History Theatre / Assassins

31st Jan '16 6:00:04 PM NotThisThing
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The show is narrated by the Balladeer, who comments on the assassins' actions and motivations. The various killers (John Wilkes Booth, Charles Guiteau, Giuseppe Zangara, John Hinckley, Lynette "Squeaky" Fromme, Sara Lee Moore, Leon Czolgosz, Samuel Byck, and Lee Harvey Oswald) interact throughout the play, regardless of time period. Their assassination attempts are represented like a carnival game -- a bell rings when they succeed, and a buzzer sounds when they fail.
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The show is narrated by the Balladeer, who comments on the assassins' actions and motivations. The various killers (John Wilkes Booth, Charles Guiteau, Giuseppe Zangara, John Hinckley, Lynette "Squeaky" Fromme, Sara Lee Jane Moore, Leon Czolgosz, Samuel Byck, and Lee Harvey Oswald) interact throughout the play, regardless of time period. Their assassination attempts are represented like a carnival game -- a bell rings when they succeed, and a buzzer sounds when they fail.

* CampStraight: Guiteau, who despite his mannerisms is still attracted to Sarah Jane Moore.
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* CampStraight: Guiteau, who despite his mannerisms is still attracted to Sarah Sara Jane Moore.

* HandsOnApproach: Guiteau gets ''very'' handsy with Sarah Jane Moore while giving her shooting tips.
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* HandsOnApproach: Guiteau gets ''very'' handsy with Sarah Sara Jane Moore while giving her shooting tips.

* ImperialStormtrooperMarksmanshipAcademy: Sarah Jane Moore, by her own admission.
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* ImperialStormtrooperMarksmanshipAcademy: Sarah Sara Jane Moore, by her own admission.

* RecklessGunUsage: Sarah Jane Moore is written to be played with no regard for the proper operation or storage of her .38 revolver. She accidentally discharges it no less than five times during the course of the show, once while it's still in her hand bag, narrowly missing Squeaky Fromme, once into the air when she's supposed to be clicking the hammer of an unloaded weapon in "The Gun Song," once when startled with her finger prematurely on the trigger, damaging Charles Guiteau's hearing in the process, and twice during two separate scene change blackouts, with the lights coming up on her scene the second time to reveal she's just [[IJustShotMarvinInTheFace accidentally shot her own dog]].
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* RecklessGunUsage: Sarah Sara Jane Moore is written to be played with no regard for the proper operation or storage of her .38 revolver. She accidentally discharges it no less than five times during the course of the show, once while it's still in her hand bag, narrowly missing Squeaky Fromme, once into the air when she's supposed to be clicking the hammer of an unloaded weapon in "The Gun Song," once when startled with her finger prematurely on the trigger, damaging Charles Guiteau's hearing in the process, and twice during two separate scene change blackouts, with the lights coming up on her scene the second time to reveal she's just [[IJustShotMarvinInTheFace accidentally shot her own dog]].

* RummageFail: Sarah Jane Moore and the "really great gun".
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* RummageFail: Sarah Sara Jane Moore and the "really great gun".

** Most notably, Guiteau's "Going to the Lordy" bit in his ballad is taken from lyrics the real Guiteau wrote shortly before his execution. (He read it at his execution, and had actually requested an orchestra to accompany him, but that part was nixed. [[FridgeBrilliance He finally got one in the show.]]
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** Most notably, Guiteau's "Going to the Lordy" bit in his ballad is taken from lyrics the real Guiteau wrote shortly before his execution. (He read it at his execution, and had actually requested an orchestra to accompany him, but that part was nixed. [[FridgeBrilliance He finally got one in the show.]]]])

** Sarah Jane Moore: Mezzo
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** Sarah Jane Moore: Mezzo
26th Jan '16 1:38:23 PM Gravidef
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** "Something Just Broke" serves a symbolic one to "How I Saved Roosevelt." In "Roosevelt," various bystanders in Florida talk about the attempted assassination of FDR, bragging about their own (highly embellished) actions and making themselves sound like heroes. In "Something Just Broke," the same bystanders return...only now JFK is dead, and instead of talking about how they saved the day, the various Americans are stunned and saddened, talking about the precise time when they heard the news, and how they'll never be able to forget that specific moment.
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** "Something Just Broke" serves a symbolic one to "How I Saved Roosevelt." In "Roosevelt," various bystanders in Florida talk are interviewed about the attempted assassination of FDR, bragging about their own (highly embellished) actions and making themselves sound like heroes. In "Something Just Broke," the same bystanders return...only now JFK is dead, and instead of cheerfully talking about how they saved the day, the various Americans are they're stunned and saddened, talking saddened as they speak about the precise time when they heard the news, and how they'll never be able to forget that specific moment.
26th Jan '16 1:36:56 PM Gravidef
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* CutSong: "The Flag Song", which was later used in ''Road Show'' with altered lyrics.

Added DiffLines:
* CutSong: "The Flag Song", which was later used ** "Something Just Broke" serves a symbolic one to "How I Saved Roosevelt." In "Roosevelt," various bystanders in ''Road Show'' with altered lyrics.Florida talk about the attempted assassination of FDR, bragging about their own (highly embellished) actions and making themselves sound like heroes. In "Something Just Broke," the same bystanders return...only now JFK is dead, and instead of talking about how they saved the day, the various Americans are stunned and saddened, talking about the precise time when they heard the news, and how they'll never be able to forget that specific moment.

