History Theatre / KingLear

6th Nov '17 11:50:29 AM snichols1973
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* AntiVillain: The Duke of Albany. From his point of view, all he is doing is defending England from an invasion of France. He knows damn well that Edmund is an untrustworthy bastard and that neither his wife nor sister-in-law are much better, but he feels forced to work with them by circumstance in case the French are here to conquer, which pits him against Cordelia and Lear.

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* AntiVillain: The Duke of Albany. From his point of view, all he is doing is defending England from an invasion of France. He knows damn well that Edmund is an untrustworthy bastard and that neither his wife nor sister-in-law are much better, but he feels forced to work with them by circumstance in case the French are here to conquer, which pits him against Cordelia and Lear. This changes near the end when he discovers Goneril's letter intended for Edmund which is an attempted plot on Albany's life, which leads Albany to arrest Edmund and Goneril.



** Old Gloucester, when Edmund steals his property and Cornwall gouges his eyes out.



* ChuckCunninghamSyndrome: The Fool vanishes from the play between Acts and his whereabouts are never accounted for. Many speculate that the character probably was meant to have died and that the scene explicitly stating or depicting this was lost. His final line about "Going to bed at noon," has been interpreted as {{foreshadowing}} his demise. Another theory is that the Fool and Cordelia may have been depicted by the same actor in the original production, necessitating the disappearance of one when the other reenters the play. Some productions have Lear, while mad, accidentally killing him. Since he is a comic character, The Fool's disappearance may very well indicate the play's shift to the subsequent tragedies that befall [[spoiler: Cornwall and his servant, Oswald, Gloucester, Goneril, Regan, Edmund, Cordelia, and King Lear]]. A line in the fifth act from Lear says "my poor fool is hanged", but the f is lowercase - leading to doubt as to whether The Fool was hanged offscreen.

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* ChuckCunninghamSyndrome: The Fool vanishes from the play between Acts after Act 3, Scene 6, and his whereabouts are never accounted for. Many speculate that the character probably was meant to have died and that the scene explicitly stating or depicting this was lost. His final line about "Going to bed at noon," has been interpreted as {{foreshadowing}} his demise. Another theory is that the Fool and Cordelia may have been depicted by the same actor in the original production, necessitating the disappearance of one when the other reenters the play. Some productions have Lear, while mad, accidentally killing him. Since he is a comic character, The Fool's disappearance may very well indicate the play's shift to the subsequent tragedies that befall [[spoiler: Cornwall and his servant, Oswald, Gloucester, Goneril, Regan, Edmund, Cordelia, and King Lear]]. A line in the fifth act from Lear says "my poor fool is hanged", but the f "f" is lowercase - leading to doubt as to whether The Fool was hanged offscreen.
5th Nov '17 6:10:50 PM JesseMB27
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* CanonForeigner: In relation to the source material by Geoffrey of Monmouth, the Earl of Gloucester, his sons Edgar and Edmund, and the Earl of Kent were neither present in the ''Literature/HistoriaRegumBritanniae'' nor had any specific analogues.


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* SpellMyNameWithAnS: Lear himself is a recipient of this. In Geoffrey of Monmouth's ''Literature/HistoriaRegumBritanniae'', the king's name was spelled with an "i" as "Leir".
5th Nov '17 12:47:27 PM fearlessnikki
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* {{Irony}}: As part of his BreakTheHaughty, Lear expresses sympathy for a poor homeless beggar. Said beggar is actually a prince in disguise.



* NoPronunciationGuide: Gloucester can be a tricky one for any productions outside England. Despite the spelling, it's 'gloss-ter'. Getting it wrong into 'glow-ster' or 'gloss-chess-ter' is quite common.

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* NoPronunciationGuide: NoPronunciationGuide:
**
Gloucester can be a tricky one for any productions outside England. Despite the spelling, it's 'gloss-ter'. Getting it wrong into 'glow-ster' or 'gloss-chess-ter' is quite common.common.
** Regan too. 'Ree-gan' is the correct way, but it's not uncommon to also hear 'ray-gan' or [[Film/TheExorcist 'reggan']].
** And Albany can either be 'all-bany' or 'al-bany'.


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* OlderHeroVersusYoungerVillain: Kent, who is forty-eight years old, is one of the most heroic characters in the play. His antagonists are the two wicked sisters, who are much younger.
29th Oct '17 3:03:54 AM Aquila89
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* TemptingFate: Edgar, after he's wrongly accused and has to disguise himself as a homeless madman, tries to console himself by saying that he has reached RockBottom and things can only get better for him. Immediately after, he meets his father who has just been blinded.
-->'''Edgar:''' O gods! Who is ’t can say “I am at the worst”?\\
I am worse than e'er I was.\\
And worse I may be yet. The worst is not\\
So long as we can say “This is the worst.”
18th Oct '17 7:34:25 AM fearlessnikki
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* SacrificialLion: Cornwall dies at the end of the third act to show that AnyoneCanDie.


