History Theatre / Coriolanus

8th Apr '18 3:18:44 PM Tarlonniel
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It has the reputation of being the only Shakespeare play [[BannedInChina banned by a modern democracy]] (France in the 1930s for its co-opting by fascist groups, it was also briefly banned in [[UsefulNotes/{{Germany}} West Germany]] but was subject of a notable production and adaptation in UsefulNotes/EastGermany under Creator/BertoltBrecht's Berliner Ensemble.

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It has the reputation of being the only Shakespeare play [[BannedInChina banned by a modern democracy]] (France in the 1930s for its co-opting by fascist groups, it was also briefly banned in [[UsefulNotes/{{Germany}} West Germany]] but was subject of a notable production and adaptation in UsefulNotes/EastGermany under Creator/BertoltBrecht's Berliner Ensemble.Ensemble).
13th Feb '18 2:02:52 AM Cryoclaste
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* AnOfficerAndAGentleman: During his campaign against the Volscian city of Corioli, Martius insists his men behave themselves and commit no war crimes, and he insists on treating the Volscians honorably.

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* AnOfficerAndAGentleman: OfficerAndAGentleman: During his campaign against the Volscian city of Corioli, Martius insists his men behave themselves and commit no war crimes, and he insists on treating the Volscians honorably.
30th Oct '17 6:04:46 PM JulianLapostat
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''Coriolanus'' is a play by Creator/WilliamShakespeare. It is one of his plays set in AncientGrome (alongside ''Theatre/TitusAndronicus, Theatre/JuliusCaesar, Theatre/AntonyAndCleopatra'') and it is considered to be Shakespeare's "last tragedy" before he turned to his final phase of serious romance problem plays. The play is an adaptation of the "Life of Coriolanus" from Plutarch's ''Parallel Lives'' and is set in [[UsefulNotes/TheRomanRepublic the early Roman Republic]].

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''Coriolanus'' is a play by Creator/WilliamShakespeare. It is one of his plays set in AncientGrome (alongside ''Theatre/TitusAndronicus, Theatre/JuliusCaesar, Theatre/AntonyAndCleopatra'') and it is considered to be Shakespeare's "last tragedy" before he turned to his final phase of serious romance problem plays. The play is an adaptation of the "Life of Coriolanus" from Plutarch's ''Parallel Lives'' ''Literature/ParallelLives'' and is set in [[UsefulNotes/TheRomanRepublic the early Roman Republic]].
25th Oct '17 8:35:58 PM JulianLapostat
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Added DiffLines:

* ThePeterPrinciple: Plutarch's biography and Shakespeare's play both present this as Coriolanus' tragedy. His virtues in the battlefield and a warzone, as an excellent commander and noble general who doesn't commit war crimes, translates in peacetime into vices that make him unfit for public office, a terrible politician, and a man whose patriotism combined with a contempt for people has him openly proclaim that he would try to repeal or abolish the office of the tribune.


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* SlaveToPR: Coriolanus refuses to become this, even when he actively needs to appeal to the public to win election as Consul. Far from humility, Coriolanus' refusal to appeal to the people by making himself palatable and appealing to popular interests is a symptom of his overwhelming arrogance and pride.
24th Oct '17 7:42:06 PM JulianLapostat
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''Coriolanus'' is one of Creator/WilliamShakespeare's lesser-known (but extremely well thought-of by critics) plays, with such political overtones that it remains the only Shakespeare play [[BannedInChina banned by a modern democracy]] (France in the 1930s for its co-opting by fascist groups, it was also banned in post-war UsefulNotes/{{Germany}}).

Caius Martius is a Roman general; brilliant but arrogant and contemptuous of the ordinary folk. When we meet him at the start of the play, there are food riots going on in Rome and Caius Martius is being blamed for taking the grain supplies for the army. While others try and calm the situation, Martius simply retorts that the commoners aren't worthy of having the grain as they have not done military service.

