History TookALevelInBadass / LiveActionTV

31st Aug '17 10:51:59 AM CaptainCrawdad
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* ''Series/TwentyFour'': This show is full of characters who have taken up multiple levels of Badass. These include Teri Bauer, Kim Bauer, Chloe O'Brien in season 4 (see also CrowningMomentOfAwesome), George Mason (see also HeroicSacrifice), Wayne Palmer, and Milo Pressman (total geek in season 1; to taking bullets in season 6). Some of the bad guys pull this off as well (Behrooz Araz and his trusty {{shovel|strike}} in season 4 is the premier example)

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* ''Series/TwentyFour'': This show is full of characters who have taken up multiple levels of Badass. These
** Some examples
include Teri Bauer, Kim Bauer, Chloe O'Brien in season 4 (see also CrowningMomentOfAwesome), George Mason (see also HeroicSacrifice), Wayne Palmer, and Milo Pressman (total geek in season 1; to taking bullets in season 6). 6).
**
Some of the bad guys pull this off as well (Behrooz Araz and his trusty {{shovel|strike}} in season 4 is the premier example)



* ''Series/BattlestarGalactica2003'': Interestingly, the civilian characters of Ron Moore's show have been immune to this (with the exception of those revealed to be Cylons), although Laura Roslin becomes a political badass. Considering military officers like Adama and Cain, the badass market of ''Battlestar'' is cornered.
** However, the TV movie ''Razor'' is all about Kendra Shaw being molded into a badass by Cain.
** Also: Saul Tigh. In the first 2 seasons he's an alcoholic CommanderContrarian, but in the first 5 episodes of Season 3 alone he [[spoiler:[[EyepatchofPower loses an eye]], sends men on suicide missions against the Cylons, shuts up Laura Roslin, poisons his wife, and executes collaborators by airlocking them.]] He has remained awesome ever since.
** In fact, he seems to take ''another'' level in badass after [[spoiler: he finds out he's a cylon]]. One of his plans involves going and standing in an airlock threatening to space himself unless he gets what he wants (it makes more sense in context).
* ''Series/{{Being Human|UK}}'': Annie definitely takes a level after [[spoiler: refusing to pass to the other side]] although one could argue that it began [[spoiler: after she breaks her emotional bond to her boyfriend/killer]].
** The biggest part of her level up occurred when she went from being a ghost to being a poltergeist.
* ''Series/BreakingBad'': Walter White. Too many examples to mention, he takes several levels. At least a level 5 badass, at the moment. It also serves as a massive {{Deconstruction}}. The more badass he gets, [[ProtagonistJourneyToVillain the more humanity he sheds.]]

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* ''Series/BattlestarGalactica2003'': Interestingly, the civilian characters of Ron Moore's show have been immune to this (with the exception of those revealed to be Cylons), although Laura Roslin becomes a political badass. Considering military officers like Adama and Cain, the badass market of ''Battlestar'' is cornered.
''Series/BattlestarGalactica2003'':
** However, the The TV movie ''Razor'' is all about Kendra Shaw being molded into a badass by Cain.
** Also: Saul Tigh. In the first 2 seasons he's an alcoholic CommanderContrarian, but in the first 5 episodes of Season 3 alone he [[spoiler:[[EyepatchofPower loses an eye]], sends men on suicide missions against the Cylons, shuts up Laura Roslin, poisons his wife, and executes collaborators by airlocking them.]] He has remained awesome ever since.
**
since. In fact, he seems to take ''another'' level in badass after [[spoiler: he finds out he's a cylon]]. One of his plans involves going and standing in an airlock threatening to space himself unless he gets what he wants (it makes more sense in context).
* ''Series/{{Being Human|UK}}'': Annie definitely takes a level after [[spoiler: refusing to pass to the other side]] although one could argue that it began [[spoiler: after she breaks her emotional bond to her boyfriend/killer]].
**
boyfriend/killer]]. The biggest part of her level up occurred when she went from being a ghost to being a poltergeist.
* ''Series/BreakingBad'': ''Series/BreakingBad'':
**
Walter White. Too many examples to mention, he takes several levels. At least a level 5 badass, at The whole point of the moment. It also serves as a massive {{Deconstruction}}. The more badass he gets, series is his [[ProtagonistJourneyToVillain the more humanity he sheds.]]slow transformation]] from mild-mannered school teacher to evil criminal mastermind.



