History Theatre / DeathOfASalesman

21st Mar '17 5:48:13 PM DustSnitch
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* LonelyFuneral: AvertedTrope. The titular salesman is described as having a funeral where hundreds of his clients froma ll over the country come and mourn him. For months after, the mood was much sadder on the country's trains. [[spoiler:This is in contrast to Willy's funeral, which is attended by three of his family members, two of his colleagues, and none of his clients.]]

to:

* LonelyFuneral: AvertedTrope. The titular salesman is described as having a funeral where hundreds of his clients froma ll from all over the country come and mourn him. For months after, the mood was much sadder on the country's trains. [[spoiler:This is in contrast to Willy's funeral, which is attended by three of his family members, two of his colleagues, and none of his clients.]]
21st Mar '17 2:11:56 PM DustSnitch
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!!This play provides examples of the following tropes:

to:

!!This play and its various performances provides examples of the following tropes:
tropes:

* AdaptationalAttractiveness: In one of the film adaptations, Creator/DustinHoffman plays the character of Willy Loman, who in the play's original script was described as fat and unattractive. The film edits out references to Loman's weight and replaces them with jabs at his intellect and height. Apparently Arthur Miller told Dustin Hoffman his original vision of Willy Loman was a small man, despite how casting for the first play turned out.
21st Mar '17 11:56:22 AM DustSnitch
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%%Zero Context Examples will be commented out until proper context is given.



-->--'''Willy Loman''', ''Death of a Salesman''

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-->--'''Willy Loman''', ''Death of a Salesman''



* TheAllAmericanBoy: Biff as a kid. As he grows up, not so much.

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* TheAllAmericanBoy: Biff as was a kid. As high-school athlete who carried his football time, caught the eye of every girl, and loved his dad more than anything else in his life. He was everything Willy hoped he grows up, not would be, which is why Willy is now so much.angry that his son has no job or family despite being thirty-four years old.



* ArcWords: "He's liked, but he's not ''well liked''."

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* ArcWords: "He's Willy demeans a neighbor he dislikes by saying "he's liked, but he's not ''well liked''."liked''," a phrase which indicates the great value Willy places on appearances and networking over work and study. The same phrase is repeated several times over to express the same principle, until eventually it is used to describe the hollowness of such a value system.



* BungledSuicide: Linda thinks this is the real reason that Willy crashed his car a few months before the play started.
* ButtMonkey: Willy, and by extension, the average working man everywhere. See: ThisLoserIsYou.

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* BungledSuicide: Linda thinks this is the real reason that Willy crashed his car a few months before the play started.started is that he was attempting to kill himself. Her suspicions are only furthered when she finds out Willy was fiddling with the gas hose, as if he was planning to suffocate himself with it.
* %%* ButtMonkey: Willy, and by extension, the average working man everywhere. See: ThisLoserIsYou.everywhere.



* DespairEventHorizon: Biff reached this fourteen years ago when [[spoiler: he discovered Willy's affair.]]
* DownerEnding: [[spoiler: Willy dies, the rest of the Loman family continues its proud tradition of sucking at life. Linda's words after the death are "I'm free". It's up for debate if she meant she is now free from anguish often caused by Willy, or free as in free of debt (the play was written during a time that if a spouse died, their debt did not transfer to the living). The only upside might be that Biff has rejected Willy's delusions. Maybe.]]

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* DespairEventHorizon: Biff reached this fourteen sixteen years ago when [[spoiler: he [[spoiler:he discovered Willy's affair.]]
* DownerEnding: [[spoiler: Willy [[spoiler:Willy dies, the rest of the Loman family continues its proud tradition of sucking at life. Linda's words after the death are "I'm free". It's up for debate if she meant she is now free from anguish often caused by Willy, or free as in free of debt (the play was written during a time that if a spouse died, their debt did not transfer to the living). The only upside might be that Biff has rejected Willy's delusions. Maybe.]]



* DrivenToSuicide: [[spoiler: Willy.]]

