History Theatre / DeathOfASalesman

5th Aug '16 11:12:36 AM mlsmithca
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First produced on Broadway in 1949 with Lee J. Cobb as Willy Loman, ''Death of a Salesman'' is a very stagy play, since it's from Willy's dreamy, hallucination-and-flashback-ridden perspective. Nonetheless, several screen adaptations have been made, including a 1951 theatrical film starring Frederic March and made-for-TV versions on Creator/{{CBS}} (1966, with Lee J. Cobb; 1985, with Creator/DustinHoffman), Creator/TheBBC (1966, with Rod Steiger; 1996, with Warren Mitchell), and Creator/{{Showtime}} (2000, with Brian Dennehy).

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First produced on Broadway in 1949 with Lee J. Cobb as Willy Loman, ''Death of a Salesman'' is a very stagy play, since it's from Willy's dreamy, hallucination-and-flashback-ridden perspective. Nonetheless, several screen adaptations have been made, including a 1951 theatrical film starring Frederic Fredric March and made-for-TV versions on Creator/{{CBS}} (1966, with Lee J. Cobb; 1985, with Creator/DustinHoffman), Creator/TheBBC (1966, with Rod Steiger; 1996, with Warren Mitchell), and Creator/{{Showtime}} (2000, with Brian Dennehy).
27th Jul '16 5:01:10 PM KingClark
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A sequel is currently in the works.
5th Jul '16 8:53:18 PM TheBestTroperInTheWorld
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A sequel is currently in the works.
14th Jun '16 11:48:24 AM CJCroen1393
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* RedemptionEqualsDeath: Played With. Willy plans for his death to obtain big insurance money for his family to compensate for all the grief he caused for them or/and so he can live his ideals through Biff. A defied trope since he really gains nothing out of it.
9th May '16 7:45:32 PM drac0blade
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* YourCheatingHeart

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* YourCheatingHeartYourCheatingHeart: Willy's affair with "The Woman." It's the source of the animosity between Biff and his father, years after it happened.
13th Apr '16 9:02:50 AM Morgenthaler
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->''[[ArcWords "He's liked... but not well-liked."]]''

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->''[[ArcWords "He's ->''"He's liked... but not well-liked."]]''"''
14th Mar '16 9:16:09 AM Orbiting
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* DysfunctionalFamily: The Lomans (complete with ghost!); the only halfway reasonable people are Linda and Biff.



* HonoraryUncle: Willy and Charlie are this to each other's kids.



* TheUnFavorite: Happy Loman.

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* TheUnFavorite: Happy Loman.Loman, who can never measure up in his dad's eyes to his older brother Biff.
* WackyParentSeriousChild: A very dark version with Willy and Biff.



* WhosLaughingNow: Bernard is, once he becomes a successful high-flying lawyer. Willy Loman, who once looked down on him, comes crawling to him for help. Averted in that Bernard is not cruel or condescending, and gives Willy advice. Not to mention he doesn't seem to hold any bad feelings toward the Lomans for looking down on him and considers Biff a good friend.

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* WhosLaughingNow: Bernard is, once he becomes a successful high-flying lawyer. Willy Loman, who once looked down on him, comes crawling to him for help. Averted Subverted in that Bernard is not cruel or condescending, and actually gives Willy advice. Not to mention he doesn't seem to hold any bad feelings toward the Lomans for looking down on him and considers Biff a good friend.
14th Jan '16 4:44:57 PM molokai198
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* AloofBigBrother: Willy's older brother Ben, who got rich by going to Africa and finding diamonds when he was trying to go to Alaska. He appears in flashbacks as a practically godlike figure in Willy's mind, and is always talking about how rich he is, once offering Willy to join him in Alaska.


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* BungledSuicide: Linda thinks this is the real reason that Willy crashed his car a few months before the play started.
26th Dec '15 4:36:07 PM nombretomado
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* AnAesop: You don't have to follow the AmericanDream, just find something you want to do and be good at it.

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* AnAesop: You don't have to follow the AmericanDream, UsefulNotes/TheAmericanDream, just find something you want to do and be good at it.



* AmericanDream: [[{{Deconstruction}} Deconstructed]] as the pursuit of this is ultimately what leads to Willy and his sons' failures. In the end, Biff rejects the American Dream, convinced that it will [[TragicDream only lead him to ruin]]. Happy elects [[DramaticallyMissingThePoint to follow it anyway]].
2nd Dec '15 10:11:52 PM JulianLapostat
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Once upon a time, playwright Arthur Miller (some time husband of MarilynMonroe) set out to disprove one of the fundamental theories about the TragicHero -- specifically, that the TragicHero must be royalty, nobility, or some other type of great man who has far to fall (which he does) and much to lose (which, again, he does). Miller intended to write a play with an EveryMan as the TragicHero. He may instead have created an entirely different archetype, the [[ThisLoserIsYou "pathetic hero"]]. Either way, in doing so, he wrote what is often considered the greatest American play.

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Once upon a time, playwright Arthur Miller (some time husband of MarilynMonroe) Creator/ArthurMiller set out to disprove one of the fundamental theories about the TragicHero -- specifically, that the TragicHero must be royalty, nobility, or some other type of great man who has far to fall (which he does) and much to lose (which, again, he does). Miller intended to write a play with an EveryMan as the TragicHero. He may instead have created an entirely different archetype, the [[ThisLoserIsYou "pathetic hero"]]. Either way, in doing so, he wrote what is often considered the greatest American play.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Theatre.DeathOfASalesman