History Theatre / Cabaret

26th May '17 2:52:08 AM CumbersomeTercel
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* CrotchGrabSexCheck: In some productions, this is how the MC tells Victor and Bobby apart. (Maybe Bobby is really a girl?)



* GratuitousEnglish: Many of the phrases in "Willkommen" are sung in GratuitousGerman, then in GratuitousFrench, then in GratuitousEnglish.



* LastNoteNightmare:
** "Tomorrow Belongs to Me" on the 1998 Broadway Cast Recording is already kind of creepy since it's intentionally made to sound low-quality and distorted. Then it stops and the MC harshly whispers the last two words. At least they give you a few seconds to brace yourself.
** Also from the 1998 cast, there is the beginnings of a lovely reprise of "Married" between the sweet old couple. Which is then promptly interrupted by a brick being "thrown" through a shop window. Well, there go all the good feelings.



* SmallStartBigFinish: "Maybe This Time".



* VillainSong: "Tomorrow Belongs To Me" for the Nazis.

to:

* VillainSong: "Tomorrow Belongs To Me" for the Nazis. It was so realistic and of the spirit that it got the (Jewish) producers accused of anti-Semitism!
* WelcomingSong: "Wilkommen".



* WhiteSheep: ShowWithinAShow example: the Mama of DontTellMama seems to be the only family member not involved in something seedy, as her daughter is a dancer at a seedy nightclub, her husband is a ''customer'' of the nightclub, her brother or brother-in-law is her daughter's agent for the nightclub, her mother or mother-in-law is ''also'' a dancer at the nightclub, and her son is involved in something bad enough that her daughter 'will squeal on him' if he squeals on her.



** In the revival, Natasha Richardson played her with a suitable voice, but with added tired inflections that managed to fit both ways. (The 2014 revival with MichelleWilliams took this even further.

to:

** In the revival, Natasha Richardson played her with a suitable voice, but with added tired inflections that managed to fit both ways. (The 2014 revival with MichelleWilliams Creator/MichelleWilliams took this even further.



* AdaptationalSexuality: Brian Roberts is straight, unlike his book counterpart, who is gay.



* BadGirlSong: Sally's first song is "Mein Herr", which establishes her as a GoodBadGirl.
-->"You have to understand the way I am, Mein Herr."



* TheBlindLeadingTheBlind: An innocent virgin asks Sally Bowles for advice on whether her feelings are true love or mere lust, since Sally is 'a woman who is giving her body often to men'. Sally, who is really 'as fatale as an after-dinner mint' can only shrug helplessly.



* DownerEnding: Less blatantly then the plays indicates, but the final image of the blurry mirror reflecting the cluster Nazi soldiers sitting among the crowd suggest that this is so.

to:

* DownerEnding: Less blatantly then the plays play indicates, but the final image of the blurry mirror reflecting the cluster Nazi soldiers sitting among the crowd suggest that this is so.



* EthicalSlut: Sally starts out as a straight example, before evolving into a deconstruction. Both she and Brian engage in TriangRelations with a bisexual billionaire, causing friction in their relationship. She ends up pregnant [[spoiler: but decides to abort the baby, feeling that she couldn't be mother material. It's instead implied that she wants to continue her partying lifestyle, which is ultimately shown to be empty and just escapism]].



* LittlePeopleAreSurreal: Subverted: Sally, trying to shock Brian, asks whether he's ever had sex with a dwarf. Brian calmly responds with, "Yes. But it wasn't a lasting relationship."



** Really there are quite a few of these. There are numerous small set pieces that show the Nazis taking over Berlin that add a feeling of dread to the happy talk of the characters, like the radio with Nazi propoganda or the swastika posters. Then there are the cabaret songs which cut between the upbeat music and darker scenes, such as a man being beaten perhaps to death.

to:

** Really there are quite a few of these. There are numerous small set pieces that show the Nazis taking over Berlin that add a feeling of dread to the happy talk of the characters, like the radio with Nazi propoganda propaganda or the swastika posters. Then there are the cabaret songs which cut between the upbeat music and darker scenes, such as a man being beaten perhaps to death.


Added DiffLines:

* MusicalWorldHypotheses: All the songs take place in a night club, with the single exception of "Tomorrow Belongs To Me", a patriotic song that a boy sings to a luncheon, with the diners joining in for the last chorus.


Added DiffLines:

* RevealShot: [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LNMVMNmrqJE Tomorrow Belongs To Me]]. Starts out as a nice song, and then you start to see the swastikas...


