History Theatre / TheMagicFlute

18th Dec '15 4:46:10 AM MangaShoggoth
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** Also played with: Papageno and Monastos flee from each other, believing the other being the devil (Papageno has never seen a black man before, Monastos because Papageno's appearance is really outlandish). Papageno actually is the first to recover, in one adaptation commenting "There are black birds, why shouldn't there be black men?"

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** Also played with: Papageno and Monastos Monostatos flee from each other, believing the other being the devil (Papageno has never seen a black man before, Monastos Monostatos because Papageno's appearance is really outlandish). Papageno actually is the first to recover, in one adaptation commenting "There are black birds, why shouldn't there be black men?"
18th Dec '15 4:44:35 AM MangaShoggoth
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** Also played with: Papageno and Monastos flee from each other, believing the other being the devil (Papageno has never seen a black man before, Monastos because Papageno's appearance is really outlandish). Papageno actually is the first to recover, in one adaptation commenting "There are black birds, why shouldn't there be black men?"
26th May '15 7:06:57 PM Alberich
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* MacGuffin: the Magic Flute itself, which is only played a couple of times
** More importantly the Sevenfold Circle of the Sun. To acquire it, The Queen of the Night urges her daughter Pamina to kill Sarastro.

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* MacGuffin: the Magic Flute itself, which is only played a couple of times
** More importantly the
The Sevenfold Circle of the Sun. To acquire it, The Queen of the Night urges her daughter Pamina to kill Sarastro.
5th May '15 7:06:31 PM ShinyTsukkomi
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The last opera WolfgangAmadeusMozart ever wrote (''La clemenza di Tito'' was composed after the Flute was started, but before its completion), right after he was initiated into the Freemasons; the libretto is thus rife with that organization's symbolism. '''''The Magic Flute''''' is actually closer to our understanding of a {{Musical}} than {{Opera}}: it is generally as seen as LighterAndSofter than, say, Creator/RichardWagner's ''[[Theatre/DerRingDesNibelungen The Ring of the Nibelung]]'', and deals more with the themes of ignorance versus wisdom and the virtues of love and family rather than the fall of the gods and the end of the world. Also, being a "''singspiel''," it has dialogue, not just singing. To make a long story short, this was the Mozartian equivalent of ''Theatre/JosephAndTheAmazingTechnicolorDreamcoat'', with which it shares a similar level of popularity within its genre.

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The last opera WolfgangAmadeusMozart Creator/WolfgangAmadeusMozart ever wrote (''La clemenza di Tito'' was composed after the Flute was started, but before its completion), right after he was initiated into the Freemasons; the libretto is thus rife with that organization's symbolism. '''''The Magic Flute''''' is actually closer to our understanding of a {{Musical}} than {{Opera}}: it is generally as seen as LighterAndSofter than, say, Creator/RichardWagner's ''[[Theatre/DerRingDesNibelungen The Ring of the Nibelung]]'', and deals more with the themes of ignorance versus wisdom and the virtues of love and family rather than the fall of the gods and the end of the world. Also, being a "''singspiel''," it has dialogue, not just singing. To make a long story short, this was the Mozartian equivalent of ''Theatre/JosephAndTheAmazingTechnicolorDreamcoat'', with which it shares a similar level of popularity within its genre.
14th Dec '14 10:46:53 AM Jeduthun
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* PatterSong: "Pa-pa-pa-papagena."
30th Nov '14 9:24:48 AM Alberich
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Pamina, bereft of her beloved, decides to kill herself. Fortunately, the Three Young Boys intervene and take her to Tamino, who can now apologize; Pamina is so overjoyed that she doesn't even make him sleep on the couch. Next, Papageno attempts the same thing, only to be saved by the [[DeusExMachina Three Young Boys]] and united with his no-longer-disguised-as-a-squishy-old-woman Papagena. Finally, the Queen of the Night, Monostatos and the Three Ladies attempt to attack the Temple, only to be... umm... Well, ''some''thing happens that takes them out of contention. But whatever, the bad guys die a lot, and both couples have their HappyEnding as the curtain falls.