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* DrivenToSuicide: [[spoiler: Willy.[[spoiler:Willy convinces himself crashing his car with him him in it will let his family pay off their insurance, making his suicide a Heroic Suicide. His brother, the possibly illusive Ben, points out that suicide would invalidate his life insurance and that his suicide is nothing but selfish, but Willy blocks him out and walks to his car as if in a trance.]]



* DysfunctionalFamily: The Lomans (complete with ghost!); the only halfway reasonable people are Linda and Biff.

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* DysfunctionalFamily: The Lomans (complete are lead by a mentally ill patriarch who values financial success over work, compliance with ghost!); the only halfway reasonable people are Linda law, and Biff.intelligence, a wife who refuses to stand up to her husband no matter the scenario, a son who has had every pressure to succeed put on him by his father, and a younger son who has adopted every single one of his father's flaws in his attempts to get any sort of attention. the most down-to-earth of all of Lomans is Ben, who's a hallucination of the father.



* FutureLoser: Young Biff.

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* %%* FutureLoser: Young Biff.



* HollywoodNerd: Bernard. Subverted later in that [[spoiler: he DOESN'T pull a WhosLaughingNow on the Lomans when he's a successful adult and makes an honest attempt to help Willy and Biff.]]

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* HollywoodNerd: Bernard. Subverted later in that [[spoiler: he [[spoiler:he DOESN'T pull a WhosLaughingNow on the Lomans when he's a successful adult and makes an honest attempt to help Willy and Biff.]]



* LonelyFuneral: [[spoiler: For Willy.]] He was liked... but not well-liked.

to:

* LonelyFuneral: [[spoiler: AvertedTrope. The titular salesman is described as having a funeral where hundreds of his clients froma ll over the country come and mourn him. For Willy.]] He months after, the mood was liked... but not well-liked.much sadder on the country's trains. [[spoiler:This is in contrast to Willy's funeral, which is attended by three of his family members, two of his colleagues, and none of his clients.]]



* TheMistress: [[spoiler: Willy had one fourteen years ago. Biff found out and never forgave him.]]

to:

* TheMistress: [[spoiler: Willy had one fourteen sixteen years ago. Biff in the past. [[spoiler:Biff found out and never forgave him.]]



* TitleDrop: According to Willy, Dave Singleman "died the death of a salesman".
* TragicDream: The whole point of the play.
* TragicDropout: Biff became this when he gave up his chance to make up a failed exam after [[spoiler: finding out his father was having an affair.]]

to:

* TitleDrop: According to Willy, Dave Singleman "died the death of a salesman".
salesman" and as such, was grieved by hundreds of his clients around the country.
* TragicDream: The whole point of the play.
play is that Willy's desire to rise to financial greatness through his job in sales, despite his lack of passion for the business, is ultimately self-destructive.
* TragicDropout: Biff became this when he gave up his chance to make up a failed exam never graduated after [[spoiler: failing his regents exam. [[spoiler:He also refused to go to summer school after finding out his father was having an affair.]]



* UnconfessedUnemployment: [[spoiler: Willy has a hard time admitting to his wife he's out of a job.]]

to:

* UnconfessedUnemployment: [[spoiler: Willy [[spoiler:Willy has a hard time admitting to his wife he's out of a job.]]



* WhamLine: [[spoiler: "Pop, I'm a dime a dozen and so are you!"]]

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* WhamLine: [[spoiler: [[spoiler:After the play has been spent with the Loman talking about how great they'll become, Biff gets the gall to tell his father, "Pop, I'm a dime a dozen and so are you!"]]
21st Mar '17 11:15:17 AM DustSnitch
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* ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin: [[spoiler: It's about the events leading up to the '''death of a salesman'''.]]

to:

* ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin: [[spoiler: It's [[spoiler:It's about the events leading up to the '''death of a salesman'''.]]



* ForegoneConclusion: Willy's a salesman. Guess what? [[spoiler: He dies.]] Some readers, however, expect the title to be a metaphor, or otherwise consider it too obvious of a giveaway, so they will get mad if you ruin the surprise. It probably helps that there is a TitleDrop in the middle of the play, in reference to a ''different'' salesman.

