History Trivia / NintendoEntertainmentSystem

30th Dec '16 8:48:58 PM nombretomado
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* The system can read a ROM size of up to 32 KB, but like the 2600 it used bank switching (however, mappers can make the banks bigger). Cartridge sizes ranged from 24KB (most games from 1983-4, such as ''VideoGame/DonkeyKong'' and ''DuckHunt'') to 1MB (''VideoGame/MetalSladerGlory'' was the only such game, released in 1991, apart from multicarts and much later Chinese releases).

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* The system can read a ROM size of up to 32 KB, but like the 2600 it used bank switching (however, mappers can make the banks bigger). Cartridge sizes ranged from 24KB (most games from 1983-4, such as ''VideoGame/DonkeyKong'' and ''DuckHunt'') ''VideoGame/DuckHunt'') to 1MB (''VideoGame/MetalSladerGlory'' was the only such game, released in 1991, apart from multicarts and much later Chinese releases).
12th Nov '16 9:44:21 AM cookieman
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* DemandOverload: NES-era cart shortages were frequent, particularly for hot new games, since a limited amount of copies could be pressed monthly. There were actual news reports of parents driving out of state just to get copies of ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros2'' and ''VideoGame/ZeldaIITheAdventureOfLink''.

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* DemandOverload: DemandOverload
**
NES-era cart shortages were frequent, particularly for hot new games, since a limited amount of copies could be pressed monthly. There were actual news reports of parents driving out of state just to get copies of ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros2'' and ''VideoGame/ZeldaIITheAdventureOfLink''.''VideoGame/ZeldaIITheAdventureOfLink''.
** This hit the NES Classic Edition (the miniature NES) hard just as much as the older cartridges. While a small handful of stores had a reasonable amount, some stores were reported to only carry stock in the single digits. When orders came up on Amazon, the page literally crashed from all of the traffic, giving people a smaller chance to snatch it there.
29th Oct '16 11:32:34 AM nombretomado
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** R.O.B. was really never intended to be anything more than a TrojanHorse outside of Japan: it was intended outside of Japan to camouflage the NES as a "toy", and not as a "video game"-- the [[TheGreatVideoGameCrashOf1983 crash]] made retailers wary of ''anything'' video-game related. This got Nintendo their initial American distribution deal with Worlds of Wonder, the builders of the TeddyRuxpin line of animatronic dolls. Ironically, once the NES started to take off, the fact that R.O.B. ''was'' a Trojan Horse caused the deal to fall apart. But of course, by then the console was already a hit, so they didn't need R.O.B. anymore.

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** R.O.B. was really never intended to be anything more than a TrojanHorse outside of Japan: it was intended outside of Japan to camouflage the NES as a "toy", and not as a "video game"-- the [[TheGreatVideoGameCrashOf1983 [[UsefulNotes/TheGreatVideoGameCrashOf1983 crash]] made retailers wary of ''anything'' video-game related. This got Nintendo their initial American distribution deal with Worlds of Wonder, the builders of the TeddyRuxpin line of animatronic dolls. Ironically, once the NES started to take off, the fact that R.O.B. ''was'' a Trojan Horse caused the deal to fall apart. But of course, by then the console was already a hit, so they didn't need R.O.B. anymore.
20th Oct '16 11:34:53 PM RAMChYLD
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* The Famicom Disk System, a floppy disk drive add-on. It was introduced in 1986, as was a Twin Famicom model that could play both disks and cartridges. The Disk System was only released in Japan, and even there was moribund by the end of the 1980s due to improvements in cartridge construction and rampant piracy concerns (though Nintendo continued to support it until 2003).[[note]]While FDS didn't use the common 3.5" floppy, it nevertheless utilized the more or less standard design, namely Mitsumi's 3" Quick Disk floppies, widely used in home computers and word processors in Japan at the time. While there is an additional anti-piracy measure, the measure (which consisted of a set of sensors that checked to see if the word "Nintendo" was embossed onto a certain location on the disk) was easily bypassed [[/note]] The experience with piracy and [[LoadsAndLoadsOfLoading loading time]] caused Nintendo to be reluctant to accept disks until the UsefulNotes/NintendoGameCube, and only accepted standard-size optical disks with the UsefulNotes/{{Wii}}. ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZelda'' (its first title), ''VideoGame/{{Castlevania|I}}'', ''VideoGame/DokiDokiPanic'' ([[DolledUpInstallment AKA]] ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros2''), ''VideoGame/KidIcarus'' and ''{{Metroid}}'' were all originally released as Disk System games.

