History TheWorldCup / TropesIToP

4th Aug '15 3:48:04 PM phoenix
Is there an issue? Send a Message


TheWorldCup/{{Tropes A To H}} | '''Tropes I To P''' | TheWorldCup/{{Tropes Q To Z}}
----
* IdiotBall: Wayne Rooney moaning about the fans after an awful performance for England against Algeria.
* InstantWinCondition: Golden Goal in 1998 and 2002 allowed Laurent Blanc (France v Paraguay '98), Henri Camara (Senegal vs Sweden '02), Ahn Jun-Hwang (S Korea vs Italy '02) and Ilhan Mansiz (Turkey vs Senegal '02) to end the game, no questions asked.
* InterruptingMeme: The vuvuzelas are '''''BRRRRRRRZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ!!!!!!!!!!!!!'''''
* ItRunsInTheFamily: Italian Paolo Maldini was coached by father Cesare Maldini in 1998, and both Domingos da Guia and his son Ademir have played for Brazil in the World Cup. USA midfielder Michael Bradley played on the team at the 2010 World Cup, coached by his father Bob. For brothers, Sócrates and Raí played for Brazil in separate World Cups.
** A subversion happened when in 2000-01, Colombian coach Luis Augusto García [[{{Nepotism}} successfully lobbied to have his son Luis Alberto play for the national team which he was coaching at the time. Luis García Jr. was an average player that was not particularly noteworthy or talented enough for the national team.]] Though not a bad teammate, García was generally derided by Colombian fans as he did not earn his spot on the team; he particularly rubbed wrong with longtime midfielder Freddy Rincón, who swore never to return to the national team when the coach, Luis Sr. subbed him in favor of his son during a match on the 2002 World Cup qualifiers (Rincón was part of the team that qualified to the '90, '94 and '98 World Cups and a notable player in Brazilian soccer). Neither Sr. or Jr. are very well regarded in Colombia due to the coach's failure to qualify Colombia to that World Cup.
* ItsPersonal: Dutch sentiment is that it doesn't matter how well their team does, as long as they end ahead of [[SitcomArchNemesis Germany]].
** Ditto with Mexico and the USA, which has the added bonus of actually being mutual. The list of incidents between the two is nearly endless.
* [[EleventhHourSuperpower Last Five Minutes Superpower]]: As the entry in Who Needs Extra Time shows, a few teams only get the strength to win when extra time or penalties seem inevitable.
* LetsGetDangerous: Some teams need a kick into the butt, before they get really dangerous, or only become more dangerous the longer the tournament goes on.
** The German team is one of the most famous examples. They won all of their titles only after something upsetting, which made them decide to stop messing around. They coined the term "Turniermannschaft", which means they get stronger the longer they are in the tournament.
*** In 1954, it got mixed with a XanatosGambit of coach Sepp Herberger. He only sent his reserve players to play Hungary (the huge favourites) in order to keep his best players fresh and lure Hungary into a false sense of security. However, the shock of the loss also motivated the team to give everything in order to win the cup.
*** In 1974, the embarrassing loss against the GDR could have let to a player revolt. Instead, in the famous ''"Nacht von Malente"'', the players and the coach Helmut Schön sat together and finally aired out all the problems and the team morale improved significantly, giving everyone enough determination to win the tournament.
*** While there was no huge upset in the 1990 World Cup, coach Franz Beckenbauer was livid at how careless his team played with a mere 1-0 lead in the quarterfinals. A huge scolding after the game stamped out any upcoming easygoing.
*** The German team almost failed in the Round of 16 in 2014 against Algeria. This time it was coach Joachim Löw who realized he should stop messing around and put his men back into their favourite positions (especially Phillip Lahm)[[note]] forced by having center back Mats Hummels out with the flu for the game and a late-game injury to replacement Shkodran Mustafi[[/note]] and stop experimenting around. It paid off, as the defense was strengthened significantly, enabling winning the cup.
** On the women's side, the United States in 2015 started off with a defense-first approach with coach Jill Ellis using a 4-4-2 formation for their Group of Death D (Australia, Sweden, Nigeria); it did allow the US to top the group but many commentators noted the US seemed lost on attack and Ellis came under fire. After a 2-0 win over Colombia in the Round of 16 both Lauren Holiday and Megan Rapinoe had to sit out the quarterfinal against China because of yellow cards - combined they had about half of the US total attacking touches to that point. Ellis switched to a 4-2-3-1 and the US attack exploded, with a 1-0 win over China (that most neutral observers felt could have easily been 3-0), 2-0 over #1 Germany in the semis, and then punctuates it against Japan in the Final with 4 goals in 16 minutes en route to a 5-2 win.
* LiesDamnedLiesAndStatistics: Football coverage in general.
* LargeHamAnnouncer: [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fpt0YkywovQ Mexican commentators.]]
* LongName: A few, such as Jan Vennegoor of Hesselink, Reza Ghoochannejhad and Sokratis Papastathopoulos.
* LongRunner:
** Sepp Herberger (see XanatosGambit) was appointed [[WeimarRepublic Germany]] assistant coach in 1932. He became [[UsefulNotes/NaziGermany Germany's]] coach after Otto Nerz failed in the Olympics of 1936. He was first manager of Germany in 1938, but political pressure from ThoseWackyNazis forced 6 Austrians into his team and Germany lost (in the only case of a walk-over victory in the World Cup's history: Austria was scheduled to play Sweden, but due to them being annexed by UsefulNotes/NaziGermany, they withdrew). Despite [[WorldWarTwo some turbulence involving Germany]], Herberger was reappointed manager (of WestGermany) for their return to internationals after the 1950 World Cup, and he guided them to victory in 1954. He remained manager until 1964. This meant he had been part of the German World Cup set-up for 5 World Cups, the last 28 years after the first.
** Herberger's sucessor Helmut Schön also qualifies, coaching for four World Cups (1966-1978). Germany [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Germany_national_football_team_manager#Statistical_summary used to keep managers for long periods]] (before the 2000s "one coach per Cup", six coaches in 14 tournaments; Joachim Löw is the first to return since 1998).
** Lothar Matthäus played for Germany between 1982 and 1998 (being the captain of the 1990 title), tying Mexican goalkeeper Antonio Carbajal's five World Cups (1954-66), and reaching a record 25 games.
** Faryd Mondragón, goalkeeper of the Colombian National Football Team, became the oldest player to participate in a World Cup when Colombia manager José Pékerman brought him off the bench for the final minutes of their 4–1 win over Japan in the final match of 2014 group play. Mondragón, who turned 43 three days before the Japan match, had been on the national team since 1993, making him the last player of the golden generation of the Colombian team of the 1990's, which included legends like René Higuita, the late Andrés Escobar, Carlos Valderrama, Leonel Álvarez and Faustino Asprilla among others. As such, he is the only player who participated in two different World Cups 16 years apart, the longest time between two non-consecutive tournaments. Also, he was the last active player overall from Colombia's last participation in the 1998 World Cup (he retired right after the 2014 World Cup).
*** Mondragón also is the first and only player to have ever participated in a record six World Cup qualifying cycles (1994, 1998, 2002, 2006, 2010 & 2014), achieving the finals of the first two and the latter.
** On the women's side, 2015 saw Brazil's Formiga and Japan's Homare Sawa become the first players of either sex to compete in six World Cup final tournaments. To put it another way, the only Women's World Cup they missed was ''the very first one'' (when Formiga had just turned 13 and Sawa was just short of that same birthday; both were born in 1978).
* LoopholeAbuse
** The whole "interfering with play" part of the offside law has been much abused by attackers. Italy and AC Milan former international striker Fillipo Inzaghi was said to have been "born offside"; he was more often than not caught in the wrong.
** The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disgrace_of_Gijón Non-Aggression Pact of Gijón]] took loophole abuse to a completely new level. It was bad enough that it caused FIFA to change the rules and comparisons to Gijón always arise when two teams could benefit from an agreement.
* LoserLeavesTown: Rematches in the knockout stages of countries that met in the group stages.
** Brazil vs Turkey in 2002 was a second match between the sides in the same tournament.
** The finals of 1954 (Hungary vs. West Germany) and 1962 (Brazil vs. Czechoslovakia) and semifinals in 1982 (Italy vs. Poland) and 1994 (Brazil vs. Sweden) were also repeats with bigger value.
* ManBitesMan: [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bsxpApxpzwo Luis]] [[http://www.theguardian.com/football/gallery/2014/jun/24/luis-suarez-giorgio-chiellini-world-cup-pictures-gallery Suárez]].
* MenBuyFromMarsWomenBuyFromVenus: Ad breaks tend to involve commercials aimed at men during the World Cup, even though there is a high number of women watching. Indeed, the TropeNamer Mars have made themselves the Official Chocolate Supplier to the England Team.
* {{Misblamed}}[=/=]TheScapegoat: Sometimes one player becomes "responsible" for the whole team's failure.
