Franken, whose humor he had always considered somewhat mean. He refused to accept Franken's apology and has reportedly never forgiven him.
** *** That also ended Franken and Davis's chance of producing the show in Lorne's absence. That season's [[SeasonFinale last episode]], two weeks later, had some of the hallmarks of a SeriesFinale. While Creator/BuckHenry promised the show would go on in his opening monologue, he also introduced a purported "new cast",[[note]]actually longtime backstage employees of the show[[/note]] and in the final shot of the end credits the "On Air" sign was shown flickering out. NBC had no intention of allowing that to happen, and continued to look for a new producer. Gallagher suggested her friend, the show's longtime associate producer Jean Doumanian, and after being offered the job on the provision she not disclose it if she accepted, she did so.
** *** When Michaels, who not only had been trying to recruit Doumanian to work for him but had warned the network that not only was she not a writer as he had suggested a replacement be, no one presently associated with the show's creative side would work for her if she ''was'' the producer,[[note]]Franken in particular hated her for insisting on a writing credit during that season's Radio/BobAndRay [[ChristmasEpisode Christmas special]] after she added two lines to one sketch[[/note]] found out a month later that not only had the network disregarded his advice but had provisionally hired Doumanian while still making a last-ditch effort to bring him back, he went ballistic, both at NBC and Doumanian, whom he has reportedly never spoken to since, much less forgiven.
* ** Thus started the show's sixth season, widely remembered as ''SNL''[='=]s first DorkAge:
** *** The cast, all severely burnt out, left. Whether the writers did so as well or were fired depends on who tells the story. Some of them have said the word came down that Doumanian wanted them all out by the end of July, while she says that three writers who agreed to stay on under her changed their minds once Lorne found out she had been hired. In any event, the offices were stripped bare by August ... Creator/JoePiscopo recalled that not even the pencils had been left behind.
** *** To be fair to the oft-maligned Doumanian, she thus had only ten weeks to put together a new writing staff and cast, a task which Lorne had had almost a year to do before the show's first season. And she had to do this on a third of the budget the show's fifth season had had, since not only was NBC pinching pennies, she had no established stars. Nonetheless, she managed to pass on up-and-coming talent like Creator/JimCarrey and Creator/JohnGoodman, and only hired Creator/EddieMurphy after others lobbied her hard for him.
** *** However, that's as far as fairness goes. The putative stars of her cast - Denny Dillon, Gilbert Gottfried and Charles Rocket - acted like they had it made just by virtue of being on ''Saturday Night Live'', and to others it showed. At the end of a meeting after the cast and writers had worked on material for several weeks, Doumanian asked if anyone had any comments or suggestions. Piscopo, dismayed by what he had seen so far, was about to suggest she fire everyone and start over, until Dillon spoke up that she didn't like having white wine in her dressing room and wanted a bottle of red instead. At that point he realized the problem went all the way to the top.
** *** Dillon's request pointed to Lorne's concerns about Doumanian, her associate producer credit notwithstanding, not being a writer as having been on target. She had mainly been responsible for guest relations during the previous five seasons, and the care she devoted to their needs assured that no guest ever refused to return because they had been neglected in that department. But she was at sea with the writers. Many recall her notes primarily being limited to "make it funnier" or "It isn't hip enough" (and no, those aren't paraphrases, they are ''direct quotes''); many writers seriously wondered if she was even reading what they sent her, based on the size of the pile on her desk. At one point she handed down a requirement that every sketch have three jokes ''per page''. Unlike Lorne, she also decided to actively enforce NBC's policy forbidding drug use on company property, even posting signs to this effect, further alienating those who felt more comfortable writing after they had smoked a joint or two. Barry Blaustein recalls that he had barely settled into his desk on his first day when another writer came into his office with a petition demanding Doumanian be fired.
** *** The season got off to a bad start with critics[[note]]deservedly, considering it was rife with the sort of humor exemplified by a sketch in the season premiere about an Army unit of gay soldiers stationed at ... [[LamePun Fort Dix]]![[/note]] and didn't get better, as Rocket's ''Weekend Update'' appearances, despite his background doing that sort of spoof news, were often so devoid of laughs as to be painful, and sketches like the "Leather Weather" bit that made the previous season's vomitorium sketch look inspired in comparison. Doumanian insisted on booking Creator/MalcolmMcDowell as host despite the network's concern that he was (at the time) too obscure for most of the audience.
** *** About two-thirds of the way through the season, the cast started to gel as Dillon, Rocket and Gottfried realized that comedy was something that, like the original cast, they had to work at no matter how talented they were. An episode hosted by Karen Black managed to be consistently funny. Murphy started to emerge.
** *** But then came the infamous show hosted by ''Series/{{Dallas}}''[='=]s Charlene Tilton, which had a RunningGag parodying the "Who Shot J.R." plotline of her show with brief intercuts in which every cast member supposedly had a reason to kill Rocket, and he was finally shot just before the last commercial break. With, unusually, a few minutes more left than expected, they gathered on stage and [[ThrowItIn improvised]] before [[TheReveal learning who had shot Rocket]]. Tilton asked a wheelchair-bound Rocket how he felt, and he answered "I'd like to know [[PrecisionFStrike who the fuck]] did it" ... on ''live air''.
