History Theatre / RomeoAndJuliet

5th Dec '17 7:44:52 PM nombretomado
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* DianaWynneJones used the story as a subplot in ''The Magicians of Caprona'' in which the feuding families of Casa Montana and Casa Petrocchi eventually learn that two of their younger members have fallen in love with each other.

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* DianaWynneJones Creator/DianaWynneJones used the story as a subplot in ''The Magicians of Caprona'' in which the feuding families of Casa Montana and Casa Petrocchi eventually learn that two of their younger members have fallen in love with each other.
3rd Dec '17 7:31:37 PM DrOO7
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Added DiffLines:

* ''The Spruces And The Pines'', an Creator/{{ION}} Channel Christmas movie, which has two young people falling in love despite the long-running feud between their families, who happen to own rival Christmas tree farms.
23rd Nov '17 5:23:29 PM PaulA
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* EmoTeen: Romeo is this at first, moping around and reciting emo poetry because of his unrequited love for Rosaline. He improves upon meeting Juliet, but when he has to be separated from her, he gets even worse than he was at the beginning.
** It is also worth noting that the metaphors Romeo uses to express his infatuation with Rosaline were ''very'' over-used cliches in Shakespeare's time. But as soon as he starts describing Juliet, his poetry get far more original and interesting.

to:

* EmoTeen: Romeo is this at first, moping around and reciting emo poetry because of his unrequited love for Rosaline. He improves upon meeting Juliet, but when he has to be separated from her, he gets even worse than he was at the beginning.
**
beginning. It is also worth noting that the metaphors Romeo uses to express his infatuation with Rosaline were ''very'' over-used cliches in Shakespeare's time. But as soon as he starts describing Juliet, his poetry get gets far more original and interesting. interesting.
23rd Nov '17 1:02:27 PM TheGreatConversation
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** Mercutio provides some in-universe as he dies.

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** Mercutio provides some in-universe as he dies.



-->O, I am Fortune's fool!

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-->O, -->'''Romeo:''' O, I am Fortune's fool!



* DueToTheDead: Romeo honors Paris' request to lay him beside Juliet, after having killed him because Paris thought that Romeo was coming to do the evil version of this trope.

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* DueToTheDead: Romeo honors Paris' Paris's request to lay him beside Juliet, after having killed him because Paris thought that Romeo was coming to do the evil version of this trope.



** It is also worth noting that Romeo's lines regarding his obsession with Rosaline were ''very'' over-used cliches in Shakespeare's time. But as soon as he starts describing Juliet, his lines get far more original and poetic.

to:

** It is also worth noting that Romeo's lines regarding the metaphors Romeo uses to express his obsession infatuation with Rosaline were ''very'' over-used cliches in Shakespeare's time. But as soon as he starts describing Juliet, his lines poetry get far more original and poetic.interesting.



* TheFightingNarcissist: Mercutio's description of Tybalt's ornate fighting style implies that Tybalt may fit this trope. Given Mercutio's tendency to criticize others for flaws in himself, he could easily be one as well.

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* TheFightingNarcissist: Mercutio's description of Tybalt's ornate fighting style implies that Tybalt may fit this trope. Given Mercutio's [[{{Hypocrite}} tendency to criticize others for flaws in himself, himself}}, he could easily be one as well.



** According to the guest list, she is in attendance at Capulet's feast, and some productions make her an obvious presence there.

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** According to the guest list, she is in attendance at Capulet's feast, and some productions make her an a more obvious presence there.



* InspirationNod: In Act II, Mercutio sarcastically disses several mythical {{Love Interest}}s, including Thisbe, heroine of ''Pyramus and Thisbe'', a much earlier version of the ''Romeo and Juliet'' story.

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* InspirationNod: In Act II, Mercutio sarcastically disses several mythical {{Love Interest}}s, including Thisbe, heroine of ''Pyramus and Thisbe'', a much earlier older version of the ''Romeo and Juliet'' story.



* MasterSwordsman: Tybalt lives by his blade. His devotion to ornate classical fighting styles drives Mercutio ''crazy''.