** In Brazil, there's Barbosa (the goalkeeper in 1950), Toninho Cerezo (who led to Italy's second goal in 1982), Zico (who lost a penalty in 1986) and Roberto Carlos (who let Thierry Henry score the goal which led to their elimination in 2006).
** Andrés Escobar unjustly became briefly the scapegoat for Colombia's ousting on the group stage of the 1994 tournament after his own-goal in the match against the USA; this resulted in him being killed some weeks after the tournament. The tragedy of his death relieved him of his scapegoat status and it was later revealed that the team generally under-performed during the tournament because they received death threats from armed groups back in Colombia, destabilizing their morale.
** David Beckham getting sent off against Argentina in 1998. England would lose the game on penalties; headlines the next day famously said "10 heroic lions, one stupid boy."
** The British media are fairly infamous for this one. "The Rooney Metatarsal" was another one.
** Brazil also subverted this in 2010 with Felipe Melo -- sure, he scored an assist against the Netherlands. But in that same game he scored an own goal [[note]]although FIFA later changed the attribution to Wesley Sneijder of the Netherlands[[/note]] and got expelled after ''stomping'' a Dutch player ''on the ground'' (final score: 2-1 to the Dutch), Brazil managed their best performance (3-0 against Chile in the second round) without him, and overall he played [[http://twitpic.com/21wrfz horribly]] ''and'' [[UnnecessaryRoughness violently]]. That's one player who ''deserved'' to be blamed.
*** Four years later, striker Fred got scapegoated for the 7-1 defeat to Germany, while it was a team-wide failure [[http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/football/international/brazil-vs-germany-world-cup-2014-was-freds-performance-the-worst-display-by-a-striker-in-world-cup-history-his-heat-map-makes-comical-viewing-9594748.html despite him being particularly bad that day]]. Coach Luiz Felipe Scolari even said the blame should be put on him instead of Fred.
** In a strange case after Spain's defeat to Switzerland in 2010, the British press said that Spanish people were somehow [[YokoOhNo putting the blame on the goalkeeper's girlfriend]] ([[http://thelede.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/06/18/spanish-goalkeepers-girlfriend-distracts-british-press/ no one could prove it]]). Then they were champions, she was "absolved", and it was literally SealedWithAKiss. The British press ''themselves'' claimed they were being misblamed on whether THEY were the ones blaming Sara Carbonero. They were just saying the Spaniards were blaming her, as properly noted above. All while in reality no Spaniard, in the press or the internet (except perhaps that lost Youtube comment among millions) blamed Carbonero for it. Which means the British press was misblaming a misblaming from the get go. Plus, the fact they published [[RecycledScript a similar story]] but with Robert Green and his ex-girlfriend some days before doesn't speak the less in their favour. [[invoked]]
** Blamed for Argentina's loss against Germany in 2006: Cambiasso. The guy who kicked (and missed) the last penalty. Poor guy had nothing to do with his teammates' failures.
** After the 2010 final, the Dutch media attempted to blame referee Howard Webb for their loss as he missed a corner decision for the Netherlands prior to the Spanish goal and even claimed he favoured Spain in general. However it's widely considered Webb, who was probably too lenient on the Dutch, could (and according to Netherlands legend Cruyff ''should'') have sent two Dutch players off before it was even half-time, given the main Dutch strategy had largely consisted of [[UnnecessaryRoughness kicking lumps]] out of Spanish players. In particular Nigel de Jong's infamous 28th minute ''mid-air'' [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J2NqS4IBLxw "tackle"]] on Alonso's chest somehow avoided a straight red. Spain were likely the best passing team in the world and being a ''single'' man down to them with so long to go in the match would have likely all but ended their chances.
** In 2014 Uruguayan Luis Suárez became a scapegoat for FIFA according to the Uruguayan Football Association due to his biting of Italian Giorgio Chiellini; they are mainly concerned about FIFA's ban of 4 months against Suárez. The Association considers that FIFA (being influenced by the English Premier League in their own words) was too severe in the punishment and that it cost them any chance they had to advance in the World Cup. As Suárez was a repeat offender, FIFA's severe ban effectively crippled the team. While they admit that Suárez did bite Chiellini, no blame or foul play has been attributed to him by his country's association even when the entire incident was entirely caused by him and they are blaming FIFA for their loss regardless.
** After an impressive qualifier stage without conceding a single goal, Chile was waiting the 1982 World Cup with expectation. Due to the overhype the coach relaxed too much, and the squad arrived to the World Cup unfit and even with several overweight players. The campaign was a complete disaster, losing all 3 matches and receiving 8 goals; however, 32 years later the only thing everyone talks about is a penalty miss from striker Carlos Caszely against Austria.
*** Ironically the ones who should blame Caszely are Algerians; had him scored that penalty, Austria would have reached the third match forced to win to qualify, and the Disgrace of Gijón could have never happened.
* MistreatmentInducedBetrayal: In the 2014 tournament, the Costa Rica team was performing way beyond their paygrade and everything seemed to be going fine; cue their elimination and trip back home, where they were received as heroes. Some days later, coach Jorge Luis Pinto was dismissed from the national team on the players' accounts of him being one of the most overbearing and accosting people they've ever had to work with; the accusations included the coach showing up at the players' homes when they called in sick to verify that they were actually sick, endless hounding of the players and the support staff, and being a remarkably rude person as a whole. Though Costa Rica was thoroughly grateful for his work in the team, they soundly asked him to never, ever come back.
** LateArrivalSpoiler: If they had bothered to ask why Pinto was ousted from the Colombia National Team, they would have found that a coach like him demands too much patience and that Pinto left few friends at the Colombian Federation, leaving with a reputation of being a remarkably caustic man; granted, he is an incredibly talented coach if you don't mind being stripped of your privacy and dignity.
** In hindsight, and after reviewing the video evidence, it was noted by the media that none of the players or the support staff in Costa Rica ever celebrated scoring with their coach. When Pinto sought support in the eve of his ousting, he found no friends in his staff.
* MrFanservice: Plentiful. [[http://www.kickette.com/files/2010/06/nandofit.jpg Look]] at [[http://www.kickette.com/files/2010/06/reinacasillasvaldes-reuters1.jpg these]] [[http://www.kickette.com/files/2010/04/davidvillatakemenow.jpg fine]] [[http://www.kickette.com/files/2010/07/spainsecrets.jpg examples]] of [[http://www.kickette.com/files/2010/08/fabio-ap.jpg estrogen-baiting]] [[http://newscaster.eu/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/ITLAY-Champion-of-FIFA-2006-World-Cup.jpg gents]] -- and that's just from the 2006 and 2010 champions. On the other hand, there's no shortage of [[MsFanservice good-looking women]] in the Women's World Cup.
* MoodSwinger: Some teams tend to do very well or very bad, but to rarely do average.
** France (5 semifinals, ousted at groups stage 6 times) and Italy (8 semifinals, 7 eliminations at group stage) come to mind.
** Since 2002, Germany have a habit of having impressive wins immediately followed by disappointing games where they win with the smallest margin, draw, or even lose:
*** 2002: 8-0 against Saudi Arabia followed by a 1-1 draw with Ireland;
*** 2006: 4-2 against Costa Rica followed by a boring 1-0 against Poland;
*** 2010: The worst in this regards, 4-0 against Australia, only to get beaten 1-0 by Serbia and win 1-0 over Ghana. It was the same at knockout stage: two resounding victories against England and Argentina, only to get ousted 1-0 by Spain in a boring game.
*** 2014 might surpass in its alternation of "awesome football" and "GermanicEfficiency": 4–0 against Portugal, then a 2–2 draw against Ghana and a hard-fought 1–0 win over the USA. In the knockout stage, a hard-fought 2–1 win against Algeria, a boring 1–0 over France with a goal in the first 20 minutes, and then the offensive festival that was the 7–1 victory against Brazil before another close victory against Argentina.
* MultinationalTeam: Sort of. The Spanish team in 1962 were nicknamed "United Nations" because it had some naturalized players: an Argentinian (Di Stéfano), a Hungarian (Puskas), an Uruguayan (Santamaria) and a Paraguayan (Eulogio Martinez). However, despite the fact that some of these players were quite talented (especially Di Stéfano and Puskas), Spain went out in the group stage.[[note]]Di Stéfano was injured and only recovered when the quarter-finals happened. Since Spain didn't went to the next stage...[[/note]]
** Another variant was the French team who won the 1998 Cup. Naturalized Africans (Desailly: Ghana, Vieira: Senegal), people from France's overseas territories (Karembeu: New Caledonia; Thuram: Antilles), or descendants of various immigrants (Zidane's parents are Algerian; Djorkaeff was the son of a Pole and an Armenian, with Central Asian ancestry farther back in his family tree; Trezeguet is the son of an Argentinian and even grew up in Buenos Aires). [[http://observer.theguardian.com/osm/story/0,,1741569,00.html It even worked as a point against racism in France for a while.]]
* MusicAtSportingEvents: Every match is preceded by the playing of both teams' national anthems. Much national pride ensues, especially when the fan contingent from one country is large enough and sings along loud enough to be heard on television.
* MySignificanceSenseIsTingling: On ITV's first game of the 2010 World Cup, presenter Adrian Chiles revealed his "lifelong talent" by missing the opening goal of the World Cup [[StealthPun going to the toilet.]]
* NegatedMomentOfAwesome: There are a few instances of a player having a last-minute chance to make a game-winning goal but blowing it. For instance, Asamoah Gyan of Ghana missed a penalty kick against Uruguay in 2010, and Mauricio Pinilla of Chile saw a kick against Brazil hit the pole ([[http://www.theguardian.com/football/2014/jul/01/world-cup-2014-chile-mauricio-pinilla-miss-tattoo "One centimetre from glory”]]) - both times leading to penalty shootouts their teams lost.
