History Theatre / Othello

12th Jul '17 5:47:31 AM Doug86
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-->--'''The ReducedShakespeareCompany'''

to:

-->--'''The ReducedShakespeareCompany'''
Creator/ReducedShakespeareCompany'''
19th May '17 3:49:23 PM PaulA
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* WarGod: Othello through and through.
19th May '17 10:58:11 AM TheGreatConversation
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Added DiffLines:

* BewilderingPunishment: Desdemona to Othello before he smothers her.
19th May '17 10:06:21 AM TheGreatConversation
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Added DiffLines:

* WarGod: Othello through and through.
18th May '17 2:25:58 PM TheGreatConversation
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* ArcWords: "Honest"

to:

* ArcWords: "Honest""Honest" and "handkerchief."



* MeaningfulName: "Desdemona", unsurprisingly, means "ill-fated". Othello even calls her "ill-starred wench".

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* MeaningfulName: MeaningfulName
**
"Desdemona", unsurprisingly, means "ill-fated". Othello even calls her "ill-starred wench".wench".
** Des''demon''a and Ot''hell''o.
** "Iago" is a form of "Jacob," which carries connotations of "supplanter." As Iago's manipulation begins to work on Othello, the general's speech patterns begin to mirror those of his ensign, and over time the two effectively switch roles in the relationship.


Added DiffLines:

* {{Symbolism}}: The handkerchief given to Desdemona by Othello comes to represent Desdemona's chastity and fidelity. Reinforced by the fact that [[GetTheeToANunnery in Shakespeare's time]], the "strawberry" pattern on the kerchief would have represented bloodstains on a wedding sheet.
10th May '17 3:13:38 AM Tightwire
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** Othello, suspecting Desdemona, questions Emilia, who has been with Desdemona from Act 1 onwards, whether his wife had cheated on him with Cassio. She says no. He then asks Desdemona to promise him that she hasn't cheated. She does. He decides not to believe either of them. This could be proof of Iago's amazing skills of manipulation, but considering that the bulk of the play takes place over three days in Cyprus and Cassio and Desdemona haven't even had a chance to talk, it suggests Othello's being absurd.



* IgnoredConfession: Iago flatout tells Othello that he shouldn't believe anything Iago says and that it's all probably lies anyway. Which of course just leads Othello to trust him more, which ''of course'' was [[ReversePsychology Iago's plan all along.]]

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* IgnoredConfession: Iago flatout flat out tells Othello that he shouldn't believe anything Iago says and that it's all probably lies anyway. Which of course just leads Othello to trust him more, which ''of course'' was [[ReversePsychology Iago's plan all along.]]


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* JerkAss: Othello, suspecting Desdemona, questions Emilia, who has been with Desdemona from Act 1 onwards, whether his wife had cheated on him with Cassio. She says no. He then asks Desdemona to promise him that she hasn't cheated. She does. He decides not to believe either of them. This could be proof of Iago's amazing skills of manipulation, but considering that the bulk of the play takes place over three days in Cyprus and Cassio and Desdemona haven't even had a chance to talk, it's clear that Othello just doesn't trust his wife, which makes him a jerk.
6th May '17 9:51:52 PM PaulA
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** Which, while being generally true to the story, unfortunately ends with Iago running away, which significantly decreases his MagnificentBastard status. [[invoked]]
6th May '17 9:49:25 PM PaulA
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* AdaptationalHeroism: In the original short story ''A Moorish Captain'' by the Italian writer Cinthio, "The Moor" actually has "The Ensign" (Iago) ''bludgeon'' Desdemona to death with him and then the two of them MakeItLookLikeAnAccident. The Moor then eventually turns on The Ensign not because he realises he has been manipulated but because the latter reminds him of his crime just by being around. He also refuses to admit his crime even after he is caught out. Shakespeare's Othello, by contrast, confesses to his crime almost immediately and chooses strangulation (after toying with poison) because he couldn't bring himself to damage her in such a brutal way; he is also much more of an UnwittingPawn overall.
** "The Ensigns wife" (Emilia) was in on the murder plot from the beginning. Here, while she steal the handkerchief, she has no idea what Iago plans to do with it and utterly appalled when she learns the truth.
** Iago himself. The Ensign in the original is fired by The Moor after the murder and takes his revenge by blabbing everything to the authorities, getting the Moor arrested, tortured and eventually killed; The Ensign then escapes justice and commits several other crimes before finally being caught. His motivation is almost much more overt and base in the short- he [[StalkerWithACrush lusts after Desdemona]] and sets out to murder her [[NotGoodWithRejection simply because she rejected him]].
* AerithAndBob: To Hispanic or Latino readers, Roderigo (translated as "Rodrigo") and Emilia feel unusually common.

