History Theatre / Follies

6th Dec '17 12:02:33 PM RitzyMandrill
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* LostEpisode: Has never been recorded professionally and unlike Assassins, no full bootleg versions of the play in it's various forms exist. Moreso the 1985 concert performance video version was 70% behind the scenes material with the songs that were featured in said video, largely featured without any context as the numbers were performed outside the context of the story. Furthermore, soundtrack versions of the musical have largely been incomplete or missing dialogue that explains the various plots and songs. It was not until the 2011 version's soundtrack was released that "Follies" was released in a manner that was remotely complete.

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* LostEpisode: Has never been recorded professionally and unlike Assassins, no full bootleg versions of the play in it's various forms exist. Moreso the 1985 concert performance video version was 70% behind the scenes material with the songs that were featured in said video, largely featured without any context as the numbers were performed outside the context of the story. Furthermore, soundtrack versions of the musical have largely been incomplete or missing dialogue that explains the various plots and songs. It was not until the 2011 version's soundtrack was released that "Follies" was released in a manner that was remotely complete. However now averted since The 2013 Toulon Production was screened on TV and the 2017 National Theatre Production was screened live to Cinemas.
26th Nov '17 9:05:33 AM SeptimusHeap
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* CutSong: "All Things Bright and Beautiful" (used in the prologue), "Can That Boy Foxtrot!" and "Uptown Downtown". The musical numbers "Ah, But Underneath" (replacing "The Story of Lucy and Jessie"), "Country House", "Make the Most of Your Music" (replacing "Live, Laugh, Love"), "Social Dancing" have been incorporated into various productions. Also {{In-Universe}}, Carlotta's song was cut from the show because it got laughs [[{{Narm}} despite being a sad song]].

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* CutSong: "All Things Bright and Beautiful" (used in the prologue), "Can That Boy Foxtrot!" and "Uptown Downtown". The musical numbers "Ah, But Underneath" (replacing "The Story of Lucy and Jessie"), "Country House", "Make the Most of Your Music" (replacing "Live, Laugh, Love"), "Social Dancing" have been incorporated into various productions. Also {{In-Universe}}, InUniverse, Carlotta's song was cut from the show because it got laughs [[{{Narm}} despite being a sad song]].
21st Nov '17 6:36:41 PM nombretomado
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* {{Pastiche}}: "Rain on the Roof" is a pastiche of novelty songs, "The-God-Why-Don't-You-Love-Me-Blues" is a vaudeville/{{Patter Song}} pastiche, and "Broadway Baby" is a pastiche of optimistic songs of the 1920s, like "The Best Things in Life are Free". "Who's That Woman?" is in the style of {{Cole Porter}}'s lyrics and Richard Rodger's music, "Losing My Mind" is in the style of Music/GeorgeGershwin's "The Man I Love," "I'm Still Here" is in the style of Harold Arlen, "One More Kiss" is in the style of Sigmund Romberg and Rudolf Fiml, "You're Gonna Love Tomorrow" is in the style of Jerome Kern, "The Story of Lucy and Jessie" is in the style of Cole Porter and Yip Harburg, "Live, Laugh, Love" is in the style of Fred Astaire, "Ah, Paris" is fully in the style of Cole Porter and "Loveland" is, of course, in the style of the Ziegfeld Follies.

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* {{Pastiche}}: "Rain on the Roof" is a pastiche of novelty songs, "The-God-Why-Don't-You-Love-Me-Blues" is a vaudeville/{{Patter Song}} pastiche, and "Broadway Baby" is a pastiche of optimistic songs of the 1920s, like "The Best Things in Life are Free". "Who's That Woman?" is in the style of {{Cole Porter}}'s Music/ColePorter's lyrics and Richard Rodger's music, "Losing My Mind" is in the style of Music/GeorgeGershwin's "The Man I Love," "I'm Still Here" is in the style of Harold Arlen, "One More Kiss" is in the style of Sigmund Romberg and Rudolf Fiml, "You're Gonna Love Tomorrow" is in the style of Jerome Kern, "The Story of Lucy and Jessie" is in the style of Cole Porter and Yip Harburg, "Live, Laugh, Love" is in the style of Fred Astaire, "Ah, Paris" is fully in the style of Cole Porter and "Loveland" is, of course, in the style of the Ziegfeld Follies.
4th Aug '17 1:26:07 AM PaulA
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Added DiffLines:

* DoubleMeaningTitle: Refers to both the Follies that the characters performed in, and the follies that they have committed.


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* ThatRemindsMeOfASong: Used dramatically; half the songs are numbers that the women used to sing in their days in the Follies, but are used to point up the melancholy of the story.


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* WhiteDwarfStarlet: Half the cast of ''Follies'', a show which does a little examining of this very phenomenon.
4th Aug '17 1:12:43 AM PaulA
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* InTheStyleOf: The musical makes the most of this trope. "Who's That Woman?" is in the style of {{Cole Porter}}'s lyrics and Richard Rodger's music, "Losing My Mind" is in the style of Music/GeorgeGershwin's "The Man I Love," "I'm Still Here" is in the style of Harold Arlen, "One More Kiss" is in the style of Sigmund Romberg and Rudolf Fiml, "You're Gonna Love Tomorrow" is in the style of Jerome Kern, "The Story of Lucy and Jessie" is in the style of Cole Porter and Yip Harburg, "Live, Laugh, Love" is in the style of Fred Astaire, "Ah, Paris" is fully in the style of Cole Porter and "Loveland" is, of course, in the style of the Ziegfeld Follies.



