History Theatre / HenryV

18th Nov '15 7:13:30 PM PaulA
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separate section for tropes that aren't in the original play
!!This play and the filmed productions contain examples of:
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!!This !!The play and the filmed productions contain contains examples of:

* AdaptationalWimp. The First Citizen of Harfleur is presented as a bit of a wuss, especially in the Kenneth Branagh film. The real life Commander of Harfleur was all round Badass Raoul de Gaucourt, a highly intelligent, chivalrous commander who held up Henry's way superior army with 200 professional soldiers and 1,000 citizens with crossbows. Only when the DirtyCoward Dauphin refused to aid him did he finally surrender.

* ArmourIsUseless. Implied in Brannagh's film, as the French all wear full plate armor and are easily killed by the English arrows, as well as by swords and daggers. Partly TruthInTelevision, as 15th century armor was often strong enough to resist even the English longbow but would knock the wearer down. Considering that the field was a mudbath, this would prove deadly. * ArmorPiercingSlap: Exeter performs one on Lord Scroop while arresting him in the 1989 film. Whereas the other traitors flinched when he arrested them and tore off their badges of office, Scroop remained stoic, so Exeter angrily slapped him to rob him of his dignity.

* AuthorityEqualsAsskicking: Henry. Depending upon the production, also Westmoreland, Salisbury and Essex (particularly when played by BRIAN BLESSED!)
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* AuthorityEqualsAsskicking: Henry. Depending upon the production, also Westmoreland, Salisbury and Essex (particularly when played by BRIAN BLESSED!)

* CompositeCharacter: Some of the roles in the Branagh production, such as the French ambassador or an English herald, were given to the French herald Montjoy.

* DisorganizedOutlineSpeech: Just how is Henry entitled to the French throne, again? Played as straight-up comedy in the Olivier version; the Archbishop of Canterbury in the Branagh version, by contrast, delivers the "clear as the summer's sun" line with considerable irony. (The line is technically meant to introduce the Archbishop's summary of the preceding speech, which actually is pretty clear.)
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* DisorganizedOutlineSpeech: Just how is Henry entitled to the French throne, again? Played as straight-up comedy in the Olivier version; the Archbishop of Canterbury in the Branagh version, by contrast, delivers the "clear as the summer's sun" line with considerable irony. (The line is technically meant to introduce the Archbishop's summary of the preceding speech, which actually is pretty clear.)again?

* HollywoodDarkness: How the KingIncognito scenes are usually shot, with varying believability.

* IndecisiveMedium: Both film adaptations used this trope. ** The Creator/LaurenceOlivier version looks like an Elizabethan-era performance of Henry V; at the beginning, we get to see some glimpses of the backstage. As the film goes on, it gets less and less theatrical, presumably corresponding to the audience's increased immersion in the plot. ** The Creator/KennethBranagh version has [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B5dI65LvbrE The Prologue]] - which is about making theater magic by suspending your disbelief over the people prancing about on stage are pretending to be the real Henry V etc. - is said in an empty soundstage. Then at the very end: "Who, Prologue-like, your humble patience pray / Gently to hear, kindly to judge, our play!" and he throws open some doors showing a production utilizing the hyperrealism of film. *** That introduction was the original Shakespeare word-for-word instructing his audience to use their imagination for the parts which were impossible to present on stage. * InformedDeformity / HistoricalBeautyUpdate: Henry goes out of his way to apologize to Katherine for his looks, as if he's some sort of gargoyle. Yet he's generally depicted as good-looking (if perhaps dressed more plainly than the French). This is what he looked like on film/tv: [[http://www.fandor.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/henryDM0402_600x442.jpeg 1944]], [[http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/02249/ken_2249862b.jpg 1989]], and [[http://www.britishmuseum.org/images/event_hiddleston_henry_V_304x384.jpg 2012.]] ''[[SarcasmMode Clearly]]'', a "face not worth sunburning." ** In real life, he did have facial scars from the battle of Shrewsbury, where he (not even joking) took an arrow to the face. It's the reason his royal portrait is one of the few (or possibly only) in profile.
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* IndecisiveMedium: Both film adaptations used this trope. ** The Creator/LaurenceOlivier version looks like an Elizabethan-era performance of Henry V; at the beginning, we get to see some glimpses of the backstage. As the film goes on, it gets less and less theatrical, presumably corresponding to the audience's increased immersion in the plot. ** The Creator/KennethBranagh version has [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B5dI65LvbrE The Prologue]] - which is about making theater magic by suspending your disbelief over the people prancing about on stage are pretending to be the real Henry V etc. - is said in an empty soundstage. Then at the very end: "Who, Prologue-like, your humble patience pray / Gently to hear, kindly to judge, our play!" and he throws open some doors showing a production utilizing the hyperrealism of film. *** That introduction was the original Shakespeare word-for-word instructing his audience to use their imagination for the parts which were impossible to present on stage. * InformedDeformity / HistoricalBeautyUpdate: Henry goes out of his way to apologize to Katherine for his looks, as if he's some sort of gargoyle. Yet he's generally depicted as good-looking (if perhaps dressed more plainly than the French). This is what he looked like on film/tv: [[http://www.fandor.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/henryDM0402_600x442.jpeg 1944]], [[http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/02249/ken_2249862b.jpg 1989]], and [[http://www.britishmuseum.org/images/event_hiddleston_henry_V_304x384.jpg 2012.]] ''[[SarcasmMode Clearly]]'', a "face not worth sunburning." ** In real life, he did have facial scars from the battle of Shrewsbury, where he (not even joking) took an arrow to the face. It's the reason his royal portrait is one of the few (or possibly only) in profile.

