History Theatre / MuchAdoAboutNothing

5th Dec '16 5:55:13 PM FiliasCupio
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* BetaCouple: Either Beatrice and Benedick or Claudio and Hero, depending on your view of the play. It's notable that King Charles II referred to the play as "Benedick and Beatrice."

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* BetaCouple: Either Beatrice and Benedick or Claudio and Hero, depending on your view of the play. It's notable that King Charles II referred to Beatrice and Benedick are the play as "Benedick lead roles (they get far more lines than anyone else), but Claudio and Beatrice."Hero's relationship drives the main plot.
24th Nov '16 10:21:29 PM Adept
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* BelligerentSexualTension: Benedick and Beatrice. Possibly the UrExample.

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* BelligerentSexualTension: Benedick and Beatrice. Possibly the UrExample.Beatrice, a couple who spends most of their time together having "a merry war" with each other.
6th Oct '16 5:55:00 AM Willbyr
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[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/much_ado_about_nothing_poster.jpg]]

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24th Sep '16 2:06:53 AM Salmobook
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* MinionWithAnFInEvil: Nearly averted. Don John is merely spiteful and petty, content to cause minor trouble now that he's been defeated. He's also rather stupid, and his minion Borrachio comes up with all the evil plots, and fleeces his boss while he's at it. But in the end, he's the one who expresses remorse and confesses, while John flees for freedom.
24th Aug '16 9:06:40 AM cordychase
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* ExactWords: During Claudio and Hero's ill-fated first wedding, Leonato attempts to smooth things over using this trope when Claudio begins to derail the event. Unfortunately, it doesn't take.
-->Friar Francis: You come hither, my lord, to marry this lady?
-->Claudio: No.
-->Leonato: To ''be'' married to her--Friar, you marry her.



* SpeakNowOrForeverHoldYourPeace

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* SpeakNowOrForeverHoldYourPeaceSlutShaming: Claudio goes off on Hero, essentially calling her a whore in the ''middle of their wedding''.
* SpeakNowOrForeverHoldYourPeace: Played with; see above. The groom himself objects.
4th May '16 9:15:48 AM Kafkesque
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* FatalFlaw: Claudio's is jealousy; Don John easily tricks him into thinking that Hero is being unfaithful. ''[[IdiotBall Twice]]''.
4th May '16 9:00:23 AM Kafkesque
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* DueToTheDead

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* DueToTheDeadDueToTheDead: Hero's actually FakingTheDead, but Claudio doesn't know that.
14th Apr '16 5:05:10 PM jamespolk
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* A [[Film/MuchAdoAboutNothing1993 1993 film]] featuring Creator/KennethBranagh and Creator/EmmaThompson as Benedick and Beatrice.

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* A [[Film/MuchAdoAboutNothing1993 1993 film]] directed by Creator/KennethBranagh, featuring Creator/KennethBranagh and Branagh as Benedict, Creator/EmmaThompson as Benedick Beatrice, and Beatrice.an AllStarCast that included Creator/DenzelWashington, Creator/KeanuReeves, Creator/MichaelKeaton, and Creator/KateBeckinsale.
11th Apr '16 7:30:13 AM broadwaygirl
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* TheChessMaster: Boraccio. Were he not overheard by the watch he would have gotten away with it all.

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* TheChessMaster: Boraccio.Borachio. Were he not overheard by the watch he would have gotten away with it all.



* ManipulativeBastard: Boraccio again. He manipulates Don John into paying him huge amounts of money to cause mischief, he convinces Margaret to pretend to be Hero whilst he seduces her, he convinces Claudio and Don Pedro that he has seduced Hero and at the end of the play he convinces Don Pedro that it was all Don John's fault and that Claudio is as much to blame for Hero's apparent suicide. And he seems to get away with it all too.

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* ManipulativeBastard: Boraccio Borachio again. He manipulates Don John into paying him huge amounts of money to cause mischief, he convinces Margaret to pretend to be Hero whilst he seduces her, he convinces Claudio and Don Pedro that he has seduced Hero and at the end of the play he convinces Don Pedro that it was all Don John's fault and that Claudio is as much to blame for Hero's apparent suicide. And he seems to get away with it all too.



* UnwittingPawn: Margaret to Boraccio.

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* UnwittingPawn: Margaret to Boraccio.Borachio.
11th Apr '16 6:27:23 AM broadwaygirl
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* BluffTheEavesdropper: Used to make Beatrice and Benedick fall in love with each other. Benedict and Beatrice's ''reactions'' to what they overhear are prime opportunities for physical comedy.

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* BluffTheEavesdropper: Used to make Beatrice and Benedick fall in love with each other. Benedict Benedick and Beatrice's ''reactions'' to what they overhear are prime opportunities for physical comedy.



* {{Foreshadowing}}: Benedick and Beatrice both have lines that indicate their affections for each other well before the ZanyScheme: Benedick says that Beatrice "exceeds [Hero] as much in beauty as the first of May doth the last of December," and Beatrice confides to someone she thinks is a stranger (actually Benedick in disguise) that she wishes Benedick had "boarded" her. Also noteworthy is that one of Beatrice's very first lines in the play involves asking after Benedict's well-being under the pretense of mocking his military service.

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* {{Foreshadowing}}: Benedick and Beatrice both have lines that indicate their affections for each other well before the ZanyScheme: Benedick says that Beatrice "exceeds [Hero] as much in beauty as the first of May doth the last of December," and Beatrice confides to someone she thinks is a stranger (actually Benedick in disguise) that she wishes Benedick had "boarded" her. Also noteworthy is that one of Beatrice's very first lines in the play involves asking after Benedict's Benedick's well-being under the pretense of mocking his military service.



* ImportantHaircut: After they convince Benedick that Beatrice is in love with him, Don Pedro and Claudio run into Benedick and notice that he has shaved. They start teasing him about his sudden clean-shaven appearance, seeing this as proof that their ploy to get him to fall for Beatrice has worked. Not used in many productions, but used to great effect in the Joss Whedon film version. This may also be combined with Beatrice's earlier jabs about not liking men with beards or clean-shaven men, perhaps having Benedict shave his beard into a mustache in a clever nod to that earlier scene ([[TakeAThirdOption he doesn't have a beard anymore, but neither is he clean shaven]]!).

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* ImportantHaircut: After they convince Benedick that Beatrice is in love with him, Don Pedro and Claudio run into Benedick and notice that he has shaved. They start teasing him about his sudden clean-shaven appearance, seeing this as proof that their ploy to get him to fall for Beatrice has worked. Not used in many productions, but used to great effect in the Joss Whedon film version. This may also be combined with Beatrice's earlier jabs about not liking men with beards or clean-shaven men, perhaps having Benedict Benedick shave his beard into a mustache in a clever nod to that earlier scene ([[TakeAThirdOption he doesn't have a beard anymore, but neither is he clean shaven]]!).
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