History Theatre / Agamemnon

8th Sep '15 5:42:35 PM RainFairy
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%%* BecauseDestinySaysSo
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%%* BecauseDestinySaysSo* BecauseDestinySaysSo: Agamemnon sacrifriced Iphigenia because of this, and [[spoiler: Cassandra rushes to her death at the hands of Clytemnestra since it's useless to delay it.]]

%%* GreekChorus
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%%* GreekChorus* GreekChorus: This is basically the role of the Eldest of Argos in the story.

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%%* GreekChorus* TheOphelia: Subverted. The Elders ''think'' Cassandra is one of these and treat her as a madwoman at first, but then she starts talking about the RoyallyScrewedUp story of Argos as if she had been there...
8th Aug '15 8:30:56 AM Silverblade2
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* BecauseDestinySaysSo
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* %%* BecauseDestinySaysSo

* Myth/ClassicalMythology
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* %%* Myth/ClassicalMythology

* GreekChorus
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* %%* GreekChorus

* KeepTheHomeFiresBurning
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* %%* KeepTheHomeFiresBurning

* RoyallyScrewedUp * SecondaryCharacterTitle * SecondHandStorytelling
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* %%* RoyallyScrewedUp * %%* SecondaryCharacterTitle * %%* SecondHandStorytelling

* {{Tragedy}}
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* %%* {{Tragedy}}
3rd May '15 6:26:31 PM nombretomado
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namespacing
* ClassicalMythology
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* ClassicalMythologyMyth/ClassicalMythology

* HistoricalFantasy: Archaeologists have found there was a real Agamemnon. Whether he was killed by his cousin and avenged by his children (as well as whether Atreus was as evil as depicted in ClassicalMythology or subjected to a HistoricalVillainUpgrade) cannot be known.
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* HistoricalFantasy: Archaeologists have found there was a real Agamemnon. Whether he was killed by his cousin and avenged by his children (as well as whether Atreus was as evil as depicted in ClassicalMythology Myth/ClassicalMythology or subjected to a HistoricalVillainUpgrade) cannot be known.
16th Mar '15 8:09:33 PM jormis29
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Agamemnon himself is the King of Argos, who is returning home from the {{The Trojan War}} after enslaving Cassandra, the daughter of the Trojan king, Priam. Cassandra is forced into being his [[{{UnusualEuphemism}} concubine.]] Much to the distress of his wife, Clytemnestra when he finally returns home. Clytemnestra welcomes him back as if nothing bothers her, but is unable to keep the bitterness out of her tone when she speaks of how long he had been gone. Stringing out [[{{False Reassurance}} extravagant tales of how much she missed him]], in an attempt to make him feel uneasy and guilt stricken. She then orders maids to retrieve a purple cloth from his chariot, and spread it on the palace floor beneath his feet. But Agamemnon refuses to step on it.
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Agamemnon himself is the King of Argos, who is returning home from the {{The Trojan War}} UsefulNotes/TheTrojanWar after enslaving Cassandra, the daughter of the Trojan king, Priam. Cassandra is forced into being his [[{{UnusualEuphemism}} concubine.]] Much to the distress of his wife, Clytemnestra when he finally returns home. Clytemnestra welcomes him back as if nothing bothers her, but is unable to keep the bitterness out of her tone when she speaks of how long he had been gone. Stringing out [[{{False Reassurance}} extravagant tales of how much she missed him]], in an attempt to make him feel uneasy and guilt stricken. She then orders maids to retrieve a purple cloth from his chariot, and spread it on the palace floor beneath his feet. But Agamemnon refuses to step on it.
7th Oct '14 7:31:48 PM horizonholds
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Wrong word. "Throne" not "Thrown."
Aegisthus arrives to the scene and offers thanks to the gods. He is described by the Elders as a coward who refused to serve in the war, a lecher who seduced the king's wife in order to steal the thrown back. However, he tells the horrifing story of what Agamemnon's father Atreus, did to his father Thyestes, we realize that the same obligation which drove him to plot vengeance on the son of Atreus is exactly the same as that which now lies upon Orestes.
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Aegisthus arrives to the scene and offers thanks to the gods. He is described by the Elders as a coward who refused to serve in the war, a lecher who seduced the king's wife in order to steal the thrown throne back. However, he tells the horrifing story of what Agamemnon's father Atreus, did to his father Thyestes, we realize that the same obligation which drove him to plot vengeance on the son of Atreus is exactly the same as that which now lies upon Orestes.
4th Aug '14 5:14:04 PM ChaoticNovelist
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A giant eagle is one of the inhabitants of the new Earth. It fights off an ''entire pack'' of predatory cats!
* BigBadassBirdOfPrey: Bird symbolism is used throughout the play.