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* MasterSwordsman: Tybalt lives by his blade. His Tybalt, whose devotion to ornate classical fighting styles drives Mercutio ''crazy''.



* NotSoDifferent: Despite the grudge between the Capulet and Montague families, they have more in common than not, as pointed out in the very first line: "Two households, both alike in dignity..."

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* NotSoDifferent: Despite the grudge between the Capulet and Montague families, they have more in common than not, as pointed out in the very first line: "Two households, both alike in dignity...dignity ..."



* PowerTrio: Romeo, Benvolio, and Mercutio.



-->'''Romeo:''' Pardon, good Mercutio, my business was great; and in\\
such a case as mine a man may strain courtesy.\\
'''Mercutio:''' That's as much as to say, such a [[UnusualEuphemism case]] as yours\\
constrains a man to bow in the hams.

to:

-->'''Romeo:''' Pardon, good Mercutio, my business was great; and in\\
in such a case as mine a man may strain courtesy.\\
'''Mercutio:''' That's as much as to say, such a [[UnusualEuphemism case]] as yours\\
yours constrains a man to bow in the hams.



* TemptingFate: Just before his wedding Romeo says this:

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* TemptingFate: Just Romeo, just before his wedding Romeo says this:wedding:



::In modern English that can be summed up as "I'm so happy right now, after I'm married to Juliet death can do whatever he wants. I'll die happy." Death must have taken that as a challenge.



[[/folder]]

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[[/folder]]

----
23rd Nov '17 12:42:57 PM TheGreatConversation
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[[folder:This play contains examples of]]

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[[folder:This play contains examples of]]
!!A Trope, by Any Other Word . . .



* AlternateEnding: Shakespeare is believed to have written one.
* AmazinglyEmbarrassingParents: The Nurse (who is more of a mother figure to Juliet than Juliet's own mother). In particular, the whole story of Juliet's weaning. Juliet's comment, "Stint thou too, I pray thee, Nurse," should be translated as, "Dang it, will you please stop telling stories about the embarrassing things I did when I was three?"
* AntiVillain: Paris is Romeo's rival for Juliet's hand but is a good man who would have made a good husband for Juliet.
* AnyoneCanDie: Mercutio, Tybalt, Paris, Lady Montague, [[ForegoneConclusion Romeo and Juliet]] all kick the bucket.

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* %%* AlternateEnding: Shakespeare is believed to have written one.
* AmazinglyEmbarrassingParents: The Nurse (who is more of a mother figure to Juliet than Juliet's own mother). In particular, the whole her story of Juliet's weaning. Juliet's comment, "Stint thou too, I pray thee, Nurse," should be translated as, "Dang it, will you please stop telling stories about the embarrassing things I did when I was three?"
* AntiVillain: Paris is Romeo's rival for Juliet's hand but is a good man who likely would have made been a good decent husband for Juliet.
* AnyoneCanDie: Mercutio, Tybalt, Paris, Lady Montague, [[ForegoneConclusion Romeo Romeo, and Juliet]] all kick the bucket.



* BadassBoast: Tybalt to Benvolio.

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* BadassBoast: Tybalt to Benvolio.before dueling with Benvolio.



* BlackComedy: Sometimes performed this way. Mercutio provides black comedy in-story as he dies.

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* BlackComedy: Sometimes performed this way.
**
Mercutio provides black comedy in-story some in-universe as he dies.



* BlackComedyRape: Act I Scene 1 is filled with constant rape jokes.

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* BlackComedyRape: Act I Scene 1 is filled with constant rape jokes.



* TheCassandra: No one ever listens to pragmatic pacifist Benvolio.
-->'''Benvolio:''' I pray thee, good Mercutio, let's retire:\\
The day is hot, the Capulets abroad,\\
And, if we meet, we shall not scape a brawl;\\
For now, these hot days, is the mad blood stirring.[[note]]They don't, and [[FiveSecondForeshadowing within half an hour]] Mercutio has been slain in a duel.[[/note]]



-->'''Romeo:''' Peace, peace, Mercutio, peace!Thou talk'st of nothing.