to:

* AdaptationalHeroism: AdaptationalHeroism:
**
In the original short story ''A Moorish Captain'' by the Italian writer Cinthio, "The Moor" actually has "The Ensign" (Iago) ''bludgeon'' Desdemona to death with him and then the two of them MakeItLookLikeAnAccident. The Moor then eventually turns on The Ensign not because he realises he has been manipulated but because the latter reminds him of his crime just by being around. He also refuses to admit his crime even after he is caught out. Shakespeare's Othello, by contrast, confesses to his crime almost immediately and chooses strangulation (after toying with poison) because he couldn't bring himself to damage her in such a brutal way; he is also much more of an UnwittingPawn overall.
** "The Ensigns Ensign's wife" (Emilia) was in on the murder plot from the beginning. Here, while she steal the handkerchief, she has no idea what Iago plans to do with it and utterly appalled when she learns the truth.
** Iago himself. The Ensign in the original is fired by The Moor after the murder and takes his revenge by blabbing everything to the authorities, getting the Moor arrested, tortured and eventually killed; The Ensign then escapes justice and commits several other crimes before finally being caught. His motivation is almost much more overt and base in the short- he short--he [[StalkerWithACrush lusts after Desdemona]] and sets out to murder her [[NotGoodWithRejection simply because she rejected him]].
* AerithAndBob: AerithAndBob:
**
To Hispanic or Latino readers, Roderigo (translated as "Rodrigo") and Emilia feel unusually common.



* DrivenByEnvy: Iago is incensed by Cassio's promotion (it's implied he's been at Othello's side for a while) and strives first to take him down and then Othello himself. [[AlternativeCharacterInterpretation Then again...]]
** Iago also says that he lies a lot, so it's entirely possible that [[ForTheEvulz he has no reason for ruining Othello's life]].

to:

* DrivenByEnvy: Iago is incensed by Cassio's promotion (it's implied he's been at Othello's side for a while) and strives first to take him down and then Othello himself. [[AlternativeCharacterInterpretation Then again...]]
**
]] Iago also says that he lies a lot, so it's entirely possible that [[ForTheEvulz he has no reason for ruining Othello's life]].



* GreenEyedMonster: The play's major theme; jealousy ends up being the motivation for most characters, and it's eventually what causes everything to end in destruction. The play is also the TropeNamer as Iago accuses Cassio of being this to Othello, while likely serving as an example himself.

to:

* GreenEyedMonster: The play's major theme; jealousy ends up being the motivation for most characters, and it's eventually what causes everything to end in destruction. The play is also the TropeNamer as Iago accuses Cassio of being this to Othello, while likely serving as an example himself.



* HorribleJudgeOfCharacter: This is a tricky one. Othello constantly refers to Iago as "honest Iago" and everyone else seems to think likewise. To be fair, Iago does nothing to contradict this assessment until TheReveal and it's implied he goes way back with Othello.
** Although much of what Iago says ''is'' [[ExactWords literal]]. He does more damage through what he does '''not''' say. Moreover, "honest" was also a condescending title for a social inferior (like "sirrah"), as well as meaning "chaste" and the modern sense of "truthful". Shakespeare, being Shakespeare, plays with all three meanings.

to:

* HorribleJudgeOfCharacter: HorribleJudgeOfCharacter:
**
This is a tricky one. Othello constantly refers to Iago as "honest Iago" and everyone else seems to think likewise. To be fair, Iago does nothing to contradict this assessment until TheReveal and it's implied he goes way back with Othello.
**
Othello. Although much of what Iago says ''is'' [[ExactWords literal]]. He does more damage through what he does '''not''' say. Moreover, "honest" was also a condescending title for a social inferior (like "sirrah"), as well as meaning "chaste" and the modern sense of "truthful". Shakespeare, being Shakespeare, plays with all three meanings.