After defeating the army of the Volsces tribe and capturing the city of Corioles, Martius is given the name "Coriolanus" as a reward, and is persuaded to run for Consul. However, two of his opponents conspire to whip up the commons against him and he is hounded out of Rome after making a bitter speech about the evils of democracy.

Caius Martius, now hungry for revenge against his homeland, offers his services to the Volsces and their leader Aufidius. Marching on Rome, he has the city at his mercy, but is persuaded by his wife and mother to spare the city. When he returns to Aufidius, he is murdered for his betrayal.

to:

''Coriolanus'' is a play by Creator/WilliamShakespeare. It is one of Creator/WilliamShakespeare's lesser-known (but extremely well thought-of by critics) plays, with such political overtones that his plays set in AncientGrome (alongside ''Theatre/TitusAndronicus, Theatre/JuliusCaesar, Theatre/AntonyAndCleopatra'') and it remains the only Shakespeare is considered to be Shakespeare's "last tragedy" before he turned to his final phase of serious romance problem plays. The play [[BannedInChina banned by a modern democracy]] (France in is an adaptation of the 1930s for its co-opting by fascist groups, it was also banned "Life of Coriolanus" from Plutarch's ''Parallel Lives'' and is set in post-war UsefulNotes/{{Germany}}).

[[UsefulNotes/TheRomanRepublic the early Roman Republic]].

Caius Martius is a Roman general; general, who is an excellent soldier, brave commander, and brilliant in the battlefield but arrogant incorrigibly conservative, arrogant, and openly contemptuous of the ordinary folk. When He is so unpopular personally that when we meet him at the start of the play, there are food riots going on in Rome and Caius Martius is being blamed for taking the grain supplies for the army. While others try and calm the situation, Martius simply retorts that the commoners aren't worthy of having the grain as they have not done military service. \n\n After defeating the army of the Volsces tribe and capturing the city of Corioles, Martius is given the name [[TheRedBaron "Coriolanus" as a reward, and is persuaded to run for Consul. Consul]]. However, two of his opponents conspire to whip up the commons against him and he is hounded out of Rome after making for sedition when he calumnies against the power of the tribune of the plebs, where he gives a bitter speech about the evils of democracy.

democracy and the ingratitude of the rabble. Caius Martius, now hungry for revenge against his homeland, offers his services to the Volsces and their leader Aufidius. Marching on Rome, he has the city at his mercy, but is persuaded by his wife and mother to spare the city. When he returns to Aufidius, he is murdered for his betrayal.



It has the reputation of being the only Shakespeare play [[BannedInChina banned by a modern democracy]] (France in the 1930s for its co-opting by fascist groups, it was also briefly banned in [[UsefulNotes/{{Germany}} West Germany]] but was subject of a notable production and adaptation in UsefulNotes/EastGermany under Creator/BertoltBrecht's Berliner Ensemble.



* AdaptationalVillainy: In Shakespeare's play, the "rabble" are painted as being unfairly harsh on Coriolanus such as the opening scene where shortage of grain is blamed on Coriolanus as an example of irrational mob phobias. In Plutarch's original history, it is made clear that Coriolanus was always extremely unpopular and antagonistic to the Roman people and populace, opposing the rights of the plebians and the power of the tribunate well before the grain incident. Furthermore, when the Mob initially proposed to throw him off the tarpeian rock, this was immediately voted down by the people as Plutarch reports, whereas Shakespeare takes this brief passing remark to make it a constant threat on Coriolanus' life.



* BloodIsTheNewBlack: In the 2013 Donmar adaptation, Martius is ''covered'' in blood after the battle at Corioli.

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* BloodIsTheNewBlack: Coriolanus in both Plutarch and Shakespeare is described as being covered in blood after a battle. In the 2013 Donmar adaptation, Martius is ''covered'' in blood after the battle at Corioli.



