History Theatre / Othello

21st May '16 8:17:02 AM Aquila89
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* NoAccountingForTaste: Iago and Emilia have a very unhappy marriage with him frequently making misogynistic jokes in her presence. One of the early results of her bad treatment is that Emilia puts forward some, for the time, very surprising ideas about whether a woman could ever be justified in cheating on her husband.

to:

* NoAccountingForTaste: Iago and Emilia have a very unhappy marriage with him frequently making misogynistic jokes in her presence. One of the early results of her bad treatment is that Emilia puts forward some, for the time, very surprising ideas about whether a woman could ever be justified in cheating on her husband. Emilia feels far more loyalty and affection towards Desdemona than her husbands (which in the end leads to Iago's downfall).
8th Feb '16 10:00:56 AM Silverblade2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* BatmanGambit / EvilPlan: Iago's plan to drive Othello into an absolute rampage. It works brilliantly, though it would have fallen on its face if Othello didn't listen to him.



* EvilPlan: Iago's plan to drive Othello into an absolute rampage. It works brilliantly, though it would have fallen on its face if Othello didn't listen to him.



* FalseFriend[=/=]PoisonousFriend: Iago, to everyone. Even Emilia doesn't know the full depths of his bastardry.

to:

* FalseFriend[=/=]PoisonousFriend: FalseFriend: Iago, to everyone. Even Emilia doesn't know the full depths of his bastardry.


Added DiffLines:

* LameComeback: When Brabantio calls Iago a villain, the latter responds "You are--a senator".
7th Feb '16 4:40:32 PM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* EvilIsPetty: As noted in DisproportionateRetribution above, Iago decides to destroy Othello's life in response to not getting his desired promotion.



* {{Subtext}}: See HoYay, above. Some of Iago's lines really do support this particular EpilepticTree, at least to modern eyes.

to:

* {{Subtext}}: See HoYay, above. Some of Iago's lines really do support this particular EpilepticTree, suggest, at least to modern eyes.eyes, that he's attracted to Othello himself.



* AdaptedOut: As noted above, the ridiculous moment where Desdemona manages to gasp out a final speech before ''dying of strangulation'' is almost always cut out of adaptations.

to:

* AdaptedOut: As noted above, the The ridiculous moment where Desdemona manages to gasp out a final speech before ''dying of strangulation'' is almost always cut out of adaptations.
7th Feb '16 1:36:23 PM Silverblade2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


It is the GreenEyedMonster which doth mock\\

to:

It is the GreenEyedMonster green eyed monster which doth mock\\
2nd Jan '16 2:48:09 PM gallium
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* AdaptedOut: As noted above, the ridiculous moment where Desdemona manages to gasp out a final speech before ''dying of strangulation'' is almost always cut out of adaptations.
2nd Dec '15 11:48:10 AM bravo104
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* GreenEyedMonster

to:

* GreenEyedMonsterGreenEyedMonster: The play's major theme; jealousy ends up being the motivation for most characters, and it's eventually what causes everything to end in destruction.
30th Nov '15 5:51:05 PM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* GreenEyedMonster: The TropeNamer.

to:

* GreenEyedMonster: The TropeNamer. GreenEyedMonster
30th Nov '15 10:42:48 AM bravo104
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* GreenEyedMonster

to:

* GreenEyedMonsterGreenEyedMonster: The TropeNamer.
23rd Nov '15 10:04:33 AM FastFingers
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Although much of what Iago says ''is'' actually [[ExactWords perfectly honest]]. He does more damage through what he does '''not''' say than what he does say. Moreover, "honest" was also a condescending title for a social inferior (like "sirrah"), as well as meaning "chaste" and the modern sense of "truthful". Shakespeare, being Shakespeare, plays with all three meanings.
** Othello's lack of perception in general is the driving force of the plot. Of course Iago inflamed his emotions, but it didn't take much and once Othello had made up his mind about what was happening, he behaved in a way that was disastrously blind towards everyone else's intentions.
* IdiotBall: Partially, anyway. Though the plot isn't completely driven by certain characters' stupidities, most non-Iago characters are completely and conveniently stupid whenever it supports the short-term plot.
** Othello, suspecting Desdemona, questions Emilia, who has been with Desdemona from Act 1 onwards, whether his wife had cheated on him with Cassio. She says no. He then asks Desdemona to promise him that she hasn't cheated. She does. He decides not to believe either of them, which, one could argue, is proof of Iago's amazing skills of manipulation, but considering that the bulk of the play takes place over three days in Cyprus and Cassio and Desdemona haven't even had a chance, it kind of suggests Othello's being a little bit silly.
** Desdemona has promised Cassio that she'll plead his case to Othello to try and get him re-instated. Perfectly fine. Desdemona proceeds to do so, insistently and constantly, ignoring things such as timing, tact, and Othello's mood at any given moment. She is also vague about the fate of the handkerchief when being direct probably would have served her better.
** One of the most important motifs in the play is the Handkerchief, Othello's family heirloom that he gives to Desdemona, and which becomes a symbol of all sorts of things, but particularly her innocence and faithfulness. Desdemona drops this on the floor directly in front of Othello. Nobody notices.
** Emelia knows what happened to the handkerchief. Even after she hears Othello angrily grill her mistress and friend about the handkerchief, she doesn't tell the truth until it's far too late.

to:

** Although much of what Iago says ''is'' actually [[ExactWords perfectly honest]]. literal]]. He does more damage through what he does '''not''' say than what he does say. Moreover, "honest" was also a condescending title for a social inferior (like "sirrah"), as well as meaning "chaste" and the modern sense of "truthful". Shakespeare, being Shakespeare, plays with all three meanings.
** Othello's lack of perception in general is the driving force of the plot. Of course Iago inflamed his emotions, but it didn't take much and once those were volatile. Once Othello had made up his mind about what was happening, he behaved in a way that was became disastrously blind towards everyone else's intentions.
* IdiotBall: Partially, anyway. Though although the plot isn't completely driven by certain characters' stupidities, most non-Iago characters are completely and conveniently stupid whenever it supports the short-term plot.
** Othello, suspecting Desdemona, questions Emilia, who has been with Desdemona from Act 1 onwards, whether his wife had cheated on him with Cassio. She says no. He then asks Desdemona to promise him that she hasn't cheated. She does. He decides not to believe either of them, which, one them. This could argue, is be proof of Iago's amazing skills of manipulation, but considering that the bulk of the play takes place over three days in Cyprus and Cassio and Desdemona haven't even had a chance, chance to talk, it kind of suggests Othello's being a little bit silly.
absurd.
** Desdemona has promised Cassio that she'll plead his case to Othello to try and get him re-instated. Perfectly fine. Desdemona proceeds to do so, insistently and constantly, ignoring things such as timing, tact, and Othello's mood at any given moment. She is also vague avoidant about the fate of missing the handkerchief when being direct probably would could have served helped her better.
standing with Othello.
** One of the most important motifs in the play is the Handkerchief, Othello's family heirloom that he gives to Desdemona, and which becomes a symbol of all sorts of things, but particularly her innocence and faithfulness. Either Desdemona or Othello drops this on the floor directly in front of Othello. Nobody notices.
with neither one noticing.
** Emelia knows what happened to the handkerchief. Even after she hears Othello angrily grill handkerchief and does not interrupt Othello's interrogations of her mistress and friend about the handkerchief, she doesn't tell the truth handkerchief until it's far too late.
18th Nov '15 12:22:29 AM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


!!Tropes

to:

!!Tropes
!!The play itself provides examples of:



* TheBadGuyWins: In the BBC Modern Shakespeare adaptation, where "Ben Jago" commits a perfect crime and becomes [[KarmaHoudini head of the Met.]]



* BreakingTheFourthWall: The 1995 film production had Iago look at the camera at several points; some say this adds the idea that he was in control of everything, while it is technically described as a [[http://ninjawords.com/soliloquy soliloquy]] in which the audience can more clearly understand Iago's scheme, and he's notably the only character to do so in the film. Though other characters make soliloquies, they look like they're musing to themselves rather than directly speaking to the audience.
** Another effect of him being the only one to talk to the camera is to emphasise the fact that he might be satanic in some way, since he's clearly operating on a whole different level to the other characters if he has a degree of MediumAwareness.
* ButNotTooBlack: As the Atlantic slave trade gained ground and racism developed as a justifying philosophy for it, it became increasingly implausible to audiences that the intelligent, complex TragicHero of a Shakespeare play should be a black man. As a result (and also because not having to cake on blackface made it easier to convey emotion), a paler-skinned, Arabic Othello came into fashion, who was usually characterised as being mild-mannered and civilised or aristocratic and arrogant rather than passionate and 'bestial'. These versions stuck around even after black actors playing the lead began to become more acceptable, both because of lingering racism and because of increasing guilt over the rather grotesque caricature blackface-Othello had so often become.