** *** That sealed Doumanian's fate. Three weeks later, on what would be the last show she produced, Murray returned as the first member of the original cast to guest host. The show went well enough, but at the end, he apologized to all his former castmates, even Belushi and Aykroyd, for what he had just done. Afterwards, he refused to embrace all of the cast except Murphy, quite blatantly turning away from Rocket in the process.
** *** Dick Ebersol was hired to replace Doumanian; he fired all the cast except Piscopo and Murphy, and all the writers except Blaustein. After almost two months, he was able to produce one show, hosted by Creator/ChevyChase. Its most notable moment was [[BookEnds another]] ''Weekend Update'' commentary by Franken, in which he recounted the events of the past year and proposed another write-in campaign to NBC, this time telling them to "put this tired old format to sleep", until Chevy "reminded" him that he and Davis were due to host the show next week (actually, as they both knew, that was the end of the season as that year's writer's strike was imminent).
25th Aug '17 5:50:05 PM Grrrrrrrrrrrrrr
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[[folder:SNL Movies and TV Spin-Offs That Never Happened]]
* While The Coneheads did get a movie adaptation in 1993, it was originally supposed to be a Saturday morning cartoon in 1983. It was animated by Rankin/Bass (the same guys who do those holiday specials, like ''Santa Claus is Coming to Town'' and ''Rudolph The Red Nose Reindeer''), produced by LorneMichaels, written by Al Franken and Tom Davis, and had Jane Curtin, Creator/DanAykroyd, and Laraine Newman reprising their roles. It did air as a NBC special and released on VHS. Had it been picked up, this show would have been the first Saturday morning cartoon based on an ''SNL'' character instead of Martin Short's ''TheCompletelyMentalMisadventuresOfEdGrimley''.
* In 1990, ''Saturday Night Live'' was going to be adapted to a feature-length, anthology-style string of comedy sketches on the theme of going to the movies called ''The Saturday Night Movie''.
* ''Hans & Franz: The Girly-Man Dilemma'': A movie centered on Dana Carvey and Kevin Nealon's Austrian bodybuilder characters. The story revolved around Hans and Franz following in Schwarzenegger's footsteps by traveling to Hollywood to become movie stars. The movie was to be a gag-heavy musical that toyed with a lot of the conventions of cinema, and would have featured Arnold Schwarzenegger as himself. Arnold Schwarzenegger got cold feet and pulled out, causing the movie to be cancelled. Presumably, it was because ''Last Action Hero'', another satirical action film in which Schwarzenegger played himself, had bombed, and he didnít want to star in anything that was in a similar vein.
* A movie based on the Chicago Superfans, the group of stereotypical Chicago sports fanatics whose catchphrases "Da Bulls" and "Da Bears" swept the nation after Chris Farley, Mike Myers, Robert Smigel, and frequent SNL guest George Wendt originated the roles in a series of popular sketches, was set for 1994-1995. The plot for the proposed film involved the Superfans dealing with a businessman who doesnít understand football buying the Chicago Bears and turning Soldier Field into a luxury stadium for the rich. Smigel and Odenkirk wrote the part of Burton Kimpkington, the businessman who purchases the Bears, for Martin Short. Smigel even quit his job as Conan OíBrienís head writer to work on the script, but the timing didnít work out right. ''SNL'' was going through its disastrous 1994-95 season, and the network called off all future ''SNL'' movies because of how bad ''It's Pat'' and ''Stuart Saves His Family'' did at the box office (though the need for more ''SNL'' movies would come about in the late 1990s into the 2000s with ''Superstar'', ''The Ladies Man'', and ''A Night at the Roxbury'', and later with ''Harold the Bald Kid'' and ''[=MacGruber=]'').
* The AmbiguouslyGay Duo was going to be a movie in 2005, and it was going to be a live-action feature film, but the writers decided to scale it back and that's how it became a short film for the season 36 episode hosted by Ed Helms.
* In the mid-2000s, there were rumors that Lorne Michaels was going to create an ''American Idol''-style reality show where the winner would become a cast member for ''Saturday Night Live''. The rumors turned out to be false, though most people were relieved that ''SNL'' didn't jump on the reality talent show bandwagon.
* A movie centered on Stefon (Bill Hader's burnt-out ClubKid character) was planned by Bill Hader and John Mulaney, but later scrapped when they couldn't make it work. According to Bill Hader, the movie would have been centered on Stefon coming out to his parents, a blue collar couple from the Bronx[[note]]though, according to Weekend Update, Stefon's mother is known as "Ms. Stefon" and his father is Music/DavidBowie, though the Bronx couple could be his adopted parents[[/note]] who are in denial that he is gay, though most Stefon fans are content with having the Weekend Update segment where Creator/SethMeyers saves Stefon from marrying Anderson Cooper on the season 38 finale hosted by Ben Affleck with musical guest Music/KanyeWest as the closest thing to a Stefon movie (similar to the AmbiguouslyGay Duo example above).
* A ''Sprockets'' movie was in the works, [[http://www.ew.com/ew/article/0,,276429,00.html but Mike Myers pulled out and Universal sued him in retaliation.]] Hence, to get Universal off his back, he took the lead role of ''Film/TheCatInTheHat'' (Tim Allen was supposed to be the lead, but he had to do something else). And look how ''that'' turned out.
[[/folder]]
This list shows the last 10 events of 271. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Trivia.SaturdayNightLive