*** To show her new badassery, when Michael tells Sam and Fiona that she's trying to hold them off, Sam says "She's good, but she's not that good." When a former ''Navy SEAL'' thinks you're tough, that's saying something.
*** This isn't the first time said Navy SEAL acknowledges her badassery -- from "The Hunter":
---->'''Madeline''': Sam, let me remind you you're sleeping in my guestroom. You call me or God as my witness I will smother you in your sleep.
---->'''Sam''': Okay, we'll call!



* ''Series/{{Chuck}}'': The second season finale. "Guys, I know kung-fu," indeed.
** Chuck takes additional levels throughout the series. After losing The Intersect he begins studying the spy craft on his own and claims to be gaining competency. This comes to a head in "Chuck Vs. The Santa Suit" where Chuck tricks Shaw into uninstalling his own Intersect, and then Chuck beats Shaw in a fair fight. Keep in mind that Shaw was still a fully trained, lethal CIA killer '''before''' The Intersect, and Chuck still beat that. Level up!
** ''Series/{{Chuck}}'' also shows this trope can apply to inanimate objects too -- in Season 1, Sarah's "workplace" had nothing but a gun hidden in the mayonnaise. Then in Season 2, the stock room turns out to be [[spoiler: a fully decked-out underground base]].
*** The same applies to Buy More. After it burns to the ground, the NSA rebuilds it and turns it into a high-tech command center with the customers completely oblivious.

to:

* ''Series/{{Chuck}}'': ''Series/{{Chuck}}'':
** Chuck.
The second season finale. "Guys, I know kung-fu," indeed.
** Chuck
indeed. He takes additional levels throughout the series. After losing The Intersect he begins studying the spy craft on his own and claims to be gaining competency. This comes to a head in "Chuck Vs. The Santa Suit" where Chuck tricks Shaw into uninstalling his own Intersect, and then Chuck beats Shaw in a fair fight. Keep in mind that Shaw was still a fully trained, lethal CIA killer '''before''' The Intersect, and Chuck still beat that. Level up!
** ''Series/{{Chuck}}'' also shows this trope can apply to inanimate objects too -- in Season 1, Sarah's "workplace" had nothing but a gun hidden in the mayonnaise. Then in Season 2, the stock room turns out to be [[spoiler: a fully decked-out underground base]].
*** The same applies to Buy More. After it burns to the ground, the NSA rebuilds it and turns it into a high-tech command center with the customers completely oblivious.
up!



** In the original ''Series/MightyMorphinPowerRangers'', Adam is an example of this. While he was overshadowed by his other teammates and some unfortunate dialogue ([[Film/MightyMorphinPowerRangersTheMovie power of kissing]], anyone?) during his run as a Ranger (only second to Tommy Oliver in the entire series history), he returns twice having taken quite a few levels in badass after he stopped being a Ranger. First is in ''Series/PowerRangersInSpace'' where he saves Carlos, the guy who replaced him, by jumping out of nowhere and attacking the Monster of the Week UNMORPHED. Later in the same episode when surrounded by said monster and a ton of mooks, he risks being destroyed when he uses his original damaged ''Mighty Morphin''' morpher to save the day. He then shows up again for the 15th anniversary episode to lead a team of veteran rangers. Not only is he a muscular martial artist who runs a dojo, but when the team is attacked by an ocean of mooks unmorphed, all the younger Rangers use their super powers to beat them. Adam, however, just proceeds to dispatch the most mooks by using nothing but his martial arts skills. Finally at the end of the special he takes on the Big Bad (Rita and Zedd's son no less) single-handedly. Levels in badass indeed.