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-->'''Romeo:''' Peace, peace, Mercutio, peace!Thou peace! Thou talk'st of nothing.



* CourtlyLove: Subverted. Romeo abandons his courtly love for Rosaline as soon as he meets the much more... open... Juliet.
* CrazyEnoughToWork: Faking Juliet's death... wasn't.

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* CourtlyLove: Subverted. Romeo abandons his courtly love for Rosaline as soon as he meets the much more... open...more . . . open . . . Juliet.
* CrazyEnoughToWork: Faking Juliet's death...death . . . wasn't.



** Mercutio dies offstage, but goes off with a bang:
--->"[[DyingCurse A plague a' both your houses!]] / They have made worms' meat of me. I have it, / And soundly too. Your houses!"
** Lady Montague, a much less important character, [[DroppedABridgeOnHim gets a couple lines for her offstage death]] in the very last scene. [[DeathIsDramatic "Basically, the spectacle involved in a character's death is proportional to the importance of the character to the story."]]

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** Mercutio dies offstage, but goes off out with a bang:
--->"[[DyingCurse --->'''Mercutio:''' [[DyingCurse A plague a' both your houses!]] / They have made worms' meat of me. I have it, / And and soundly too. Your houses!"
houses!
** By contrast, Lady Montague, a much less important character, [[DroppedABridgeOnHim gets a couple lines for her offstage death]] in the very last scene. [[DeathIsDramatic "Basically, the spectacle involved in a character's death is proportional to the importance of the character to the story."]]



* DidTheyOrDidntThey: Many productions take Lady Capulet's [[ExcessiveMourning disproportionate grief]] over Tybalt's death to imply that the two have been romantically involved. After all, the two are closer in age than Lord and Lady Capulet, and the LoveTriangle can justify some of the malice between Lord Capulet and Tybalt, Lord Capulet and Lady Capulet, and Lord Capulet and Juliet when she disobeys him.



* DoubleEntendre: Almost every one of Mercutio's lines, overlapping with GetTheeToANunnery.

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* DoubleEntendre: Almost every one of Mercutio's lines, overlapping with GetTheeToANunnery. Romeo, Juliet, the Nurse, and even Lord Capulet all get in on the action at some point.



-->"A plague a' both your houses!"

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-->"A -->'''Mercutio:''' A plague a' both your houses!"houses!



* EmoTeen: Romeo is this at first, moping around and reading emo poetry because of his one-sided love on Rosaline. It is also worth noting that Romeo's lines regarding his romance of Rosaline are ''very'' over-used cliches at Shakespeare's time, but as soon as Romeo starts describing Juliet, his lines become very creative and much more poetic. When he has to be separated from Juliet, he gets even worse than he was at the beginning.

to:

* EmoTeen: Romeo is this at first, moping around and reading reciting emo poetry because of his one-sided unrequited love on for Rosaline. He improves upon meeting Juliet, but when he has to be separated from her, he gets even worse than he was at the beginning.
**
It is also worth noting that Romeo's lines regarding his romance of obsession with Rosaline are were ''very'' over-used cliches at in Shakespeare's time, but time. But as soon as Romeo he starts describing Juliet, his lines become very creative and much get far more original and poetic. When he has to be separated from Juliet, he gets even worse than he was at the beginning.



* FeudingFamilies: Montagues and Capulets.
* TheFightingNarcissist: Mercutio's description of Tybalt's ornate fighting style implies that Tybalt may fit this trope.
* ForegoneConclusion: Even if, by some strange power, you've never heard of the plot of this thing, it's stated in the very beginning that the title characters die... on line '''six''' of the Prologue, to be precise. Supposedly, there was a happy alternate ending that contemporary audiences could vote for in lieu of the tragic ending. No one has ever discovered it, though.