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** An Irish theatre company called ''Thirteenth Floor'' did a version in 2017 where The Fool is entirely a figment of Lear's imagination, also giving him a GenderFlip to imply that it's the ghost of his dead wife. Very little had to be changed, aside from the other characters not being able to see her. Ironically The Fool continued to appear in the background after her final line.
24th Sep '17 4:58:08 PM fearlessnikki
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* ArcNumber: Three:
** Lear has three daughters.
** There are three in Gloucester's family - himself, Edgar and Edmund.
** Characters frequently travel in groups of three - Lear, Kent and the Fool; Cornwall, Regan and Goneril.
** There are three survivors by the end.


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* FaceHeelDoubleTurn: In the first act of the play, Lear is set up as the unsympathetic one, while Goneril and Regan appear to be more sympathetic. Then the two sisters' evil deeds come to the forefront, and Lear is treated in such a way that BreakTheHaughty is in full play.


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* FourIsDeath: The first scene of the fourth act confirms the first CharacterDeath.


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* SweetAndSourGrapes: Cordelia refuses to stroke Lear's ego like her two sisters. Although this earns her no favour with her father, his disinheriting her results in the shallow Burgundy abandoning his offer of marriage (to Cordelia's own pleasure it's implied). And France is so enchanted with her virtue that he marries her dowerless - and makes her his Queen. So Cordelia gets to rule a whole kingdom, as opposed to having to deal with a divided share and her senile father.


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* WouldntHitAGirl: Albany says of much after discovering Goneril's affair with Edmund.
--> "a woman's shape doth shield thee."
19th Sep '17 2:46:55 PM IllustriousAsinine
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* KillTheCutie: [[spoiler: Cordelia will never get a break]].
17th Sep '17 5:57:49 AM Dragon101
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Added DiffLines:

* AntiVillain: The Duke of Albany. From his point of view, all he is doing is defending England from an invasion of France. He knows damn well that Edmund is an untrustworthy bastard and that neither his wife nor sister-in-law are much better, but he feels forced to work with them by circumstance in case the French are here to conquer, which pits him against Cordelia and Lear.


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* TokenGoodTeammate: The Duke of Albany to Edmund, Reagan and his wife Goneril.
8th Sep '17 10:59:36 AM fearlessnikki
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* AlasPoorVillain:
** [[spoiler: Edmund repents on his deathbed, lamenting that he was born inherently evil, because he was illegitimate]].
** A lot of productions will portray [[spoiler: Cornwall's death sadly, if his and Regan's marriage is shown to be a happy one]]. It does mark the start of AnyoneCanDie.



* FailedAttemptAtDrama: When Albany first stands up to Goneril - "you are not worth the dust which the wind blows in your face" - she just finds it funny, given his meek disposition.



* FrenchJerk: Averted. The King of France is by far the more decent of Cordelia's suitors and proves a good and loyal husband to her.

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* FrenchJerk: Averted. The King of France is by far the more decent of Cordelia's suitors and proves a good and loyal husband to her. Although if you want to get technical, Burgundy is a region of France too - and he refuses to marry Cordelia when she's disinherited.
* GenderFlip: The Fool has sometimes been played by a woman, notably Linda Kerr Scott in a 1990 production.



* TheIngenue: Cordelia is a classic example, in contrast to her two scheming sisters. Notably Regan and Goneril have a sexual aspect to them (as they both have affairs with Edmund), whereas Cordelia's marriage is depicted as a loving one. She does however prove to be SilkHidingSteel.



* PetTheDog: Goneril seems to have some affection for her servant Oswald

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* PerfectlyArrangedMarriage:
** France is so enchanted by Cordelia's virtue that he marries her when she is disinherited. Their married life isn't shown, but she seems to be happy.
** An evil version in Regan and Cornwall, who work extremely well together as villains.
* PetTheDog: Goneril seems to have some affection for her servant OswaldOswald.
6th Sep '17 12:52:41 PM fruitstripegum
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* WhatTheHellHero: Even though he's the king, multiple characters speak out against [[{{Jerkass}} Lear's behavior]] when he makes his big mistake: disowning Cordelia.



* WhatTheHellHero: Even though he's the king, multiple characters speak out against [[{{Jerkass}} Lear's behavior]] when he makes his big mistake: disowning Cordelia.
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