History Theatre / SwanLake

3rd Nov '15 6:43:54 PM RoseAndHeather
Is there an issue? Send a Message


http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/SwanLake.jpg
28th May '15 8:24:17 PM lalalei2001
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ActingForTwo: Odette and Odile are traditionally played by the same ballerina as they have to resemble each other. Some productions cast two women in the roles, which leaves room for Odile to have a part in the finale
11th May '15 9:24:26 PM Patachou
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* NoCelebritiesWereHarmed: Prince Siegfried is said to be based on KingLudwigII, the nineteenth century Bavarian monarch often referred to as "the Swan King."

to:

* NoCelebritiesWereHarmed: Prince Siegfried is said to be based on KingLudwigII, King UsefulNotes/LudwigIIOfBavaria, the nineteenth century Bavarian monarch often referred to as "the Swan King."
26th Dec '14 3:22:51 AM Patachou
Is there an issue? Send a Message


'''''[[color:#191970: Swan Lake]]''''' (Russian: ''Лебединое Озеро, Lebedinoye Ozero'') is a ballet, by PyotrIlyichTchaikovsky , composed 1875-1876. The scenario, initially in four acts, by Vladimir Begichev and Vasiliy Geltser was fashioned from Russian folk tales as well as an ancient German legend, which tells the story of Odette, a girl turned into a swan by an evil sorcerer's curse. The choreographer of the original production was Julius Reisinger. The ballet received its premiere on February 27, 1877, at the Bolshoi Theatre in Moscow as ''Le lac des cygnes'' ("The Lake of the Swans"), French being the language of the Imperial Russian court. Although it is presented in many different versions, most ballet companies base their stagings both choreographically and musically on the 1895 revival of Marius Petipa and Lev Ivanov, first staged for the Imperial Ballet on January 15, 1895, at the Mariinsky Theatre in St. Petersburg, Russia. For this revival, Tchaikovsky's score was revised by the St. Petersburg Imperial Theatre's chief conductor and composer Riccardo Drigo.

Many critics have disputed the original source of the ''Swan Lake'' story. The Russian ballet patriarch Fyodor Lopukhov has called ''Swan Lake'' a "national ballet" due to the swans which are common in Russian romantic lyrics, while many of the movements of the ''corps de ballet'' originated from Slavonic ring-dances. According to Lopukhov, "both the plot of Swan Lake (despite the fact that it is based on German source), the image of the Swan, and the very idea of a faithful love are essentially Russian". Though the scenario is (as in the case of ''Theatre/TheNutcracker'') tenuously based on a story by a German author, in this case Johann Karl August Musäus' ''Der geraubte Schleier'' ("The Stolen Veil"), this provides only the general outline of the plot; the Russian folktale "Literature/TheWhiteDuck" also bears some resemblance to the story of the ballet and might have been another possible source. The contemporaries of Tchaikovsky recalled the composer taking great interest in the life story of [[KingLudwigII Ludwig II]], the Bavarian King and Count Palatine of the Rhine, who was constantly associated with the symbol of the Swan, and whom "whether consciously or not" Tchaikovsky chose as the prototype of the dream-haunted Prince Siegfried.

to:

'''''[[color:#191970: Swan Lake]]''''' (Russian: ''Лебединое Озеро, Lebedinoye Ozero'') is a ballet, by PyotrIlyichTchaikovsky Music/PyotrIlyichTchaikovsky , composed 1875-1876. The scenario, initially in four acts, by Vladimir Begichev and Vasiliy Geltser was fashioned from Russian folk tales as well as an ancient German legend, which tells the story of Odette, a girl turned into a swan by an evil sorcerer's curse. The choreographer of the original production was Julius Reisinger. The ballet received its premiere on February 27, 1877, at the Bolshoi Theatre in Moscow as ''Le lac des cygnes'' ("The Lake of the Swans"), French being the language of the Imperial Russian court. Although it is presented in many different versions, most ballet companies base their stagings both choreographically and musically on the 1895 revival of Marius Petipa and Lev Ivanov, first staged for the Imperial Ballet on January 15, 1895, at the Mariinsky Theatre in St. Petersburg, Russia. For this revival, Tchaikovsky's score was revised by the St. Petersburg Imperial Theatre's chief conductor and composer Riccardo Drigo.

