History Theatre / TheTamingOfTheShrew

15th Mar '17 8:17:19 PM Michael_McManus
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* LikesOlderWomen: Hortensio, who ends up marrying a widow.
15th Mar '17 8:15:17 PM Michael_McManus
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* GuileHero: Tranio, who manages to arrange a marriage between Lucentio and Bianca through a series of bluffs and manipulations.
15th Mar '17 2:14:10 AM Michael_McManus
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* DecoyProtagonist: Lucentio is set up as the main character in the first scene. He's not.


Added DiffLines:

* {{Deuteragonist}}: Tranio is TheProtagonist of the B-plot, trying to get Lucentio and Bianca together. In terms of lines, he's second only to Petruchio.
13th Mar '17 11:53:03 AM jamespolk
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The play was adapted to film several times; the 1967 version, directed by Franco Zeffirelli and starring Creator/ElizabethTaylor and Creator/RichardBurton is probably the most famous (and the source of the page image).

to:

The play was adapted to film several times; times. A 1929 version starred Hollywood power couple Creator/MaryPickford and Creator/DouglasFairbanks in her second talking film and his first, and the only film they appeared in together. Probably the most well-known adaptation is the 1967 version, directed by Franco Zeffirelli and starring another Hollywood power couple, Creator/ElizabethTaylor and Creator/RichardBurton is probably the most famous (and (it's the source of the page image).image).
13th Mar '17 11:46:31 AM jamespolk
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* TwoPlusTortureEqualsFive: For a very mild form of torture, anyway, but Petruchio ''does'' withhold food and drink in order to bring Kate to heel. The turning point comes when she submits to him and agrees with his insistence that it's 7 am and time to go out, when it's really no later than 2 am. Shortly thereafter she agrees with his insistence that the sun is really the moon and that an old man passing them on the road is really a young maid. Kate gives Petruchio no trouble thereafter.


Added DiffLines:

* RoofHopping: In the Zeffirelli version Kate tries to flee from Petruchio's wooing by roof hopping across the mansion. Petruchio gives chase, and they wind up falling into the storeroom (fortunately onto a load of cotton) when the roof gives way.
19th Dec '16 3:18:26 PM Eievie
Is there an issue? Send a Message


It's hard to find a story more prime for AlternativeCharacterInterpretation. Some readers see 'sweet' Bianca as a little manipulator who's got their father twisted 'round her finger, and Kate 'acts out' just to get some of his attention. It is also clear that, though it is the thought of a fat dowry that initially attracts him, Petruchio is also enchanted by Kate's quick wit. His challenge is to break what has become a conditioned reflex. Many adaptations do something to undercut the Kate-submits-to-Petruchio ending.

to:

It's hard to find a story more prime for AlternativeCharacterInterpretation. Some readers see 'sweet' "sweet" Bianca as a little manipulator who's got their father twisted 'round her finger, and Kate 'acts out' "acts out" just to get some of his attention. It is also clear that, though it is the thought of a fat dowry that initially attracts him, Petruchio is also enchanted by Kate's quick wit. His challenge is to break what has become a conditioned reflex. Many adaptations do something to undercut the Kate-submits-to-Petruchio ending.



* AluminumChristmasTrees: Tranio's father was a 'sail maker' from land-locked Bergamo. Bergamo is the nearest large city to Lake Iseo and close to Lake Como, creating a Bergamo boat-making and sail-making industry which started long before the 16th century and continues to this day.

to:

* AluminumChristmasTrees: Tranio's father was a 'sail maker' "sail maker" from land-locked Bergamo. Bergamo is the nearest large city to Lake Iseo and close to Lake Como, creating a Bergamo boat-making and sail-making industry which started long before the 16th century and continues to this day.



* BavarianFireDrill: Essentially how Tranio (disguised as Lucentio) dupes a random passerby and passes him off as Vincentio-- he asks the guy where he's from, and on his reply (Mantua) claims that the dukes of Mantua and Padua are feuding, and that any citizens of one city found in the other would be arrested and executed. It would've worked, too, [[ConfrontingYourImposter if the real Vincentio hadn't shown up.]]

to:

* BavarianFireDrill: Essentially how Tranio (disguised as Lucentio) dupes a random passerby and passes him off as Vincentio-- he Vincentio--he asks the guy where he's from, and on his reply (Mantua) claims that the dukes of Mantua and Padua are feuding, and that any citizens of one city found in the other would be arrested and executed. It would've worked, too, [[ConfrontingYourImposter if the real Vincentio hadn't shown up.]]