* NeverAcceptedInHisHometown: So you've moved abroad and become a hero, winning bucketloads for your club. Sometimes no-one knows that at home. Previously German-based (and Canadian-born) English midfielder Owen Hargreaves was this until he broke into the side during the 2006 tournament.
* NiceJobBreakingItHero: Zinedine Zidane, the hero of France. Taunted into [[ItWasHisSled headbutting Marco Materazzi in the 2006 final.]] To his defense, Materazzi called his sister a whore. [[note]] Ironically, Materazzi later revelaed he didn't even know Zidane actually had a sister. It was only a random insult that just happened to hit a nerve. [[/note]]
** Luis Suárez, Uruguayan striker and foremost national player in the 2010 and 2014 World Cups. His actions during two of his team's decisive games (which were won by his team) gained him suspensions from the following games. As an utterly necessary piece of the Uruguayan team, he effectively left a hole in his absence, awarding his team some tickets back home when the team lost the aforementioned matches.
** Poor England suffered this in the 2015 Women's World Cup when they were defeated in the semifinals by Japan, after dominating the match, narrowly missing several chances and generally making the World Champions look very average by virtue of an own goal ''two minutes into stoppage time!''
*** To make it even worse, that own goal was scored by one of England's centre backs who had had a fantastic game was sprinting back and had to intercept the ball before it dropped right in front of the Japanese striker who would then have had a tap in. 99 times out of 100, it would have looped over or wide. Instead, it beat the keeper. Unsurprisingly, said centre back broke down in tears at the final whistle, [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome then proceeded to play a blinder several days later against Germany, helping England to beat Germany for the first time in 21 attempts and win a bronze medal]].
* NominalImportance:
** Maradona won the 1986 World Cup [[{{Pun}} on his own hand]], say the media. How does that make the other Argentines feel?
** The same is said of Garrincha in 1962 (mainly because Pelé sustained an injury in the second match and didn't play for the rest of the tournament) and Romário in 1994. But, for what can be seen in Brazilian press, the other players didn't feel dejected in the least.
** In a completely different sense, the 1950 World Cup became the tournament that Brazil's goalkeeper Barbosa lost. The ''Maracanazo'' haunted Barbosa for the rest of his life, as he was blamed for letting Uruguay score two goals (rather than praising the Uruguayan scorers). At one point, Barbosa was unjustly referred to as "The Man That Made Brazil Cry". This was so prevalent that 44 years later, he was forbidden to pay a visit to the Brazil team that competed in the 1994 World Cup, where he intended to advise goalie Claudio Taffarel because it was thought that he would "jinx" the team, notwithstanding that Barbosa was considered one of the best goalkeepers in the world during the 50', even after Brazil's loss. It was to the point that historians say 1950 was a significant step behind in Brazilian race relations (as Barbosa was Black) — even if 1958 had Brazil winning a title due to Black (Pelé, Didi) and mixed-race (Garrincha) players, Black goalkeepers still have a bad reputation in the country.
* NoSenseOfDirection: Own goal... or, worse, [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZnZSO4bkz48 own foul.]]
* NotCheatingUnlessYouGetCaught: Some teams, who will remain unnamed, seem to have this as a motto. It's best used regarding fouls and penalties, either committing or [[WoundedGazelleGambit receiving]].
* ObviousRulePatch: The infamous [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disgrace_of_Gijón Non-Aggression Pact of Gijón]] caused a rule change requiring the last two matches of each group to be played at the same time.
* OlderAndWiser: Ex-players return as coaches. Mario Zagallo of Brazil (1958-62 player, 1970 coach) and Franz Beckenbauer of West Germany (1974 player, 1990 coach) are the sole two men to have won the World Cup both as players and coaches.
* OnlyInItForTheMoney[=/=]MoneyDearBoy: Three African teams got on it in 2014: Cameroon refused to travel to Brazil before getting paid, while both Ghana and Nigeria started asking for their reward money during the tournament. LaserGuidedKarma hit the first two, who proceeded to fall winless in the group stage.
* OpposingSportsTeam:
** The United States, whom everyone loves to thump on even though they are a mid-level team at best. A lot of this has to do with the [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFootball other kind of football]] that they like, and how obnoxious the arguments between each side tend to be. There's a mixture of this and EveryYearTheyFizzleOut, since the USA consistently make it out of the Group Stage, only to be knocked out by teams ranked worse than them (especially infamous in 2006, given that at one point in time, they were the #5 team in the world and only managed to win one point). American fans and players, however, [[FanOfUnderdog see themselves differently]].
** A few (particularly Wales, Scotland and either side of Ireland) consider the England team to be this as well - just google "Anyone But England".
** The 1982 West Germany team [[http://www.theguardian.com/football/blog/2014/feb/25/world-cup-25-stunning-moments-no3-germany-austria-1982-rob-smyth definitely]] [[http://www.theguardian.com/football/blog/2014/may/27/world-cup-25-stunning-moments-patrick-battiston qualifies]]. Some of their supporters even disowned them!
* PassingTheTorch: Happens when the old man retires and the great new hope turns up.
** As also noted under ChangingOfTheGuard, Abby Wambach and Christie Rampone finally won a World Cup with the USA in 2015, and they hoisted their final tournament's trophy together, before passing it behind them to the younger teammates who will play in the World Cups to come.
* PoliticallyCorrectHistory: 2010 -- Spain's first World Cup semi-final. Technically true, but the implication was that Spain had achieved their best result at a World Cup ''before'' beating Germany. Spain finished fourth in the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1950_FIFA_World_Cup 1950 World Cup]] where no semi-finals were held -- instead, a final group stage with the group winners was held.
* PopculturalOsmosis: Some people are on the pitch. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/They_think_it%27s_all_over They think it's all over.]] It is now.
* PrecisionFStrike: Once Laura Bassett saw her attempt at stopping an incoming kick [[HoistByHisOwnPetard wound up as a last minute own goal]], her reaction is a visible [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-N5bqrNJ340 "FUCK!"]]. Followed by "MyGodWhatHaveIDone" as she starts crying.
* PsychicPowers:
** Paul the Octopus, who predicted correctly the winner of every match that involved Germany in South Africa 2010, and the winner of the final (Spain). Sadly, he passed away after the World Cup, but a [[SeriousBusiness shrine was built on his memory]] at his former home, the Oberhousen Sea Life Centre in Germany.
** There have been other attempts, but other animals got it wrong, like the camel who predicted a victory by Portugal against Germany in 2014.
* PutMeInCoach: Sort of. In 1958, when Brazil was preparing for the World Cup, in Sweden, their coach Feola complimented in a loud voice the ability of the Swedish player Hamrin. Nilton Santos (or Didi), immediately responded: "Sir, you have Garrincha and Pelé, who can do that a lot better, and you don't let them play". After a while, Feola conceded and put Garrincha and Pelé on the starting eleven. And history began to be made.
** In 2014, Belgian striker Romelu Lukaku was benched for the Round of 16 game vs. the United States after a poor showing in the group stage. He was subbed in and promptly assisted a goal and scored his own, putting the game out of reach.
* PyrrhicVictory: In South Africa 2010, Luis Suárez committed an intentional (and blatant) handball on the goal line in the dying moments of extra-time against Ghana to prevent them winning the match. It worked despite the penalty awarded, but the red card he received kept him out of his dream encounter with the Netherlands and his absence was likely a factor in Uruguay's subsequent loss.
** In 2014, Suárez himself bit Italian player Giorgio Chiellini on his shoulder during the last and decisive game of their group. The referee failed to notice the aggression and the game continued; Uruguay's Diego Godin would score the goal that sent Uruguay to the round of 16 moments later. Upon reviewing the video evidence, FIFA banned Suárez from participating in any competition on every level for a period of four months; as such, Suárez did not participate in the game that Uruguay lost 0-2 to Colombia in the round of 16, as Suárez' absence effectively crippled the team's morale and structure. Suárez' ban was unsuccessfully contested by the Uruguayan Football Association and by Liverpool F.C., who have been affected by the ban as well [[note]]The aggression itself is not being contested, but the severity of the ban; as a repeated offender (as he did it twice before), it's perceived by his defenders that FIFA set out to make an example out of Suárez. FIFA's position states that even when aggression in football is commonplace, the unusual nature of Suárez' raucous behavior is unbecoming of the sport[[/note]]. Liverpool then sold him to Barcelona two days before the World Cup final.
** Also in 2014, Brazil's game against Colombia saw roughhousing between the two teams get completely out of hand while the referee did absolutely nothing. One of the few cards handed was for Brazilian captain Thiago Silva, who with his third earned an automatic suspension for the semifinal. And then there's striker Neymar Jr. being kneed in the back by Camilo Zuñiga, being forced to leave the field in a stretcher and ultimately sidelined for the other games. Brazil won 2-1 in the end, and went on to play Germany in the semifinals, where they were demolished 7-1 without two of their centerpieces.
** As far as stadia go, anytime a team won a game in Manaus, you could chalk up the next game as a loss, due to just how draining playing in the heart of the Amazon rainforest could be. Only one to win was Portugal, whose game in Manaus was a draw - and yet the victory.
----