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* FeudingFamilies: The Montagues and the Capulets.
* TheFightingNarcissist: Mercutio's description of Tybalt's ornate fighting style implies that Tybalt may fit this trope.
trope. Given Mercutio's tendency to criticize others for flaws in himself, he could easily be one as well.
* ForegoneConclusion: Even if, by some strange power, you've never heard of the plot of this thing, it's stated in the very beginning that the title characters die...die . . . on line '''six''' of the Prologue, to be precise. Supposedly,
%%Supposedly,
there was a happy alternate ending that contemporary audiences could vote for in lieu of the tragic ending. No one has ever discovered it, though.



* TheFriendsWhoNeverHang: Juliet reacts to the news of Tybalt's death with heartbreak and tears, her beloved cousin. The Nurse exclaims that Tybalt was her best friend. Tybalt never spent time on-stage with any of these women. All of his stage time was consumed in proving himself a HotBlooded and pitiless fighter.
* GallowsHumor: Most of Mercutio's dying speech. "Ask for me in the morning, and you shall find me a grave man."
* {{GenreBusting}}/{{GenreShift}}: Unusual for its time in combining comedy and tragedy. A typical comedy contains bawdy humor, farce, and young lovers who live HappilyEverAfter, despite the interference of the older generation. A typical tragedy contains unquiet political figures, and drama, a TragicHero who makes [[TragicMistake mistakes]] and dies in the end, despite his best efforts. ''Romeo and Juliet'' explores all of this, [[{{Dissimile}} except]] [[DownerEnding the happily-ever-after part.]] Act III marks the definitive shift from comedy to tragedy.

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* TheFriendsWhoNeverHang: Juliet reacts to the news of Tybalt's death with heartbreak and tears, her beloved cousin. The Nurse exclaims that Tybalt was her best friend. Tybalt never spent time on-stage with any either of these women. All of his stage time was consumed in proving himself a HotBlooded and pitiless fighter.
them.
* GallowsHumor: Most of Mercutio's dying speech. "Ask
-->'''Mercutio:''' Ask
for me in the morning, tomorrow, and you shall find me a grave man."
[[PungeonMaster grave]] man.
* {{GenreBusting}}/{{GenreShift}}: Unusual for its time in combining comedy and tragedy. A typical comedy contains bawdy humor, farce, and young lovers who live HappilyEverAfter, despite the interference of the older generation. A typical tragedy contains unquiet political figures, and drama, a TragicHero who makes [[TragicMistake mistakes]] and dies in the end, despite his best efforts. ''Romeo and Juliet'' explores all of this, [[{{Dissimile}} except]] [[DownerEnding the happily-ever-after part.]] Mercutio's death in Act III marks the definitive shift from comedy to tragedy.



And the demesnes that there adjacent lie
* TheGhost: Rosaline.

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And the demesnes that there adjacent lie
lie ...
* TheGhost: Rosaline.We hear ''quite'' a lot about Rosaline, Romeo's unrequiting love at the start of the play, but she never makes it onscreen.
** According to the guest list, she is in attendance at Capulet's feast, and some productions make her an obvious presence there.



** Tybalt, as everyone around him acknowledges. He reacts to catching Romeo at the Capulet feast by calling for his rapier.

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** Tybalt, as everyone around him acknowledges.knows. He reacts to catching Romeo at the Capulet feast by calling for his rapier.



* HanlonsRazor: Two teens in "love" die because of a problem with the post. Not much malice against them from anybody except Tybalt, who proves pretty pathetic.

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* HanlonsRazor: Two teens in "love" The tragic heroes die because of a problem with the post. Not much malice against them from anybody except Tybalt, who proves pretty pathetic.fairly ineffectual.



