History Theatre / TheMiracleWorker

28th Sep '17 5:56:00 PM eroock
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* HandSignals: Helen’s most effective means of communication before learning language. Most notably, she strokes her cheek to indicate that she wants her mother, and adults nod or shake their heads against her hand to indicate yes or no. (She had over ''sixty'' such signs (they're called home signs) long before Annie arrived.)

to:

* HandSignals: Helen’s Helen's most effective means of communication before learning language. Most notably, she strokes her cheek to indicate that she wants her mother, and adults nod or shake their heads against her hand to indicate yes or no. (She had over ''sixty'' such signs (they're called home signs) long before Annie arrived.)



* NonverbalMiscommunication: Most of Helen’s attempts to express her wants and needs are either misunderstood or disregarded by those around her. Conversely, she understands very little of what her family tries to tell her.
* PragmaticAdaptation: Of the early part of Helen Keller’s autobiography.

to:

* NonverbalMiscommunication: Most of Helen’s Helen's attempts to express her wants and needs are either misunderstood or disregarded by those around her. Conversely, she understands very little of what her family tries to tell her.
* PragmaticAdaptation: Of the early part of Helen Keller’s Keller's autobiography.



* ShownTheirWork: Much of the play is taken directly from Helen Keller’s autobiography and Anne Sullivan’s letters. The letters are occasionally used as monologue for Anne's character.

to:

* ShownTheirWork: Much of the play is taken directly from Helen Keller’s Keller's autobiography and Anne Sullivan’s Sullivan's letters. The letters are occasionally used as monologue for Anne's character.
27th Sep '17 9:27:46 PM CaptEquinox
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* EurekaMoment: Just as described in Helen Keller's autobiography, feeling water from a pump as Annie spells out the word causes her to suddenly make the connection that everything around her has a name, and her finger game has actually been teaching her a language.

to:

* EurekaMoment: Just as described in Helen Keller's autobiography, feeling water from a pump as Annie spells out the word causes her to suddenly make the connection that the symbols ''are'' the things; everything around her has a name, and her finger game has actually been teaching her a language.



* HandSignals: Helen’s most effective means of communication before learning language. Most notably, she strokes her cheek to indicate that she wants her mother, and adults nod or shake their heads against her hand to indicate yes or no.

to:

* HandSignals: Helen’s most effective means of communication before learning language. Most notably, she strokes her cheek to indicate that she wants her mother, and adults nod or shake their heads against her hand to indicate yes or no. (She had over ''sixty'' such signs (they're called home signs) long before Annie arrived.)



* TemptingFate: On their second encounter, Annie tells Helen she's a "very good girl" upon which the latter smashes a vase on the floor.

to:

* TemptingFate: On their second encounter, Annie shows Helen the difference between "bad girl" (with a nasty face) and "good girl" (with a big bright artificial smile). She tells Helen she's a "very "''very'' good girl" upon which the latter smashes a vase on the floor.floor. (She's apparently trying to ask if this too is "bad girl", to which Annie signals that it is.)
10th Sep '17 4:49:45 AM jormis29
Is there an issue? Send a Message


There have been three movie adaptations. The best known is the 1962 version, with Anne Bancroft and Patty Duke assuming their Broadway roles. Both actresses won Oscars for their roles; Bancroft for Best Leading Actress and Duke for Best Supporting Actress (who at 16, was the youngest Oscar winner at the time). In 1979, Patty Duke took on the role of Anne Sullivan and Melissa Gilbert played Helen. In 2000, Disney took its shot at the story, with Alison Elliott and Hallie Kate Eisenberg. The 1979 and 2000 versions were released direct to TV.

to:

There have been three movie adaptations. The best known is the 1962 version, with Anne Bancroft and Patty Duke Creator/PattyDuke assuming their Broadway roles. Both actresses won Oscars for their roles; Bancroft for Best Leading Actress and Duke for Best Supporting Actress (who at 16, was the youngest Oscar winner at the time). In 1979, Patty Duke took on the role of Anne Sullivan and Melissa Gilbert played Helen. In 2000, Disney took its shot at the story, with Alison Elliott and Hallie Kate Eisenberg. The 1979 and 2000 versions were released direct to TV.
9th Sep '17 3:33:50 PM Premonition45
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The play premiered in 1957 in a ''Playhouse 90'' broadcast. In 1959, it was shown on Broadway with Creator/AnneBancroft as Annie Sullivan and [[Series/ThePattyDukeShow Patty Duke]] as Helen Keller. In 1961 it was performed in London’s West End starring Anna Massey and Janina Faye.