Added DiffLines:
* CutSong: "The Flag Song", which was later used in ''Road Show'' with altered lyrics.SmurfettePrinciple: A justified case--there are only two females (Fromme and Moore) among the main characters, but that's because they're the only (known) women who have attempted to assassinate a U.S. President.
20th Jan '16 11:27:43 AM JujuP
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Added DiffLines:
* {{Tyrannicide}}: John Wilkes Booth believes he is doing this when he kills UsefulNotes/AbrahamLincoln, comparing the situation to ''Theatre/JuliusCaesar''. -->"Hunt me down, smear my name. Say I did it for the fame, what I did was kill the man who killed my country! Now the Southland can end! Now this bloody war can end! Because someone slew the tyrant, just as Brutus slew the tyrant!"
26th Dec '15 4:28:37 PM nombretomado
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Useful Notes/ pages are not tropes
* UsefulNotes/AmericanAccents: Booth, despite being from Maryland, often has a [[SouthernGentleman genteel Southern accent]] (probably because [[TheCoconutEffect we expect him to]]), Byck has a cranky Philadelphia accent, and Moore can have a Southern accent in some productions (she was from West Virginia). * AmericanDream: That of the cynical flavor.
13th Oct '15 7:00:29 PM AjWargo
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The show is narrated by the Balladeer, who comments on the assassins' actions and motivations. The various killers (John Wilkes Booth, Charles Guiteau, Giuseppe Zangara, John Hinckley, Lynette "Squeaky" Fromme, Sara Lee Moore, Leon Czolgoz, Samuel Byck, and Lee Harvey Oswald) interact throughout the play, regardless of time period. Their assassination attempts are represented like a carnival game -- a bell rings when they succeed, and a buzzer sounds when they fail.
to:
The show is narrated by the Balladeer, who comments on the assassins' actions and motivations. The various killers (John Wilkes Booth, Charles Guiteau, Giuseppe Zangara, John Hinckley, Lynette "Squeaky" Fromme, Sara Lee Moore, Leon Czolgoz, Czolgosz, Samuel Byck, and Lee Harvey Oswald) interact throughout the play, regardless of time period. Their assassination attempts are represented like a carnival game -- a bell rings when they succeed, and a buzzer sounds when they fail.
7th Oct '15 6:22:43 PM AjWargo
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The show is narrated by the Balladeer, who comments on the assassins' actions and motivations. The various killers (John Wilkes Booth, Charles Guiteau, Guiseppe Zangara, John Hinckley, Lynette "Squeaky" Fromme, Sara Lee Moore, Leon Czolgoz, Sam Byck, and Lee Harvey Oswald) interact throughout the play, regardless of time period. Their assassination attempts are represented like a carnival game -- a bell rings when they succeed, and a buzzer sounds when they fail.
to:
The show is narrated by the Balladeer, who comments on the assassins' actions and motivations. The various killers (John Wilkes Booth, Charles Guiteau, Guiseppe Giuseppe Zangara, John Hinckley, Lynette "Squeaky" Fromme, Sara Lee Moore, Leon Czolgoz, Sam Samuel Byck, and Lee Harvey Oswald) interact throughout the play, regardless of time period. Their assassination attempts are represented like a carnival game -- a bell rings when they succeed, and a buzzer sounds when they fail.
7th Oct '15 6:18:14 PM AjWargo
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The show is narrated by the Balladeer, who comments on the assassins' actions and motivations. The various killers (including John Wilkes Booth, Charles Guiteau, John Hinckley, Lynette "Squeaky" Fromme, Leon Czolgosz, and Lee Harvey Oswald) interact throughout the play, regardless of time period. Their assassination attempts are represented like a carnival game -- a bell rings when they succeed, and a buzzer sounds when they fail.
to:
The show is narrated by the Balladeer, who comments on the assassins' actions and motivations. The various killers (including John (John Wilkes Booth, Charles Guiteau, Guiseppe Zangara, John Hinckley, Lynette "Squeaky" Fromme, Sara Lee Moore, Leon Czolgosz, Czolgoz, Sam Byck, and Lee Harvey Oswald) interact throughout the play, regardless of time period. Their assassination attempts are represented like a carnival game -- a bell rings when they succeed, and a buzzer sounds when they fail.
6th Oct '15 4:20:54 PM NotThisThing
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Added DiffLines:
* WhamShot: [[spoiler:The Zapruder film projected onto Oswald's shirt after he shoots Kennedy.]]
6th Oct '15 4:11:10 PM NotThisThing
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* TheDitz: Sarah Jane Moore's characterization essentially boils down to this.
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* TheDitz: Sarah Sara Jane Moore's characterization essentially boils down to this.

--> Fromme: You had amnesia? --> Moore: I did? (Laughs) It's a joke. See, it's like, if I had amnesia, then I couldn't remember anything, including that I had amnesia.
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--> Fromme: '''Fromme:''' You had amnesia? --> Moore: '''Moore:''' I did? (Laughs) It's a joke. See, it's like, if I had amnesia, then I couldn't remember anything, including that I had amnesia.

Added DiffLines:
--> Fromme: You had amnesia? --> Moore: I did? (Laughs) It's ** "Something Just Broke," added in the 2004 revival, provides a joke. See, truer example. We've spent the entire show in the company of the assassins, building up to a tremendous climax where [[spoiler:Oswald, formerly the Balladeer, shoots and kills Kennedy]]... then we see its effect on ordinary American citizens, and it's like, if I had amnesia, then I couldn't remember anything, including that I had amnesia. ''devastating.''
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