* MoodWhiplash: After the battle at Harfleur and Henry's savage threat, which gets the governor to surrender, the audience is treated to the French princess Katherine in her dressing room happily chatting with her lady-in-waiting about the English language since she will probably be married to the English king. She learns super important vocabulary like "elbow" and ultimately, the entire sequence is a set up for a dirty pun. In Branagh's version the scene whiplashes again as Katherine, in high spirits and gleeful giggles at saying a naughty word, throws open her door to see the French king and the dauphin on their way to a war council. If she truly is to marry the English king, it will be because he has defeated her father and brother. Emma Thompson's face says it all. ** The happy scene of Henry and Katherine's betrothal is followed by the Chorus' reminder that Henry would die young, and his son would lose France and "make his England bleed." The BBC version underscores this by going straight from betrothal to funeral. ** Captain Fluellen and Gower return to find the baggage train raided and all the boys in the camp slaughtered. They talk about how horrible this is for about half a minute, then launch into a debate about whether Henry is like Alexander the Great. Also about how he turned Falstaff away. ''Then'' Henry comes in with his 'I was not angry since I came to France until this instant'. Both film productions understandably cut the part between discovering the boys had been killed and Henry's anger, as there is a time and a place for discussing Alexander, and mourning over slaughtered children is '''not''' it. * MoralDissonance: Before the final attack on Harfleur, Henry delivers the rousing "Once more unto the breach" speech. Yay! But after the battle, he threatens the governor of Harfleur with what he and his soldiers will do if the governor doesn't surrender, including the (graphically described) rape of virgins, the bashing of elderly fathers' heads against the walls and "your naked infants spitted upon pikes." Not exactly "on, on you noblest English." Olivier omits this speech entirely, and Branagh leaves out huge chunks and then makes it obvious it was all an empty threat- ''The Hollow Crown'' version with Hiddleston, on the other hand, says the whole thing word for word. Note:This is actually fair by the standards of the day. Once a "Practicable Breach had been made in a city's walls, it's fall was just a matter of time, and very little at that. EVERYONE knew that. Therefore, the laws of war were that once a breach was made, the city was obliged to surrender, because if the soldiers had to fight their way in, knowing that every one of their friends who were killed in the battle died essentially for nothing, there was absolutely no way any commander could prevent the loot, murder, and rapine that would inevitably follow. The laws of war actually said that if a city refused to surrender after a breach, the attackers had the right to put every living soul in the city to the sword, after doing whatever they want to them first. Henry isn't making bloodthirsty threats, he's reminding them of the inevitable consequences. ** Also, after the adorkable wooing scene with Katherine, Henry and Burgundy exchange some mildly dirty DoubleEntendre remarks about her, while she is still standing right there, and Henry knows very well she doesn't understand what he's saying. Some productions leave this out entirely.
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* MoodWhiplash: MoodWhiplash: ** After the battle at Harfleur and Henry's savage threat, which gets the governor to surrender, the audience is treated to the French princess Katherine in her dressing room happily chatting with her lady-in-waiting about the English language since she will probably be married to the English king. She learns super important vocabulary like "elbow" and ultimately, the entire sequence is a set up for a dirty pun. In Branagh's version the scene whiplashes again as Katherine, in high spirits and gleeful giggles at saying a naughty word, throws open her door to see the French king and the dauphin on their way to a war council. If she truly is to marry the English king, it will be because he has defeated her father and brother. Emma Thompson's face says it all. pun. ** The happy scene of Henry and Katherine's betrothal is followed by the Chorus' reminder that Henry would die young, and his son would lose France and "make his England bleed." The BBC version underscores this by going straight from betrothal to funeral. " ** Captain Fluellen and Gower return to find the baggage train raided and all the boys in the camp slaughtered. They talk about how horrible this is for about half a minute, then launch into a debate about whether Henry is like Alexander the Great. Also about how he turned Falstaff away. ''Then'' Henry comes in with his 'I was not angry since I came to France until this instant'. Both film productions understandably cut the part between discovering the boys had been killed and Henry's anger, as there is a time and a place for discussing Alexander, and mourning over slaughtered children is '''not''' it. instant'. * MoralDissonance: MoralDissonance: ** Before the final attack on Harfleur, Henry delivers the rousing "Once more unto the breach" speech. Yay! But after the battle, he threatens the governor of Harfleur with what he and his soldiers will do if the governor doesn't surrender, including the (graphically described) rape of virgins, the bashing of elderly fathers' heads against the walls and "your naked infants spitted upon pikes." Not exactly "on, on you noblest English." Olivier omits this speech entirely, and Branagh leaves out huge chunks and then makes it obvious it was all an empty threat- ''The Hollow Crown'' version with Hiddleston, on the other hand, says the whole thing word for word. Note:This Note: This is actually fair by the standards of the day. Once a "Practicable Breach had been made in a city's walls, it's fall was just a matter of time, and very little at that. EVERYONE knew that. Therefore, the laws of war were that once a breach was made, the city was obliged to surrender, because if the soldiers had to fight their way in, knowing that every one of their friends who were killed in the battle died essentially for nothing, there was absolutely no way any commander could prevent the loot, murder, and rapine that would inevitably follow. The laws of war actually said that if a city refused to surrender after a breach, the attackers had the right to put every living soul in the city to the sword, after doing whatever they want to them first. Henry isn't making bloodthirsty threats, he's reminding them of the inevitable consequences. ** Also, after After the adorkable wooing scene with Katherine, Henry and Burgundy exchange some mildly dirty DoubleEntendre remarks about her, while she is still standing right there, and Henry knows very well she doesn't understand what he's saying. Some productions leave this out entirely.saying.