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* ForegoneConclusion: Willy's a salesman. Guess what? [[spoiler: He [[spoiler:He dies.]] Some readers, however, expect the title to be a metaphor, or otherwise consider it too obvious of a giveaway, so they will get mad if you ruin the surprise. It probably helps that there is a TitleDrop in the middle of the play, in reference to a ''different'' salesman.



* TheHeroDies: Durrr...
* HeroicBSOD: Young Biff has one when he [[spoiler: catches Willy cheating on Linda.]]

to:

* TheHeroDies: Durrr...
PlayedWith. The title of the play seems to allude to the death of the elderly protagonist, Willy Loman, but halfway through the play, Willy makes a point about his philosophy in life by describing the death of ''a different'' salesman while [[TitleDrop referencing the play's title]]. [[spoiler:Still, Willy kills himself at the end of the play.]]
* HeroicBSOD: Young Biff has one when he [[spoiler: catches [[spoiler:catches Willy cheating on Linda.]]


Added DiffLines:

* KnowNothingKnowItAll: Willy Loman criticizes Charlie's poor eating habits as the cause of his heart pain. Charlie tries to ask how he knows this, but Willy only vaguely mentions vitamins affecting bones and the word "chemistry" before getting frustrated and trying to move on.
16th Feb '17 2:35:01 PM JulianLapostat
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* SpiritualSuccessor:[[invoked]]It was one of the most influential works in the American arts and especially popular in TheFifties. Creator/NicholasRay's ''Theatre/DeathOfASalesman'' was described by its director and screenwriters as a SpiritualAdaptation even.

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* SpiritualSuccessor:[[invoked]]It was one of the most influential works in the American arts and especially popular in TheFifties. Creator/NicholasRay's ''Theatre/DeathOfASalesman'' ''Film/BiggerThanLife'' was described by its director and screenwriters as a SpiritualAdaptation even.
16th Feb '17 2:34:32 PM JulianLapostat
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Added DiffLines:

* SpiritualSuccessor:[[invoked]]It was one of the most influential works in the American arts and especially popular in TheFifties. Creator/NicholasRay's ''Theatre/DeathOfASalesman'' was described by its director and screenwriters as a SpiritualAdaptation even.
5th Aug '16 11:12:36 AM mlsmithca
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First produced on Broadway in 1949 with Lee J. Cobb as Willy Loman, ''Death of a Salesman'' is a very stagy play, since it's from Willy's dreamy, hallucination-and-flashback-ridden perspective. Nonetheless, several screen adaptations have been made, including a 1951 theatrical film starring Frederic March and made-for-TV versions on Creator/{{CBS}} (1966, with Lee J. Cobb; 1985, with Creator/DustinHoffman), Creator/TheBBC (1966, with Rod Steiger; 1996, with Warren Mitchell), and Creator/{{Showtime}} (2000, with Brian Dennehy).

to:

First produced on Broadway in 1949 with Lee J. Cobb as Willy Loman, ''Death of a Salesman'' is a very stagy play, since it's from Willy's dreamy, hallucination-and-flashback-ridden perspective. Nonetheless, several screen adaptations have been made, including a 1951 theatrical film starring Frederic Fredric March and made-for-TV versions on Creator/{{CBS}} (1966, with Lee J. Cobb; 1985, with Creator/DustinHoffman), Creator/TheBBC (1966, with Rod Steiger; 1996, with Warren Mitchell), and Creator/{{Showtime}} (2000, with Brian Dennehy).
27th Jul '16 5:01:10 PM KingClark
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A sequel is currently in the works.
5th Jul '16 8:53:18 PM TheBestTroperInTheWorld
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Added DiffLines:

A sequel is currently in the works.
14th Jun '16 11:48:24 AM CJCroen1393
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Added DiffLines:

* RedemptionEqualsDeath: Played With. Willy plans for his death to obtain big insurance money for his family to compensate for all the grief he caused for them or/and so he can live his ideals through Biff. A defied trope since he really gains nothing out of it.
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