History TheAllegedCar / RealLife

24th Apr '17 11:44:22 AM Golondrina
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* The Ford Model T. The very car that put the world on wheels in the nineteen tens and early twenties had become the alleged car by the late twenties to early thirties because they were primitive and funny looking. They quickly became a mainstay of silent comedies because they were cheap, disposable and their idiosyncratic controls made them ideal stunt cars. By the 1930s they'd become visual shorthand for fools and country bumpkins--try to imagine BusterKeaton or LaurelAndHardy behind the wheel of anything else. Ironically, they always were kind of an alleged car compared to their more expensive competitors (their reliance on "by guess or by god" pumpless themodynamic circulation made them particularly prone to overheating) but their primitive nature limited the number of ways they could go wrong and they could easily be kept running by anyone with very basic skills and a few spares.

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* The Ford Model T. The very car that put the world on wheels in the nineteen tens and early twenties had become the alleged car by the late twenties to early thirties because they were primitive and funny looking. They quickly became a mainstay of silent comedies because they were cheap, disposable and their idiosyncratic controls made them ideal stunt cars. By the 1930s they'd become visual shorthand for fools and country bumpkins--try to imagine BusterKeaton Creator/BusterKeaton or LaurelAndHardy Creator/LaurelAndHardy behind the wheel of anything else. Ironically, they always were kind of an alleged car compared to their more expensive competitors (their reliance on "by guess or by god" pumpless themodynamic circulation made them particularly prone to overheating) but their primitive nature limited the number of ways they could go wrong and they could easily be kept running by anyone with very basic skills and a few spares.
23rd Apr '17 5:57:53 PM Arch9enius
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** What ''good'' was a Trabant? It was better than other Eastern Bloc brands. It was surprisingly safe (other than the gas tank thing). And it handled so well that it could even beat out some pricey Western brands in obstacle avoidance tests. And all shortcomings aside they were actually useful, which is the primary measure of any motor vehicle.
* The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wartburg_(car) Wartburg]] was basically the only other option to the Trabant in East Germany. It had the same stupid engine design as the Trabant, it was made from a polymer so soft that livestock could ''eat'' your car, and the only reason its flaws weren't fatal was that the motor had only seven moving parts.

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** What ''good'' was a Trabant? It was better than other Eastern Bloc brands. It was surprisingly safe (other than the gas tank thing). And it handled so well that it could even beat out some pricey Western brands in obstacle avoidance tests. And of course the manual had instructions on refitting the dynamo; dealerships and even automobile workshops were few and far between. And all shortcomings aside they were actually useful, which is the primary measure of any motor vehicle.
* The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wartburg_(car) Wartburg]] was basically the only other option to the Trabant in East Germany. It had the same stupid engine design as an extra cylinder on the Trabant, it was made from a polymer so soft that livestock could ''eat'' your car, and the only reason its flaws weren't fatal was that the motor had only seven moving parts.



* The classic Lada 1200 was not a bad car when it was introduced in 1970, being essentially a modified Fiat 124. But it quickly gained this reputation because (a) it was still based on a Fiat, (b) it had horrible fuel economy and handling, (c) Soviet production lines lacked any real quality control, and (d) thanks to production quotas and such, it received practically no updates or redesigns until the fall of the Soviet Union (and beyond, as production continued until 2012). Most export versions were considered disposable Communist cars, and it was treated as such -- except [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff in Finland]], where they were impressed with its ability to start even in the coldest weather.

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* The classic Lada 1200 was not a bad car when it was introduced in 1970, being essentially a modified Fiat 124. But it quickly gained this reputation because (a) it was still based on a Fiat, (b) it had horrible fuel economy and handling, (c) Soviet production lines lacked any real quality control, and (d) thanks to production quotas and such, it received practically no updates or redesigns until the fall of the Soviet Union (and beyond, as production continued until 2012). Most export versions were considered disposable Communist cars, and it was treated as such -- except [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff in Finland]], where they were impressed with its ability to start even in the coldest weather. And like a BMW, it came with a complete toolkit which unlike a BMW, could be used without invalidating the warrenty.
22nd Apr '17 12:01:44 PM Kadorhal
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** Let's put it this way: [[Film/BackToTheFuture If you can actually get it up to 88 mph, that really is some serious shit.]] Its performance was quite lacklustre, especially for an intended supercar, because it was watered down to save costs. It was originally designed for a rear-mounted rotary engine, but due to fuel concerns, it got a mid-mounted 2.8-litre V6 instead; this not only caused weight distribution issues, but also meant the very expensive [=DeLorean=] made only 145 HP (125 in the U.S. due to further emissions controls).
** ''Film/BackToTheFuture'' is the only thing keeping it alive now, especially when people realize that using it as a time machine was proof that Doc Brown [[MadScientist maybe didn't have all his screws in tightly]]. A new company was formed in 2013 to remake the DMC-12 in several much more modern and reliable versions (including an electric one!).

