History Theatre / KingLear

16th Jun '17 10:35:33 AM fearlessnikki
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* AcquittedTooLate: [[spoiler: Edmund sends someone to pardon Lear and Cordelia's execution on his deathbed, but he's too late and Cordelia is hanged]].



* ChuckCunninghamSyndrome: The Fool vanishes from the play between Acts and his whereabouts are never accounted for. Many speculate that the character probably was meant to have died and that the scene explicitly stating or depicting this was lost. His final line about "Going to bed at noon," has been interpreted as {{foreshadowing}} his demise. Another theory is that the Fool and Cordelia may have been depicted by the same actor in the original production, necessitating the disappearance of one when the other reenters the play. Some productions have Lear, while mad, accidentally killing him. Since he is a comic character, The Fool's disappearance may very well indicate the play's shift to the subsequent tragedies that befall [[spoiler: Cornwall and his servant, Oswald, Gloucester, Goneril, Regan, Edmund, Cordelia, and King Lear]].
** Having just checked both the 1608 Quarto and the Folio text in my copy of the Oxford edition, I don't understand this one. Both copies of the text outright state that the Fool is hanged.
*** With this line, Lear is actually using the term "fool" to refer endearingly to Cordelia, who [[spoiler: was hanged in prison]].

to:

* ChuckCunninghamSyndrome: The Fool vanishes from the play between Acts and his whereabouts are never accounted for. Many speculate that the character probably was meant to have died and that the scene explicitly stating or depicting this was lost. His final line about "Going to bed at noon," has been interpreted as {{foreshadowing}} his demise. Another theory is that the Fool and Cordelia may have been depicted by the same actor in the original production, necessitating the disappearance of one when the other reenters the play. Some productions have Lear, while mad, accidentally killing him. Since he is a comic character, The Fool's disappearance may very well indicate the play's shift to the subsequent tragedies that befall [[spoiler: Cornwall and his servant, Oswald, Gloucester, Goneril, Regan, Edmund, Cordelia, and King Lear]].
** Having just checked both
Lear]]. A line in the 1608 Quarto and fifth act from Lear says "my poor fool is hanged", but the Folio text in my copy of the Oxford edition, I don't understand this one. Both copies of the text outright state that the f is lowercase - leading to doubt as to whether The Fool is hanged.
*** With this line, Lear is actually using the term "fool" to refer endearingly to Cordelia, who [[spoiler:
was hanged in prison]].offscreen.



* HairContrastDuo: It's not uncommon for productions to cast actresses with the same hair colour to play Goneril and Regan, and a contrasting colour for Cordelia. A planned film in the late 2000s would have had the evil sisters played by blondes Gwyneth Paltrow and Naomi Watts while brunette Keira Knightley would have played Cordelia.



%%* LongList

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%%* LongList* LongList: Kent gives Oswald a list of what he knows him for - "A knave; a rascal; an eater of broken meats; a base, proud, shallow, beggarly, three-suited, hundred-pound, filthy, worsted-stocking knave; a lily-liver'd, action-taking, whoreson, glass-gazing, superserviceable, finical rogue; one-trunk-inheriting slave; one that wouldst be a bawd in way of good service, and art nothing but the composition of a knave, beggar, coward, pander, and the son and heir of a mongrel bitch." - also doubling as a PreAssKickingOneLiner.



%%* {{Tragedy}}

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%%* {{Tragedy}}* {{Tragedy}}: This is one of Shakespeare's classic four tragedies. Lear's actions bring nothing but doom and misery upon those around him, and his FatalFlaw is the cause of most of them.
17th May '17 9:04:22 AM DocJamore
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A {{tragedy}} by Creator/WilliamShakespeare, though the story is older than that, first found in the ''Literature/HistoriaRegumBritanniae'' (the tragic ending ''isn't'', though).c

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A {{tragedy}} by Creator/WilliamShakespeare, though the story is older than that, first found in the ''Literature/HistoriaRegumBritanniae'' (the tragic ending ''isn't'', though).c
though).
4th May '17 10:21:53 AM Jeduthun
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Added DiffLines:

* CouldHaveAvoidedThisPlot: The entire tragedy is set in motion by Lear's completely avoidable decision to disown Cordelia and give the kingdom to Regan and Goneril. He realizes as early as scene 4 that this was a terrible mistake, but by then it's too late.
20th Apr '17 7:12:42 PM ading
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* OnlySaneMan: Kent is the one who calls Lear out on the ridiculousness of his actions - dividing the kingdom and banishing his youngest daughter. He's also sane enough to realise that Lear will still need him once his daughters are in power.

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* OnlySaneMan: Kent is the one who calls Lear out on the ridiculousness of his actions - dividing the kingdom and banishing his youngest daughter. He's also sane enough to realise that Lear will still need him once his daughters are in power. Also, The Fool, who is ironically far more wise than any other character.


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* RedemptionEqualsDeath: Lear, while not evil, is a temperamental, power-hungry {{Jerkass}} who thinks only of himself. Unlike most of Shakespeare's {{Tragic Hero}}es, he does see the error of his ways and becomes a genuinely good person by the end... but his transformation comes too late to prevent him from losing everything, including, ultimately, his life.
2nd Apr '17 12:50:08 AM LordGro
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* {{Sequel}}: To Theatre/TroilusAndCressida but only on a technicality: Lear is descended from Aeneas with that information being a case of AllThereInTheManual, said manual being British legend.
28th Mar '17 5:24:39 PM Thorion
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* {{Sequel}}: To Theatre/TroilusAndCressida but only on a technicality: Lear is descended from Aeneas.

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* {{Sequel}}: To Theatre/TroilusAndCressida but only on a technicality: Lear is descended from Aeneas. Aeneas with that information being a case of AllThereInTheManual, said manual being British legend.
28th Mar '17 2:13:40 PM Thorion
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Added DiffLines:

* AdaptedOut: Lear's grandsons by Goneril and Regan and their husbands.


Added DiffLines:

* {{Sequel}}: To Theatre/TroilusAndCressida but only on a technicality: Lear is descended from Aeneas.
1st Mar '17 8:19:20 PM TheBlackAngel07
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*** With this line, Lear is actually using the term fool to refer endearingly to Cordelia, who was hanged in prison.

to:

*** With this line, Lear is actually using the term fool "fool" to refer endearingly to Cordelia, who [[spoiler: was hanged in prison.prison]].
1st Mar '17 8:18:11 PM TheBlackAngel07
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Added DiffLines:

*** With this line, Lear is actually using the term fool to refer endearingly to Cordelia, who was hanged in prison.
7th Feb '17 6:48:34 AM ImperialMajestyXO
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* BastardBastard: Edmund gets a lengthy soliloquy on why his bastard status causes him to be treated as a lesser man than his brother Edgar. Unlike most examples, his noble father the Earl of Gloucester acknowledges and loves Edmund, but that's not good enough—he wants to be the heir, and he'll do what it takes to make it happen.

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* BastardBastard: Edmund gets a lengthy soliloquy on why his bastard status causes him to be treated as a lesser man than his brother half-brother Edgar. Unlike most examples, his noble father the Earl of Gloucester acknowledges and loves Edmund, but that's not good enough—he wants to be the heir, and he'll do what it takes to make it happen.
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