* TheOner: Both Oliver and Branagh feature an impressive long single shot: the charge of the French cavalry to begin the battle of Agincourt in Olivier's, and the king's slow walk through death and mud at the end of the same battle in Branagh's. ** Also both films feature the scene at Eastcheap where Mistress Quickly tells of Falstaff's death as one long shot. They're both quite touching.

* PicturePerfectPresentation: This is how Olivier makes his transition from the filmed-play portion to the cinematic story.

* RuleOfCool: in the Branagh film, BRIAN BLESSED. Marching into the Fench court dressed in full plate armour, and later battering a French guy with a freaking MACE!

* SadBattleMusic: Used during the Battle of Agincourt in the Branagh version.

* WarIsHell / WarIsGlorious: Depending on the interpretation - modern adaptations tend to go with the former, though a notable exception was Olivier in 1944, in which the play was presented as a glorious British resistance against an evil foreign empire. No prizes for guessing UsefulNotes/{{w|orldWarII}}hy.

Added DiffLines:
!!The filmed adaptations add examples of: * AdaptationalWimp: The First Citizen of Harfleur is presented as a bit of a wuss, especially in the Kenneth Branagh film. The real life Commander of Harfleur was all round Badass Raoul de Gaucourt, a highly intelligent, chivalrous commander who held up Henry's way superior army with 200 professional soldiers and 1,000 citizens with crossbows. Only when the DirtyCoward Dauphin refused to aid him did he finally surrender. * ArmourIsUseless. In Branagh's film, the French all wear full plate armor and are easily killed by the English arrows, as well as by swords and daggers. Partly TruthInTelevision, as 15th century armor was often strong enough to resist even the English longbow but would knock the wearer down. Considering that the field was a mudbath, this would prove deadly. * ArmorPiercingSlap: Exeter performs one on Lord Scroop while arresting him in the 1989 film. Whereas the other traitors flinched when he arrested them and tore off their badges of office, Scroop remained stoic, so Exeter angrily slapped him to rob him of his dignity. * CompositeCharacter: Some of the roles in the Branagh production, such as the French ambassador or an English herald, were given to the French herald Montjoy. * HollywoodDarkness: How the KingIncognito scenes are usually shot, with varying believability. * IndecisiveMedium: Both film adaptations used this trope. ** The Creator/LaurenceOlivier version looks like an Elizabethan-era performance of Henry V; at the beginning, we get to see some glimpses of the backstage. As the film goes on, it gets less and less theatrical, presumably corresponding to the audience's increased immersion in the plot. ** The Creator/KennethBranagh version has [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B5dI65LvbrE The Prologue]] - which is about making theater magic by suspending your disbelief over the people prancing about on stage are pretending to be the real Henry V etc. - is said in an empty soundstage. Then at the very end: "Who, Prologue-like, your humble patience pray / Gently to hear, kindly to judge, our play!" and he throws open some doors showing a production utilizing the hyperrealism of film. * MoodWhiplash: In Branagh's version the English-lesson scene whiplashes again as Katherine, in high spirits and gleeful giggles at saying a naughty word, throws open her door to see the French king and the dauphin on their way to a war council. If she truly is to marry the English king, it will be because he has