* InLoveWithYourCarnage: Petruchio is not at all put off by the fact that Kate has just ''broken a lute over someone's head'' - "Now, by the world, it is a lusty wench! I love her ten times more than ever."

to:

* InLoveWithYourCarnage: Petruchio is not at all put off by the fact that Kate has just ''broken a lute over someone's head'' - "Now, head''--"Now, by the world, it is a lusty wench! I love her ten times more than ever."



--> '''Lucentio''': Now, mistress, profit you in what you read?
--> '''Bianca''': What, master, read you? first resolve me that.
--> '''Lucentio''': I read what I profess, ''[[Creator/{{Ovid}} The Art to Love]]''.
--> '''Bianca''': And may you prove, sir, master of your art!

to:

--> '''Lucentio''': -->'''Lucentio''': Now, mistress, profit you in what you read?
-->
read?\\
'''Bianca''': What, master, read you? first resolve me that.
-->
that.\\
'''Lucentio''': I read what I profess, ''[[Creator/{{Ovid}} The Art to Love]]''.
-->
Love]]''.\\
'''Bianca''': And may you prove, sir, master of your art!
7th Oct '16 5:17:59 PM MartineBrooke
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* TheGloriousWarOfSisterlyRivalry: Kate even hits her sister, and binds her hands. Incestuous BDSM or what?!

to:

* TheGloriousWarOfSisterlyRivalry: Kate even hits her sister, and binds her hands. Incestuous BDSM or what?!
12th May '16 11:42:55 PM TheMorlock
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* BadBoss: Petruchio treats his servants pretty horribly.
28th Apr '16 10:50:18 PM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AbortedArc: The play starts off with a wealthy man deciding to pull a prank on a drunkard, by fooling him into thinking he's suffering from amnesia and is actually incredibly wealthy, and the play itself is provided for his amusement. After this, the entire setup is forgotten, and outside of one of them remarking on the play briefly as they're watching, this beginning is never brought up again.
** Probably the scenes resolving this subplot are lost to history, along with quite a bit of Shakespeare's work thanks to the fact that he didn't bother to preserve his plays himself in any form and many of the written texts of the period were bad knockoff versions penned by others. It's also been speculated that the frame story was added to the play later, probably by someone other than Shakespeare.
** In some collections, a resolution to the Christopher Sly arc IS added (though it's unclear whether it was actually written by Shakespeare or by someone else). In the ending in ''The Norton Shakespeare'', [[spoiler: Sly falls asleep before the end of the PlayWithinAPlay and the men dress him back up in his regular clothes and when he wakes up, he's back where they found him. He thinks it's a dream, and the bartender tells him that he should go home to his wife. Sly agrees, and muses that in the dream, he learned a thing or two about taming a shrew, and maybe he'll try it out]].
*** These scenes are from Taming of A Shrew, a play that, for complicated reasons, may either be based on or be a basis of Taming of THE Shrew. Much debate occurs over this stapling on of another (much worse) play's ending.



* ForgottenFramingDevice: The play starts off with a wealthy man deciding to pull a prank on the drunkard tinker Christopher Sly by fooling him into thinking he's suffering from amnesia and is actually incredibly wealthy, and the play itself is provided for his amusement. After this, the entire setup is forgotten, and outside of one of them remarking on the play briefly as they're watching, this beginning is never brought up again. Possibly the scenes resolving this subplot are lost to history, along with quite a bit of Shakespeare's work thanks to the fact that he didn't bother to preserve his plays himself in any form and many of the written texts of the period were bad knockoff versions penned by others. It's also been speculated that the frame story was added to the play later, probably by someone other than Shakespeare. These scenes are often left out of modern performances.



* FramingDevice: A drunken tinker has been made to believe that he is really a lord, and the play is being put on for his amusement.



* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: There's growing discussion among critics about the induction scenes with Christopher Sly -- which starts the play and intermingles with it, then disappears and gets forgotten about. These scenes are often left out of modern performances.
28th Mar '16 8:17:56 AM somerandomdude
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* WouldHitAGirl: Petruchio's "I swear I'll cuff you if you strike again." (Kate counters by telling him he'll be no gentleman if he does so, and it's never brought up again, as they just continue their punning)

to:

* WouldHitAGirl: Petruchio's "I swear I'll cuff you if you strike again." (Kate counters by telling him he'll be no gentleman if he does so, and it's never brought up again, as they just continue their punning)punning[[note]]Of course, the threat could also be interpreted as her threatening to cut his arms off.[[/note]])
This list shows the last 10 events of 116. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Theatre.TheTamingOfTheShrew