History Theatre / Othello

20th Mar '17 2:44:09 PM Eievie
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* ArtisticLicenseBiology: Poor smothered--and stabbed--Desdemona manages to [[FinalSpeech gasp out a few words before dying]]. Dying of asphyxiation. Even by Renaissance standards, this may have stretched disbelief beyond the exigencies of the RuleOfDrama. Most adaptations and modern productions end up cutting the speech and the stabbing entirely.

to:

* ArtisticLicenseBiology: AlmostDeadGuy[=/=]FinalSpeech: Poor smothered--and stabbed--Desdemona manages to [[FinalSpeech gasp out a few words before dying]]. Dying dying... of asphyxiation. Even by Renaissance standards, this may have stretched disbelief beyond the exigencies of the RuleOfDrama. Most adaptations and modern productions end up cutting the speech and the stabbing entirely.



* CasanovaWannabe: Roderigo.
* CharacterFilibuster: Iago.



* TheChessmaster: Iago.
* ClassicVillain: Iago represents Pride and Envy.
* ConceptsAreCheap: Iago's motivation for acting against Othello is never specifically stated. Although he gives a few reasons in his monologues, it is never truly clear what he was trying to accomplish. His final words before being taken offstage can be seen as a Shakespearean [[TakeThat "fuck you"]] for anyone trying to decipher his final goal.
--> Demand me nothing: what you know, you know:
--> ''From this time forth I never will speak word.''
* CrazyJealousGuy

to:

* TheChessmaster: Iago.
* ClassicVillain:
TheChessmaster[=/=]EvilGenius[=/=]ManipulativeBastard: Iago represents Pride is absolute definition of these types, and Envy.
* ConceptsAreCheap: Iago's motivation
the inspiration for acting against Othello is never specifically stated. Although he gives a few reasons in his monologues, it is never truly clear what he was trying to accomplish. His final words before being taken offstage can be seen as a Shakespearean [[TakeThat "fuck you"]] for anyone trying to decipher his final goal.
--> Demand me nothing: what you know, you know:
--> ''From this time forth I never will speak word.''
* CrazyJealousGuy
many later characters of them.



* DrivenToSuicide: Othello in the end.
* EvilGenius: Iago.



* FallenHero: Othello.



* ForTheEvulz: Iago even says that he has no reason to destroy Othello, Desdemona, Cassio or Roderigo.

to:

* ForTheEvulz: Iago even says that Iago's motivation for acting against Othello is never specifically stated. Although he has no reason gives a few reasons in his monologues, it is never truly clear what he was trying to destroy Othello, Desdemona, Cassio or Roderigo.accomplish. His final words before being taken offstage can be seen as a Shakespearean [[TakeThat "fuck you"]] for anyone trying to decipher his final goal.
--> Demand me nothing: what you know, you know:
--> ''From this time forth I never will speak word.''



* HonorBeforeReason



** Roderigo is possibly the most stupid character in anything ever, and his stupidity directly facilitates Iago's plotting. He goes and gets smitten with Desdemona (who, given the era, is probably between twelve and sixteen years of age), and so follows her ''and her newly-wed husband'' (a big scary general) to a war-torn country in an attempt to win her back. In the meantime, he is played as a complete pawn, not only personally funding Iago's schemes, but also getting stabbed as a fundamental aspect thereof.

to:

** Roderigo is possibly the most stupid character in anything ever, and his stupidity directly facilitates Iago's plotting. He goes and gets smitten with Desdemona (who, given the era, is probably between twelve and sixteen years of age), and so follows her ''and her newly-wed husband'' (a big scary general) to a war-torn country in an attempt to win her back. In the meantime, he is played as a complete pawn, not only personally funding Iago's schemes, but also getting stabbed as a fundamental aspect thereof.



* LameComeback: When Brabantio calls Iago a villain, the latter responds "You are--a senator".
* LoveMakesYouCrazy: Othello.

to:

* LameComeback: When Brabantio calls Iago LameComeback:
-->'''Brabantio''': Thou art
a villain, the latter responds "You are--a senator".
* LoveMakesYouCrazy: Othello.
villain!\\
'''Iago''': You are a senator!