to:

TheWorldCup/{{Tropes A To H}} | '''Tropes I To P''' | TheWorldCup/{{Tropes Q To Z}}
----
* IdiotBall: Wayne Rooney moaning about the fans after an awful performance for England against Algeria.
* InstantWinCondition: Golden Goal in 1998 and 2002 allowed Laurent Blanc (France v Paraguay '98), Henri Camara (Senegal vs Sweden '02), Ahn Jun-Hwang (S Korea vs Italy '02) and Ilhan Mansiz (Turkey vs Senegal '02) to end the game, no questions asked.
* InterruptingMeme: The vuvuzelas are '''''BRRRRRRRZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ!!!!!!!!!!!!!'''''
* ItRunsInTheFamily: Italian Paolo Maldini was coached by father Cesare Maldini in 1998, and both Domingos da Guia and his son Ademir have played for Brazil in the World Cup. USA midfielder Michael Bradley played on the team at the 2010 World Cup, coached by his father Bob. For brothers, Sócrates and Raí played for Brazil in separate World Cups.
** A subversion happened when in 2000-01, Colombian coach Luis Augusto García [[{{Nepotism}} successfully lobbied to have his son Luis Alberto play for the national team which he was coaching at the time. Luis García Jr. was an average player that was not particularly noteworthy or talented enough for the national team.]] Though not a bad teammate, García was generally derided by Colombian fans as he did not earn his spot on the team; he particularly rubbed wrong with longtime midfielder Freddy Rincón, who swore never to return to the national team when the coach, Luis Sr. subbed him in favor of his son during a match on the 2002 World Cup qualifiers (Rincón was part of the team that qualified to the '90, '94 and '98 World Cups and a notable player in Brazilian soccer). Neither Sr. or Jr. are very well regarded in Colombia due to the coach's failure to qualify Colombia to that World Cup.
* ItsPersonal: Dutch sentiment is that it doesn't matter how well their team does, as long as they end ahead of [[SitcomArchNemesis Germany]].
** Ditto with Mexico and the USA, which has the added bonus of actually being mutual. The list of incidents between the two is nearly endless.
* [[EleventhHourSuperpower Last Five Minutes Superpower]]: As the entry in Who Needs Extra Time shows, a few teams only get the strength to win when extra time or penalties seem inevitable.
* LetsGetDangerous: Some teams need a kick into the butt, before they get really dangerous, or only become more dangerous the longer the tournament goes on.
** The German team is one of the most famous examples. They won all of their titles only after something upsetting, which made them decide to stop messing around. They coined the term "Turniermannschaft", which means they get stronger the longer they are in the tournament.
*** In 1954, it got mixed with a XanatosGambit of coach Sepp Herberger. He only sent his reserve players to play Hungary (the huge favourites) in order to keep his best players fresh and lure Hungary into a false sense of security. However, the shock of the loss also motivated the team to give everything in order to win the cup.
*** In 1974, the embarrassing loss against the GDR could have let to a player revolt. Instead, in the famous ''"Nacht von Malente"'', the players and the coach Helmut Schön sat together and finally aired out all the problems and the team morale improved significantly, giving everyone enough determination to win the tournament.
*** While there was no huge upset in the 1990 World Cup, coach Franz Beckenbauer was livid at how careless his team played with a mere 1-0 lead in the quarterfinals. A huge scolding after the game stamped out any upcoming easygoing.
*** The German team almost failed in the Round of 16 in 2014 against Algeria. This time it was coach Joachim Löw who realized he should stop messing around and put his men back into their favourite positions (especially Phillip Lahm)[[note]] forced by having center back Mats Hummels out with the flu for the game and a late-game injury to replacement Shkodran Mustafi[[/note]] and stop experimenting around. It paid off, as the defense was strengthened significantly, enabling winning the cup.
** On the women's side, the United States in 2015 started off with a defense-first approach with coach Jill Ellis using a 4-4-2 formation for their Group of Death D (Australia, Sweden, Nigeria); it did allow the US to top the group but many commentators noted the US seemed lost on attack and Ellis came under fire. After a 2-0 win over Colombia in the Round of 16 both Lauren Holiday and Megan Rapinoe had to sit out the quarterfinal against China because of yellow cards - combined they had about half of the US total attacking touches to that point. Ellis switched to a 4-2-3-1 and the US attack exploded, with a 1-0 win over China (that most neutral observers felt could have easily been 3-0), 2-0 over #1 Germany in the semis, and then punctuates it against Japan in the Final with 4 goals in 16 minutes en route to a 5-2 win.
* LiesDamnedLiesAndStatistics: Football coverage in general.
* LargeHamAnnouncer: [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fpt0YkywovQ Mexican commentators.]]
* LongName: A few, such as Jan Vennegoor of Hesselink, Reza Ghoochannejhad and Sokratis Papastathopoulos.
* LongRunner:
** Sepp Herberger (see XanatosGambit) was appointed [[WeimarRepublic Germany]] assistant coach in 1932. He became [[UsefulNotes/NaziGermany Germany's]] coach after Otto Nerz failed in the Olympics of 1936. He was first manager of Germany in 1938, but political pressure from ThoseWackyNazis forced 6 Austrians into his team and Germany lost (in the only case of a walk-over victory in the World Cup's history: Austria was scheduled to play Sweden, but due to them being annexed by UsefulNotes/NaziGermany, they withdrew). Despite [[WorldWarTwo some turbulence involving Germany]], Herberger was reappointed manager (of WestGermany) for their return to internationals after the 1950 World Cup, and he guided them to victory in 1954. He remained manager until 1964. This meant he had been part of the German World Cup set-up for 5 World Cups, the last 28 years after the first.
** Herberger's sucessor Helmut Schön also qualifies, coaching for four World Cups (1966-1978). Germany [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Germany_national_football_team_manager#Statistical_summary used to keep managers for long periods]] (before the 2000s "one coach per Cup", six coaches in 14 tournaments; Joachim Löw is the first to return since 1998).
** Lothar Matthäus played for Germany between 1982 and 1998 (being the captain of the 1990 title), tying Mexican goalkeeper Antonio Carbajal's five World Cups (1954-66), and reaching a record 25 games.
** Faryd Mondragón, goalkeeper of the Colombian National Football Team, became the oldest player to participate in a World Cup when Colombia manager José Pékerman brought him off the bench for the final minutes of their 4–1 win over Japan in the final match of 2014 group play. Mondragón, who turned 43 three days before the Japan match, had been on the national team since 1993, making him the last player of the golden generation of the Colombian team of the 1990's, which included legends like René Higuita, the late Andrés Escobar, Carlos Valderrama, Leonel Álvarez and Faustino Asprilla among others. As such, he is the only player who participated in two different World Cups 16 years apart, the longest time between two non-consecutive tournaments. Also, he was the last active player overall from Colombia's last participation in the 1998 World Cup (he retired right after the 2014 World Cup).
*** Mondragón also is the first and only player to have ever participated in a record six World Cup qualifying cycles (1994, 1998, 2002, 2006, 2010 & 2014), achieving the finals of the first two and the latter.
** On the women's side, 2015 saw Brazil's Formiga and Japan's Homare Sawa become the first players of either sex to compete in six World Cup final tournaments. To put it another way, the only Women's World Cup they missed was ''the very first one'' (when Formiga had just turned 13 and Sawa was just short of that same birthday; both were born in 1978).
* LoopholeAbuse
** The whole "interfering with play" part of the offside law has been much abused by attackers. Italy and AC Milan former international striker Fillipo Inzaghi was said to have been "born offside"; he was more often than not caught in the wrong.
** The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disgrace_of_Gijón Non-Aggression Pact of Gijón]] took loophole abuse to a completely new level. It was bad enough that it caused FIFA to change the rules and comparisons to Gijón always arise when two teams could benefit from an agreement.
* LoserLeavesTown: Rematches in the knockout stages of countries that met in the group stages.
** Brazil vs Turkey in 2002 was a second match between the sides in the same tournament.
** The finals of 1954 (Hungary vs. West Germany) and 1962 (Brazil vs. Czechoslovakia) and semifinals in 1982 (Italy vs. Poland) and 1994 (Brazil vs. Sweden) were also repeats with bigger value.
* ManBitesMan: [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bsxpApxpzwo Luis]] [[http://www.theguardian.com/football/gallery/2014/jun/24/luis-suarez-giorgio-chiellini-world-cup-pictures-gallery Suárez]].
* MenBuyFromMarsWomenBuyFromVenus: Ad breaks tend to involve commercials aimed at men during the World Cup, even though there is a high number of women watching. Indeed, the TropeNamer Mars have made themselves the Official Chocolate Supplier to the England Team.
* {{Misblamed}}[=/=]TheScapegoat: Sometimes one player becomes "responsible" for the whole team's failure.