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* The Famicom Disk System, a floppy disk drive add-on. It was introduced in 1986, as was a Twin Famicom model that could play both disks and cartridges.1986. The Disk System was only released in Japan, and even there was moribund by the end of the 1980s due to improvements in cartridge construction and rampant piracy concerns (though Nintendo continued to support it until 2003).[[note]]While FDS didn't use the common 3.5" floppy, it nevertheless utilized the more or less standard design, namely Mitsumi's 3" Quick Disk floppies, widely used in home computers and word processors in Japan at the time. While there is an additional anti-piracy measure, the measure (which consisted of a set of sensors that checked to see if the word "Nintendo" was embossed onto a certain location on the disk) was easily bypassed [[/note]] The experience with piracy and [[LoadsAndLoadsOfLoading loading time]] caused Nintendo to be reluctant to accept disks until the UsefulNotes/NintendoGameCube, and only accepted standard-size optical disks with the UsefulNotes/{{Wii}}. ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZelda'' (its first title), ''VideoGame/{{Castlevania|I}}'', ''VideoGame/DokiDokiPanic'' ([[DolledUpInstallment AKA]] ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros2''), ''VideoGame/KidIcarus'' and ''{{Metroid}}'' were all originally released as Disk System games. Sharp had actually built two models of ''officially licensed Famiclones'' with a FDS built right in, called the ''Famicom Twin'' and ''Famicom Twin Turbo'' respectively, the only difference being that the latter had ''turbo buttons''.
20th Oct '16 12:22:28 AM RAMChYLD
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* The Famicom Disk System, a floppy disk drive add-on. It was introduced in 1986, as was a Twin Famicom model that could play both disks and cartridges. The Disk System was only released in Japan, and even there was moribund by the end of the 1980s due to improvements in cartridge construction and rampant piracy concerns (though Nintendo continued to support it until 2003).[[note]]While FDS didn't use the common 3.5" floppy, it nevertheless utilized the more or less standard design, namely Mitsumi's 3" Quick Disk floppies, widely used in home computers and word processors in Japan at the time, so copying them wasn't a problem.[[/note]] The experience with piracy and [[LoadsAndLoadsOfLoading loading time]] caused Nintendo to be reluctant to accept disks until the UsefulNotes/NintendoGameCube, and only accepted standard-size optical disks with the UsefulNotes/{{Wii}}. ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZelda'' (its first title), ''VideoGame/{{Castlevania|I}}'', ''VideoGame/DokiDokiPanic'' ([[DolledUpInstallment AKA]] ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros2''), ''VideoGame/KidIcarus'' and ''{{Metroid}}'' were all originally released as Disk System games.

to:

* The Famicom Disk System, a floppy disk drive add-on. It was introduced in 1986, as was a Twin Famicom model that could play both disks and cartridges. The Disk System was only released in Japan, and even there was moribund by the end of the 1980s due to improvements in cartridge construction and rampant piracy concerns (though Nintendo continued to support it until 2003).[[note]]While FDS didn't use the common 3.5" floppy, it nevertheless utilized the more or less standard design, namely Mitsumi's 3" Quick Disk floppies, widely used in home computers and word processors in Japan at the time, so copying them wasn't time. While there is an additional anti-piracy measure, the measure (which consisted of a problem.set of sensors that checked to see if the word "Nintendo" was embossed onto a certain location on the disk) was easily bypassed [[/note]] The experience with piracy and [[LoadsAndLoadsOfLoading loading time]] caused Nintendo to be reluctant to accept disks until the UsefulNotes/NintendoGameCube, and only accepted standard-size optical disks with the UsefulNotes/{{Wii}}. ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZelda'' (its first title), ''VideoGame/{{Castlevania|I}}'', ''VideoGame/DokiDokiPanic'' ([[DolledUpInstallment AKA]] ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros2''), ''VideoGame/KidIcarus'' and ''{{Metroid}}'' were all originally released as Disk System games.
11th Oct '16 10:56:40 PM RAMChYLD
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* Unlike Nintendo of America, Nintendo Japan was actually willing to license their console patents out to third parties. This resulted in several third party companies, including Creator/{{Konami}} and Sharp, making licensed clones of the system. Unfortunately, these clones are Japan-only.

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* Unlike Nintendo of America, Nintendo Japan was actually willing to license their console patents out to third parties. This resulted in several third party companies, including Creator/{{Konami}} and Sharp, making licensed ''licensed'' clones of the system. Unfortunately, these clones are Japan-only.
11th Oct '16 10:53:34 PM RAMChYLD
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* Unlike Nintendo of America, Nintendo Japan was actually willing to license their console patents out to third parties. This resulted in Sharp and several third party companies, including Creator/{{Konami}}, making licensed clones of the system. Unfortunately, these clones are Japan-only.

to:

* Unlike Nintendo of America, Nintendo Japan was actually willing to license their console patents out to third parties. This resulted in Sharp and several third party companies, including Creator/{{Konami}}, Creator/{{Konami}} and Sharp, making licensed clones of the system. Unfortunately, these clones are Japan-only.
11th Oct '16 10:51:46 PM RAMChYLD
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Added DiffLines:

* Unlike Nintendo of America, Nintendo Japan was actually willing to license their console patents out to third parties. This resulted in Sharp and several third party companies, including Creator/{{Konami}}, making licensed clones of the system. Unfortunately, these clones are Japan-only.
11th Oct '16 10:19:53 PM RAMChYLD
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* The Data Recorder, a cassette tape recorder intended mainly for storing programs created with [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Family_BASIC Family BASIC]]; some games also used it for saves. Like the Disk System, [[NoExportForYou it was only released in Japan]]. Essentially just a standard portable mono tape recorder with line-in/line-out jacks and the necessary mono 3.5mm cables bundled and Nintendo branding. Requires the Famicom Keyboard to operate as the keyboard actually contained the necessary modulator/demodulator circuits.

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* The Data Recorder, a cassette tape recorder intended mainly for storing programs created with [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Family_BASIC Family BASIC]]; some games also used it for saves. Like the Disk System, System and Famicom BASIC with Keyboard bundle, [[NoExportForYou it was only released in Japan]]. Essentially just a standard portable mono tape recorder with line-in/line-out jacks and the necessary mono 3.5mm cables bundled and Nintendo branding. Requires the Famicom Keyboard to operate as the keyboard actually contained the necessary modulator/demodulator circuits.
11th Oct '16 10:18:24 PM RAMChYLD
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* The Data Recorder, a cassette tape recorder intended mainly for storing programs created with [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Family_BASIC Family BASIC]]; some games also used it for saves. Like the Disk System, [[NoExportForYou it was only released in Japan]]. Essentially just a standard portable mono tape recorder with line-in/line-out jacks and the necessary mono 3.5mm cables bundled. Requires the Famicom Keyboard to operate as the keyboard actually contained the necessary modulator/demodulator circuits.

to:

* The Data Recorder, a cassette tape recorder intended mainly for storing programs created with [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Family_BASIC Family BASIC]]; some games also used it for saves. Like the Disk System, [[NoExportForYou it was only released in Japan]]. Essentially just a standard portable mono tape recorder with line-in/line-out jacks and the necessary mono 3.5mm cables bundled.bundled and Nintendo branding. Requires the Famicom Keyboard to operate as the keyboard actually contained the necessary modulator/demodulator circuits.
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