* ManipulativeBastard: Iago.
20th Mar '17 12:47:16 PM Eievie
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It's worth noting that in times past, it was usual for white actors to play Othello by way of {{Blackface}}, up to and past the 1960s. In fact, the first time a black actor played the part in a major stage production with an otherwise white cast wasn't until 1943. Thus, the early Othello movies have a {{white|MaleLead}} [[RaceLift Othello]]. It is a case of post-facto ValuesDissonance, but it [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement does not make such portrayals inherently bad.]] As a Christian Moor, or part-Moor (as in, from Morocco, although that was a catch-all term to refer to any kind of African), Othello would likely have been some sort of shade of brown - we don't really know for sure - but in his most recent portrayals he has been portrayed by very dark actors, and the 'racism' angle - often using racial stereotypes as understood in the modern USA - has been played up considerably. What slaves there were in the 16th Century Mediterranean were Slavic peoples from eastern Europe (and, in fact, the word "slave" is derived from "Slav"), and if anyone was doing the slaving it was probably an Italian, or a Turk. Racial characterisation of black people as inferior, the way we understand racism against blacks today, came after this period. A phenomenon largely, but not entirely, confined to the Americas it was a post-facto justification of sorts for the trans-Atlantic slave trade when it got going in earnest over a century later.

to:

It's worth noting that in times past, it was usual for white actors to play Othello by way of {{Blackface}}, up to and past the 1960s. In fact, the first time a black actor played the part in a major stage production with an otherwise white cast wasn't until 1943. Thus, the early Othello movies have a {{white|MaleLead}} [[RaceLift Othello]]. It is a case of post-facto ValuesDissonance, but it [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement does not make such portrayals inherently bad.]] As a Christian Moor, or part-Moor (as in, from Morocco, although that was a catch-all term to refer to any kind of African), Othello would likely have been some sort of shade of brown - we brown--we don't really know for sure - but sure--but in his most recent portrayals he has been portrayed by very dark actors, and the 'racism' angle - often "racism" angle--often using racial stereotypes as understood in the modern USA - has USA--has been played up considerably. What slaves there were in the 16th Century Mediterranean were Slavic peoples from eastern Europe (and, in fact, the word "slave" is derived from "Slav"), and if anyone was doing the slaving it was probably an Italian, or a Turk. Racial characterisation of black people as inferior, the way we understand racism against blacks today, came after this period. A phenomenon largely, but not entirely, confined to the Americas it was a post-facto justification of sorts for the trans-Atlantic slave trade when it got going in earnest over a century later.



* AllWomenAreLustful: Iago says it time and again to everyone who will listen - which is, unfortunately, everyone - and more significantly, Othello, who makes the mistake of taking Iago's advice on women as he would on the battlefield. Iago also plays a stereotype card with regards to Venetian women; Venice had a real-life contemporary reputation as a city of high-class courtesans and prostitutes of all orders. Venice has lots of prostitutes; therefore Venetian women are lustful. Desdemona is a Venetian woman; therefore she is lustful and will do anything to satisfy her appetite, including cheating on Othello. Simple.

to:

* AllWomenAreLustful: Iago says it time and again to everyone who will listen - which listen--which is, unfortunately, everyone - and everyone--and more significantly, Othello, who makes the mistake of taking Iago's advice on women as he would on the battlefield. Iago also plays a stereotype card with regards to Venetian women; Venice had a real-life contemporary reputation as a city of high-class courtesans and prostitutes of all orders. Venice has lots of prostitutes; therefore Venetian women are lustful. Desdemona is a Venetian woman; therefore she is lustful and will do anything to satisfy her appetite, including cheating on Othello. Simple.



* ArtisticLicenseBiology: Poor smothered - and stabbed - Desdemona manages to [[FinalSpeech gasp out a few words before dying]]. Dying of asphyxiation. Even by Renaissance standards, this may have stretched disbelief beyond the exigencies of the RuleOfDrama. Most adaptations and modern productions end up cutting the speech and the stabbing entirely.

to:

* ArtisticLicenseBiology: Poor smothered - and stabbed - Desdemona smothered--and stabbed--Desdemona manages to [[FinalSpeech gasp out a few words before dying]]. Dying of asphyxiation. Even by Renaissance standards, this may have stretched disbelief beyond the exigencies of the RuleOfDrama. Most adaptations and modern productions end up cutting the speech and the stabbing entirely.



* WhereDaWhiteWomenAt: Iago plays this card about Desdemona with regards to Othello as 'proof' of her sexual appetite. Iago goes on to convince Othello that Desdemona's defiance of her father in her courtship of and marriage to Othello is proof of her lustful nature, noting how 'unnatural' it is that she should prefer him - the exotic foreigner - over all the Venetian Dandies like Roderigo who have sought her hand.
** The unnatural-ness of it all vindicating, supposedly, her voracious sexual appetite. [[FridgeBrilliance Iago implies that she's already had her fill of Roderigo's type, carnally of course, and longs for a change - possibly because no local boy would marry her on account of her actually being a slut.]] All that's left is for Othello, in his anger, to connect the dots...

to:

* WhereDaWhiteWomenAt: Iago plays this card about Desdemona with regards to Othello as 'proof' "proof" of her sexual appetite. Iago goes on to convince Othello that Desdemona's defiance of her father in her courtship of and marriage to Othello is proof of her lustful nature, noting how 'unnatural' "unnatural" it is that she should prefer him - the him--the exotic foreigner - over foreigner--over all the Venetian Dandies like Roderigo who have sought her hand.
** The unnatural-ness of it all vindicating, supposedly, her voracious sexual appetite. [[FridgeBrilliance Iago implies that she's already had her fill of Roderigo's type, carnally of course, and longs for a change - possibly change--possibly because no local boy would marry her on account of her actually being a slut.]] All that's left is for Othello, in his anger, to connect the dots...
16th Mar '17 7:36:36 AM Mdumas43073
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''Othello, The Moor Of Venice'' is one of Creator/WilliamShakespeare's most famous plays. Adapted at least ten times for the screen (sometimes with setting changes), it is a play about racism (though not as we understand it today), trust, love, and betrayal.

to:

''Othello, The Moor Of of Venice'' is one of Creator/WilliamShakespeare's most famous plays. Adapted at least ten times for the screen (sometimes with setting changes), it is a play about racism (though not as we understand it today), trust, love, and betrayal.
6th Mar '17 2:33:08 AM BittersweetNSour
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* BreakingTheFourthWall: The 1995 film production had Iago look at the camera at several points; some say this adds the idea that he was in control of everything, while it is technically described as a [[http://ninjawords.com/soliloquy soliloquy]] in which the audience can more clearly understand Iago's scheme, and he's notably the only character to do so in the film. Though other characters make soliloquies, they look like they're musing to themselves rather than directly speaking to the audience. Another effect of him being the only one to talk to the camera is to emphasise the fact that he might be satanic in some way, since he's clearly operating on a whole different level to the other characters if he has a degree of MediumAwareness.

to:

* BreakingTheFourthWall: The 1995 film production had Iago look at the camera at several points; points, and at one point even places his hand over the camera lens; some say this adds the idea that he was in control of everything, while it is technically described as a [[http://ninjawords.com/soliloquy soliloquy]] in which the audience can more clearly understand Iago's scheme, and he's notably the only character to do so in the film. Though other characters make soliloquies, they look like they're musing to themselves rather than directly speaking to the audience. Another effect of him being the only one to talk to the camera is to emphasise the fact that he might be satanic in some way, since he's clearly operating on a whole different level to the other characters if he has a degree of MediumAwareness.
19th Feb '17 12:59:51 AM PaulA
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* ManipulativeBastard: Guess who?

to:

* ManipulativeBastard: Guess who?Iago.
18th Feb '17 7:30:12 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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* ManipulativeBastard

to:

* ManipulativeBastardManipulativeBastard: Guess who?
7th Jan '17 10:11:19 AM nombretomado
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* A 1952 film directed by and starring OrsonWelles
* A 1965 film starring LaurenceOlivier

to:

* A 1952 film directed by and starring OrsonWelles
Creator/OrsonWelles
* A 1965 film starring LaurenceOlivierCreator/LaurenceOlivier
27th Dec '16 12:50:34 PM KingClark
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--> "I am one, sir, that comes to tell you your daughter and the Moor are now making '''the beast with two backs!"'''
--> "Even now, now, very now, an '''old black ram''' / Is tupping '''your white ewe!"'''

to:

--> "I -->"I am one, sir, that comes to tell you your daughter and the Moor are now making '''the beast with two backs!"'''
--> "Even
backs'''!"
-->"Even
now, now, very now, an '''old black ram''' / Is tupping '''your white ewe!"'''ewe'''!"
18th Dec '16 6:03:07 PM Saveelich
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to:

* A December 2016/January 2017 performance at the [[http://www.newyorkcitytheatre.com/theaters/newyorktheaterworkshop/othello.php New York Theater Workshop]] directed by Sam Gold and starring David Oyelowo as Othello and Creator/DanielCraig as Iago sets the story in a modern-day military barracks.



** The 2016/2017 [[http://www.newyorkcitytheatre.com/theaters/newyorktheaterworkshop/othello.php New York Theater Workshop]] performance directed by Sam Gold and starring David Oyelowo as Othello and Creator/DanielCraig as Iago sets the story in a modern-day military barracks.



18th Dec '16 6:00:48 PM Saveelich
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Added DiffLines:

** The 2016/2017 [[http://www.newyorkcitytheatre.com/theaters/newyorktheaterworkshop/othello.php New York Theater Workshop]] performance directed by Sam Gold and starring David Oyelowo as Othello and Creator/DanielCraig as Iago sets the story in a modern-day military barracks.
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