History Theatre / Amadeus

19th Dec '16 7:11:11 AM Saveelich
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''Amadeus'' is a 1979 stage play written by Creator/PeterShaffer, adapted into a film in 1984 by Shaffer and director [[Creator/MilosForman Miloš Forman]]. It is based off of an 1897 one-act opera by Nikolai Rimsky-Korshakov, ''Mozart and Salieri'', which is in turn based on an 1830 drama of the same name by Creator/AlexanderPushkin. This article deals mainly with the film.

[[ArtisticLicenseHistory Taking some liberties with historical accounts]], the story is told from the [[SympatheticPOV point of view]] of Antonio Salieri, the court composer for Emperor Joseph II. A devout and serious man, Salieri's faith is shaken when he meets Creator/WolfgangAmadeusMozart. Though Mozart proves to be a tremendous boor and an immature ManChild, his godlike musical talents win the affections of the court and the audiences while simultaneously moving and infuriating Salieri with their genius. That the boorish Mozart could create such magnificent, groundbreaking compositions with seemingly little effort, while Salieri had to struggle to get to where he was, drives him to undermine Mozart any way he can. [[DownerEnding Sometimes, he even succeeds]].

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''Amadeus'' is a 1979 stage play about the life of Creator/WolfgangAmadeusMozart written by Creator/PeterShaffer, adapted into a film in 1984 by Shaffer and director [[Creator/MilosForman Miloš Forman]]. It is based off of an 1897 one-act opera by Nikolai Rimsky-Korshakov, ''Mozart and Salieri'', which is in turn based on an 1830 drama of the same name by Creator/AlexanderPushkin. This article deals mainly with the film.

[[ArtisticLicenseHistory Taking some liberties with historical accounts]], the story is told from the [[SympatheticPOV point of view]] of Antonio Salieri, the court composer for Emperor Joseph II. A devout and serious man, Salieri's faith is shaken when he meets Creator/WolfgangAmadeusMozart.Mozart. Though Mozart proves to be a tremendous boor and an immature ManChild, his godlike musical talents win the affections of the court and the audiences while simultaneously moving and infuriating Salieri with their genius. That the boorish Mozart could create such magnificent, groundbreaking compositions with seemingly little effort, while Salieri had to struggle to get to where he was, drives him to undermine Mozart any way he can. [[DownerEnding Sometimes, he even succeeds]].
14th Dec '16 2:07:54 PM HighCrate
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* DeaderThanDisco: In-universe, Salieri's music is this. How could he have known that it'd experience a revival many years later–thanks to this very movie, no less?
18th Nov '16 1:40:46 PM CorporalPie
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* OhCrap: The Emperor's expression when he realized that he unreasonably forbid ballet in operas.

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* OhCrap: The Emperor's expression when he realized that he unreasonably forbid forbade ballet in operas.
2nd Nov '16 4:17:08 AM Morgenthaler
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* CaliforniaDoubling: 18th century Vienna was shot in 1980s Prague - because their roofs don't have lots of satellite dishes that could potentially spoil the shot.
18th Oct '16 7:20:53 PM superdog
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** One minor but curious alteration in the movie is the absence of Salieri's wife. The movie portrays him as celibate but secretly lustful towards his students, adding weight to the Director's Cut scene where he tries to take advantage of Constanze but doesn't entirely follow through. The real Salieri was most certainly not celibate and was in fact known to have fathered eight children.

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** One minor but curious alteration in the movie is the absence of Salieri's wife. The movie portrays him as celibate but secretly lustful towards his students, in particular Caterina Cavalieri, adding weight to the Director's Cut scene where he tries to take advantage of Constanze but doesn't entirely follow through. The real Salieri was most certainly not celibate celibate, and was in fact known to have fathered eight children.children with his wife. In addition, the real Caterina Cavalieri was known to have been a mistress of Salieri.
18th Oct '16 7:09:46 PM superdog
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** One minor but curious alteration in the movie is the absence of Salieri's wife. The movie portrays him as celibate but secretly lustful towards his students, adding weight to the Director's Cut scene where he tries to take advantage of Constanze but doesn't entirely follow through.

to:

** One minor but curious alteration in the movie is the absence of Salieri's wife. The movie portrays him as celibate but secretly lustful towards his students, adding weight to the Director's Cut scene where he tries to take advantage of Constanze but doesn't entirely follow through. The real Salieri was most certainly not celibate and was in fact known to have fathered eight children.
16th Oct '16 11:22:19 PM superdog
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* KickTheDog: Salieri constantly sabotages Mozart's career opportunities as much as possible. But a particular nasty instance is in the Director's Cut where he takes advantage of Constance's desperation and devotion and obtain sexual favors from her. Even when he decides not to go through with it, he never does anything to remedy Constance's [[BreakTheCutie emotional breakdown.]]

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* KickTheDog: Salieri constantly sabotages Mozart's career opportunities as much as possible. But a particular nasty instance is in the Director's Cut where he takes advantage of Constance's Constanze's desperation and devotion and obtain sexual favors from her. Even when he decides not to go through with it, he never does anything to remedy Constance's Constanze's [[BreakTheCutie emotional breakdown.]]
16th Oct '16 9:49:53 PM superdog
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Added DiffLines:

** Mozart did not actually collapse during the premiere of The Magic Flute as shown in the film, and was actually able to finish conducting the entire performance. The film also shows Mozart playing the keyed glockenspiel in the orchestra, with somebody else conducting the performance, but in reality Mozart himself was the conductor at the premiere.
16th Oct '16 7:27:26 PM superdog
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Added DiffLines:

** The film depicts Salieri as being jealous of Mozart and doing everything he can to undermine Mozart, and even trying (unsuccessfully) to kill him. In reality, while it is true that they were both competing for the same jobs in Vienna, with Salieri beating Mozart to certain coveted jobs, there is no evidence that the relationship was any more acrimonious than that. On the contrary, there is evidence to suggest that Salieri and Mozart actually had a professional working relationship built on mutual respect for each other's work, and both composers have even worked together on several occasions. In fact, after Mozart died, Salieri served as the music teacher of one of Mozart's sons.
13th Oct '16 5:09:06 PM CarolC
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** Another major departure from actual history: Salieri was the composition tutor of one Ludwig van Beethoven, of whom Mozart was known to have explicitly stated was a rising star, indeed Mozart predicted that Beethoven would go on to be an even greater composer than Mozart ''himself''.

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** Another major departure from actual history: Salieri was the composition tutor of one Ludwig van Beethoven, Beethoven (who has a cameo of a sorts as a child), of whom Mozart was known to have explicitly stated was a rising star, indeed Mozart predicted that Beethoven would go on to be an even greater composer than Mozart ''himself''.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Theatre.Amadeus