Many critics have disputed the original source of the ''Swan Lake'' story. The Russian ballet patriarch Fyodor Lopukhov has called ''Swan Lake'' a "national ballet" due to the swans which are common in Russian romantic lyrics, while many of the movements of the ''corps de ballet'' originated from Slavonic ring-dances. According to Lopukhov, "both the plot of Swan Lake (despite the fact that it is based on German source), the image of the Swan, and the very idea of a faithful love are essentially Russian". Though the scenario is (as in the case of ''Theatre/TheNutcracker'') tenuously based on a story by a German author, in this case Johann Karl August Musäus' ''Der geraubte Schleier'' ("The Stolen Veil"), this provides only the general outline of the plot; the Russian folktale "Literature/TheWhiteDuck" also bears some resemblance to the story of the ballet and might have been another possible source. The contemporaries of Tchaikovsky recalled the composer taking great interest in the life story of [[KingLudwigII [[UsefulNotes/LudwigIIOfBavaria Ludwig II]], the Bavarian King and Count Palatine of the Rhine, who was constantly associated with the symbol of the Swan, and whom "whether consciously or not" Tchaikovsky chose as the prototype of the dream-haunted Prince Siegfried.
2nd Dec '14 5:24:17 AM CartoonBrewMonkey
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* WickedStepmother: The original production had given one to Odette to be the main villain (though [[AllThereInTheManual production material suggests that Odette was turned into a swan to protect her from the witch rather than being cursed directly by her]]). Rothbart and Odile are her mininons. Obviously, most productions avert this by making Rothbart the main villain.
19th Oct '14 5:39:41 PM Yoonique
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/KamenRiderDenO'', the Imagin Sieg got his image from Prince Siegfried.
10th Mar '14 6:35:07 AM Orihime
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Anime/KaleidoStar'' used SwanLake as the basis for a circus show in the second season.

to:

* ''Anime/KaleidoStar'' used SwanLake as the basis for a circus show in the second season. It turns out to be a LighterAndSofter adaptation that has [[spoiler: Sora as a bright Odette [[SparedByTheAdaptation who lives through all]], Leon as a DefrostingIceKing Siegfried who manages to play out the ''Angelic Maneuvre'' with Sora, and May as an {{Anti Villain}}ous Odile who [[HeelFaceTurn ultimately is saved too]].]]



* AntiVillain: Some productions portray Odile as a sympathetic or even tragic figure.



* BittersweetEnding: [[spoiler: When Siegfried accidentally confesses his love to Odile, he seals Odette's fate: her spell is now unbreakable. Odette, doomed to swan form perpetually, leaps into the lake and drowns herself. Unwilling to live without her, Siegfried follows suit and the two [[TogetherInDeath die together]]. Sometimes, the two are shown rising to heaven in an apotheosis.]] In some versions of the ballet, this is [[spoiler:changed to a happy ending, where Odette lives and she and the other swans are freed from their captivity, and sometimes this includes Odile being redeemed as well.]]

to:

* BittersweetEnding: [[spoiler: When Siegfried accidentally confesses his love to Odile, he seals Odette's fate: her spell is now unbreakable. Odette, doomed to swan form perpetually, [[DrivenToSuicide leaps into the lake and drowns herself.herself]]. Unwilling to live without her, Siegfried follows suit and the two [[TogetherInDeath die together]]. Sometimes, the two are shown rising to heaven in an apotheosis.]] In some versions of the ballet, this is [[spoiler:changed to a happy ending, where Odette lives and she and the other swans are freed from their captivity, and sometimes this includes a [[AntiVillain more sympathetic role]] for an Odile being [[HeelFaceTurn who is redeemed as well.well]].]]



* {{Disneyfication}}: Depending on the staging, the BittersweetEnding may be changed to HappilyEverAfter. The same change was made in the animated feature ''WesternAnimation/TheSwanPrincess'', a direct example applied to the ballet's plot. Interestingly, this appears to have been the original ending of the ballet, with more bittersweet versions being later additions to the story.

to:

* {{Disneyfication}}: Depending on the staging, the BittersweetEnding may be changed to HappilyEverAfter. The same change was made in the animated feature ''WesternAnimation/TheSwanPrincess'', a direct example applied to the ballet's plot. Interestingly, this appears to have been the original ''original'' ending of the ballet, with more bittersweet versions being later additions to the story.



* TheVamp: Odile, though some versions [[HiddenDepths make her more sympathetic]] and thus a BrokenBird FemmeFatale instead.

to:

* TheVamp: Odile, though some versions [[HiddenDepths make her more sympathetic]] and thus she becomes a mix of BrokenBird and FemmeFatale instead.
5th Mar '14 7:17:47 PM Miriam
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* EverythingsBetterWithSpinning: In one of the ballet's most famous moments, Odile executes thirty-two fouettés while seducing the Prince.
14th Dec '13 8:02:35 AM Thornfield13713
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* {{Disneyfication}}: Depending on the staging, the BittersweetEnding may be changed to HappilyEverAfter. The same change was made in the animated feature ''WesternAnimation/TheSwanPrincess'', a direct example applied to the ballet's plot.

to:

* {{Disneyfication}}: Depending on the staging, the BittersweetEnding may be changed to HappilyEverAfter. The same change was made in the animated feature ''WesternAnimation/TheSwanPrincess'', a direct example applied to the ballet's plot. Interestingly, this appears to have been the original ending of the ballet, with more bittersweet versions being later additions to the story.
30th Nov '13 4:36:30 PM lalalei2001
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ClipItsWings: In happy endings, von Rothbart's power is broken at the end by tearing off one or both of his wings.

to:

* ClipItsWings: In happy endings, von Rothbart's power is usually broken at the end by tearing off one or both of his wings.
This list shows the last 10 events of 64. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Theatre.SwanLake