History Theatre / TheMusicMan

14th Jun '17 8:10:52 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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''This page has "Trouble" with a "T", and that rhymes with "D", and that stands for "[[DescribeTopicHere Describe The Music Man Here]]".''

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''This This page has "Trouble" with tropes {{with a "T", capital T}}, and that rhymes with "D", and that stands for "[[DescribeTopicHere Describe The "{{Describe|TopicHere}} ''The Music Man Here]]".''
Man'' Here!"
6th Jun '17 11:49:03 AM CaptEquinox
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** Not too weird. Soda fountains have been around since about 1800 and were insanely popular by 1912. There was no place that did not have them. The operator was a "soda jerk", because they pulled a lever to dispense soda water which would then be mixed with different flavors (like a sno-cone). It could get very elaborate. Today's coffee places and baristas are their descendants.
14th May '17 10:49:59 PM Drcynic24
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* AntiVillain: Mayor George Shinn, who comes across as the bad guy, but after all is only trying to expose a con artist.

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* AntiVillain: Mayor George Shinn, who comes across as the bad guy, but after all is only trying to expose a con artist. He's also a bit too much of a boob to be completely unlikable.
21st Apr '17 10:35:04 AM PaulA
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* UsefulNotes/BarbershopMusic: Easily the most famous barbershop quartet in popular culture, played onstage and onscreen by the 1950 International Champion Quartet, The Buffalo Bills.
18th Apr '17 10:43:07 AM hummedwithmystery
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* ACappella: Both the stage play and the film. Professor Harold Hill teaches the four squabbling members of the school board to sing Barbershop. All of their performances from then on are a capella. (In both the original production and the film, the School Board was played by [[NamesTheSame The Buffalo Bills]], the 1950 International Quartet Champions of the Society for the Preservation and Encouragement of Barber Shop Quartet Singing in America (SPEBSQSA).) All the other songs, performed by anyone else, have orchestral accompaniment (with the exception of "Rock Hill", [[ThrowItIn the result of a late pianist during one rehearsal]]).

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* ACappella: Both the stage play and the film. Professor Harold Hill teaches the four squabbling members of the school board to sing Barbershop.[[UsefulNotes/BarbershopMusic barbershop]]. All of their performances from then on are a capella. (In both the original production and the film, the School Board was played by [[NamesTheSame The Buffalo Bills]], the 1950 International Quartet Champions of the Society for the Preservation and Encouragement of Barber Shop Quartet Singing in America (SPEBSQSA).) All the other songs, performed by anyone else, have orchestral accompaniment (with the exception of "Rock Hill", [[ThrowItIn the result of a late pianist during one rehearsal]]).



* UsefulNotes/BarbershopMusic: Easily the most famous barbershop quartet in popular culture, played onstage and onscreen by the 1950 International Champion Quartet, The Buffalo Bills.



* MusicalisInterruptus: Inverted repeatedly by Professor Hill who distracts the School Board from seeking his credentials by forming them into a barbershop quartet.

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* MusicalisInterruptus: Inverted repeatedly by Professor Hill who distracts the School Board from seeking his credentials by forming them into a [[UsefulNotes/BarbershopMusic barbershop quartet.quartet]].
5th Jan '17 4:24:21 AM PaulA
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* ACappella: Both the stage play and the film. Professor Harold Hill teaches the four squabbling members of the school board to sing Barbershop. All of their performances from then on are a capella. "Rock Hill" is the only song not by these character to be performed this way, [[ThrowItIn the result of a late pianist during one rehearsal]]. All the other songs, performed by anyone else, have orchestral accompaniment. (In both the original production and the film, the School Board was played by [[NamesTheSame The Buffalo Bills]], the 1950 International Quartet Champions of the Society for the Preservation and Encouragement of Barber Shop Quartet Singing in America (SPEBSQSA).)

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* ACappella: Both the stage play and the film. Professor Harold Hill teaches the four squabbling members of the school board to sing Barbershop. All of their performances from then on are a capella. "Rock Hill" is the only song not by these character to be performed this way, [[ThrowItIn the result of a late pianist during one rehearsal]]. All the other songs, performed by anyone else, have orchestral accompaniment. (In both the original production and the film, the School Board was played by [[NamesTheSame The Buffalo Bills]], the 1950 International Quartet Champions of the Society for the Preservation and Encouragement of Barber Shop Quartet Singing in America (SPEBSQSA).)) All the other songs, performed by anyone else, have orchestral accompaniment (with the exception of "Rock Hill", [[ThrowItIn the result of a late pianist during one rehearsal]]).



* PatterSong: "Rock Island" and "Ya Got Trouble" are two of the most famous examples in 20th century music.

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* PatterSong: "Rock Island" and "Ya Got Trouble" are two of the most famous examples in 20th century music.Trouble".
4th Jan '17 5:03:02 PM NWolfman
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* ACappella: Both the stage play and the film. Professor Harold Hill teaches the four squabbling members of the school board to sing Barbershop. All of their performances from then on are a capella. All the other songs, performed by anyone else, have orchestral accompaniment. (In both the original production and the film, the School Board was played by [[NamesTheSame The Buffalo Bills]], the 1950 International Quartet Champions of the Society for the Preservation and Encouragement of Barber Shop Quartet Singing in America (SPEBSQSA).)

to:

* ACappella: Both the stage play and the film. Professor Harold Hill teaches the four squabbling members of the school board to sing Barbershop. All of their performances from then on are a capella. "Rock Hill" is the only song not by these character to be performed this way, [[ThrowItIn the result of a late pianist during one rehearsal]]. All the other songs, performed by anyone else, have orchestral accompaniment. (In both the original production and the film, the School Board was played by [[NamesTheSame The Buffalo Bills]], the 1950 International Quartet Champions of the Society for the Preservation and Encouragement of Barber Shop Quartet Singing in America (SPEBSQSA).)
4th Jan '17 4:58:05 PM NWolfman
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* PatterSong: "Rock Island" and "Ya Got Trouble" are two of the most famous examples in 20th century music.
4th Jan '17 4:43:36 PM NWolfman
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* HideYourPregnancy: The movie had to shoot around Shirley Jones's pregnancy, getting as many full-body shots out of the way as quickly as they could before she began to show. When she and Robert Preston filmed "Till There Was You," on one take he accidentally bumped into her... well, bump, asking "What was that?" to which she replied "My son." Years later, Preston was introduced to Jones's then-grown son and joked that they had already met.
4th Jan '17 4:43:21 PM NWolfman
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* HideYourPregnancy: The movie had to shoot around Shirley Jones's pregnancy, getting as many full-body shots out of the way as quickly as they could before she began to show. When she and Robert Preston filmed "Till There Was You," on one take he accidentally bumped into her... well, bump, asking "What was that?" to which she replied "My son." Years later, Preston was introduced to Jones's then-grown son and joked that they had already met.
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