History Theatre / TheTempest

2nd May '16 3:28:26 PM margdean56
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Stephano and Trinculo, whilst having nothing to do with the usurping of Prospero, spend the entire play being ridiculed whilst flat out drunk. Trinculo specifically in Act 3 Scene 2, when Stephano constantly beats him as punishment for what the invisible Ariel says.

to:

** Stephano and Trinculo, whilst having nothing to do with the usurping of Prospero, spend the entire play being ridiculed whilst flat out flat-out drunk. Trinculo specifically in Act 3 Scene 2, when Stephano constantly beats him as punishment for what the invisible Ariel says.



* {{Expy}}: Prospero is often considered to have been inspired by [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_dee John Dee]], an adviser to UsefulNotes/ElizabethI. Dee was a practicing occultist who was an early advocate of colonizing the New World - and, contemporary legend had it, he had saved England from the Spanish Armada by using his magic powers to... ''raise a tempest''.

to:

* {{Expy}}: Prospero is often considered to have been inspired by [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_dee John Dee]], an adviser to UsefulNotes/ElizabethI. Dee was a practicing occultist who was an early advocate of colonizing the New World - -- and, contemporary legend had it, he had saved England from the Spanish Armada by using his magic powers to... ''raise a tempest''.



* GenderBlenderName: Yes, confused readers: Ariel is male. Sometimes. See ViewerGenderConfusion. [[note]]Until the latter half of the 20th Century, Ariel was more commonly a male name than a female name. In Israel, this is still the case- recall the former Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon. That said, Ariel is only referred to using masculine gender pronouns twice in the entire play, one of which is a stage direction rather than a line of dialogue, and the character was played exclusively by female actors from the mid-16th century to the 1930s. And then on top of that, Ariel is a shapeshifter, the actor playing Ariel sometimes also plays the goddess Ceres, and the classical conception of the four elements considered air to be hermaphroditic, so honestly, it's little wonder that his gender is so much in question.[[/note]]

to:

* GenderBlenderName: Yes, confused readers: Ariel is male. Sometimes. See ViewerGenderConfusion. [[note]]Until the latter half of the 20th Century, Ariel was more commonly a male name than a female name. In Israel, this is still the case- recall case--recall the former Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon. That said, Ariel is only referred to using masculine gender pronouns twice in the entire play, one of which is a stage direction rather than a line of dialogue, and the character was played exclusively by female actors from the mid-16th mid-17th century to the 1930s. And then on top of that, Ariel is a shapeshifter, the actor playing Ariel sometimes also plays the goddess Ceres, and the classical conception of the four elements considered air to be hermaphroditic, so honestly, it's little wonder that his gender is so much in question.[[/note]]



* ParentalMarriageVeto: Subversion - Prospero only ''pretends'' to oppose Ferdinand and Miranda's relationship.

to:

* ParentalMarriageVeto: Subversion - -- Prospero only ''pretends'' to oppose Ferdinand and Miranda's relationship.



* WhatTheHellHero: Reversed; the moment Prospero decides to back out of his revenge plan - a near-miss "MyGodWhatHaveIDone"

to:

* WhatTheHellHero: Reversed; the moment Prospero decides to back out of his revenge plan - -- a near-miss "MyGodWhatHaveIDone"
2nd May '16 3:18:50 PM margdean56
Is there an issue? Send a Message


When Antonio, along with a group that includes the King of Naples and his son, Ferdinand, sails by the island, Prospero has Ariel create a storm (the emponymous tempest) to shipwreck them onto the island, so that Prospero may have his revenge. The story ends happily, though, with Prospero forgiving those that wronged him, Ferdinand and Miranda falling in love and getting married, and Ariel getting his hard-earned freedom.

to:

When Antonio, along with a group that includes the King of Naples and his son, Ferdinand, sails by the island, Prospero has Ariel create a storm (the emponymous eponymous tempest) to shipwreck them onto the island, so that Prospero may have his revenge. The story ends happily, though, with Prospero forgiving those that wronged him, Ferdinand and Miranda falling in love and getting married, and Ariel getting his hard-earned freedom.
15th Mar '16 8:42:57 AM wittylibrarian
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

** Ariel does do this to Prospero if this line is read a certain way: "Mine (conscience) would, sir, were it human."
1st Feb '16 2:12:00 PM gallium
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* HiddenDepths: Robert Browning's poem ''Caliban Upon Setebos'', basically Caliban musing on his deity with Darwinist undertones, is an excellent fanfiction on Caliban exploring such depths.

to:

* HiddenDepths: Robert Browning's Creator/RobertBrowning's poem ''Caliban Upon Setebos'', basically Caliban musing on his deity with Darwinist undertones, is an excellent fanfiction on Caliban exploring such depths.
22nd Nov '15 3:02:42 AM atropos7
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* GenderBlenderName: Yes, confused readers: Ariel is male. Sometimes. See ViewerGenderConfusion. [[note]]Until the latter half of the 20th Century, Ariel was more commonly a male name than a female name. In Israel, this is still the case- recall the former Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon. That said, Ariel is only referred to using masculine gender pronouns twice in the entire play, one of which is a stage direction rather than a line of dialogue, and the character was played exclusively by female actors from the mid-16th century to the 1930s.[[/note]]

to:

* GenderBlenderName: Yes, confused readers: Ariel is male. Sometimes. See ViewerGenderConfusion. [[note]]Until the latter half of the 20th Century, Ariel was more commonly a male name than a female name. In Israel, this is still the case- recall the former Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon. That said, Ariel is only referred to using masculine gender pronouns twice in the entire play, one of which is a stage direction rather than a line of dialogue, and the character was played exclusively by female actors from the mid-16th century to the 1930s. And then on top of that, Ariel is a shapeshifter, the actor playing Ariel sometimes also plays the goddess Ceres, and the classical conception of the four elements considered air to be hermaphroditic, so honestly, it's little wonder that his gender is so much in question.[[/note]]
22nd Nov '15 2:03:59 AM atropos7
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* GenderBlenderName: Yes, confused readers: Ariel is male. Sometimes. See ViewerGenderConfusion. [[note]]Until the latter half of the 20th Century, Ariel was more commonly a male name than a female name. In Israel, this is still the case- recall the former Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon. [[/note]]

to:

* GenderBlenderName: Yes, confused readers: Ariel is male. Sometimes. See ViewerGenderConfusion. [[note]]Until the latter half of the 20th Century, Ariel was more commonly a male name than a female name. In Israel, this is still the case- recall the former Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon. That said, Ariel is only referred to using masculine gender pronouns twice in the entire play, one of which is a stage direction rather than a line of dialogue, and the character was played exclusively by female actors from the mid-16th century to the 1930s.[[/note]]
19th Nov '15 6:06:34 PM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AuthorAvatar: Prospero, according to many critics. The FourthWall-breaking speech at the end certainly helps this idea.
** Some critics view Prospero's farewell to magic as Shakespeare's farewell to theater and writing. This does ignore the official timeline that Shakespeare wrote more plays after this.

to:

* AuthorAvatar: Prospero, according to many critics. The FourthWall-breaking speech at the end certainly helps this idea.
**
idea, though it's hardly the first of Shakespeare's plays to end with a character directly soliciting the audience's approval. Some critics view Prospero's farewell to magic as Shakespeare's farewell to theater and writing. This does ignore writing, but this ignores the official timeline that Shakespeare wrote more plays after this.



* ButtMonkey: Stephano and Trinculo, whilst having nothing to do with the usurping of Prospero, spend the entire play being ridiculed whilst flat out drunk. Caliban too, but since he once [[AttemptedRape attempted to rape]] Miranda, one can debate that he deserves it.
** Trinculo specifically in Act 3 Scene 2, when Stephano constantly beats him as punishment for what the invisible ''Ariel'' says.

to:

* ButtMonkey: ButtMonkey:
**
Stephano and Trinculo, whilst having nothing to do with the usurping of Prospero, spend the entire play being ridiculed whilst flat out drunk. Caliban too, but since he once [[AttemptedRape attempted to rape]] Miranda, one can debate that he deserves it.
**
Trinculo specifically in Act 3 Scene 2, when Stephano constantly beats him as punishment for what the invisible ''Ariel'' says.Ariel says.
** Caliban too, but since he once [[AttemptedRape attempted to rape]] Miranda, one can debate that he deserves it.



* KarmaHoudini: Antonio gets absolutely no comeuppance for his actions against Prospero.
** Well, Prospero does torture them a bit through Ariel. Whether or not this is enough is another question.

to:

* KarmaHoudini: Antonio gets absolutely basically no comeuppance for his actions against Prospero.
** Well,
Prospero. Prospero does torture them a bit through Ariel. Whether or not Ariel; whether this is enough is another question.



* ThoseTwoGuys / ThoseTwoBadGuys: Stephano and Trinculo.
** Also Adrian and Francisco, in Alsono's party.
* UnusualEuphemism: Sycorax, Caliban's mother and the witch who trapped Ariel in a pine tree long before the play's events, is described as "blue-eyed" as a euphemism for "pregnant." [[GetTheeToANunnery Made much more sense in Elizabethan times, we assume.]]
** Reportedly, this expression refers to the eyelids of pregnant women turning bluish. Maybe an iron deficiency?
** Or, Sycorax is meant to be a blue-eyed Algerian. Or both.

to:

* ThoseTwoGuys / ThoseTwoBadGuys: ThoseTwoBadGuys:
**
Stephano and Trinculo.
** Also Adrian and Francisco, in Alsono's Alonso's party.
* UnusualEuphemism: Sycorax, Caliban's mother and the witch who trapped Ariel in a pine tree long before the play's events, is described as "blue-eyed" as a euphemism for "pregnant." [[GetTheeToANunnery Made much more sense in Elizabethan times, we assume.]]
**
Reportedly, this expression refers to the eyelids of pregnant women turning bluish. Maybe an iron deficiency?
** Or, Sycorax is meant to be a blue-eyed Algerian. Or both.
deficiency?
19th Nov '15 6:01:40 PM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* [[EvilPlan Good Plan]]: A rare heroic version; the entire play is Prospero's GodGame to end his exile from Milan. 'Good' because all he wants is to get his home back and teach his evil brother a lesson. No one gets hurt, not even the evil brother, and almost all of them go back to Milan as more or less friends.
19th Nov '15 6:00:27 PM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* CanonWelding: It's not done in the play itself, but many later writers have identified Sycorax with [[ClassicalMythology Circe]].


Added DiffLines:

* CanonWelding: It's not done in the play itself, but many later writers have identified Sycorax with [[Myth/ClassicalMythology Circe]].
19th Nov '15 5:58:55 PM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: In the play, Prospero makes the accusation that Caliban "didst seek to violate / The honour of my child". In a retelling by Creator/BrianAldiss, Miranda and Caliban were in love with each other, and Prospero separated them against their will.

to:

* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: In the play, Prospero makes the accusation that Caliban "didst seek to violate / The honour of my child". In a retelling by Creator/BrianAldiss, Miranda and Caliban were in love with each other, and Prospero separated them against their will.[[invoked]]
This list shows the last 10 events of 60. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Theatre.TheTempest