** In Brazil, there's Barbosa (the goalkeeper in 1950), Toninho Cerezo (who led to Italy's second goal in 1982), Zico (who lost a penalty in 1986) and Roberto Carlos (who let Thierry Henry score the goal which led to their elimination in 2006).
** Andrés Escobar unjustly became briefly the scapegoat for Colombia's ousting on the group stage of the 1994 tournament after his own-goal in the match against the USA; this resulted in him being killed some weeks after the tournament. The tragedy of his death relieved him of his scapegoat status and it was later revealed that the team generally under-performed during the tournament because they received death threats from armed groups back in Colombia, destabilizing their morale.
** David Beckham getting sent off against Argentina in 1998. England would lose the game on penalties; headlines the next day famously said "10 heroic lions, one stupid boy."
** The British media are fairly infamous for this one. "The Rooney Metatarsal" was another one.
** Brazil also subverted this in 2010 with Felipe Melo -- sure, he scored an assist against the Netherlands. But in that same game he scored an own goal [[note]]although FIFA later changed the attribution to Wesley Sneijder of the Netherlands[[/note]] and got expelled after ''stomping'' a Dutch player ''on the ground'' (final score: 2-1 to the Dutch), Brazil managed their best performance (3-0 against Chile in the second round) without him, and overall he played [[http://twitpic.com/21wrfz horribly]] ''and'' [[UnnecessaryRoughness violently]]. That's one player who ''deserved'' to be blamed.
*** Four years later, striker Fred got scapegoated for the 7-1 defeat to Germany, while it was a team-wide failure [[http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/football/international/brazil-vs-germany-world-cup-2014-was-freds-performance-the-worst-display-by-a-striker-in-world-cup-history-his-heat-map-makes-comical-viewing-9594748.html despite him being particularly bad that day]]. Coach Luiz Felipe Scolari even said the blame should be put on him instead of Fred.
** In a strange case after Spain's defeat to Switzerland in 2010, the British press said that Spanish people were somehow [[YokoOhNo putting the blame on the goalkeeper's girlfriend]] ([[http://thelede.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/06/18/spanish-goalkeepers-girlfriend-distracts-british-press/ no one could prove it]]). Then they were champions, she was "absolved", and it was literally SealedWithAKiss. The British press ''themselves'' claimed they were being misblamed on whether THEY were the ones blaming Sara Carbonero. They were just saying the Spaniards were blaming her, as properly noted above. All while in reality no Spaniard, in the press or the internet (except perhaps that lost Youtube comment among millions) blamed Carbonero for it. Which means the British press was misblaming a misblaming from the get go. Plus, the fact they published [[RecycledScript a similar story]] but with Robert Green and his ex-girlfriend some days before doesn't speak the less in their favour. [[invoked]]
** Blamed for Argentina's loss against Germany in 2006: Cambiasso. The guy who kicked (and missed) the last penalty. Poor guy had nothing to do with his teammates' failures.
** After the 2010 final, the Dutch media attempted to blame referee Howard Webb for their loss as he missed a corner decision for the Netherlands prior to the Spanish goal and even claimed he favoured Spain in general. However it's widely considered Webb, who was probably too lenient on the Dutch, could (and according to Netherlands legend Cruyff ''should'') have sent two Dutch players off before it was even half-time, given the main Dutch strategy had largely consisted of [[UnnecessaryRoughness kicking lumps]] out of Spanish players. In particular Nigel de Jong's infamous 28th minute ''mid-air'' [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J2NqS4IBLxw "tackle"]] on Alonso's chest somehow avoided a straight red. Spain were likely the best passing team in the world and being a ''single'' man down to them with so long to go in the match would have likely all but ended their chances.
** In 2014 Uruguayan Luis Suárez became a scapegoat for FIFA according to the Uruguayan Football Association due to his biting of Italian Giorgio Chiellini; they are mainly concerned about FIFA's ban of 4 months against Suárez. The Association considers that FIFA (being influenced by the English Premier League in their own words) was too severe in the punishment and that it cost them any chance they had to advance in the World Cup. As Suárez was a repeat offender, FIFA's severe ban effectively crippled the team. While they admit that Suárez did bite Chiellini, no blame or foul play has been attributed to him by his country's association even when the entire incident was entirely caused by him and they are blaming FIFA for their loss regardless.
** After an impressive qualifier stage without conceding a single goal, Chile was waiting the 1982 World Cup with expectation. Due to the overhype the coach relaxed too much, and the squad arrived to the World Cup unfit and even with several overweight players. The campaign was a complete disaster, losing all 3 matches and receiving 8 goals; however, 32 years later the only thing everyone talks about is a penalty miss from striker Carlos Caszely against Austria.
*** Ironically the ones who should blame Caszely are Algerians; had him scored that penalty, Austria would have reached the third match forced to win to qualify, and the Disgrace of Gijón could have never happened.
* MistreatmentInducedBetrayal: In the 2014 tournament, the Costa Rica team was performing way beyond their paygrade and everything seemed to be going fine; cue their elimination and trip back home, where they were received as heroes. Some days later, coach Jorge Luis Pinto was dismissed from the national team on the players' accounts of him being one of the most overbearing and accosting people they've ever had to work with; the accusations included the coach showing up at the players' homes when they called in sick to verify that they were actually sick, endless hounding of the players and the support staff, and being a remarkably rude person as a whole. Though Costa Rica was thoroughly grateful for his work in the team, they soundly asked him to never, ever come back.
** LateArrivalSpoiler: If they had bothered to ask why Pinto was ousted from the Colombia National Team, they would have found that a coach like him demands too much patience and that Pinto left few friends at the Colombian Federation, leaving with a reputation of being a remarkably caustic man; granted, he is an incredibly talented coach if you don't mind being stripped of your privacy and dignity.
** In hindsight, and after reviewing the video evidence, it was noted by the media that none of the players or the support staff in Costa Rica ever celebrated scoring with their coach. When Pinto sought support in the eve of his ousting, he found no friends in his staff.
* MrFanservice: Plentiful. [[http://www.kickette.com/files/2010/06/nandofit.jpg Look]] at [[http://www.kickette.com/files/2010/06/reinacasillasvaldes-reuters1.jpg these]] [[http://www.kickette.com/files/2010/04/davidvillatakemenow.jpg fine]] [[http://www.kickette.com/files/2010/07/spainsecrets.jpg examples]] of [[http://www.kickette.com/files/2010/08/fabio-ap.jpg estrogen-baiting]] [[http://newscaster.eu/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/ITLAY-Champion-of-FIFA-2006-World-Cup.jpg gents]] -- and that's just from the 2006 and 2010 champions. On the other hand, there's no shortage of [[MsFanservice good-looking women]] in the Women's World Cup.
* MoodSwinger: Some teams tend to do very well or very bad, but to rarely do average.
** France (5 semifinals, ousted at groups stage 6 times) and Italy (8 semifinals, 7 eliminations at group stage) come to mind.
** Since 2002, Germany have a habit of having impressive wins immediately followed by disappointing games where they win with the smallest margin, draw, or even lose:
*** 2002: 8-0 against Saudi Arabia followed by a 1-1 draw with Ireland;
*** 2006: 4-2 against Costa Rica followed by a boring 1-0 against Poland;
*** 2010: The worst in this regards, 4-0 against Australia, only to get beaten 1-0 by Serbia and win 1-0 over Ghana. It was the same at knockout stage: two resounding victories against England and Argentina, only to get ousted 1-0 by Spain in a boring game.
*** 2014 might surpass in its alternation of "awesome football" and "GermanicEfficiency": 4–0 against Portugal, then a 2–2 draw against Ghana and a hard-fought 1–0 win over the USA. In the knockout stage, a hard-fought 2–1 win against Algeria, a boring 1–0 over France with a goal in the first 20 minutes, and then the offensive festival that was the 7–1 victory against Brazil before another close victory against Argentina.
* MultinationalTeam: Sort of. The Spanish team in 1962 were nicknamed "United Nations" because it had some naturalized players: an Argentinian (Di Stéfano), a Hungarian (Puskas), an Uruguayan (Santamaria) and a Paraguayan (Eulogio Martinez). However, despite the fact that some of these players were quite talented (especially Di Stéfano and Puskas), Spain went out in the group stage.[[note]]Di Stéfano was injured and only recovered when the quarter-finals happened. Since Spain didn't went to the next stage...[[/note]]
** Another variant was the French team who won the 1998 Cup. Naturalized Africans (Desailly: Ghana, Vieira: Senegal), people from France's overseas territories (Karembeu: New Caledonia; Thuram: Antilles), or descendants of various immigrants (Zidane's parents are Algerian; Djorkaeff was the son of a Pole and an Armenian, with Central Asian ancestry farther back in his family tree; Trezeguet is the son of an Argentinian and even grew up in Buenos Aires). [[http://observer.theguardian.com/osm/story/0,,1741569,00.html It even worked as a point against racism in France for a while.]]
* MusicAtSportingEvents: Every match is preceded by the playing of both teams' national anthems. Much national pride ensues, especially when the fan contingent from one country is large enough and sings along loud enough to be heard on television.
* MySignificanceSenseIsTingling: On ITV's first game of the 2010 World Cup, presenter Adrian Chiles revealed his "lifelong talent" by missing the opening goal of the World Cup [[StealthPun going to the toilet.]]
* NegatedMomentOfAwesome: There are a few instances of a player having a last-minute chance to make a game-winning goal but blowing it. For instance, Asamoah Gyan of Ghana missed a penalty kick against Uruguay in 2010, and Mauricio Pinilla of Chile saw a kick against Brazil hit the pole ([[http://www.theguardian.com/football/2014/jul/01/world-cup-2014-chile-mauricio-pinilla-miss-tattoo "One centimetre from glory”]]) - both times leading to penalty shootouts their teams lost.
* NeverAcceptedInHisHometown: So you've moved abroad and become a hero, winning bucketloads for your club. Sometimes no-one knows that at home. Previously German-based (and Canadian-born) English midfielder Owen Hargreaves was this until he broke into the side during the 2006 tournament.
* NiceJobBreakingItHero: Zinedine Zidane, the hero of France. Taunted into [[ItWasHisSled headbutting Marco Materazzi in the 2006 final.]] To his defense, Materazzi called his sister a whore. [[note]] Ironically, Materazzi later revelaed he didn't even know Zidane actually had a sister. It was only a random insult that just happened to hit a nerve. [[/note]]
