History Theatre / JuliusCaesar

10th Jun '16 6:33:56 AM AnotherGuy
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Added DiffLines:

* StealthPun: "Beware the Ides of March" would have been one to audiences at the time, as March 15, not April 15, was tax day in England.
30th Apr '16 7:41:19 AM Aquila89
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30th Apr '16 7:40:53 AM Aquila89
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* CouldSayItBut: Brutus is an honourable man, so [[SuspiciouslySpecificDenial Antony won't]].

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* CouldSayItBut: Brutus is an honourable man, so [[SuspiciouslySpecificDenial Antony won't]].in his funeral speech, when talking about why he won't read Caesar's will to the crowd.
-->You are not wood, you are not stones, but men;\\
And, being men, bearing the will of Caesar,\\
It will inflame you, it will make you mad:\\
'Tis good you know not that you are his heirs;\\
For, if you should, O, what would come of it!
11th Apr '16 9:34:37 AM AnotherGuy
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The play was adapted to film several times. The most famous is the 1953 version, which starred Creator/MarlonBrando as Mark Antony and received an UsefulNotes/AcademyAward nomination for Best Picture.

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The play was adapted to film several times. The 1937 version by Creator/OrsonWelles was an attack on Nazism. The most famous is the 1953 version, which starred Creator/MarlonBrando as Mark Antony and received an UsefulNotes/AcademyAward nomination for Best Picture.
11th Apr '16 9:33:58 AM AnotherGuy
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-->'''First citizen:''' Tear him for his bad verses, tear him for his bad verses!

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-->'''First citizen:''' Tear him for his bad verses, tear him for his bad verses!verses![[note]]In other words: "Well, you shouldn't have named yourself after Cinna."[[/note]]
11th Apr '16 9:32:17 AM AnotherGuy
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* ScareChord: In Creator/OrsonWelles' famous version, the play was considered pedestrian until they changed the murder of the poet Cinna by a mob. The change was that Cinna was grabbed by a mob accompanied by ''all'' of the keys of a pipe organ being blasted, as he's dragged into the darkness to his doom. Every performance was a sellout afterward.

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* ScareChord: In Creator/OrsonWelles' famous version, the play was considered pedestrian until they changed [[https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/4b/fb/8e/4bfb8e7ed0f3957790dbff0d70f58b1b.jpg the murder of the poet Cinna Cinna]] by a mob. The change was that Cinna was grabbed by a mob accompanied by ''all'' of the keys of a pipe organ being blasted, as he's dragged into the darkness to his doom. Every performance was a sellout afterward.
11th Apr '16 9:15:35 AM AnotherGuy
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* PuttingOnTheReich: Creator/OrsonWelles' version was set in a Nazi-like Rome.
11th Apr '16 9:14:49 AM AnotherGuy
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* ScareChord: In Creator/OrsonWelles' famous version, the play was considered pedestrian until they changed the murder of the poet Cassius by a mob. The change was that Cassius was grabbed by a mob accompanied by ''all'' of the keys of a pipe organ being blasted, as he's dragged into the darkness to his doom. Every performance was a sellout afterward.

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* ScareChord: In Creator/OrsonWelles' famous version, the play was considered pedestrian until they changed the murder of the poet Cassius Cinna by a mob. The change was that Cassius Cinna was grabbed by a mob accompanied by ''all'' of the keys of a pipe organ being blasted, as he's dragged into the darkness to his doom. Every performance was a sellout afterward.
11th Apr '16 9:14:02 AM AnotherGuy
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Added DiffLines:

* ScareChord: In Creator/OrsonWelles' famous version, the play was considered pedestrian until they changed the murder of the poet Cassius by a mob. The change was that Cassius was grabbed by a mob accompanied by ''all'' of the keys of a pipe organ being blasted, as he's dragged into the darkness to his doom. Every performance was a sellout afterward.
31st Mar '16 12:54:19 PM roxana
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* ThirdPersonPerson: Caesar often refers to himself in third person, which serves to demonstrate his gigantic ego. TruthInTelevision; Caesar did this in his writing.

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* ThirdPersonPerson: Caesar often refers to himself in third person, which serves to demonstrate his gigantic ego. TruthInTelevision; Caesar did this in his writing.writing as was literary convention well into the Middle Ages.
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