* WhereDaWhiteWomenAt: Iago plays this card about Desdemona with regards to Othello as "proof" of her sexual appetite. Iago goes on to convince Othello that Desdemona's defiance of her father in her courtship of and marriage to Othello is proof of her lustful nature, noting how "unnatural" it is that she should prefer him--the exotic foreigner--over all the Venetian Dandies like Roderigo who have sought her hand.
** The unnatural-ness of it all vindicating, supposedly, her voracious sexual appetite. [[FridgeBrilliance Iago implies that she's already had her fill of Roderigo's type, carnally of course, and longs for a change--possibly because no local boy would marry her on account of her actually being a slut.]] All that's left is for Othello, in his anger, to connect the dots...

to:

* WhereDaWhiteWomenAt: Iago plays this card about Desdemona with regards to Othello as "proof" of her sexual appetite. Iago goes on to convince Othello that Desdemona's defiance of her father in her courtship of and marriage to Othello is proof of her lustful nature, noting how "unnatural" it is that she should prefer him--the exotic foreigner--over all the Venetian Dandies like Roderigo who have sought her hand.
**
hand. The unnatural-ness of it all vindicating, supposedly, her voracious sexual appetite. [[FridgeBrilliance Iago implies that she's already had her fill of Roderigo's type, carnally of course, and longs for a change--possibly because no local boy would marry her on account of her actually being a slut.]] slut. All that's left is for Othello, in his anger, to connect the dots...
6th May '17 3:29:05 PM Dragon101
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** Iago himself. The Ensign in the original is fired by The Moor after the murder and takes his revenge by blabbing everything to the authorities, getting the Moor arrested and tortured; The Ensign then escapes justice and commits several other crimes before finally being caught. His motivation is almost much more overt and base in the short- he [[StalkerWithACrush lusts after Desdemona]] and sets out to murder her [[NotGoodWithRejection simply because she rejected him]].

to:

** Iago himself. The Ensign in the original is fired by The Moor after the murder and takes his revenge by blabbing everything to the authorities, getting the Moor arrested arrested, tortured and tortured; eventually killed; The Ensign then escapes justice and commits several other crimes before finally being caught. His motivation is almost much more overt and base in the short- he [[StalkerWithACrush lusts after Desdemona]] and sets out to murder her [[NotGoodWithRejection simply because she rejected him]].
6th May '17 3:28:22 PM Dragon101
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* AdaptationalHeroism: In the original short story ''A Moorish Captain'' by the Italian writer Cinthio, "The Moor" actually has "The Ensign" (Iago) ''bludgeon'' Desdemona to death with him and then the two of them MakeItLookLikeAnAccident. The Moor then eventually turns on The Ensign not because he realises he has been manipulated but the latter reminds him of what they did. He also refuses to admit his crime even after he is caught out. Shakespeare's Othello, by contrast, confesses to his crime almost immediately and chooses strangulation (after toying with poison) because he couldn't bring himself to damage her in such a brutal way; he is also much more of an UnwittingPawn overall.

to:

* AdaptationalHeroism: In the original short story ''A Moorish Captain'' by the Italian writer Cinthio, "The Moor" actually has "The Ensign" (Iago) ''bludgeon'' Desdemona to death with him and then the two of them MakeItLookLikeAnAccident. The Moor then eventually turns on The Ensign not because he realises he has been manipulated but because the latter reminds him of what they did.his crime just by being around. He also refuses to admit his crime even after he is caught out. Shakespeare's Othello, by contrast, confesses to his crime almost immediately and chooses strangulation (after toying with poison) because he couldn't bring himself to damage her in such a brutal way; he is also much more of an UnwittingPawn overall.
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