** Luis Suárez, Uruguayan striker and foremost national player in the 2010 and 2014 World Cups. His actions during two of his team's decisive games (which were won by his team) gained him suspensions from the following games. As an utterly necessary piece of the Uruguayan team, he effectively left a hole in his absence, awarding his team some tickets back home when the team lost the aforementioned matches.
** Poor England suffered this in the 2015 Women's World Cup when they were defeated in the semifinals by Japan, after dominating the match, narrowly missing several chances and generally making the World Champions look very average by virtue of an own goal ''two minutes into stoppage time!''
*** To make it even worse, that own goal was scored by one of England's centre backs who had had a fantastic game was sprinting back and had to intercept the ball before it dropped right in front of the Japanese striker who would then have had a tap in. 99 times out of 100, it would have looped over or wide. Instead, it beat the keeper. Unsurprisingly, said centre back broke down in tears at the final whistle, [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome then proceeded to play a blinder several days later against Germany, helping England to beat Germany for the first time in 21 attempts and win a bronze medal]].
* NominalImportance:
** Maradona won the 1986 World Cup [[{{Pun}} on his own hand]], say the media. How does that make the other Argentines feel?
** The same is said of Garrincha in 1962 (mainly because Pelé sustained an injury in the second match and didn't play for the rest of the tournament) and Romário in 1994. But, for what can be seen in Brazilian press, the other players didn't feel dejected in the least.
** In a completely different sense, the 1950 World Cup became the tournament that Brazil's goalkeeper Barbosa lost. The ''Maracanazo'' haunted Barbosa for the rest of his life, as he was blamed for letting Uruguay score two goals (rather than praising the Uruguayan scorers). At one point, Barbosa was unjustly referred to as "The Man That Made Brazil Cry". This was so prevalent that 44 years later, he was forbidden to pay a visit to the Brazil team that competed in the 1994 World Cup, where he intended to advise goalie Claudio Taffarel because it was thought that he would "jinx" the team, notwithstanding that Barbosa was considered one of the best goalkeepers in the world during the 50', even after Brazil's loss. It was to the point that historians say 1950 was a significant step behind in Brazilian race relations (as Barbosa was Black) — even if 1958 had Brazil winning a title due to Black (Pelé, Didi) and mixed-race (Garrincha) players, Black goalkeepers still have a bad reputation in the country.
* NoSenseOfDirection: Own goal... or, worse, [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZnZSO4bkz48 own foul.]]
* NotCheatingUnlessYouGetCaught: Some teams, who will remain unnamed, seem to have this as a motto. It's best used regarding fouls and penalties, either committing or [[WoundedGazelleGambit receiving]].
* ObviousRulePatch: The infamous [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disgrace_of_Gijón Non-Aggression Pact of Gijón]] caused a rule change requiring the last two matches of each group to be played at the same time.
* OlderAndWiser: Ex-players return as coaches. Mario Zagallo of Brazil (1958-62 player, 1970 coach) and Franz Beckenbauer of West Germany (1974 player, 1990 coach) are the sole two men to have won the World Cup both as players and coaches.
* OnlyInItForTheMoney[=/=]MoneyDearBoy: Three African teams got on it in 2014: Cameroon refused to travel to Brazil before getting paid, while both Ghana and Nigeria started asking for their reward money during the tournament. LaserGuidedKarma hit the first two, who proceeded to fall winless in the group stage.
* OpposingSportsTeam:
** The United States, whom everyone loves to thump on even though they are a mid-level team at best. A lot of this has to do with the [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFootball other kind of football]] that they like, and how obnoxious the arguments between each side tend to be. There's a mixture of this and EveryYearTheyFizzleOut, since the USA consistently make it out of the Group Stage, only to be knocked out by teams ranked worse than them (especially infamous in 2006, given that at one point in time, they were the #5 team in the world and only managed to win one point). American fans and players, however, [[FanOfUnderdog see themselves differently]].
** A few (particularly Wales, Scotland and either side of Ireland) consider the England team to be this as well - just google "Anyone But England".
** The 1982 West Germany team [[http://www.theguardian.com/football/blog/2014/feb/25/world-cup-25-stunning-moments-no3-germany-austria-1982-rob-smyth definitely]] [[http://www.theguardian.com/football/blog/2014/may/27/world-cup-25-stunning-moments-patrick-battiston qualifies]]. Some of their supporters even disowned them!
* PassingTheTorch: Happens when the old man retires and the great new hope turns up.
** As also noted under ChangingOfTheGuard, Abby Wambach and Christie Rampone finally won a World Cup with the USA in 2015, and they hoisted their final tournament's trophy together, before passing it behind them to the younger teammates who will play in the World Cups to come.
* PoliticallyCorrectHistory: 2010 -- Spain's first World Cup semi-final. Technically true, but the implication was that Spain had achieved their best result at a World Cup ''before'' beating Germany. Spain finished fourth in the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1950_FIFA_World_Cup 1950 World Cup]] where no semi-finals were held -- instead, a final group stage with the group winners was held.
* PopculturalOsmosis: Some people are on the pitch. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/They_think_it%27s_all_over They think it's all over.]] It is now.
* PrecisionFStrike: Once Laura Bassett saw her attempt at stopping an incoming kick [[HoistByHisOwnPetard wound up as a last minute own goal]], her reaction is a visible [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-N5bqrNJ340 "FUCK!"]]. Followed by "MyGodWhatHaveIDone" as she starts crying.
* PsychicPowers:
** Paul the Octopus, who predicted correctly the winner of every match that involved Germany in South Africa 2010, and the winner of the final (Spain). Sadly, he passed away after the World Cup, but a [[SeriousBusiness shrine was built on his memory]] at his former home, the Oberhousen Sea Life Centre in Germany.
** There have been other attempts, but other animals got it wrong, like the camel who predicted a victory by Portugal against Germany in 2014.
* PutMeInCoach: Sort of. In 1958, when Brazil was preparing for the World Cup, in Sweden, their coach Feola complimented in a loud voice the ability of the Swedish player Hamrin. Nilton Santos (or Didi), immediately responded: "Sir, you have Garrincha and Pelé, who can do that a lot better, and you don't let them play". After a while, Feola conceded and put Garrincha and Pelé on the starting eleven. And history began to be made.
** In 2014, Belgian striker Romelu Lukaku was benched for the Round of 16 game vs. the United States after a poor showing in the group stage. He was subbed in and promptly assisted a goal and scored his own, putting the game out of reach.
* PyrrhicVictory: In South Africa 2010, Luis Suárez committed an intentional (and blatant) handball on the goal line in the dying moments of extra-time against Ghana to prevent them winning the match. It worked despite the penalty awarded, but the red card he received kept him out of his dream encounter with the Netherlands and his absence was likely a factor in Uruguay's subsequent loss.
** In 2014, Suárez himself bit Italian player Giorgio Chiellini on his shoulder during the last and decisive game of their group. The referee failed to notice the aggression and the game continued; Uruguay's Diego Godin would score the goal that sent Uruguay to the round of 16 moments later. Upon reviewing the video evidence, FIFA banned Suárez from participating in any competition on every level for a period of four months; as such, Suárez did not participate in the game that Uruguay lost 0-2 to Colombia in the round of 16, as Suárez' absence effectively crippled the team's morale and structure. Suárez' ban was unsuccessfully contested by the Uruguayan Football Association and by Liverpool F.C., who have been affected by the ban as well [[note]]The aggression itself is not being contested, but the severity of the ban; as a repeated offender (as he did it twice before), it's perceived by his defenders that FIFA set out to make an example out of Suárez. FIFA's position states that even when aggression in football is commonplace, the unusual nature of Suárez' raucous behavior is unbecoming of the sport[[/note]]. Liverpool then sold him to Barcelona two days before the World Cup final.
** Also in 2014, Brazil's game against Colombia saw roughhousing between the two teams get completely out of hand while the referee did absolutely nothing. One of the few cards handed was for Brazilian captain Thiago Silva, who with his third earned an automatic suspension for the semifinal. And then there's striker Neymar Jr. being kneed in the back by Camilo Zuñiga, being forced to leave the field in a stretcher and ultimately sidelined for the other games. Brazil won 2-1 in the end, and went on to play Germany in the semifinals, where they were demolished 7-1 without two of their centerpieces.
** As far as stadia go, anytime a team won a game in Manaus, you could chalk up the next game as a loss, due to just how draining playing in the heart of the Amazon rainforest could be. Only one to win was Portugal, whose game in Manaus was a draw - and yet the victory.
----
[[redirect:UsefulNotes/TheWorldCup]]
31st Jul '15 3:05:11 PM phoenix
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Sepp Herberger (see XanatosGambit) was appointed [[WeimarRepublic Germany]] assistant coach in 1932. He became [[NaziGermany Germany's]] coach after Otto Nerz failed in the Olympics of 1936. He was first manager of Germany in 1938, but political pressure from ThoseWackyNazis forced 6 Austrians into his team and Germany lost (in the only case of a walk-over victory in the World Cup's history: Austria was scheduled to play Sweden, but due to them being annexed by NaziGermany, they withdrew). Despite [[WorldWarTwo some turbulence involving Germany]], Herberger was reappointed manager (of WestGermany) for their return to internationals after the 1950 World Cup, and he guided them to victory in 1954. He remained manager until 1964. This meant he had been part of the German World Cup set-up for 5 World Cups, the last 28 years after the first.