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** In the original ''Series/MightyMorphinPowerRangers'', Adam is an example of this. While he was overshadowed by his other teammates and some unfortunate dialogue ([[Film/MightyMorphinPowerRangersTheMovie power of kissing]], anyone?) during his run as a Ranger (only second to Tommy Oliver in the entire series history), he returns twice having taken quite a few levels in badass after he stopped being a Ranger. First is in ''Series/PowerRangersInSpace'' where he saves Carlos, the guy who replaced him, by jumping out of nowhere and attacking the Monster of the Week UNMORPHED. Later in the same episode when surrounded by said the monster and a ton of mooks, he risks being destroyed when he uses his original damaged ''Mighty Morphin''' morpher to save the day. He then shows up again for the 15th anniversary episode to lead a team of veteran rangers. Not only is he a muscular martial artist who runs a dojo, but when the team is attacked by an ocean of mooks unmorphed, all the younger Rangers use their super powers to beat them. Adam, however, just proceeds to dispatch the most mooks by using nothing but his martial arts skills. Finally at the end of the special he takes on the Big Bad (Rita and Zedd's son no less) single-handedly. Levels in badass indeed.



** Carl starts out as a sort of Tagalong Kid/[[TheLoad load]], that gets shot and [[spoiler:ends up indirectly killing Otis due to needing medical supplies to survive said gunshot]]. In season 3 after a time gap of about 7 months, however, he becomes a badass. His skills are able to rival adult members of his group, and he saves Tyreese's group from zombies by himself with little effort. Oh, and he [[spoiler:killed his own mother (at age 13), to stop her from returning to life as a walker]]. Without crying. Near the end of Season 5, when Rick finds his son outside the walls of Alexandria, they simply nod to each other and start carving up an attacking group of walkers. His level in badass was so profound it ruined the "Where's Karl" meme because that question became about as foreboding as "where's Daryl".

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** Carl starts out as a sort of Tagalong Kid/[[TheLoad load]], that gets shot and [[spoiler:ends up indirectly killing Otis due to needing medical supplies to survive said gunshot]].the injury]]. In season 3 after a time gap of about 7 months, however, he becomes a badass. His skills are able to rival adult members of his group, and he saves Tyreese's group from zombies by himself with little effort. Oh, and he [[spoiler:killed his own mother (at age 13), to stop her from returning to life as a walker]]. Without crying. Near the end of Season 5, when Rick finds his son outside the walls of Alexandria, they simply nod to each other and start carving up an attacking group of walkers. His level in badass was so profound it ruined the "Where's Karl" meme because that question became about as foreboding as "where's Daryl".



** Beth was so underused in the second season that she was practically OutOfFocus, and her one memorable episode in said season had her attempting suicide after believing that living in the current world was pointless. By the time season 3 rolls around, however, she's ''much'' more capable with a gun and knife, and effortlessly dispatches walkers through the fence. When [[spoiler:her father is killed in "Too Far Gone"]], she immediately opens fire on [[spoiler:The Governor's troops]], and later gets several badass moments in "Slabtown" and "Coda". [[spoiler:However, she dies at the end of the former]].

to:

** Beth was so underused in the second season that she was practically OutOfFocus, and her one memorable episode in said season had her attempting suicide after believing that living in the current world was pointless. By the time season 3 rolls around, however, she's ''much'' more capable with a gun and knife, and effortlessly dispatches walkers through the fence. When [[spoiler:her father is killed in "Too Far Gone"]], she immediately opens fire on [[spoiler:The Governor's troops]], and later gets several badass moments in "Slabtown" and "Coda". [[spoiler:However, she dies at the end of the former]].
29th Aug '17 4:14:06 PM FastFuriousFan
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** Inverted with the demon Sahjhan in Season 3, who instead of using his awesome power to go kill Team Angel and then kill the baby Connor to prevent Connor from killing ''him'' in the future, he went back in time to [[PropheticFallacy rewrite the prophecy of Connor killing him to the Father (Angel) killing the son (Connor)]]. This caused Wesley to make a huge mistake that ruined his life and even caused Angel to try to kill him in the hospital for taking away his son. [[SmugSnake And Sahjhan was very sadistic and bragged about what he did]] when Angel, Fred and Gunn interrogated him. But this still made him a DirtyCoward for making a glorified "duck and cover" when he should've had no trouble getting past Team Angel and he never had any qualms about killing a baby to save his own skin. [[YouCantFightFate And this didn't prevent Connor from killing him in the final season.]]
22nd Aug '17 9:04:06 AM gb00393
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** Jaime Lannister, not as a fighter, obviously, but as a commander. Jaime learns from his earlier mistakes and succesfully takes Riverrun from the remaining Tully loyalists and Highgarden from the Tyrells. He also seemed to have recovered from his lost hand as he can best Dothraki in mounted combat.
9th Aug '17 5:25:48 PM ANTMuddle
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* ''Series/{{Leverage}}'': Being GenreSavvy enough to realize their situation after "The Nigerian Job," Nate and his new team know they all need a grounding in each other's area of expertise. By the second season, they're all adept at a first strike (defending against non-specialized opponents, maintaining a short-term cover identity, lifting wallets, planning the ShortCon, and cracking lower-level codes). Later on, especially after an on-the-fly SwappedRoles attempt, they're able to mix things up and even unlock new strategies. By the final season, they're all up at least one level across the board.

to:

* ''Series/{{Leverage}}'': Being GenreSavvy enough to realize their situation after "The Nigerian Job," Nate and his new team know they all need a grounding in each other's area of expertise. By the second season, they're all adept at a first an opening strike (defending against non-specialized opponents, opponents of similar training, maintaining a short-term cover identity, lifting wallets, wallets and ID, planning the ShortCon, and cracking lower-level codes). Later on, especially after an on-the-fly SwappedRoles attempt, they're able to mix things up and even unlock new strategies.strategies and plays. By the final season, they're all up at least one level across the board.
5th Aug '17 11:12:49 AM Kate
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* ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'': Any member. None of the primary characters (except for Jack, and if you count flashbacks, perhaps Ianto) started off as badasses. Owen was a doctor, Toshiko was a mild-mannered scientist, and Gwen was a police constable, whose job mostly consisted of making coffee, cordoning off crime scenes, and breaking up bar fights. As a PC, she wasn't even issued a gun. By series 3, Gwen is firing at government agents and, in [[Series/TorchwoodMiracleDay series 4]], takes out a helicopter with a rocket launcher.

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* ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'': Any member. None of the primary characters (except for Jack, and if you count flashbacks, perhaps Ianto) started off as badasses. Owen was a doctor, Toshiko was a mild-mannered scientist, and Gwen was a police constable, whose job mostly consisted of making coffee, cordoning off crime scenes, and breaking up bar fights. As a PC, she wasn't even issued a gun.gun (in the UK, only specially trained firearms officers are allowed to carry). By series 3, Gwen is firing at government agents and, in [[Series/TorchwoodMiracleDay series 4]], takes out a helicopter with a rocket launcher.
28th Jul '17 4:58:09 PM jormis29
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* ''Series/{{Sliders}}'': Quinn Mallory apparently took a level of badass during the ChannelHop from Fox to Sci-Fi. This was mostly a result of Jerry O'Connell's increasing creative control over the show, and, like the rest of the show by this point, came off as contrived and meaningless.