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** Let's put it this way: [[Film/BackToTheFuture If you can actually get it up to 88 mph, that really is some serious shit.]] shit. Its performance was quite lacklustre, especially for an intended supercar, because it was watered down to save costs. It was originally designed for a rear-mounted rotary engine, but due to fuel concerns, it got a mid-mounted 2.8-litre V6 instead; this not only caused weight distribution issues, but also meant the very expensive [=DeLorean=] made only 145 HP (125 in the U.S. due to further emissions controls).
** ''Film/BackToTheFuture'' ''Back to the Future'' is the only thing keeping it alive now, especially when people realize that using it as a time machine was proof that Doc Brown [[MadScientist maybe didn't have all his screws in tightly]]. A new company was formed in 2013 to remake the DMC-12 in several much more modern and reliable versions (including an electric one!).
4th Apr '17 7:52:20 PM Gsueagle31049
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* The Nissan Tsuru, an early 90s Sentra in the US and Canada, remained relatively unchanged during its ''[[LongRunner 25 year]]'' production run; it was popular with Mexican taxi cab operators because it was cheap (under US$10,000) and reliable. What puts the Tsuru into Alleged Car territory is modern safety standards, [[http://jalopnik.com/horrifying-crash-test-against-a-modern-car-shows-why-me-1788423100 as a head-on collision test against a 2016 Nissan Versa demonstrates]]; the Versa's cabin remained intact while the Tsuru's cabin was fatally compromised. The result of that test, as well as 4,000 plus fatalities involving the car between 2007 and 2012, finally led to the Tsuru's discontinuation in 2017.

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* The Nissan Tsuru, an early 90s Sentra in the US and Canada, remained relatively unchanged during its ''[[LongRunner 25 year]]'' production run; it was popular with Mexican taxi cab operators because it was cheap (under US$10,000) and reliable. What puts the Tsuru into Alleged Car territory is modern safety standards, standards; the Tsuru lacked certain safety features such as airbags and anti-lock brakes. [[http://jalopnik.com/horrifying-crash-test-against-a-modern-car-shows-why-me-1788423100 as In a head-on collision crash test against a 2016 Nissan Versa demonstrates]]; conducted by the IIHS]], the Versa's cabin remained intact intact, protecting the dummy, while the Tsuru's cabin was fatally compromised. compromised with the dummy suffering life-threatening, if not fatal, injuries. The result of that test, as well as 4,000 plus fatalities involving the car between 2007 and 2012, and the Mexican government tightening safety regulations finally led to the Tsuru's discontinuation in 2017.
31st Mar '17 9:08:53 PM Jake18
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*** The Chrysler TC by Maserati was the American manufacturer's idea of a luxury car. A K-car built by Maserati in Italy, it essentially had nothing, except an opera window in the C-pillar, to disguise its humble origins, and was thought of as an overly expensive Chrysler, not a budget Maserati.

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*** The Chrysler TC by Maserati was the American manufacturer's idea of a sporty luxury car. A K-car built by Maserati in Italy, it essentially had nothing, except an opera window in the C-pillar, to disguise its humble origins, and was thought of as an overly expensive Chrysler, not a budget Maserati.
24th Mar '17 9:20:45 PM Scifimaster92
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** About the only thing in its favor, owners said, was the 2.0-litre/96hp 4-cylinder LT2 engine, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GM_Family_II_engine#LT2 the Family II engine from General Motors]], which owners said wasn't bad, bud 96hp was anemic [[BadExportForYou especially when European owners got the]] 2.0-litre/116hp 4-cylinder 20NE Family II engine which was far more powerful.

