History Theatre / Assassins

30th Jul '16 12:51:10 PM Seanette
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* YoureInsane: Lee Harvey Oswald says this when he's told to shoot the president.

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* YoureInsane: Lee Harvey Oswald says this when he's told to shoot the president. The person he's talking to really doesn't care, responding "Maybe I am. So what?"
31st May '16 3:36:44 PM AjWargo
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Added DiffLines:

** Zangara didn't say "Pull switch!" as his execution command, but instead, "Pusha da button!".


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*** Zangara really did plan to kill Herbert Hoover, but when he learned that FDR had beaten him in the election, he decided to gun him down instead.
9th May '16 8:08:33 AM AdelePotter
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Added DiffLines:

[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/assassins_poster.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:350:Everybody's got the right to their dreams...]]

->''Hey, pal, feeling blue?''\\
''Don't know what to do?''\\
''Hey, pal, I mean you!''\\
''Yeah!''\\
''C'mere and kill a president!''
-->-- '''The Proprietor''', "Everybody's Got the Right"
8th May '16 8:16:44 AM AdelePotter
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* [[MurderIsTheBestSolution Assassination Is The Best Solution]]

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** "The Ballad of Booth" states he "died in a barn, in pain and bitter, twenty-seven years of age." Booth was actually twenty-''six'' when he died, but he was only about two weeks off from his twenty-seventh birthday, so... close enough.
* [[MurderIsTheBestSolution Assassination Is The Best Solution]]Solution]]: At least, if you ask our protagonists. The Balladeer's part of "Another National Anthem" is smashing this trope to pieces. The assassins don't listen to him.



* AssholeVictim: UsefulNotes/RichardNixon, UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan, UsefulNotes/WilliamMcKinley, and, eventually, [[spoiler: the audience.]]

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* AssholeVictim: AssholeVictim:
**
UsefulNotes/RichardNixon, UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan, UsefulNotes/WilliamMcKinley, and, eventually, [[spoiler: the audience.]]



* AxCrazy: From the Balladeer's point of view, ''all'' the assassins. While you can definitely make a case for all of them being crazy, it's not ''quite'' that simple.



* BlackComedy

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* BlackComedyBlackComedy: Rivals ''Theatre/SweeneyTodd'' in terms of "should I be laughing at this?" humor!



* OneSteveLimit: Averted, there are two John's (Booth and Hinckley), and two Charlie's if you count [[TheGhost Charles Manson]]

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* OneSteveLimit: Averted, there are two John's Johns (Booth and Hinckley), and two Charlie's Charlies if you count [[TheGhost Charles Manson]]Manson]].
* PetTheDog: Czolgsoz carrying Emma Goldman's bag for her.
13th Apr '16 1:46:00 PM Morgenthaler
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** Booth references the sad story of [[DeathOfASalesman Willie Loman]] and compares the character to Oswald. (It's a bit of a MindScrew: Booth is an actor, so of course he would be familiar with ''Salesman,'' if it hadn't been written 80 years after his death.)

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** Booth references the sad story of [[DeathOfASalesman [[Theatre/DeathOfASalesman Willie Loman]] and compares the character to Oswald. (It's a bit of a MindScrew: Booth is an actor, so of course he would be familiar with ''Salesman,'' if it hadn't been written 80 years after his death.)
12th Apr '16 8:31:56 AM Sorio99
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** [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]], or [[MindScrew something like that]] with the ending. As pointed out, [[spoiler: all but four of the assassins shown technically attempted (or in some cases, were adults) well after Oswald shot JFK. Booth actually uses this to convince him to go through with it.]]
--> ''Booth'': I have seen the future, [[spoiler: Lee.]] And you are it.


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** Interestingly, the only songs where the Balladeer outright criticizes the assassins are "Ballad Of Booth" and "Another National Anthem". In the others, he's more evenhanded, and in "Ballad Of Czolgosz", he paints a fairly sympathetic picture of Czolgosz. He still insults them more than a little, though.
26th Feb '16 9:53:46 PM BadSplice
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''Assassins'', with a book by John Weidman and score by StephenSondheim, is, to put it simply, [[BlackHumor a revue featuring nine men and women who have killed (or attempted to kill) the President of the United States.]]

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''Assassins'', with a book by John Weidman and score by StephenSondheim, is, to put it simply, [[BlackHumor [[BlackComedy a revue featuring nine men and women who have killed (or attempted to kill) the President of the United States.]]
31st Jan '16 6:00:04 PM NotThisThing
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The show is narrated by the Balladeer, who comments on the assassins' actions and motivations. The various killers (John Wilkes Booth, Charles Guiteau, Giuseppe Zangara, John Hinckley, Lynette "Squeaky" Fromme, Sara Lee Moore, Leon Czolgosz, Samuel Byck, and Lee Harvey Oswald) interact throughout the play, regardless of time period. Their assassination attempts are represented like a carnival game -- a bell rings when they succeed, and a buzzer sounds when they fail.

