History Trivia / Frankenstein

9th Jan '16 9:10:23 PM Katkee
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** Similarly, electricity is used as the catalyst to bring the creature back to life in most modern portrayals. Electricity was never mentioned in the book; in fact, Frankenstein makes a point of telling Walton he'll keep it a secret. TheOtherWiki states the electric use can be traced to the 1931 movie of Frankenstein.
28th Oct '15 2:19:31 PM Bense
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* BeamMeUpScotty: "It's alive!" was never said in the original book. The original monster was more of a GeniusBruiser than the DumbMuscle that he is typically portrayed as. And Fritz (the hunchback that said "It's Alive!") was nonexistent until the movie.

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* BeamMeUpScotty: "It's alive!" was never said in the original book. In fact in the book Frankenstein didn't have any assistants to talk to. The original monster was more of a GeniusBruiser than the DumbMuscle that he is typically portrayed as. And Fritz (the hunchback that said "It's Alive!") was nonexistent until the movie.
20th Oct '15 7:45:26 PM ladymountararat
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* CreatorBreakdown: Many literary historians consider the monster's creation scene in Frankenstein to be an allegory on childbirth. Months before writing the book, Mary Shelley had given birth to a premature, deformed illegitimate child who lived only minutes. Victor Frankenstein's misshapen, partly-formed 'monster' is created in 'filth' and when first brought to life is jaundiced, as most premature newborns are. This allegory may be less obvious to us because most movie adaptations don't follow Shelley's text that closely and turn the creation of the monster into a more scientific and less earthy event than Shelley imagined.

to:

* CreatorBreakdown: Many literary historians consider the monster's creation scene in Frankenstein to be an allegory on childbirth. Months Not long before writing the book, Mary Shelley had given birth to a premature, deformed illegitimate child who lived only minutes.days. Victor Frankenstein's misshapen, partly-formed 'monster' is created in 'filth' and when first brought to life is jaundiced, as most premature newborns are. This allegory may be less obvious to us because most movie adaptations don't follow Shelley's text that closely and turn the creation of the monster into a more scientific and less earthy event than Shelley imagined.
28th Jun '14 10:47:04 AM Morgenthaler
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* BeamMeUpScotty: "It's alive!" was never said in the original book. The original monster was more of a GeniusBruiser than the DumbMuscle that he is typically portrayed as. And Fritz (the hunchback that said "It's Alive!") was nonexistent until the movie.

to:

* BeamMeUpScotty: "It's alive!" was never said in the original book. The original monster was more of a GeniusBruiser than the DumbMuscle that he is typically portrayed as. And Fritz (the hunchback that said "It's Alive!") was nonexistent until the movie.movie.
* CreatorBreakdown: Many literary historians consider the monster's creation scene in Frankenstein to be an allegory on childbirth. Months before writing the book, Mary Shelley had given birth to a premature, deformed illegitimate child who lived only minutes. Victor Frankenstein's misshapen, partly-formed 'monster' is created in 'filth' and when first brought to life is jaundiced, as most premature newborns are. This allegory may be less obvious to us because most movie adaptations don't follow Shelley's text that closely and turn the creation of the monster into a more scientific and less earthy event than Shelley imagined.
* OneHitWonder: Only one of Creator/MaryShelley's novels is well-known today: ''Frankenstein, or the modern Prometheus''. Although she was taken very seriously in her day, nowadays it's either ''Frankenstein'' or being the wife of Creator/PercyByssheShelley (even though it was her efforts after his death that kept ''him'' from being considered a OneHitWonder)...
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6th Dec '13 8:10:08 AM KingKaor
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* BeamMeUpScotty: "It's alive!" was never said in the original book. The original monster was more of a GeniusBruiser than the DumbMuscle that he is typically portrayed as. And Fritz (the hunchback that said "It's Alive!" was nonexistent until the movie.

to:

* BeamMeUpScotty: "It's alive!" was never said in the original book. The original monster was more of a GeniusBruiser than the DumbMuscle that he is typically portrayed as. And Fritz (the hunchback that said "It's Alive!" Alive!") was nonexistent until the movie.
26th Jan '13 12:59:57 PM 2020dude
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* BeamMeUpScotty: "It's alive!" was never said in the original book. The original monster was more of a GeniusBruiser than the DumbMuscle that he is typically portrayed as. And Fritz (the hunchback that said "It's Alive!" was nonexistent until the movie.
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