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* ''Series/{{Sliders}}'': Quinn Mallory apparently took a level of badass during the ChannelHop from Fox to Sci-Fi. This was mostly a result of Jerry O'Connell's Creator/JerryOConnell's increasing creative control over the show, and, like the rest of the show by this point, came off as contrived and meaningless.
9th Jul '17 1:25:51 PM KamenRiderOokalf
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* ''UchuuSentaiKyuranger'' provides two examples.

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* ''UchuuSentaiKyuranger'' ''Series/UchuSentaiKyuranger'' provides two examples.
1st Jul '17 8:33:38 PM Flame
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* ''UchuuSentaiKyuranger'' provides two examples.
** [[PoisonousPerson Stinger]] took about a dozen of levels somewhere between his childhood, where he was shown as crybaby picked on by stronger tribesman, and adulthood, when he is among the strongest fighter the team has and generally a very bad choice of person to go against.
** [[BadassAdorable Kotaro]] [[KidHero Sakuma]] started off as badass already as he was throwing rocks at monsters and keeping his cool under pressure at the age of ''12''. [[spoiler: Yet, training at Rebelion HQ made him even more badass as he could provide decent CurbstompCushion against the PsychoSerum empowered Stinger after coming back.]]
17th Jun '17 11:52:34 PM Discar
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* ''Series/{{Community}}'': Appears most notably in the paintball episodes where Greendale devolves into a chaotic paint-splattered warzone. Annie, who starts off as an [[TheCutie often naive and innocent young woman]], died rapidly and fruitlessly in the Season 1 paintball episode "Modern Warfare". By the time Season 2's western-themed "A Fistful of Paintballs" rolls around she's become a one-woman killing machine, dropping no less than ten opponents single-handedly; a higher kill total than the rest of the group combined.
** Additionally, in the Season 3 episode "Remedial Chaos Theory", we discover that sweet, innocent Annie now owns and carries a revolver. She does, after all, live in a bad neighborhood. Awesomely enough, this may also [[FridgeBrilliance explain]] why Annie became a crack shot with paintball guns; she's been practicing with ''real'' ones.

to:

* ''Series/{{Community}}'': Appears most notably in the paintball episodes where Greendale devolves into a chaotic paint-splattered warzone. Annie, who starts off as an [[TheCutie often naive and innocent young woman]], died rapidly and fruitlessly in the Season 1 paintball episode "Modern Warfare". By the time Season 2's western-themed "A Fistful of Paintballs" rolls around she's become a one-woman killing machine, dropping no less than ten opponents single-handedly; single-handedly on-screen; a higher kill total than the rest of the group combined.
** Additionally, in
combined. In the Season 3 episode "Remedial Chaos Theory", we discover that sweet, innocent Annie now owns and carries a revolver. She does, after all, live in a bad neighborhood. Awesomely enough, this may also [[FridgeBrilliance explain]] why Annie became a crack shot with paintball guns; she's been practicing with ''real'' ones.
21st May '17 5:13:06 PM ANTMuddle
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* ''Series/{{Leverage}}'': Being GenreSavvy enough to realize their situation after "The Nigerian Job," Nate and his new team know they all need a grounding in each other's area of expertise. By the second season, they're all adept at a first strike (defending against non-specialized opponents, maintaining a short-term cover identity, lifting wallets, planning the ShortCon, and cracking lower-level codes). Later on, they're able to mix things up and even combine skills for new strategies. By the final season, they're all up at least one level across the board.

to:

* ''Series/{{Leverage}}'': Being GenreSavvy enough to realize their situation after "The Nigerian Job," Nate and his new team know they all need a grounding in each other's area of expertise. By the second season, they're all adept at a first strike (defending against non-specialized opponents, maintaining a short-term cover identity, lifting wallets, planning the ShortCon, and cracking lower-level codes). Later on, especially after an on-the-fly SwappedRoles attempt, they're able to mix things up and even combine skills for unlock new strategies. By the final season, they're all up at least one level across the board.
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