Added DiffLines:

* SilentCredits
18th Apr '17 6:35:23 PM WaterBlap
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* FundamentallyFunnyFruit: During the song "It Couldn't Please Me More", the Jewish grocer, Herr Schultz, presents Fraulein Schneider with a pineapple, which would be rationed in this time period and therefore a very valuable gift.
18th Mar '17 9:54:06 PM StrixObscuro
Is there an issue? Send a Message


''Cabaret'' is a stage musical based on a set of short stories by Christopher Isherwood (collected in ''Goodbye To Berlin''), which in turn were based on real events and people. It also drew enormous influence from ''I Am A Camera'' (1951), a straight play based on ''Goodbye to Berlin''. ''Cabaret'' itself was adapted into a film of the same name in 1972. No two versions of this story are the same, all starring wildly different characters, or different versions of the same characters, and following different events. Hell, even the musical itself differs somewhat in content based on what revision you're talking about.

to:

''Cabaret'' is a stage musical based on a set of short stories by Christopher Isherwood (collected in ''Goodbye To Berlin''), ''Literature/GoodbyeToBerlin''), which in turn were based on real events and people. It also drew enormous influence from ''I Am A Camera'' (1951), a straight play based on ''Goodbye to Berlin''. ''Cabaret'' itself was adapted into a film of the same name in 1972. No two versions of this story are the same, all starring wildly different characters, or different versions of the same characters, and following different events. Hell, even the musical itself differs somewhat in content based on what revision you're talking about.
19th Feb '17 10:51:04 AM Beau_Buffet
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* DramaticIrony: The movie takes place in Germany in the late 20's. Throughout the movie, we see the Nazi party becoming more and more prominent, though not all of the characters do. The end of the film is Sally blithely performing before a crowd of armband-wearing Nazis, though the audience knows even ''that'' will end in time.

to:

* DramaticIrony: The movie takes place in Germany in the late 20's.1931. Throughout the movie, we see the Nazi party becoming more and more prominent, though not all of the characters do. The end of the film is Sally blithely performing before a crowd of armband-wearing Nazis, though the audience knows even ''that'' will end in time.
12th Jan '17 9:17:17 PM Theatre_Maven_3695
Is there an issue? Send a Message


--> "Trust ''that'' to be the one German word you pronounce perfectly."

to:

--> [[DeadpanSnarker "Trust ''that'' to be the one German word you pronounce perfectly.""]]
9th Jan '17 10:08:36 AM DrSleep
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* FanDisservice: The raggedy costumes, caked-on makeup and amateurish choreography strongly downplays, if not outright removes, any potential eroticism in the cabaret ChorusGirls. Coupled with the Emcee's creepy leering, the nightmarish editing and cinematography, and the overall setting of pre-Nazi Germany, overall the numbers come across more sad and sleazy than sexy.

to:

* FanDisservice: The raggedy costumes, caked-on makeup and amateurish choreography strongly downplays, if not outright removes, any potential eroticism in the cabaret ChorusGirls. Coupled with the Emcee's creepy leering, the nightmarish editing and cinematography, and the overall setting of pre-Nazi Germany, overall the numbers overall come across more sad and sleazy than sexy.
9th Jan '17 10:08:10 AM DrSleep
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** FanDisservice: In the movie at least; between the raggedy costumes and caked-on makeup (coupled with the Emcee's creepy leering and the nightmarish editing and cinematography) the performers and their acts come across more sad and sleazy than sexy.


Added DiffLines:

* FanDisservice: The raggedy costumes, caked-on makeup and amateurish choreography strongly downplays, if not outright removes, any potential eroticism in the cabaret ChorusGirls. Coupled with the Emcee's creepy leering, the nightmarish editing and cinematography, and the overall setting of pre-Nazi Germany, overall the numbers come across more sad and sleazy than sexy.
9th Jan '17 10:03:34 AM DrSleep
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** FanDisservice: In the movie at least; between the raggedy costumes and caked-on makeup (coupled with the Emcee's creepy leering and the nightmarish editing and cinematography) the performers and their acts come across more sad and sleazy than sexy.
16th Dec '16 1:14:24 PM ImperialMajestyXO
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AdaptationalNameChange: The lead male character (played Michael York) is called Brian Roberts rather than Cliff Bradshaw. His job is also changed from writer to English teacher.

to:

* AdaptationalNameChange: AdaptationalNationality: Sally is British in the original play, but American here.
* AdaptationNameChange:
The lead male character (played Michael York) is called Brian Roberts rather than Cliff Bradshaw. His job is also changed from writer to English teacher.
20th Sep '16 10:35:48 AM momur
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Depending on the production, the Emcee can seem to be this at times.
This list shows the last 10 events of 60. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Theatre.Cabaret