History Trivia / MajorLeague

27th Apr '16 11:59:27 PM Morgenthaler
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* HeyItsThatGuy / RetroactiveRecognition: "Downtown" Anderson is [[Series/TheShield Shane]].
** Pops moved to Philadelphia and became a ColdCase detective.
** Cerrano became [[Series/TwentyFour President of the United States]].
** The director of Vaughn's Right Guard ad in the second film went on to be a [[Series/TheWestWing White House Communications Director]].
26th Jan '16 9:46:42 PM GrammarNavi
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** The director of Vaughn's Right Guard ad in the second film went on to be a [[TheWestWing White House Communications Director]].

to:

** The director of Vaughn's Right Guard ad in the second film went on to be a [[TheWestWing [[Series/TheWestWing White House Communications Director]].
19th Dec '15 7:45:22 PM nombretomado
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* HeyItsThatGuy / RetroactiveRecognition: "Downtown" Anderson is [[TheShield Shane]].

to:

* HeyItsThatGuy / RetroactiveRecognition: "Downtown" Anderson is [[TheShield [[Series/TheShield Shane]].
18th Nov '15 10:22:51 AM DaRatBastid
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* IronyAsSheIsCast: In the first film, the Yankees' power hitter, Clu Haywood, is played by Pete Vuckovich who, while he was an actual major league baseball player, was actually a ''pitcher'' who'd never hit even one home run in his career.

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* IronyAsSheIsCast: In the first film, the Yankees' power hitter, Clu Haywood, is played by Pete Vuckovich who, while he was an actual had been a major league baseball player, was actually a ''pitcher'' who'd never hit even one home run in his career.
18th Nov '15 10:22:09 AM DaRatBastid
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Added DiffLines:

* IronyAsSheIsCast: In the first film, the Yankees' power hitter, Clu Haywood, is played by Pete Vuckovich who, while he was an actual major league baseball player, was actually a ''pitcher'' who'd never hit even one home run in his career.
29th Jun '15 9:34:50 AM bt8257
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* TheCastShowoff: Creator/CharlieSheen was actually a pitcher in high school, which gives Vaughn one of the most accurate deliveries in any baseball movie. It also didn't require much fudging to make his fastballs look convincing; although nowhere near Vaughn's triple-digit heater, Sheen was routinely clocked in the high 80s during filming according to WordOfGod.

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* TheCastShowoff: TheCastShowOff: Creator/CharlieSheen was actually a pitcher in high school, which gives Vaughn one of the most accurate deliveries in any baseball movie. It also didn't require much fudging to make his fastballs look convincing; although nowhere near Vaughn's triple-digit heater, Sheen was routinely clocked in the high 80s during filming according to WordOfGod.
17th May '15 12:43:57 AM HarryLovesHermione
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* TalentDouble: Mostly averted. Virtually all the baseball scenes in the first film were done by the cast themselves; for instance, that really is Snipes making the sensational home-run-robbing catch during the finale. Anything they couldn't do well, the crew just filmed around it (with Snipes, he couldn't throw well nor run fast, so Hayes isn't seen throwing a ball and is why his running is usually in slow motion). The baseball sequences were actually shot with the actors playing ball trying to match the outcome needed to depict on film. The actors were enthusiastic about doing it, since they had to train and practice like real players, as well as living out playing major league ball in front of 25,000 people. The notable exception is Tom Berenger; former Dodger Steve Yeager (who also plays the Yankee relief pitcher Duke) does most of Jake Taylor's catching action.

to:

* TalentDouble: Mostly averted. Virtually all the baseball scenes in the first film were done by the cast themselves; for instance, that really is Snipes making the sensational home-run-robbing catch during the finale. Anything they couldn't do well, the crew just filmed around it (with Snipes, he couldn't throw well nor run fast, so Hayes isn't seen throwing a ball and is why his running is usually in slow motion). The baseball sequences were actually shot with the actors playing ball trying to match the outcome needed to depict on film. The actors were enthusiastic about doing it, since they had to train and practice like real players, as well as living out playing major league ball in front of 25,000 people. The notable exception is Tom Berenger; former Dodger Steve Yeager (who also plays the Yankee relief pitcher Duke) Indians third-base coach Temple) does most of Jake Taylor's catching action.
20th Feb '15 3:27:47 AM IlGreven
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* {{Defictionalization}}: Uecker was in the middle of his long solid career as a RealLife game announcer for the Brewers. After the first movie came out he did more national games and World Series coverage during TheNineties.

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* {{Defictionalization}}: Bob Uecker was in the middle of his long solid career as a RealLife game announcer for the Brewers. After the first movie came out he did more national games and World Series coverage during TheNineties.
9th Feb '15 7:40:49 AM lorgskyegon
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Added DiffLines:

** Not so averted in the third movie. Almost every pitched and hit ball is easily recognizable as CGI.
30th Nov '14 3:32:30 PM Jmodene
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* TalentDouble: Mostly averted. Virtually all the baseball scenes in the first film were done by the cast themselves; for instance, that really is Snipes making the sensational home-run-robbing catch during the finale. Anything they couldn't do well, the crew just filmed around it (with Snipes, he couldn't throw well nor run fast, so Hayes isn't seen throwing a ball and is why his running is usually in slow motion). The baseball sequences were actually shot with the actors playing ball trying to match the outcome needed to depict on film. The actors were enthusiastic about doing it, since they had to train and practice like real players, as well as living out playing major league ball in front of 25,000 people. The notable exception is Tom Berenger; former Dodger Steve Yeager (who also plays Coach Temple) does most of Jake Taylor's catching action.

to:

* TalentDouble: Mostly averted. Virtually all the baseball scenes in the first film were done by the cast themselves; for instance, that really is Snipes making the sensational home-run-robbing catch during the finale. Anything they couldn't do well, the crew just filmed around it (with Snipes, he couldn't throw well nor run fast, so Hayes isn't seen throwing a ball and is why his running is usually in slow motion). The baseball sequences were actually shot with the actors playing ball trying to match the outcome needed to depict on film. The actors were enthusiastic about doing it, since they had to train and practice like real players, as well as living out playing major league ball in front of 25,000 people. The notable exception is Tom Berenger; former Dodger Steve Yeager (who also plays Coach Temple) the Yankee relief pitcher Duke) does most of Jake Taylor's catching action.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Trivia.MajorLeague