History Theatre / KingLear

27th Dec '15 5:31:29 AM LahmacunKebab
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## Being blatant about it: the recent Royal Shakespeare Company run with Creator/IanMcKellen had an execution scene that served to explain his disappearance and emphasise the growing cruelty of England under Regan and Goneril. The Fool's FamousLastWords were made into his "Merlin prophecy" in Act 3 Scene 2, making for some fun thoughts of terror.(Lear does say, "And my poor fool is hanged," in the final scene, but it's not clear exactly what this means.)
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## Being blatant about it: the recent Royal Shakespeare Company run with Creator/IanMcKellen had an execution scene that served to explain his disappearance and emphasise the growing cruelty of England under Regan and Goneril. The Fool's FamousLastWords were made into his "Merlin prophecy" in Act 3 Scene 2, making for some fun thoughts of terror. (Lear does say, "And my poor fool is hanged," in the final scene, but it's not clear exactly what this means.)

%%* WhatTheHellHero: Even though he's the king, multiple characters speak out against [[{{Jerkass}} Lear's behavior]].
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%%* * WhatTheHellHero: Even though he's the king, multiple characters speak out against [[{{Jerkass}} Lear's behavior]].behavior]] when he makes his big mistake: disowning Cordelia.
27th Dec '15 5:26:13 AM LahmacunKebab
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* LadyOfWar: Affairs in France force Cordelia's husband to remind behind when the French army comes to Lear's aid, and even though a conversation mentions the man assigned to lead in his absence, Cordelia is the only one shown to be in charge.
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* LadyOfWar: Affairs in France force Cordelia's husband to remind remain behind when the French army comes to Lear's aid, and even though a conversation mentions the man assigned to lead in his absence, Cordelia is the only one shown to be in charge.

%%* ObfuscatingStupidity: The Fool.
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%%* * ObfuscatingStupidity: The Fool.Fool. Despite being, well, a Fool, he is one of the wisest characters of the play.
27th Dec '15 5:02:50 AM LahmacunKebab
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** The entire play does this to Lear: from a haughty king to a broken man who ends up having a DeathBy Despair.
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** The entire play does this to Lear: from a haughty king to a broken man who ends up having a DeathBy Despair.DeathByDespair.

%%* XanatosGambit: Most of Edmund's scheming involves letting two people destroy each other while remaining in the trust of both of them.
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%%* * XanatosGambit: Most of Edmund's scheming involves letting two people (his father and his brother, Goneril and Regan) destroy each other while remaining in the trust of both of them.
27th Dec '15 5:01:21 AM LahmacunKebab
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** The entire play does this to Lear.
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** The entire play does this to Lear.Lear: from a haughty king to a broken man who ends up having a DeathBy Despair.

%%* SanitySlippage: Lear.
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%%* * SanitySlippage: Lear.Lear. His BreakTheHaughty breaks his sanity too.
27th Dec '15 4:58:19 AM LahmacunKebab
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%%* BattleButler: The disguised Earl of Kent becomes this to Lear.
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%%* * BattleButler: The disguised Earl of Kent becomes this to Lear.

%%* BreakTheHaughty: %%** The entire play does this to Lear. %%** Gloucester. Observe how his behaviour changes after he becomes blind.
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%%* * BreakTheHaughty: %%** ** The entire play does this to Lear. %%** ** Gloucester. Observe how his behaviour changes after he becomes blind.

%%* EvilerThanThou: Edmund's ruthless pragmatism generally gets the better of Regan and Goneril's more personal vendettas.
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%%* * EvilerThanThou: Edmund's ruthless pragmatism generally gets the better of Regan and Goneril's more personal vendettas.vendettas. They even end up falling in love with him, allowing him to manipulate them.

* IndyPloy: Edgar doesn't even know who's really behind the plot against him at first, but he manages to disguise himself, help his friends, uncover the real plot and foil Edmund with little more than the the clothes on his back - and at one point, he loses those, too.
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* IndyPloy: Edgar doesn't even know who's really behind the plot against him at first, but he manages to disguise himself, help his friends, uncover the real plot and foil Edmund with little more than the the clothes on his back - and at one point, he loses those, too.

%%* KillEmAll: This play has one heck of a body count.
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%%* * KillEmAll: This play has one heck of a body count.count. But it's a Shakespearian tragedy, so it was to be expected.
19th Dec '15 12:19:34 PM LordGro
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Good style does not have to be expensive.
* BastardBastard: Edmund. He gets a lengthy soliloquy on why his bastard status causes him to be treated as a lesser man than his brother Edgar. Unlike most examples, his noble father the Earl of Gloucester acknowledges and loves Edmund, but that's not good enough—he wants to be the heir, and he'll do what it takes to make it happen.
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* BastardBastard: Edmund. He Edmund gets a lengthy soliloquy on why his bastard status causes him to be treated as a lesser man than his brother Edgar. Unlike most examples, his noble father the Earl of Gloucester acknowledges and loves Edmund, but that's not good enough—he wants to be the heir, and he'll do what it takes to make it happen.
19th Dec '15 10:09:33 AM SorPepita
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It's also been adapted into literature, such as Jane Smiley's 1991 novel ''AThousandAcres'', itself adapted into a movie. A reimagining of the story from the [[PerspectiveFlip perspective]] of the Fool was written by [[Literature/{{Fool}} Christopher Moore]].
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It's also been adapted into literature, such as Jane Smiley's 1991 novel ''AThousandAcres'', ''A Thousand Acres'', itself adapted into a movie. A reimagining of the story from the [[PerspectiveFlip perspective]] of the Fool was written by [[Literature/{{Fool}} Christopher Moore]].
13th Nov '15 3:41:20 AM MasoTey
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Copying in example text from the Bastard Bastard trope page.
%%* BastardBastard: Edmund.
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%%* * BastardBastard: Edmund.Edmund. He gets a lengthy soliloquy on why his bastard status causes him to be treated as a lesser man than his brother Edgar. Unlike most examples, his noble father the Earl of Gloucester acknowledges and loves Edmund, but that's not good enough—he wants to be the heir, and he'll do what it takes to make it happen.
28th Sep '15 10:14:54 PM morenohijazo
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Added DiffLines:

Added DiffLines:
* SymbolicMutilation: Gloucester. There are numerous references to eyes and him in the text. He can't see the truth about his sons [[CainAndAbel Edgar and Edmund]], due to [[BastardBastard Edmund]] though he is quite gullible. Eventually he gets his eyes torn out.
18th Sep '15 6:50:16 PM WarriorsGate
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* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: In one of the oldest and most famous examples of this trope, The Fool abruptly disappears from the play between Acts 3 and 4. Different productions handle this in different manners, e.g.
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* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: In one of the oldest and most famous examples of this trope, The Fool abruptly disappears from the play between Acts 3 and 4. The reigning explanation is that the Fool shared an actor with Cordelia, as he disappears right around the time she reenters the narrative. Different productions handle this in different manners, e.g.
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