to:

** Sepp Herberger (see XanatosGambit) was appointed [[WeimarRepublic Germany]] assistant coach in 1932. He became [[NaziGermany [[UsefulNotes/NaziGermany Germany's]] coach after Otto Nerz failed in the Olympics of 1936. He was first manager of Germany in 1938, but political pressure from ThoseWackyNazis forced 6 Austrians into his team and Germany lost (in the only case of a walk-over victory in the World Cup's history: Austria was scheduled to play Sweden, but due to them being annexed by NaziGermany, UsefulNotes/NaziGermany, they withdrew). Despite [[WorldWarTwo some turbulence involving Germany]], Herberger was reappointed manager (of WestGermany) for their return to internationals after the 1950 World Cup, and he guided them to victory in 1954. He remained manager until 1964. This meant he had been part of the German World Cup set-up for 5 World Cups, the last 28 years after the first.
14th Jul '15 3:23:59 PM DarkPhoenix94
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Poor England suffered this in the 2015 Women's World Cup, where they were defeated in the semifinals by Japan, by virtue of an own goal ''two minutes into stoppage time!''

to:

** Poor England suffered this in the 2015 Women's World Cup, where Cup when they were defeated in the semifinals by Japan, after dominating the match, narrowly missing several chances and generally making the World Champions look very average by virtue of an own goal ''two minutes into stoppage time!''time!''
*** To make it even worse, that own goal was scored by one of England's centre backs who had had a fantastic game was sprinting back and had to intercept the ball before it dropped right in front of the Japanese striker who would then have had a tap in. 99 times out of 100, it would have looped over or wide. Instead, it beat the keeper. Unsurprisingly, said centre back broke down in tears at the final whistle, [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome then proceeded to play a blinder several days later against Germany, helping England to beat Germany for the first time in 21 attempts and win a bronze medal]].
12th Jul '15 11:16:45 PM rabinho
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** The German team almost failed in the Round of 16 in 2014 against Algeria. This time it was coach Joachim Löw who realized he should stop messing around and put his men back into their favourite positions (especially Phillip Lahm)[note] forced by having center back Mats Hummels out with the flu for the game and a late-game injury to replacement Shkodran Mustafi[/note] and stop experimenting around. It paid off, as the defense was strengthened significantly, enabling winning the cup.

to:

*** The German team almost failed in the Round of 16 in 2014 against Algeria. This time it was coach Joachim Löw who realized he should stop messing around and put his men back into their favourite positions (especially Phillip Lahm)[note] Lahm)[[note]] forced by having center back Mats Hummels out with the flu for the game and a late-game injury to replacement Shkodran Mustafi[/note] Mustafi[[/note]] and stop experimenting around. It paid off, as the defense was strengthened significantly, enabling winning the cup.
12th Jul '15 11:15:48 PM rabinho
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** The German team almost failed in the Round of 16 in 2014 against Algeria. This time it was coach Joachim Löw who realized he should stop messing around and put his men back into their favourite positions (especially Phillip Lahm) and stop experimenting around. It paid off, as the defense was strengthened significantly, enabling winning the cup.

to:

*** The German team almost failed in the Round of 16 in 2014 against Algeria. This time it was coach Joachim Löw who realized he should stop messing around and put his men back into their favourite positions (especially Phillip Lahm) Lahm)[note] forced by having center back Mats Hummels out with the flu for the game and a late-game injury to replacement Shkodran Mustafi[/note] and stop experimenting around. It paid off, as the defense was strengthened significantly, enabling winning the cup.
6th Jul '15 8:56:04 AM megarockman
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

**On the women's side, the United States in 2015 started off with a defense-first approach with coach Jill Ellis using a 4-4-2 formation for their Group of Death D (Australia, Sweden, Nigeria); it did allow the US to top the group but many commentators noted the US seemed lost on attack and Ellis came under fire. After a 2-0 win over Colombia in the Round of 16 both Lauren Holiday and Megan Rapinoe had to sit out the quarterfinal against China because of yellow cards - combined they had about half of the US total attacking touches to that point. Ellis switched to a 4-2-3-1 and the US attack exploded, with a 1-0 win over China (that most neutral observers felt could have easily been 3-0), 2-0 over #1 Germany in the semis, and then punctuates it against Japan in the Final with 4 goals in 16 minutes en route to a 5-2 win.
5th Jul '15 6:48:55 PM Rytex
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** As also noted under ChangingOfTheGuard, Abby Wambach and Christie Rampone finally won a World Cup with the USA in 2015, and they hoisted their final tournament's trophy together, before passing it behind them to the younger teammates who will play in the World Cups to come.
4th Jul '15 6:43:09 PM KYCubbie
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Ditto with Mexico and USA, which has the added bonus of actually being mutual. The list of incidents between the two is nearly endless.

to:

** Ditto with Mexico and the USA, which has the added bonus of actually being mutual. The list of incidents between the two is nearly endless.



** Faryd Mondragón, goalkeeper of the Colombian National Football Team, became the oldest player to participate in a World Cup when Colombia manager José Pékerman brought him off the bench for the final minutes of their 4–1 win over Japan in the final match of 2014 group play. Mondragón, who turned 43 three days before the Japan match, had been on the national team since 1993, making him the last player of the golden generation of the Colombian team of the 1990's, which included legends like René Higuita, the late Andrés Escobar, Carlos Valderrama, Leonel Alvarez and Faustino Asprilla among others. As such, he is the only player who participated in two different World Cups 16 years apart, the longest time between two non-consecutive tournaments. Also, he was the last active player overall from Colombia's last participation in the 1998 World Cup (he retired right after the 2014 World Cup).

to:

** Faryd Mondragón, goalkeeper of the Colombian National Football Team, became the oldest player to participate in a World Cup when Colombia manager José Pékerman brought him off the bench for the final minutes of their 4–1 win over Japan in the final match of 2014 group play. Mondragón, who turned 43 three days before the Japan match, had been on the national team since 1993, making him the last player of the golden generation of the Colombian team of the 1990's, which included legends like René Higuita, the late Andrés Escobar, Carlos Valderrama, Leonel Alvarez Álvarez and Faustino Asprilla among others. As such, he is the only player who participated in two different World Cups 16 years apart, the longest time between two non-consecutive tournaments. Also, he was the last active player overall from Colombia's last participation in the 1998 World Cup (he retired right after the 2014 World Cup).



** On the women's side, 2015 saw Japan's Homare Sawa and Brazil's Formiga become the first players of either sex to compete in six World Cup final tournaments. To put it another way, the only Women's World Cup they missed was ''the very first one'' (when Formiga had just turned 13 and Sawa was just short of that same birthday; both were born in 1978).

to:

** On the women's side, 2015 saw Brazil's Formiga and Japan's Homare Sawa and Brazil's Formiga become the first players of either sex to compete in six World Cup final tournaments. To put it another way, the only Women's World Cup they missed was ''the very first one'' (when Formiga had just turned 13 and Sawa was just short of that same birthday; both were born in 1978).



** The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disgrace_of_Gijón Non-Agression Pact of Gijón]] took loophole abuse to a completely new level. It was bad enough that it caused FIFA to change the rules and comparisons to Gijón always arise when two teams could benefit from an agreement.

to:

** The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disgrace_of_Gijón Non-Agression Non-Aggression Pact of Gijón]] took loophole abuse to a completely new level. It was bad enough that it caused FIFA to change the rules and comparisons to Gijón always arise when two teams could benefit from an agreement.



* ManBitesMan: [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bsxpApxpzwo Luis]] [[http://www.theguardian.com/football/gallery/2014/jun/24/luis-suarez-giorgio-chiellini-world-cup-pictures-gallery Suarez]].

to:

* ManBitesMan: [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bsxpApxpzwo Luis]] [[http://www.theguardian.com/football/gallery/2014/jun/24/luis-suarez-giorgio-chiellini-world-cup-pictures-gallery Suarez]].Suárez]].