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The show is narrated by the Balladeer, who comments on the assassins' actions and motivations. The various killers (John Wilkes Booth, Charles Guiteau, Giuseppe Zangara, John Hinckley, Lynette "Squeaky" Fromme, Sara Lee Jane Moore, Leon Czolgosz, Samuel Byck, and Lee Harvey Oswald) interact throughout the play, regardless of time period. Their assassination attempts are represented like a carnival game -- a bell rings when they succeed, and a buzzer sounds when they fail.



* CampStraight: Guiteau, who despite his mannerisms is still attracted to Sarah Jane Moore.

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* CampStraight: Guiteau, who despite his mannerisms is still attracted to Sarah Sara Jane Moore.



* HandsOnApproach: Guiteau gets ''very'' handsy with Sarah Jane Moore while giving her shooting tips.

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* HandsOnApproach: Guiteau gets ''very'' handsy with Sarah Sara Jane Moore while giving her shooting tips.



* ImperialStormtrooperMarksmanshipAcademy: Sarah Jane Moore, by her own admission.

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* ImperialStormtrooperMarksmanshipAcademy: Sarah Sara Jane Moore, by her own admission.



* RecklessGunUsage: Sarah Jane Moore is written to be played with no regard for the proper operation or storage of her .38 revolver. She accidentally discharges it no less than five times during the course of the show, once while it's still in her hand bag, narrowly missing Squeaky Fromme, once into the air when she's supposed to be clicking the hammer of an unloaded weapon in "The Gun Song," once when startled with her finger prematurely on the trigger, damaging Charles Guiteau's hearing in the process, and twice during two separate scene change blackouts, with the lights coming up on her scene the second time to reveal she's just [[IJustShotMarvinInTheFace accidentally shot her own dog]].

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* RecklessGunUsage: Sarah Sara Jane Moore is written to be played with no regard for the proper operation or storage of her .38 revolver. She accidentally discharges it no less than five times during the course of the show, once while it's still in her hand bag, narrowly missing Squeaky Fromme, once into the air when she's supposed to be clicking the hammer of an unloaded weapon in "The Gun Song," once when startled with her finger prematurely on the trigger, damaging Charles Guiteau's hearing in the process, and twice during two separate scene change blackouts, with the lights coming up on her scene the second time to reveal she's just [[IJustShotMarvinInTheFace accidentally shot her own dog]].



* RummageFail: Sarah Jane Moore and the "really great gun".

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* RummageFail: Sarah Sara Jane Moore and the "really great gun".



** Most notably, Guiteau's "Going to the Lordy" bit in his ballad is taken from lyrics the real Guiteau wrote shortly before his execution. (He read it at his execution, and had actually requested an orchestra to accompany him, but that part was nixed. [[FridgeBrilliance He finally got one in the show.]]

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** Most notably, Guiteau's "Going to the Lordy" bit in his ballad is taken from lyrics the real Guiteau wrote shortly before his execution. (He read it at his execution, and had actually requested an orchestra to accompany him, but that part was nixed. [[FridgeBrilliance He finally got one in the show.]]]])



** Sarah Jane Moore: Mezzo

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** Sarah Jane Moore: Mezzo
26th Jan '16 1:38:23 PM Gravidef
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** "Something Just Broke" serves a symbolic one to "How I Saved Roosevelt." In "Roosevelt," various bystanders in Florida talk about the attempted assassination of FDR, bragging about their own (highly embellished) actions and making themselves sound like heroes. In "Something Just Broke," the same bystanders return...only now JFK is dead, and instead of talking about how they saved the day, the various Americans are stunned and saddened, talking about the precise time when they heard the news, and how they'll never be able to forget that specific moment.

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** "Something Just Broke" serves a symbolic one to "How I Saved Roosevelt." In "Roosevelt," various bystanders in Florida talk are interviewed about the attempted assassination of FDR, bragging about their own (highly embellished) actions and making themselves sound like heroes. In "Something Just Broke," the same bystanders return...only now JFK is dead, and instead of cheerfully talking about how they saved the day, the various Americans are they're stunned and saddened, talking saddened as they speak about the precise time when they heard the news, and how they'll never be able to forget that specific moment.
26th Jan '16 1:36:56 PM Gravidef
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* CutSong: "The Flag Song", which was later used in ''Road Show'' with altered lyrics.


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** "Something Just Broke" serves a symbolic one to "How I Saved Roosevelt." In "Roosevelt," various bystanders in Florida talk about the attempted assassination of FDR, bragging about their own (highly embellished) actions and making themselves sound like heroes. In "Something Just Broke," the same bystanders return...only now JFK is dead, and instead of talking about how they saved the day, the various Americans are stunned and saddened, talking about the precise time when they heard the news, and how they'll never be able to forget that specific moment.


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* SmurfettePrinciple: A justified case--there are only two females (Fromme and Moore) among the main characters, but that's because they're the only (known) women who have attempted to assassinate a U.S. President.
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