* CradlingYourKill / MomentOfSilence



* DemocracyIsBad: Sort of. Even though Coriolanus is clearly not meant to be seen as absolutely correct, his points about how the common people are extremely fickle and gullible and demand a say in government despite knowing absolutely nothing about it are arguably quite valid.
** On the other hand, Coriolanus [[DoNotTauntCthulhu gets utterly owned]] whenever he tries to go up against the public, once with his own people and again [[DeathByMocking (fatally)]] with the Volsces. This seems to say that while the public might be fickle, gullible, and naive, a good leader ''has'' to win them over regardless, and fails to do so [[TooDumbToLive at their own peril]].

to:

* DemocracyIsBad: Sort of. Even though Keeping in mind that UsefulNotes/TheRomanRepublic and even the Athenian Commonwealth differs fundamentally from the modern concept of democracy, and even more so from Shakespeare's Elizabethan era:
**
Coriolanus is clearly not meant to be seen as absolutely correct, a TragicVillain, his points about how the common people are extremely fickle being easily manipulated by populist tricks is valid, and gullible his dislike for electioneering and demand the campaign cycle and trying to put on a say in government despite knowing absolutely nothing about it are arguably quite valid.
peaceable facade to get votes is still empathetic even if his attitude is contradictory i.e. he hates the people but doesn't want to lie to them to make them like him enough to vote him for Consul, and then hates the people for voting against him anyway.
** On the other hand, Coriolanus [[DoNotTauntCthulhu gets utterly owned]] whenever he tries to go up against the public, once with his own people and again [[DeathByMocking (fatally)]] with the Volsces. This seems to say that while the public might be fickle, gullible, and naive, a good leader ''has'' to win them over regardless, and fails to do so [[TooDumbToLive at their own peril]]. Likewise, both Brutus and Sicinus point out that had Coriolanus come to power, he would have likely become a dictator or tyrant since his personality and unwillingness to work with other people would make him unfit for public office.


Added DiffLines:

* AnOfficerAndAGentleman: During his campaign against the Volscian city of Corioli, Martius insists his men behave themselves and commit no war crimes, and he insists on treating the Volscians honorably.
24th Oct '17 7:23:08 PM JulianLapostat
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''Coriolanus'' is one of Creator/WilliamShakespeare's lesser-known (but extremely well thought-of by critics) plays, with such political overtones that it remains the only Shakespeare play [[BannedInChina banned by a modern democracy]] (France in the 1930s).

to:

''Coriolanus'' is one of Creator/WilliamShakespeare's lesser-known (but extremely well thought-of by critics) plays, with such political overtones that it remains the only Shakespeare play [[BannedInChina banned by a modern democracy]] (France in the 1930s).
1930s for its co-opting by fascist groups, it was also banned in post-war UsefulNotes/{{Germany}}).
21st Oct '17 2:33:11 PM KevinKlawitter
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Added DiffLines:

* ThoseTwoGuys: The Tribunes, Brutus and Sicinius, who do their best to mobilize the Roman people against Coriolanus during his campaign for Consul.
6th Sep '17 12:35:40 PM fruitstripegum
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* FragileFlower: Coriolanus's wife, Virgilia.


Added DiffLines:

* FragileFlower: Coriolanus's wife, Virgilia.
28th Aug '17 2:48:10 AM Morgenthaler
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* FoeYay: [[invoked]] Canon, and in spades. Very few people who are familiar with the play would say there is anything remotely ambiguous about the FoeYay between Coriolanus and Aufidius.

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* FoeYay: FoeRomanceSubtext: [[invoked]] Canon, and in spades. Very few people who are familiar with the play would say there is anything remotely ambiguous about the FoeYay tension between Coriolanus and Aufidius.
15th May '17 2:30:41 PM TheGreatConversation
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* FragileFlower: Coriolanus's wife, Virgilia, is presented as having a rather weak constitution (relative to Volumnia, at least).

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* FragileFlower: Coriolanus's wife, Virgilia, is presented as having a rather weak constitution (relative to Volumnia, at least).Virgilia.
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