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* BigBadassBirdOfPrey: NobleBirdOfPrey: Bird symbolism is used throughout the play.
3rd Aug '14 5:23:50 PM vifetoile
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Not an example.
* SelfFulfillingProphecy: All of Cassandra's prophecies are doomed to this because [[{{Cassandra Truth}} no one will ever believe her.]]
3rd Jul '14 9:13:15 AM ZarbiNerada
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* HistoricalFantasy
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* HistoricalFantasyHeWhoFightsMonsters: Two in the backstory: Thyestes, who was [[MoralEventHorizon tricked by his brother Atreus into eating his own sons]], has raped his own daughter in order to raise a son who would kill Atreus. Furthermore, his son/grandson Aegisthos was raised as a weapon of vengeance, so it's not surprising he became an unpleasant character himself. * HistoricalFantasy: Archaeologists have found there was a real Agamemnon. Whether he was killed by his cousin and avenged by his children (as well as whether Atreus was as evil as depicted in ClassicalMythology or subjected to a HistoricalVillainUpgrade) cannot be known.
30th Mar '14 8:23:22 AM poppeia
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Kronos (or Cronus) is Zeus' father. Chronos is a different god (the god of time).
* DeathOfTheOldGods: The Chorus describes how Ouranos was defeated by Chronos, and Chronos in turn was defeated by Zeus.
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* DeathOfTheOldGods: The Chorus describes how Ouranos was defeated by Chronos, Kronos, and Chronos Kronos in turn was defeated by Zeus.
29th Sep '13 10:08:59 PM MathMaven
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When Clytemnestra speaks to him later she tries to convince him to walk on the purple carpet, comparing it to the sea. However, to her the carpet is [[{{RuleofSymbolism}} symbolic]]. The 'Sea' she speaks of is the family feud, and the 'purple dye' is blood shed for revenge.[[labelnote:*]]literally—the Greeks would use the blood of crushed snails to create purple dye; thus, Agamemnon would lead himself to his own death by walking on a path of blood! Clever girl.[[/labelnote] She continues to speak in [[{{Foreshadowing}} thinly veiled metaphors]] of his impending fate, however Agamemnon [[{{GenreBlind}} never catches on.]] He finally re-enters the palace after much berating from Clytemnestra, when he is out of sight she then utters a terrifying cry of triumph that her plan is coming together. She quickly gives a prayer to Zeus so that her vendetta goes off without a hitch, and she follows him.She had been planning her husbands murder in the ten year long absence he was fighting in the war. During which she was having an affair with his cousin Aegisthus, who believes himself to be the rightful ruler. Clytemnestra is also vengeful against her husband for sacrificing their daughter Iphigenia.
to:
When Clytemnestra speaks to him later she tries to convince him to walk on the purple carpet, comparing it to the sea. However, to her the carpet is [[{{RuleofSymbolism}} symbolic]]. The 'Sea' she speaks of is the family feud, and the 'purple dye' is blood shed for revenge.[[labelnote:*]]literally—the Greeks would use the blood of crushed snails to create purple dye; thus, Agamemnon would lead himself to his own death by walking on a path of blood! Clever girl.[[/labelnote] [[/labelnote]] She continues to speak in [[{{Foreshadowing}} thinly veiled metaphors]] of his impending fate, however Agamemnon [[{{GenreBlind}} never catches on.]] He finally re-enters the palace after much berating from Clytemnestra, when he is out of sight she then utters a terrifying cry of triumph that her plan is coming together. She quickly gives a prayer to Zeus so that her vendetta goes off without a hitch, and she follows him.She had been planning her husbands murder in the ten year long absence he was fighting in the war. During which she was having an affair with his cousin Aegisthus, who believes himself to be the rightful ruler. Clytemnestra is also vengeful against her husband for sacrificing their daughter Iphigenia.
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