** After the 2010 final, the Dutch Media attempted to blame referee Howard Webb for their loss as he missed a corner decision for the Netherlands prior to the Spanish goal and even claimed he favoured Spain in general. However it's widely considered Webb, who was probably too lenient on the Dutch, could (and according to Netherlands legend Cruyff ''should'') have sent two Dutch players off before it was even half-time, given the main Dutch strategy had largely consisted of [[UnnecessaryRoughness kicking lumps]] out of Spanish players. In particular Nigel de Jong's infamous 28th minute ''mid-air'' [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J2NqS4IBLxw "tackle"]] on Alonso's chest somehow avoided a straight red. Spain were likely the best passing team in the world and being a ''single'' man down to them with so long to go in the match would have likely all but ended their chances.
** In 2014 Uruguayan Luis Suarez became a scapegoat for FIFA according to the Uruguayan Football Association due to his biting of Italian Giorgio Chiellini; they are mainly concerned about FIFA's ban of 4 months against Suarez. The Association considers that FIFA (being influenced by the English Premier League in their own words) was too severe in the punishment and that it cost them any chance they had to advance in the World Cup. As Suarez was a repeat offender, FIFA's severe ban effectively crippled the team. While they admit that Suarez did bite Chiellini, no blame or foul play has been attributed to him by his country's association even when the entire incident was entirely caused by him and they are blaming FIFA for their loss regardless.

to:

** After the 2010 final, the Dutch Media media attempted to blame referee Howard Webb for their loss as he missed a corner decision for the Netherlands prior to the Spanish goal and even claimed he favoured Spain in general. However it's widely considered Webb, who was probably too lenient on the Dutch, could (and according to Netherlands legend Cruyff ''should'') have sent two Dutch players off before it was even half-time, given the main Dutch strategy had largely consisted of [[UnnecessaryRoughness kicking lumps]] out of Spanish players. In particular Nigel de Jong's infamous 28th minute ''mid-air'' [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J2NqS4IBLxw "tackle"]] on Alonso's chest somehow avoided a straight red. Spain were likely the best passing team in the world and being a ''single'' man down to them with so long to go in the match would have likely all but ended their chances.
** In 2014 Uruguayan Luis Suarez Suárez became a scapegoat for FIFA according to the Uruguayan Football Association due to his biting of Italian Giorgio Chiellini; they are mainly concerned about FIFA's ban of 4 months against Suarez.Suárez. The Association considers that FIFA (being influenced by the English Premier League in their own words) was too severe in the punishment and that it cost them any chance they had to advance in the World Cup. As Suarez Suárez was a repeat offender, FIFA's severe ban effectively crippled the team. While they admit that Suarez Suárez did bite Chiellini, no blame or foul play has been attributed to him by his country's association even when the entire incident was entirely caused by him and they are blaming FIFA for their loss regardless.



** France (5 semifinals, ousted at groups stage 6 times) and Italy (8 semifinals, 7 eliminations at groups stage) come to mind.

to:

** France (5 semifinals, ousted at groups stage 6 times) and Italy (8 semifinals, 7 eliminations at groups group stage) come to mind.



*** 2014 might surpass in its alternance of "awesome football" and "GermanicEfficiency": 4-0 against Portugal, then a 2-2 draw against Ghana and a short victory 1-0 upon USA. In the knockout stage, a hard-fought 2-1 against Algeria, a boring 1-0 over France with a goal in the first 20 minutes, and then the offensive festival that was the 7-1 victory against Brazil before another close victory against Argentina.

to:

*** 2014 might surpass in its alternance alternation of "awesome football" and "GermanicEfficiency": 4-0 4–0 against Portugal, then a 2-2 2–2 draw against Ghana and a short victory 1-0 upon hard-fought 1–0 win over the USA. In the knockout stage, a hard-fought 2-1 2–1 win against Algeria, a boring 1-0 1–0 over France with a goal in the first 20 minutes, and then the offensive festival that was the 7-1 7–1 victory against Brazil before another close victory against Argentina.



** Another variant was the French team who won the 1998 Cup. Naturalized Africans (Desailly: Ghana, Vieira: Senegal), people from France's overseas territories (Karembeu: New Caledonia; Thuram: Antilles), or descendants of various immigrants (Zidane's parents are Algerian, Djorkaeff was son of a Polish and an Armenian, Trezeguet is the son of an Argentinian and even grew in Buenos Aires). [[http://observer.theguardian.com/osm/story/0,,1741569,00.html It even worked as a point against racism in France for a while.]]

to:

** Another variant was the French team who won the 1998 Cup. Naturalized Africans (Desailly: Ghana, Vieira: Senegal), people from France's overseas territories (Karembeu: New Caledonia; Thuram: Antilles), or descendants of various immigrants (Zidane's parents are Algerian, Algerian; Djorkaeff was the son of a Polish Pole and an Armenian, with Central Asian ancestry farther back in his family tree; Trezeguet is the son of an Argentinian and even grew up in Buenos Aires). [[http://observer.theguardian.com/osm/story/0,,1741569,00.html It even worked as a point against racism in France for a while.]]



** Luis Suarez, Uruguayan striker and foremost national player in the 2010 and 2014 World Cups. His actions during two of his team's decisive games (which were won by his team) gained him suspensions from the following games. As an utterly necessary piece of the Uruguayan team, he effectively left a hole in his absence, awarding his team some tickets back home when the team lost the aforementioned matches.

to:

** Luis Suarez, Suárez, Uruguayan striker and foremost national player in the 2010 and 2014 World Cups. His actions during two of his team's decisive games (which were won by his team) gained him suspensions from the following games. As an utterly necessary piece of the Uruguayan team, he effectively left a hole in his absence, awarding his team some tickets back home when the team lost the aforementioned matches.



* ObviousRulePatch: The infamous [[en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disgrace_of_Gijón Non-aggression pact of Gijón]] caused a rule change requiring the last two matches of each group to be played at the same time.

to:

* ObviousRulePatch: The infamous [[en.[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disgrace_of_Gijón Non-aggression pact Non-Aggression Pact of Gijón]] caused a rule change requiring the last two matches of each group to be played at the same time.
4th Jul '15 6:34:55 PM KYCubbie
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Poor England suffered this in the Women's World Cup, where they were defeated in the semifinals by Japan, by virtue of an own goal ''two minutes into stoppage time!''

to:

** Poor England suffered this in the 2015 Women's World Cup, where they were defeated in the semifinals by Japan, by virtue of an own goal ''two minutes into stoppage time!''



** In a completely different sense, the 1950 World Cup became the tournament that Brazil's goalkeeper Barbosa lost. The ''Maracanazo'' haunted Barbosa for the rest of his life, as he was blamed for letting Uruguay score two goals (rather than praising the Uruguayan scorers). At one point, Barbosa was unjustly referred to as "The Man That Made Brazil Cry". This was so prevalent that 44 years later, he was forbidden to pay a visit to the Brazil team that competed in the 1994 World Cup, where he intended to advise goalie Claudio Taffarel because it was thought that he would "jinx" the team, notwithstanding that Barbosa was considered one of the best goalkeepers in the world during the 50', even after Brazil's loss. It was to the point that historians say 1950 was a significant step behind in Brazilian miscegenation (as Barbosa was Black) - even if 1958 had Brazil winning a title due to Black (Pelé, Didi) and mixed-race (Garrincha) players, Black goalkeepers still have a bad reputation in the country.

to:

** In a completely different sense, the 1950 World Cup became the tournament that Brazil's goalkeeper Barbosa lost. The ''Maracanazo'' haunted Barbosa for the rest of his life, as he was blamed for letting Uruguay score two goals (rather than praising the Uruguayan scorers). At one point, Barbosa was unjustly referred to as "The Man That Made Brazil Cry". This was so prevalent that 44 years later, he was forbidden to pay a visit to the Brazil team that competed in the 1994 World Cup, where he intended to advise goalie Claudio Taffarel because it was thought that he would "jinx" the team, notwithstanding that Barbosa was considered one of the best goalkeepers in the world during the 50', even after Brazil's loss. It was to the point that historians say 1950 was a significant step behind in Brazilian miscegenation race relations (as Barbosa was Black) - — even if 1958 had Brazil winning a title due to Black (Pelé, Didi) and mixed-race (Garrincha) players, Black goalkeepers still have a bad reputation in the country.
3rd Jul '15 11:21:09 AM igordebraga
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* PrecisionFStrike: Once Laura Bassett saw her attempt at stopping an incoming kick [[HoistByHisOwnPetard wound up as a last minute own goal]], her reaction is a visible [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-N5bqrNJ340 "FUCK!"]]. Followed by "MyGodWhatHaveIDone" as she starts crying.



** Also in 2014, Brazil's game against Colombia saw roughhousing between the two teams get completely out of hand while the referee did absolutely nothing, leading to an incident between Camilo Zuñiga and Neymar Jr. where the former charged the Brazilian on his back, sending him down. Neymar Jr. was hit so hard he's lucky he didn't fracture vertebrae, but ended up out regardless, and Thiago Silva was red-carded during the game. Brazil won 2-1 in the end, and went on to play Germany in the semifinals, where they were demolished 7-1 without two of their centerpieces.
** As far as stadia go, anytime a team won a game in Manaus, you could chalk up the next game as a loss, due to just how draining playing in the heart of the Amazon rainforest could be.

to:

** Also in 2014, Brazil's game against Colombia saw roughhousing between the two teams get completely out of hand while the referee did absolutely nothing, leading to nothing. One of the few cards handed was for Brazilian captain Thiago Silva, who with his third earned an incident between Camilo Zuñiga and automatic suspension for the semifinal. And then there's striker Neymar Jr. where being kneed in the former charged back by Camilo Zuñiga, being forced to leave the Brazilian on his back, sending him down. Neymar Jr. was hit so hard he's lucky he didn't fracture vertebrae, but ended up out regardless, field in a stretcher and Thiago Silva was red-carded during ultimately sidelined for the game.other games. Brazil won 2-1 in the end, and went on to play Germany in the semifinals, where they were demolished 7-1 without two of their centerpieces.
** As far as stadia go, anytime a team won a game in Manaus, you could chalk up the next game as a loss, due to just how draining playing in the heart of the Amazon rainforest could be. Only one to win was Portugal, whose game in Manaus was a draw - and yet the victory.
This list shows the last 10 events of 105. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=TheWorldCup.TropesIToP