** Some of the archaic uses of the word "ho" become a tad awkward in this day and age. Such as "Fetch me my long sword, ho!" Even funnier because, as mentioned previously, at this point in the play, his wife is trying to ''stop'' him from jumping into the fight. Or the Nurse calling for "[[INeedAFreakingDrink Aqua Vitae]], ho!", and getting a response from Lady Capulet.
** Romeo talking about his "Well-flowered pump." "Pumps" were shoes, which would be adorned with flowers at dances and other gatherings. Of course, {{Double Entendre}}s do abound in this scene.
** There are several with Capulet as well, such as "You are a saucy boy" and "You are too hot," the latter being said to him by his wife.

to:

** Some of the archaic uses of the word "ho" become a tad awkward in this day and age. Such as "Fetch me my long sword, ho!" Even funnier because, as mentioned previously, because at this point in the play, his wife is trying to ''stop'' him from jumping into the fight. Or the Nurse calling for "[[INeedAFreakingDrink Aqua Vitae]], ho!", and getting a response from Lady Capulet.
** Romeo talking about his "Well-flowered pump." "Pumps" were shoes, which would be adorned with flowers at dances and other gatherings. Of course, this scene is built on {{Double Entendre}}s do abound in this scene.
Entendre}}s.
** There are several with Lord Capulet as well, such as "You to Tybalt:
--->'''Capulet:''' You
are a saucy boy" and saucy[[note]]i.e. insolent[[/note]] boy.
** Lady Capulet tells her husband,
"You are too hot," the latter being said to him by his wife.meaning "angry."



* HufflepuffHouse: There's actually a ''third'' clan- the Prince's family (historically, the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scaliger Scaligers]] or Della Scala- the Prince's name, Escalus, is a Latin version of this), consisting of the Prince himself, Mercutio, and Paris. This being Shakespeare, the Prince loses his two kinsmen over the course of the play too, leading him to say in the final scene that he has also been punished for the violence in Verona alongside the Capulets and Montagues.

to:

* HufflepuffHouse: There's actually a ''third'' clan- the clan--the Prince's family (historically, the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scaliger Scaligers]] or Della Scala- the Prince's name, Escalus, is a Latin version of this), consisting of the Prince himself, Mercutio, and Paris. This being Shakespeare, the The Prince loses his two kinsmen over the course of the play too, leading him to say in the final scene that he has also been punished for the violence in Verona alongside the Capulets and Montagues.



* InspirationNod: In Act II, Mercutio disses several mythical {{Love Interest}}s in comparison to Juliet. Included in this list is Thisbe, heroine of ''Pyramus and Thisbe'', the original source material for ''Romeo and Juliet''.

to:

* InspirationNod: In Act II, Mercutio sarcastically disses several mythical {{Love Interest}}s in comparison to Juliet. Included in this list is Interest}}s, including Thisbe, heroine of ''Pyramus and Thisbe'', a much earlier version of the original source material for ''Romeo and Juliet''.Juliet'' story.



* LoveTriangle: Paris plans to marry Juliet, who is already in a relationship with Romeo.



* MasqueradeBall: Capulet holds one, which just so happens to be the place Romeo and Juliet fell in LoveAtFirstSight.

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* MasterSwordsman: Tybalt lives by his blade. His devotion to ornate classical fighting styles drives Mercutio ''crazy''.
* MasqueradeBall: Capulet holds one, which just so happens to be the place which is where Romeo and Juliet fell fall in LoveAtFirstSight.



* NameAndName
* NeverMyFault: Mercutio says "A plague on both your houses" when he was the instigator of the fight that resulted in his fatal wound.

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* NameAndName
NameAndName: Yes
* NeverMyFault: Mercutio says "A plague blames his death on both your houses" when he was the instigator of feud between the fight that resulted houses, despite having eagerly stepped forward to take Romeo's place in his fatal wound.conflict with Tybalt.



* NotSoAboveItAll: Benvolio acts as though he is above the house conflict and will not takes sides. But in his telling of the duel in Act III, he makes it sound as though Tybalt challenged Mercutio, when in fact it was the reverse.

to:

* NotSoAboveItAll: Benvolio acts as though he is above the house conflict and will not takes sides. But in his telling account of the duel in Act III, he makes it sound as though Tybalt challenged Mercutio, when in fact it was the reverse.reverse, which has a significant effect on the Prince's judgement on the affair.



* PaperThinDisguise: Romeo, Benvolio, Mercutio, and the other revelers attend the Capulets' ball wearing masks. No one is recognized save Romeo, and then only because he talks.