to:

The play premiered in 1957 in a ''Playhouse 90'' broadcast. In 1959, it was shown on Broadway with Creator/AnneBancroft as Annie Sullivan and [[Series/ThePattyDukeShow Patty Duke]] Creator/PattyDuke as Helen Keller. In 1961 it was performed in London’s West End starring Anna Massey and Janina Faye.
27th Jun '17 5:27:18 AM JamesAustin
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[quoteright:187:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/MiracleWorker_3547.jpg]]

to:

[[quoteright:187:http://static.[[quoteright:300:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/MiracleWorker_3547.jpg]]
org/pmwiki/pub/images/miracle_worker_3547.jpg]]



-->'''The Captain''': Miss Sullivan, do you like the child?
-->'''Annie''': Do you?
* BasedOnATrueStory: Dramatization strength

to:

-->'''The Captain''': Captain:''' Miss Sullivan, do you like the child?
-->'''Annie''': -->'''Annie:''' Do you?
* BasedOnATrueStory: Dramatization strengthstrength.
25th May '17 5:04:37 PM Pren
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* EurekaMoment: Just as described in Helen Keller's autobiography, feeling water from a pump as Annie spells out the word causes her to suddenly make the connection that everything around her has a name, and her finger game has actually been teaching her a language.
18th Sep '16 2:13:06 AM eroock
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* TeethFlying: Annie spits out a tooth after getting smashed in the face by Helen.
17th Sep '16 3:07:47 PM eroock
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* DeadpanSnarker: Anne, James and Captain Keller
--> '''Helen''':''(to James)'' Spanish monks under a vow of silence, which I wish you'd take!



* JerkWithAHeartOfGold: James Keller starts off the film as an apparent {{JerkAss}} who cares little for his half-sister, recommending that she be sent off to an asylum, and is rather condescending to Anne in his reference to her as someone else "to look after" after discovering that she's partially blind. That said, as the film goes on and Helen's gradual process in communicating becomes clear, James softens somewhat and sees Anne's presence as beneficial. It gets to the point where, right after his father insists on having her removed again in the film's climax, James actually defends Anne's methods and [[CallingTheOldManOut calls his father out]] on finally being wrong for once in his life.
17th Sep '16 3:07:00 PM eroock
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* RealityIsUnrealistic: Some viewers consider it unrealistic that Helen is portrayed saying “wah-wah” to mean “water” when she was too young to learn to speak before her illness. However, according to her autobiography, Helen was 19 months old and had begun to speak when she became sick. She did indeed say “wah-wah” and claimed that she retained that word for a long time after most memory of speech had faded.

to:

* RealityIsUnrealistic: Some viewers consider it unrealistic that Helen is portrayed saying “wah-wah” "wah-wah" to mean “water” when she was too young to learn to speak before her illness. However, according to her autobiography, Helen was 19 months old and had begun to speak when she became sick. She did indeed say “wah-wah” "wah-wah" and claimed that she retained that word for a long time after most memory of speech had faded.
17th Sep '16 3:06:32 PM eroock
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* DontYouDarePityMe: Annie tells Kate not to pity her, despite the fact that Annie had grown up in an almhouse, because it made her strong.



* MaidenAunt: Aunt Ev
* {{Mammy}}: Viney

to:

* LivingDollCollector: Anne Sullivan describes her own time in the orphan asylum/poor house growing up as a child. She and her brother lived in the room where the babies of prostitutes were kept until they died (of the STD's they contracted from their mothers), and were kept there until burial. She and her brother would play with them. It's unclear from the script if they stopped playing with them after they were dead.
* MaidenAunt: Aunt Ev
Ev.
* {{Mammy}}: VineyViney.



* PragmaticAdaptation: Of the early part of Helen Keller’s autobiography

to:

* PragmaticAdaptation: Of the early part of Helen Keller’s autobiographyautobiography.
* PsychoLesbian: Alluded to in Annie's talk about the asylum she grew up in: "The asylum? [...] There were [...] some of the kind that keep after other girls, especially the young ones."


Added DiffLines:

* TooHungryToBePolite: Helen Keller is portrayed as having had no table manners to speak of prior to the arrival of her teacher, Annie Sullivan.
This list shows the last 10 events of 26. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Theatre.TheMiracleWorker