* TheChessmaster: Iago. In some productions he's even shown playing Chess while talking to Othello.

to:

* TheChessmaster: Iago. In some productions he's even shown playing Chess while talking to Othello.



* DrivenToSuicide: Othello in the end. Interestingly, in at least one adaptation Cassio covertly passes him the knife to help him along.

to:

* DrivenToSuicide: Othello in the end. Interestingly, in at least one adaptation Cassio covertly passes him the knife to help him along.



* LargeHam: LaurenceOlivier, [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s2s41j8hn34 in the title role]]. He [[ModernMinstrelsy painted his skin black]], [[AsLongAsItSoundsForeign spoke in an "invented" accent]], and even ''[[SillyWalk walked]]'' in a different and bizarre manner.



* RaceLift: The Creator/PatrickStewart version has (white) Stewart as the title character, and everyone else is black.
** There is a debate among scholars as to whether Othello is a black man or an Arab/Berber, as both were referred to as Moors at the time. Naturally, whenever a productions makes the call one way or the other, those who disagree with the decision will see it as a race lift.



* StartsWithTheirFuneral: The Orson Welles film opens with Othello and Desdemona's funeral procession, while Iago is being put in a gibbet and hung from the walls.


Added DiffLines:


!!Adaptations that don't have their own pages provide examples of:

* TheBadGuyWins: In the 2001 modernised adaptation, where "Ben Jago" commits a perfect crime and becomes head of the Met.
* BreakingTheFourthWall: The 1995 film production had Iago look at the camera at several points; some say this adds the idea that he was in control of everything, while it is technically described as a [[http://ninjawords.com/soliloquy soliloquy]] in which the audience can more clearly understand Iago's scheme, and he's notably the only character to do so in the film. Though other characters make soliloquies, they look like they're musing to themselves rather than directly speaking to the audience. Another effect of him being the only one to talk to the camera is to emphasise the fact that he might be satanic in some way, since he's clearly operating on a whole different level to the other characters if he has a degree of MediumAwareness.
* ButNotTooBlack: As the Atlantic slave trade gained ground and racism developed as a justifying philosophy for it, it became increasingly implausible to audiences that the intelligent, complex TragicHero of a Shakespeare play should be a black man. As a result (and also because not having to cake on blackface made it easier to convey emotion), a paler-skinned, Arabic Othello came into fashion, who was usually characterised as being mild-mannered and civilised or aristocratic and arrogant rather than passionate and 'bestial'. These versions stuck around even after black actors playing the lead began to become more acceptable, both because of lingering racism and because of increasing guilt over the rather grotesque caricature blackface-Othello had so often become.
* LargeHam: Creator/LaurenceOlivier, [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s2s41j8hn34 in the title role]]. He [[ModernMinstrelsy painted his skin black]], [[AsLongAsItSoundsForeign spoke in an "invented" accent]], and even ''[[SillyWalk walked]]'' in a different and bizarre manner.
* RaceLift:
** The Creator/PatrickStewart version has (white) Stewart as the title character, and everyone else is black.
** There is a debate among scholars as to whether Othello is a black man or an Arab/Berber, as both were referred to as Moors at the time. Naturally, whenever a productions makes the call one way or the other, those who disagree with the decision will see it as a race lift.
* SettingUpdate: The 2001 TV movie sets the story in modern London, with "John Othello" and "Ben Jago" as high-ranking police officers who fall out after Othello gets a promotion Jago was expecting.
* StartsWithTheirFuneral: The Orson Welles film opens with Othello and Desdemona's funeral procession, while Iago is being put in a gibbet and hung from the walls.
This list shows the last 10 events of 114. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Theatre.Othello