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Pamina, bereft of her beloved, decides to kill herself. Fortunately, the Three Young Boys intervene and take her to Tamino, who can now apologize; Pamina is so overjoyed that she doesn't even make him sleep on the couch. Next, Papageno attempts the same thing, only to be saved by the [[DeusExMachina Three Young Boys]] and united with his no-longer-disguised-as-a-squishy-old-woman Papagena. Finally, the Queen of the Night, Monostatos and the Three Ladies attempt to attack the Temple, only to be... umm... Well, ''some''thing happens that takes them out of contention.have their power broken and to be cast into eternal night. But whatever, the bad guys die a lot, and both couples have their HappyEnding as the curtain falls.
30th Nov '14 9:22:47 AM Alberich
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Once the {{Intermission}} is over, Sarastro declares that Tamino and Papageno will have to undergo some [[OnlyTheWorthyMayPass character tests]] before he can let Pamina marry. Tamino, in the throes of love, agrees; Papageno needs to be bribed with the possibility of a LoveInterest of his own -- one who happens to be named Papagena. The main test is that both men need to be silent when confronted by women -- which, of course, is PlayedForDrama when one of the women who visits them is Pamina, leaving the chamber with the conclusion that Tamino no longer loves her. Papageno also gets the {{Squick}} of his life when a really old woman arrives and declares herself Papagena, his bride-to-be. (Of course, she's secretly a hot young woman in disguise, which just makes Papageno even more paranoid once this is revealed to him.) Finally, Monostatos sings his [[IWantSong I-Want-Pamina Song]] and eventually {{Face Heel Turn}}s over to the Queen of the Night. She performs an aria famous for its fantastically high glass-shattering notes in which she threatens to disown Pamina unless she kills Sarastro.

to:

Once the {{Intermission}} is over, Sarastro declares that Tamino and Papageno will have to undergo some [[OnlyTheWorthyMayPass character tests]] before he can let Pamina marry. Tamino, in the throes of love, agrees; Papageno needs to be bribed with the possibility of a LoveInterest of his own -- one who happens to be named Papagena. The main test is that both men need to be silent when confronted by women -- which, of course, is PlayedForDrama when one of the women who visits them is Pamina, leaving the chamber with the conclusion that Tamino no longer loves her. Papageno also gets the {{Squick}} of his life when a really old woman arrives and declares herself Papagena, his bride-to-be. (Of course, she's secretly a hot young woman in disguise, which just makes Papageno even more paranoid once this is revealed to him.) Finally, Monostatos sings his [[IWantSong I-Want-Pamina Song]] and eventually {{Face Heel Turn}}s over to [[VillainTeamUp joins forces]] with the Queen of the Night. She performs an aria famous for its fantastically high glass-shattering notes in which she threatens to disown Pamina unless she kills Sarastro.
28th Nov '14 6:32:34 PM Alberich
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* [[WhatDoYouMeanItsNotAllegorical What do you mean, it's not allegorical?}}: Tamino is the human soul seeking enlightenment; Pamina is the Spirit of Enlightenment; the Queen of the Night is the Roman Catholic Church; Sarastro is Freemasonry. The Spirit of Enlightenment originally lived with the Church, but when the Church became more interested in power and wealth than the pursuit of wisdom, it was taken from her and went to live with the Freemasons.
28th Nov '14 6:31:58 PM Alberich
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* WriteWhoYouKnow: It's common belief that Mozart wrote Papageno, a cheerful, [[AttentionDeficitOohShiny easily-distracted]] fellow who falls in love with any woman he meets, based directly on himself.
** Alternately, he was based on Mozart's friend Emanuel Schikaneder, whom Mozart personally described almost word for word as Papageno is normally played... and who originated the part on stage.
** And the role of The Queen was originally played by Mozart's sister-in-law Josepha Weber, who, according to Mozart, was a cold and unpleasant person and only needed to "play herself".
*** In [[Amadeus]] there's a memorable scene in which Mozart's [[mother-in-law-from-Hell]] is telling him off and in the midst of her tirade she turns into the Queen of the Night.
** In a more musical example, Sarastro's vocal lines are quite simple, making the role accessible to a larger number of deep-voiced men, who are something of a minority to begin with. (It isn't known if Mozart wrote this way ''because'' all he had to hand was a bumbling James Earl Jones, but production managers have been thanking him ever since.)
28th Nov '14 6:24:33 PM Alberich
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* FireWaterJuxtaposition: The final test of Tamino and Pamina is to pass through banks of fire and water (though the guardians sing a duet implying all four elements are involved).
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