defeated her father and brother. Emma Thompson's face says it all. * TheOner: ** The charge of the French cavalry to begin the battle of Agincourt in Olivier's film. ** The king's slow walk through death and mud at the end of the same battle in Branagh's. ** Both films feature the scene at Eastcheap where Mistress Quickly tells of Falstaff's death as one long shot. * PicturePerfectPresentation: This is how Olivier makes his transition from the filmed-play portion to the cinematic story. * RuleOfCool: In the Branagh film, BRIAN BLESSED marching into the French court dressed in full plate armour, and later battering a French guy with a mace. * SadBattleMusic: Used during the Battle of Agincourt in the Branagh version. * PragmaticAdaptation: Both film productions understandably cut the part between discovering the boys had been killed and Henry's anger, as there is a time and a place for discussing Alexander, and mourning over slaughtered children is '''not''' it. * WarIsHell / WarIsGlorious: Depending on the interpretation - modern adaptations tend to go with the former, though a notable exception was Olivier Olivier, in 1944, in which the play was presented as midst of World War II, presenting a glorious British resistance against an evil foreign empire. No prizes for guessing UsefulNotes/{{w|orldWarII}}hy.empire.
18th Nov '15 7:00:17 PM PaulA
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Lampshade Hanging is not allowed to be listed by itself; it should be mentioned in the entry for whatever trope is being lampshaded.
* LampshadeHanging: Spectacularly done in the prologue, as the Chorus relates the impossibility of properly representing a battle on stage, then attempts to inspire the audience to fill in the gaps itself. ** {{Subverted}} in the two film versions - the prologue is left in place, and then the [[FinalBattle Battle of Agincourt]] is shown in all its [[WarIsGlorious glory]]...or [[WarIsHell horror]] ** After a tangled explanation of Henry's claim to the French throne, the Archbishop of Canterbury says, "So that, as clear as is the summer's sun." *** Lampshaded still further in the Olivier film, when the actor playing the Archbishop tries to read the explanation off a mass of papers, inevitably gets lost, and the papers somehow end up all over the stage with at least a third of actors searching for the right one on their knees so they can finish the damn thing. When the archbishop beatifically declares "clear as the summer sun" line, they all look at each other in an "are you ''kidding'' me" way. *** What makes it even more ironic is that (as Henry alludes to in his soliloquy before the Battle of Agincourt where he's wracked with guilt about poor King Richard II) he's actually the son of a ''usurper'' - far from being the rightful king of France, he's not even the rightful king of ''England.''
18th Nov '15 6:35:47 PM PaulA
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trivia migration
* AllStarCast: The 1989 film reads rather like a "Who's Who of British Acting", with names like Creator/JudiDench, Creator/DerekJacobi, Creator/BrianBlessed, Creator/KennethBranagh, Creator/EmmaThompson, Creator/IanHolm, Creator/ChristianBale and Robbie Coltrane on the list. ** It's especially worth noting that this was ''not'' an AllStarCast at the time. Ian Holm, Derek Jacobi, and Brian Blessed were somewhat fairly well-known character actors on-screen, and Christian Bale was a rising child actor coming off of ''EmpireOfTheSun'', but everyone's gotten a lot more famous since, especially star-director Kenneth Branagh and his wife Emma Thompson.