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* PaperThinDisguise: Romeo, Benvolio, Mercutio, and the other Montague revelers attend the Capulets' waltz into their arch-enemy's ball wearing masks. No one is recognized save Romeo, and then only because he talks.



* ParentalSubstitute: The Nurse to Juliet.

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* ParentalSubstitute: The Nurse to Juliet.Juliet, whose mother is herself in her twenties and unequipped to be the guiding influence Juliet needs.



* PopCulturalOsmosis: Probably the main reason people think Romeo and Juliet are the model for a good relationship, and probably the reason a surprising number of people forget the ending in the prologue. Ironically, the title has become a kind of shorthand for idolizing the very behaviors it exists to make fun of.

to:

* PopCulturalOsmosis: Probably the main reason people think Romeo and Juliet are the model for a good relationship, and probably the reason a surprising number of people forget the ending in the prologue. Ironically, the title has become a kind of shorthand for idolizing the very behaviors it exists can be argued to make fun of.



* {{Pun}}: A good handful of the characters, this being Shakespeare, though Mercutio in particular seems to live off of them. He even belts them out as he lies dying.

to:

* {{Pun}}: A PungeonMaster: Goddammit, Mercutio.
-->'''Romeo:''' Pardon,
good handful of Mercutio, my business was great; and in\\
such a case as mine a man may strain courtesy.\\
'''Mercutio:''' That's as much as to say, such a [[UnusualEuphemism case]] as yours\\
constrains a man to bow in
the characters, this being Shakespeare, though Mercutio in particular seems to live off of them. He even belts them out as he lies dying.hams.



** Lord Montague, as opposed to Lord Capulet, [[NiceGuy is never shown to be bad in any way]], and seems genuinely concerned for Romeo in the first scene.

to:

** Lord Montague, as opposed to Lord Capulet, [[NiceGuy is never shown to be bad in any way]], and seems genuinely concerned shows genuine concern for Romeo in the first scene.



* RomanticFalseLead: Paris shows up asking for Juliet's hand before she meets Romeo.

to:

* RomanticFalseLead: Paris shows up asking for Juliet's hand before she meets Romeo. Or, if Juliet is the protagonist, Romeo shows up besotted with [[TheGhost Rosaline]] before he meets Juliet.



* ScrewTheRulesImDoingWhatsRight: One could say that this is Friar Lawrence's intention (although it's more like "screw societal tradition" than "screw rules"), although he ends up failing miserably.

to:

* ScrewTheRulesImDoingWhatsRight: One could say that this is Friar Lawrence's intention (although it's more like "screw societal tradition" than "screw the rules"), although he ends up failing miserably.



* SillyRabbitRomanceIsForKids: Romeo and Juliet is already one big slam against romance. It's not so much a critique of romance itself [[note]] which William Shakespeare seemed to be mostly in favour of[[/note]] as a critique of dumbass kids who, as soon as they think they're in love, immediately overreact. They're so blinded by love that they kill themselves the moment something goes wrong. Plus all the people they get killed along the way. The message seems to be the opposite of this trope: Romance should only be for people mature enough to deal with it sensibly, and kids should stay out of it.

to:

* %%* SillyRabbitRomanceIsForKids: Romeo ''Romeo and Juliet Juliet'' is already one big slam against romance. It's not so much a critique of romance itself [[note]] which William Shakespeare seemed seems to be mostly in favour have been fond of[[/note]] as a critique of dumbass kids who, as soon as they think they're in love, immediately overreact. They're so blinded by love that they kill themselves the moment something goes wrong. Plus all the people they get killed along the way. The message seems to be the opposite of this trope: Romance should only be for people mature enough to deal with it sensibly, and kids should stay out of it.



* TooDumbToLive: It's probably easier to list the characters who ''don't'' act like idiots...

to:

* TooDumbToLive: It's probably easier to list the characters who ''don't'' act like idiots...idiots.