* MusicalPastiche: "Rain on the Roof" is a pastiche of novelty songs, "The-God-Why-Don't-You-Love-Me-Blues" is a vaudeville/{{Patter Song}} pastiche, and "Broadway Baby" is a pastiche of optimistic songs of the 1920s, like "The Best Things in Life are Free."


Added DiffLines:

* {{Pastiche}}: "Rain on the Roof" is a pastiche of novelty songs, "The-God-Why-Don't-You-Love-Me-Blues" is a vaudeville/{{Patter Song}} pastiche, and "Broadway Baby" is a pastiche of optimistic songs of the 1920s, like "The Best Things in Life are Free". "Who's That Woman?" is in the style of {{Cole Porter}}'s lyrics and Richard Rodger's music, "Losing My Mind" is in the style of Music/GeorgeGershwin's "The Man I Love," "I'm Still Here" is in the style of Harold Arlen, "One More Kiss" is in the style of Sigmund Romberg and Rudolf Fiml, "You're Gonna Love Tomorrow" is in the style of Jerome Kern, "The Story of Lucy and Jessie" is in the style of Cole Porter and Yip Harburg, "Live, Laugh, Love" is in the style of Fred Astaire, "Ah, Paris" is fully in the style of Cole Porter and "Loveland" is, of course, in the style of the Ziegfeld Follies.
14th Apr '17 11:01:39 AM Malady
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Added DiffLines:

* OneWordTitle
4th Feb '17 9:44:19 PM Xtifr
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* InTheStyleOf: The musical makes the most of this trope. "Who's That Woman?" is in the style of {{Cole Porter}}'s lyrics and Richard Rodger's music, "Losing My Mind" is in the style of Creator/GeorgeGershwin's "The Man I Love," "I'm Still Here" is in the style of Harold Arlen, "One More Kiss" is in the style of Sigmund Romberg and Rudolf Fiml, "You're Gonna Love Tomorrow" is in the style of Jerome Kern, "The Story of Lucy and Jessie" is in the style of Cole Porter and Yip Harburg, "Live, Laugh, Love" is in the style of Fred Astaire, "Ah, Paris" is fully in the style of Cole Porter and "Loveland" is, of course, in the style of the Ziegfeld Follies.

to:

* InTheStyleOf: The musical makes the most of this trope. "Who's That Woman?" is in the style of {{Cole Porter}}'s lyrics and Richard Rodger's music, "Losing My Mind" is in the style of Creator/GeorgeGershwin's Music/GeorgeGershwin's "The Man I Love," "I'm Still Here" is in the style of Harold Arlen, "One More Kiss" is in the style of Sigmund Romberg and Rudolf Fiml, "You're Gonna Love Tomorrow" is in the style of Jerome Kern, "The Story of Lucy and Jessie" is in the style of Cole Porter and Yip Harburg, "Live, Laugh, Love" is in the style of Fred Astaire, "Ah, Paris" is fully in the style of Cole Porter and "Loveland" is, of course, in the style of the Ziegfeld Follies.
4th Feb '17 9:42:03 PM Xtifr
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* InTheStyleOf: The musical makes the most of this trope. "Who's That Woman?" is in the style of {{Cole Porter}}'s lyrics and Richard Rodger's music, "Losing My Mind" is in the style of {{George Gershwin}}'s "The Man I Love," "I'm Still Here" is in the style of Harold Arlen, "One More Kiss" is in the style of Sigmund Romberg and Rudolf Fiml, "You're Gonna Love Tomorrow" is in the style of Jerome Kern, "The Story of Lucy and Jessie" is in the style of Cole Porter and Yip Harburg, "Live, Laugh, Love" is in the style of Fred Astaire, "Ah, Paris" is fully in the style of Cole Porter and "Loveland" is, of course, in the style of the Ziegfeld Follies.

to:

* InTheStyleOf: The musical makes the most of this trope. "Who's That Woman?" is in the style of {{Cole Porter}}'s lyrics and Richard Rodger's music, "Losing My Mind" is in the style of {{George Gershwin}}'s Creator/GeorgeGershwin's "The Man I Love," "I'm Still Here" is in the style of Harold Arlen, "One More Kiss" is in the style of Sigmund Romberg and Rudolf Fiml, "You're Gonna Love Tomorrow" is in the style of Jerome Kern, "The Story of Lucy and Jessie" is in the style of Cole Porter and Yip Harburg, "Live, Laugh, Love" is in the style of Fred Astaire, "Ah, Paris" is fully in the style of Cole Porter and "Loveland" is, of course, in the style of the Ziegfeld Follies.
1st May '16 5:25:47 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* EnsembleDarkhorse: Carlotta Champion and "I'm Still Here".
1st May '16 5:25:04 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: Phylis, especially after the UK rewrites replaced her "Loveland" number. The original states that Phylis is internally torn between a longing to be free and sexually desirable but poor and unloved (Juicy Lucy) or being rich and pampered and financially secured but emotionally dead due to being trapped in a loveless marriage (Dressy Jesse). The UK version of the play provides a completely different take on Phylis, one that is based upon the idea that Phylis has spent her entire life trying to be whatever it is her man wants her to be ("Ah But Underneath") and that her angst comes from knowing that, having spent her entire life being what everyone else wants her to be, that Phylis fears that she is a fraud and no one knew the real her, if there ever was a real Phylis beyond the facade she put on for those around her.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Theatre.Follies