History Theatre / MacBeth

7th Jul '16 12:43:06 AM morenohijazo
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* ProphecyArmor: Macbeth believes he has this near the end, thanks to the witches' prophecy that "none of woman born shall harm Macbeth".

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* ProphecyArmor: Macbeth believes he has this near the end, thanks to the witches' prophecy that "none of woman born shall harm Macbeth". In the final battle, even though the odds seem to stand greatly against him, Macbeth takes courage from the fact that he still cannot be defeated by anyone "born of woman", and warns his opponents to attack him because (he thinks) he is unkillable. This assumption proves to be wrong with Macduff, [[NoManOfWomanBorn who was delivered by Caesarean section]].
-->''Let fall thy blade on vulnerable crests:\\
I bear a charmed life, which must not yield\\
To one of woman born.''
21st Jun '16 7:27:58 PM PaulA
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* ProphecyArmor: Macbeth believes he has this near the end, thanks to the witches' prophecy that "none of woman born shall harm Macbeth".
19th Jun '16 1:16:45 PM Gravidef
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* CreepyChild: The 2011 Royal Shakespeare Company production changed the Weird Sisters into three eerie children--two boys and one girl. This made the Act IV prophecy scene especially creepy; the three played with dolls as they gave their predictions.
17th Jun '16 10:55:41 AM Thorion
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** The 1978 filmed staged production featuring Creator/IanMckellan in the title role did much of the same. The witches are portrayed as charlatans taking advantage of a man's superstitious belief in something as dated as fate and have an OhCrap moment when Macbeth asks them to show him if Banquo's issue will ever reign in Scotland.

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** The 1978 filmed staged production featuring Creator/IanMckellan Creator/IanMckellen in the title role did much of the same. The witches are portrayed as charlatans taking advantage of a man's superstitious belief in something as dated as fate and have an OhCrap moment when Macbeth asks them to show him if Banquo's issue will ever reign in Scotland.
17th Jun '16 10:54:56 AM Thorion
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* MaybeMagicMaybeMundane: The 1983 BBC production made for television did not show Banquo's ghost, instead all we saw was an empty chair. Likewise, for the apparitions all we saw Macbeth's reaction making it all seem like Macbeth going insane. However, the prophecy involving Birnam Wood, no man of woman born and all that still comes true as the text dictates it must.

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* MaybeMagicMaybeMundane: The MaybeMagicMaybeMundane:
**The
1983 BBC production made for television did not show Banquo's ghost, instead all we saw was an empty chair. Likewise, for the apparitions all we saw Macbeth's reaction making it all seem like Macbeth going insane. However, the prophecy involving Birnam Wood, no man of woman born and all that still comes true as the text dictates it must.must.
** The 1978 filmed staged production featuring Creator/IanMckellan in the title role did much of the same. The witches are portrayed as charlatans taking advantage of a man's superstitious belief in something as dated as fate and have an OhCrap moment when Macbeth asks them to show him if Banquo's issue will ever reign in Scotland.
13th Jun '16 10:50:27 AM AndIntroducingALeg
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Shakespeare also takes liberties with the facts, although in his case his changes are {{justifi|edTrope}}able as they [[PragmaticAdaptation improve the dramatic tension and the flow of the action]]; after all, he was writing a play, not a history. For instance, he makes Duncan a wise, old good king ([[AlternativeCharacterInterpretation at least superficially]]) instead of a young wastrel, he has Macbeth [[DickDastardlyStopsToCheat kill him while sleeping instead of in a fair fight]], and he compresses the action into two seasons when the real Macbeth ruled for 17 years (and successfully).

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Shakespeare also takes liberties with the facts, although in his case his changes are {{justifi|edTrope}}able as they [[PragmaticAdaptation improve the dramatic tension and the flow of the action]]; after all, he was writing a play, not a history. For instance, he makes Duncan a wise, old good king ([[AlternativeCharacterInterpretation at least superficially]]) instead of a young wastrel, he has Macbeth [[DickDastardlyStopsToCheat kill him while sleeping instead of in a fair fight]], and he compresses the action into two seasons when the real Macbeth ruled for 17 years (and successfully).
successfully). He also leaves aside the fact that the real Macbeth actually did have a legitimate claim to the throne[[labelnote: *]]For centuries, the succession rule in Scotland was called Tannistry, by which the throne alternated between different branches of descent from the first King, [=Kenneth MacAlpin=]. Duncan's father, Malcolm II, had been the first to attempt to abandon it in favour of his eldest son. By Tannistry, it would have been Macbeth's branch's turn[[/labelnote]].
6th May '16 7:29:29 AM snichols1973
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* NiceJobFixingItVillain: The murderers successfully kill Banquo, but Fleance escapes, which makes the Witches' prophecy to Banquo that "he shall get kings, though thou be none" more ominous when Macbeth asks if Banquo's descendants will ever reign, followed by a train of ghosts whose appearances resemble Banquo's future descendanta.

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* NiceJobFixingItVillain: The murderers successfully kill Banquo, but Fleance escapes, which makes the Witches' prophecy to Banquo that "he shall get kings, though thou be none" more ominous when Macbeth asks if Banquo's descendants will ever reign, followed by a train of ghosts whose appearances resemble Banquo's future descendanta.descendants.
6th May '16 7:28:33 AM snichols1973
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* Foreshadowing: Duncan mentions that the treacherous Thane of Cawdor who had just been executed for treason in Act I, Scene 4 "was a gentleman on whom I built an absolute trust." The irony is that Macbeth, the new Thane of Cawdor, is the one who will murder Duncan, who rewarded and praised Macbeth's heroic accomplishments on the battlefield.

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* Foreshadowing: {{Foreshadowing}}: Duncan mentions that the treacherous Thane of Cawdor who had just been executed for treason in Act I, Scene 4 "was a gentleman on whom I built an absolute trust." The irony is that In an ironic contrast, Macbeth, the new Thane of Cawdor, is the one who will murder Duncan, who has just rewarded and praised Macbeth's heroic accomplishments on the battlefield.


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* NiceJobFixingItVillain: The murderers successfully kill Banquo, but Fleance escapes, which makes the Witches' prophecy to Banquo that "he shall get kings, though thou be none" more ominous when Macbeth asks if Banquo's descendants will ever reign, followed by a train of ghosts whose appearances resemble Banquo's future descendanta.
6th May '16 7:06:20 AM snichols1973
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Added DiffLines:

* Foreshadowing: Duncan mentions that the treacherous Thane of Cawdor who had just been executed for treason in Act I, Scene 4 "was a gentleman on whom I built an absolute trust." The irony is that Macbeth, the new Thane of Cawdor, is the one who will murder Duncan, who rewarded and praised Macbeth's heroic accomplishments on the battlefield.
3rd May '16 3:51:10 PM Erivale
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* VillainousValor: Macbeth, at the end. Having spent the latter half of the play convinced nobody can kill him, all the omens of his doom are before him and he loses his courage. Then, realizing he'll be captured and humiliated, he resolves to go down fighting, and does.
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