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** About the only thing in its favor, owners said, was the 2.0-litre/96hp 4-cylinder LT2 engine, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GM_Family_II_engine#LT2 the Family II engine from General Motors]], which owners said wasn't bad, bud but 96hp was anemic [[BadExportForYou especially when European owners got the]] 2.0-litre/116hp 4-cylinder 20NE Family II engine which was far more powerful.
24th Mar '17 9:16:52 PM Scifimaster92
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* The third-generation Chrysler Sebring turned Chrysler into a joke during the late 2000s and [[CreatorKiller all but destroyed the company's reputation]], of which it is still trying to recover. While marketed as a luxury sedan with the most loaded models costing close to $40,000, its odd styling and the fact that its performance, ride, and build and material quality were below that of vehicles that cost half as much made it a universally panned bust. When Chrysler went asking for a government bailout during 2008, many commentators and opponents brought up the Sebring to dispute Chrysler's claims that the global financial crisis was the source of the company's cash crunch. While most of Chrysler's product lineup at the time was uncompetitive, the Sebring was the most prominent due to how spectacularly underwhelming it was considering its price, and given that Chrysler had the far superior full-size 300 in its lineup right next to it. The Sebring is almost universally considered to be one of the worst cars made in recent memory, and even Chrysler enthusiasts will admit that it is a terrible car (though there exists a VocalMinority that defends it).

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* The third-generation Chrysler Sebring turned Chrysler into a joke during the late 2000s and [[CreatorKiller all but destroyed the company's reputation]], of which it is still trying to recover. While marketed as a luxury sedan with the most loaded models costing close to $40,000, its odd styling and the fact that its performance, ride, and build and material quality were below that of vehicles that cost half as much made it a universally panned bust. When Chrysler went asking for a government bailout during in 2008, many commentators and opponents brought up the Sebring to dispute Chrysler's claims that the global financial crisis was the source of the company's cash crunch. While most of Chrysler's product lineup at the time was uncompetitive, the Sebring was the most prominent due to how spectacularly underwhelming it was considering its price, and given that Chrysler had the far superior full-size 300 in its lineup right next to it. The Sebring is almost universally considered to be one of the worst cars made in recent memory, and even Chrysler enthusiasts will admit that it is a terrible car (though there exists a VocalMinority that defends it).
21st Mar '17 3:52:59 PM Scifimaster92
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** The [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Undie_500 Undie 500]], which shared the $500 concept, was a rally held in NewZealand by the University of Canterbury Engineering Society between the early 1980s and 2009.

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** The [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Undie_500 Undie 500]], which shared the $500 concept, was a rally held in NewZealand UsefulNotes/NewZealand by the University of Canterbury Engineering Society between the early 1980s and 2009.
20th Mar '17 7:28:56 PM Scifimaster92
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* The third-generation Chrysler Sebring turned Chrysler into a joke during the late 2000s and [[CreatorKiller all but destroyed the company's reputation]], of which it is still trying to recover. While marketed as a luxury sedan with the most loaded models costing close to $40,000, its odd styling and the fact that its performance, ride, and build and material quality were below that of vehicles that cost half as much made it a universally panned bust. When Chrysler went asking for a government bailout during 2008, many commentators and opponents brought up the Sebring to dispute Chrysler's claims that the global financial crisis was the source of the company's cash crunch. While most of Chrysler's product lineup at the time was uncompetitive, the Sebring was the most prominent due to how spectacularly underwhelming it was considering its price, and given that Chrysler had the far superior full-size 300 in its lineup right next to it. The Sebring is almost universally considered to be one of the worst cars made in recent memory, and even Chrysler enthusiasts will admit that it is a terrible car (though there exists a VocalMinority that defends it).