* BandOfBrothers: TropeNamer
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* BandOfBrothers: TropeNamerBandOfBrothers

* RealLifeRelative: Branagh cast wife (at the time) Creator/EmmaThompson as Catherine.
2nd Jul '15 8:16:56 PM Micah
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* RoyalsWhoAreUseless: The Dauphin and the King of France.
15th Jun '15 3:00:27 PM Sivartius
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Giving a little historical context to Henry's surrender demand
* MoralDissonance: Before the final attack on Harfleur, Henry delivers the rousing "Once more unto the breach" speech. Yay! But after the battle, he threatens the governor of Harfleur with what he and his soldiers will do if the governor doesn't surrender, including the (graphically described) rape of virgins, the bashing of elderly fathers' heads against the walls and "your naked infants spitted upon pikes." Not exactly "on, on you noblest English." Olivier omits this speech entirely, and Branagh leaves out huge chunks and then makes it obvious it was all an empty threat- ''The Hollow Crown'' version with Hiddleston, on the other hand, says the whole thing word for word.
to:
* MoralDissonance: Before the final attack on Harfleur, Henry delivers the rousing "Once more unto the breach" speech. Yay! But after the battle, he threatens the governor of Harfleur with what he and his soldiers will do if the governor doesn't surrender, including the (graphically described) rape of virgins, the bashing of elderly fathers' heads against the walls and "your naked infants spitted upon pikes." Not exactly "on, on you noblest English." Olivier omits this speech entirely, and Branagh leaves out huge chunks and then makes it obvious it was all an empty threat- ''The Hollow Crown'' version with Hiddleston, on the other hand, says the whole thing word for word. Note:This is actually fair by the standards of the day. Once a "Practicable Breach had been made in a city's walls, it's fall was just a matter of time, and very little at that. EVERYONE knew that. Therefore, the laws of war were that once a breach was made, the city was obliged to surrender, because if the soldiers had to fight their way in, knowing that every one of their friends who were killed in the battle died essentially for nothing, there was absolutely no way any commander could prevent the loot, murder, and rapine that would inevitably follow. The laws of war actually said that if a city refused to surrender after a breach, the attackers had the right to put every living soul in the city to the sword, after doing whatever they want to them first. Henry isn't making bloodthirsty threats, he's reminding them of the inevitable consequences.
12th May '15 6:11:03 AM unclejack
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* AllStarCast: The 1989 film reads rather like a "Who's Who of British Acting", with names like Creator/JudiDench, Creator/DerekJacobi, Creator/BrianBlessed, Creator/KennethBranagh, Creator/EmmaThompson, Ian Holm, Creator/ChristianBale and Robbie Coltrane on the list.
to:
* AllStarCast: The 1989 film reads rather like a "Who's Who of British Acting", with names like Creator/JudiDench, Creator/DerekJacobi, Creator/BrianBlessed, Creator/KennethBranagh, Creator/EmmaThompson, Ian Holm, Creator/IanHolm, Creator/ChristianBale and Robbie Coltrane on the list.
27th Mar '15 5:50:14 PM morenohijazo
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Added DiffLines:

Added DiffLines:
* DigAttack: One scene focuses on miners, who dig tunnels under the walls of the cities they're attacking.
28th Feb '15 5:47:42 PM kouta
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*** The that introduction was the original Shakespeare word-for-word instructing his audience to use their imagination for the parts which were impossible to present on stage.
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*** The that That introduction was the original Shakespeare word-for-word instructing his audience to use their imagination for the parts which were impossible to present on stage.
28th Feb '15 5:46:05 PM kouta
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Added DiffLines:
*** The that introduction was the original Shakespeare word-for-word instructing his audience to use their imagination for the parts which were impossible to present on stage.
22nd Feb '15 2:40:24 AM Epithumia
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2 typos
* UnreliableNarrator: everythung the chorus says until Act 4 is exagerated a little or a downright lie.
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* UnreliableNarrator: everythung everything the chorus says until Act 4 is exagerated exaggerated a little or a downright lie.
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