* UnstoppableRage: Mercutio's death imbues Romeo with so much vengeful fury that he manages to defeat master swordsman Tybalt. Later, after Juliet's supposed death, Romeo kills Paris, the ''prince's cousin'', when he tries to deny Romeo entry to the tomb.

to:

* UnstoppableRage: Mercutio's death imbues Romeo with so much vengeful fury that he manages to defeat master swordsman MasterSwordsman Tybalt. Later, after Juliet's supposed death, Romeo kills Paris, the ''prince's cousin'', when he tries to deny Romeo entry to the tomb.
14th Nov '17 10:01:20 AM Mdumas43073
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[[quoteright:320:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/dicksee5.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:315:Parting is such sweet sorrow...]]

to:

[[quoteright:320:http://static.[[quoteright:300:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/dicksee5.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:315:Parting [[caption-width-right:300:Parting is such sweet sorrow...]]
26th Sep '17 11:31:08 AM fearlessnikki
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Has been adapted for silver screen numerous times, perhaps most famously by the Italian director Creator/FrancoZeffirelli in 1968. That production is widely regarded as an exceptional movie, though it gained a measure of infamy at the time for featuring teen-aged Romeo and Juliet - Olivia Hussey and Leonard Whiting - partially naked during a scene.[[note]]Famously, Olivia Hussey was prohibited from attending the London premiere of the film. The reason: She was not yet 18, and there was nudity in the film - of her.[[/note]] Perhaps more well known today is Baz Luhrmann's zany 1996 adaptation which moved the story to a modern setting, and starred Creator/LeonardoDiCaprio at the height of his teenage heartthrob-dom.

to:

Has been adapted for silver screen numerous times, perhaps most famously by the Italian director Creator/FrancoZeffirelli in 1968. That production is widely regarded as an exceptional movie, though it gained a measure of infamy at the time for featuring teen-aged Romeo and Juliet - Olivia Hussey and Leonard Whiting - partially naked during a scene.[[note]]Famously, [[note]]An urban legend is that Olivia Hussey was prohibited from attending refused into the London premiere because of the film. The reason: She nudity; this is likely false because she was not yet 18, actually sixteen-seventeen at the time of the film's release, and there it was nudity in given an "A" rating by the film - of British censor board. And even if she was underage, she could still legally watch the picture if a parent or guardian came with her.[[/note]] Perhaps more well known today is Baz Luhrmann's zany 1996 adaptation which moved the story to a modern setting, and starred Creator/LeonardoDiCaprio at the height of his teenage heartthrob-dom.


Added DiffLines:

* ''{{Disney/Pocahontas}}'' depicts a highly fictionalised romance between Pocahontas and John Smith in the midst of an upcoming war. The film was actually pitched as "Romeo & Juliet in 17th century Virginia". Notably it's one of Disney's only films to have a BittersweetEnding (albeit where the lovers simply don't end up together as opposed to dying tragically).
25th Sep '17 6:20:31 AM PaulA
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* TropeBreaker: Any and all of the many attempts to update it have to work their way around the fact that the story hinges around two teenagers from well-off families being unable to communicate in time. Even just setting it post-plague raises issues; accept that the main characters would have the latest smartphones, Website/{{Twitter}} and Website/{{Facebook}} accounts and you have some serious plot-preservation problems.
25th Sep '17 6:15:21 AM PaulA
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** ''Website/CollegeHumor'' is spoofing the troubles of such a SettingUpdate [[https://youtu.be/yH2B9F-GPm0?t=102 here]].
25th Sep '17 6:14:11 AM PaulA
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*** Romeo - passionate, intensely emotional, and romantic (Id).
*** Mercutio - cynical, snarky, explosive, and driven (Ego).
*** Benvolio - levelheaded, keeps the others in check (Superego).

to:

*** ** Romeo - passionate, intensely emotional, and romantic (Id).
*** ** Mercutio - cynical, snarky, explosive, and driven (Ego).
*** ** Benvolio - levelheaded, keeps the others in check (Superego).
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Theatre.RomeoAndJuliet