* The third-generation Chrysler Sebring turned Chrysler into a joke during the late 2000s and [[CreatorKiller all but destroyed the company's reputation]], of which it is still trying to recover. While marketed as a luxury sedan with the most loaded models costing close to $40,000, its odd styling and the fact that its performance, ride, and build and material quality were below that of vehicles that cost half as much made it a universally panned bust. When Chrysler went asking for a government bailout during 2008, many commentators and opponents brought up the Sebring to dispute Chrysler's claims that the global financial crisis was the source of the company's cash crunch. While most of Chrysler's product lineup at the time was uncompetitive, the Sebring was the most prominent due to how spectacularly underwhelming it was considering its price, and given that Chrysler had the far superior full-size 300 in its lineup right next to it. The Sebring is almost universally considered to be one of the worst cars made in recent memory, and even Chrysler enthusiasts will admit that it is a terrible car (though there exists a VocalMinority that defends it).
20th Mar '17 7:27:27 PM Scifimaster92
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* As famously documented by Ralph Nader in ''Unsafe at Any Speed'', the first-generation Chevy Corvair was basically GM's version of the Pinto in the sense that it would become better known for its safety issues than for its merits as an automobile. Although popular, it quickly gained notoriety for its quirky handling characteristics resulting from its unusual (for a North American model) rear-engine layout and swing-axle suspension. But while the similarly-designed Porsche 911 was marketed to sports car enthusiasts who were experienced drivers to begin with and the also similarly-designed Volkswagen Beetle was too low-powered to reach a speed where the handling would be dangerous, the Corvair was sold as an everyday mid-market car whose purchasers assumed it would perform in a similar fashion as the front-engine vehicles they were used to and was to be maintained as such. This led many inexperienced motorists to [[DrivesLikeCrazy treat their Corvairs as cheap sports cars]] and get themselves killed in the process. The most famous Corvair casualty was undoubtedly Creator/ErnieKovacs, who was killed when he lost control of his Corvair Lakewood station wagon and slammed into a power pole during a rainstorm. And just as Ford had done with the Pinto, GM quickly figured that a cheap fix in the form of a front stabilizer bar could easily remedy most of the car's problems but ultimately decided it was even cheaper to leave the vehicle as it was and settle any future lawsuits, as revealed in Nader's book. (Contrary to popular belief, only the first chapter was about the Corvair specifically, the rest focusing on the American automobile industry in general.) While the accident rate for the Corvair was technically no worse than that of any of its contemporaries, these revelations left a bad taste in the public's mouth and the second-generation Corvair, whose design ''did'' incorporate the vital anti-sway bar as well as an independent suspension system, flopped hard. In the end, the Corvair was discontinued in 1969. The whole fiasco also practically [[GenreKiller killed the rear-engine automobile in North America]], save for Porsche.

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* As famously documented by Ralph Nader in ''Unsafe at Any Speed'', the first-generation Chevy Corvair was basically GM's version of the Pinto in the sense that it would become better known for its safety issues than for its merits as an automobile. automobile.
**
Although popular, it quickly gained notoriety for its quirky handling characteristics resulting from its unusual (for a North American model) rear-engine layout and swing-axle suspension. But while the similarly-designed Porsche 911 was marketed to sports car enthusiasts who were experienced drivers to begin with and the also similarly-designed Volkswagen Beetle was too low-powered to reach a speed where the handling would be dangerous, the Corvair was sold as an everyday mid-market car whose purchasers assumed it would perform in a similar fashion as the front-engine vehicles they were used to and was to be maintained as such. This led many inexperienced motorists to [[DrivesLikeCrazy treat their Corvairs as cheap sports cars]] and get themselves killed in the process. The most famous Corvair casualty was undoubtedly Creator/ErnieKovacs, who was killed when he lost control of his Corvair Lakewood station wagon and slammed into a power pole during a rainstorm.
**
And just as Ford had done with the Pinto, GM quickly figured that a cheap fix in the form of a front stabilizer bar could easily remedy most of the car's problems but ultimately decided it was even cheaper to leave the vehicle as it was and settle any future lawsuits, as revealed in Nader's book. (Contrary to popular belief, only the first chapter was about the Corvair specifically, the rest focusing on the American automobile industry in general.) )
**
While the accident rate for the Corvair was technically no worse than that of any of its contemporaries, these revelations left a bad taste in the public's mouth and the second-generation Corvair, whose design ''did'' incorporate the vital anti-sway bar as well as an independent suspension system, flopped hard. In the end, the Corvair was discontinued in 1969. The whole fiasco also practically [[GenreKiller killed the rear-engine automobile in North America]], save for Porsche.
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