History TearJerker / TheHoganFamily

9th Jan '15 11:12:07 AM twilicorn
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The last NBC episode, aired in December 1990 and titled "Best of Friends, Worst of Times," details David's best friend Rich being stricken with [=AIDS=]. Throughout the episode, David and his other close friend, Burt, help Rich live out his final days to the fullest. By the end of the episode, David (along with Sandy, who at this point in the series is vice-principal at the local high school) is invited to speak at the assembly about HIV and AIDS. David touches upon his experiences with Rich, dispels common myths associated with the disease and how to prevent it... and fights back tears as he reveals that Rich had died one night earlier.

to:

* The last NBC episode, fifth-to-last episode aired in December 1990 and titled "Best of Friends, Worst of Times," details David's best friend Rich being stricken with [=AIDS=]. Throughout the episode, David and his other close friend, Burt, help Rich live out his final days to the fullest. By the end of the episode, David (along with Sandy, who at this point in the series is vice-principal at the local high school) is invited to speak at the an assembly about HIV and AIDS. David touches upon his experiences with Rich, dispels common myths associated with the disease and how to prevent it... and fights back tears as he reveals that Rich had died one night earlier.
17th Dec '14 10:12:46 AM twilicorn
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* When original series star Valerie Harper was fired and her character McLeaned in 1987, several stories during the following season (Season 3) focused on the family grieving the death of her character (also Valerie). The one that made the most impact by far was the episode "Burned Out", where [[HouseFire a fire starts in the attic]] and eventually severely damages the house. The fire destroyed many of the family's possessions, but the piece bringing about the most tears was the charred remains of a photograph of Valerie. After being allowed back in their home and investigating the ruins, David goes into his room and finds the burned photo on the nightstand, immediately breaking down in tears; Sandy comes in and, comforting David, shares his grief.

to:

* When original series star Valerie Harper was fired and her character McLeaned in 1987, several stories during the following season (Season 3) focused on the family grieving the death of her character (also Valerie). The one that made the most impact by far was the episode "Burned Out", Out" (financed and sponsored by UsefulNotes/McDonalds, who helped with the set damage), where [[HouseFire a fire starts in the attic]] and eventually severely damages the house. The fire destroyed many of the family's possessions, but the piece bringing about the most tears was the charred remains of a photograph of Valerie. After being allowed back in their home and investigating the ruins, David goes into his room and finds the burned photo on the nightstand, immediately breaking down in tears; Sandy comes in and, comforting David, shares his grief.



** Overall, the episode (financed and sponsored by UsefulNotes/McDonalds, who helped with the set damage) was well-received by critics and fans alike, not only for the safety aspect but presenting a reality some families face in dealing with grief: losing a loved one, and not long thereafter a fire destroys most, if not all, of the momentos of that person.
* The last NBC episode, aired in December 1990 and titled "Best of Friends, Worst of Times," details David's best friend Rich being stricken with [=AIDS=]. In an episode filled with emotion, where David and his other close friend, Burt, help Rich live out his final days to the fullest, the most emotional scene comes at the end. David (along with Sandy, who by now is vice-principal at the local high school) is invited to speak at the assembly about HIV and AIDS. David touches upon his experiences with Rich, dispels common myths associated with the disease and how to prevent it ... and fights back tears as he reveals that Rich had died one night earlier.

to:

** Overall, the episode (financed and sponsored by UsefulNotes/McDonalds, who helped with the set damage) was well-received highly praised by critics and fans alike, viewers - not only for the safety aspect but presenting a reality some families face in dealing with grief: losing a loved one, and not long thereafter a fire destroys most, if not all, of the momentos of that person.
* The last NBC episode, aired in December 1990 and titled "Best of Friends, Worst of Times," details David's best friend Rich being stricken with [=AIDS=]. In an episode filled with emotion, where Throughout the episode, David and his other close friend, Burt, help Rich live out his final days to the fullest, fullest. By the most emotional scene comes at end of the end. episode, David (along with Sandy, who by now at this point in the series is vice-principal at the local high school) is invited to speak at the assembly about HIV and AIDS. David touches upon his experiences with Rich, dispels common myths associated with the disease and how to prevent it ...it... and fights back tears as he reveals that Rich had died one night earlier.
4th Dec '14 11:25:45 AM twilicorn
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* When original series star Valerie Harper was dismissed from the series in 1987 and [[McLeaned written out as being killed in a traffic accident]], several stories during the following season (Season 3) focused on the family grieving the death of her character (Valerie, the Hogan family matriarch). The one that made the most impact by far was the episode "Burned Out" (aired October 5, 1987), where [[HouseFire a fire starts in the attic]] and eventually severely damages the house. The fire destroyed many of the family's possessions, but the piece bringing about the tearjerker trope was the charred remains of a photograph of Valerie. After being allowed back in their home and investigating the ruins, eldest son David (Creator/JasonBateman) goes into his room and finds the burned photo on the nightstand, immediately breaking down in tears; Sandy comes in and, comforting David, shares his grief. The episode financed and sponsored by McDonalds well-received by critics and fans alike, not only for the safety aspect but presenting a reality some families face in dealing with grief: losing a loved one, and not long thereafter a fire destroys most, if not all, of the momentos of that person.

to:

* When original series star Valerie Harper was dismissed from the series in 1987 fired and [[McLeaned written out as being killed her character McLeaned in a traffic accident]], 1987, several stories during the following season (Season 3) focused on the family grieving the death of her character (Valerie, the Hogan family matriarch). (also Valerie). The one that made the most impact by far was the episode "Burned Out" (aired October 5, 1987), Out", where [[HouseFire a fire starts in the attic]] and eventually severely damages the house. The fire destroyed many of the family's possessions, but the piece bringing about the tearjerker trope most tears was the charred remains of a photograph of Valerie. After being allowed back in their home and investigating the ruins, eldest son David (Creator/JasonBateman) goes into his room and finds the burned photo on the nightstand, immediately breaking down in tears; Sandy comes in and, comforting David, shares his grief. The episode financed and sponsored by McDonalds well-received by critics and fans alike, not only for the safety aspect but presenting a reality some families face in dealing with grief: losing a loved one, and not long thereafter a fire destroys most, if not all, of the momentos of that person.grief.



* The series finale, aired in December 1990 and titled "Best of Friends, Worst of Times," details David's best friend Rich being stricken with [=AIDS=]. In an episode filled with emotion, where David and his other close friend, Burt, help Rich live out his final days to the fullest, the most emotional scene comes at the end. David (along with Sandy, who by now is vice-principal at the local high school) is invited to speak at the assembly about HIV and AIDS. David touches upon his experiences with Rich, dispels common myths associated with the disease and how to prevent it ... and fights back tears as he reveals that Rich had died one night earlier.

to:

** Overall, the episode (financed and sponsored by UsefulNotes/McDonalds, who helped with the set damage) was well-received by critics and fans alike, not only for the safety aspect but presenting a reality some families face in dealing with grief: losing a loved one, and not long thereafter a fire destroys most, if not all, of the momentos of that person.
* The series finale, last NBC episode, aired in December 1990 and titled "Best of Friends, Worst of Times," details David's best friend Rich being stricken with [=AIDS=]. In an episode filled with emotion, where David and his other close friend, Burt, help Rich live out his final days to the fullest, the most emotional scene comes at the end. David (along with Sandy, who by now is vice-principal at the local high school) is invited to speak at the assembly about HIV and AIDS. David touches upon his experiences with Rich, dispels common myths associated with the disease and how to prevent it ... and fights back tears as he reveals that Rich had died one night earlier.
4th Dec '13 7:16:43 AM Briguy52748
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The {{Aesop}} mentioned on the main page. The episode doesn't end happily, nor with Willie sulking over whatever punishment he's incurred, but with him sitting alone in the kitchen, crying as he realizes the impact of everything he's done.

to:

* The {{Aesop}} mentioned on the main page. page, regarding the episode "Leave It To Willie." The episode doesn't end happily, nor with Willie sulking over whatever punishment he's incurred, but with him sitting alone in the kitchen, crying as he realizes the impact of everything he's done.
22nd Aug '13 10:37:03 AM Viira
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* When original series star Valerie Harper was dismissed from the series in 1987 and [[McLeaned written out as being killed in a traffic accident]], several stories during the following season (Season 3) focused on the family grieving the death of her character (Valerie, the Hogan family matriarch). The one that made the most impact by far was the episode "Burned Out" (aired October 5, 1987), where [[HouseFire a fire starts in the attic]] and eventually severely damages the house. The fire destroyed many of the family's possessions, but the piece bringing about the tearjerker trope was the charred remains of a photograph of Valerie. After being allowed back in their home and investigating the ruins, eldest son David (JasonBateman) goes into his room and finds the burned photo on the nightstand, immediately breaking down in tears; Sandy comes in and, comforting David, shares his grief. The episode financed and sponsored by McDonalds well-received by critics and fans alike, not only for the safety aspect but presenting a reality some families face in dealing with grief: losing a loved one, and not long thereafter a fire destroys most, if not all, of the momentos of that person.

to:

* When original series star Valerie Harper was dismissed from the series in 1987 and [[McLeaned written out as being killed in a traffic accident]], several stories during the following season (Season 3) focused on the family grieving the death of her character (Valerie, the Hogan family matriarch). The one that made the most impact by far was the episode "Burned Out" (aired October 5, 1987), where [[HouseFire a fire starts in the attic]] and eventually severely damages the house. The fire destroyed many of the family's possessions, but the piece bringing about the tearjerker trope was the charred remains of a photograph of Valerie. After being allowed back in their home and investigating the ruins, eldest son David (JasonBateman) (Creator/JasonBateman) goes into his room and finds the burned photo on the nightstand, immediately breaking down in tears; Sandy comes in and, comforting David, shares his grief. The episode financed and sponsored by McDonalds well-received by critics and fans alike, not only for the safety aspect but presenting a reality some families face in dealing with grief: losing a loved one, and not long thereafter a fire destroys most, if not all, of the momentos of that person.
18th Dec '12 9:27:28 PM BondGirl
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* When original series star Valerie Harper was dismissed from the series in 1987 and [[McLeaned written out as being killed in a traffic accident]], several stories during the following season (Season 3) focused on the family grieving the death of her character (Valerie, the Hogan family matriarch). The one that made the most impact by far was the episode "Burned Out" (aired October 5, 1987), where [[HouseFire a fire starts in the attic]] and eventually severely damages the house. The fire destroyed many of the family's possessions, but the piece bringing about the tearjerker trope was the charred remains of a photograph of Valerie. After being allowed back in their home and investigating the ruins, eldest son David (JasonBateman) goes into his room and finds the burned photo on the nightstand, immediately breaking down in tears; Sandy comes in and, comforting David, shares his grief. The episode financed and sponsored by McDonalds well-received by critics and fans alike, not only for the safety aspect but presenting a reality some families face in dealing with grief: losing a loved one, and not long thereafter a fire destroys most, if not all, of the momentoes of that person.
** Late in the episode, David reveals his emotions on the night of the fire. He had been returning home from a date when he found his street blocked off for a house fire; when he realized that it was his house, he is initially prevented from finding his family, before breaking free from a police officer and eventually finding his family. In the moments in between seeing that his house was burning and finding his family, he admits that he was scared that his family was trapped inside. He tells his family, "Dear God, I just lost my mother. Please don't take them too."

to:

* The {{Aesop}} mentioned on the main page. The episode doesn't end happily, nor with Willie sulking over whatever punishment he's incurred, but with him sitting alone in the kitchen, crying as he realizes the impact of everything he's done.
* When original series star Valerie Harper was dismissed from the series in 1987 and [[McLeaned written out as being killed in a traffic accident]], several stories during the following season (Season 3) focused on the family grieving the death of her character (Valerie, the Hogan family matriarch). The one that made the most impact by far was the episode "Burned Out" (aired October 5, 1987), where [[HouseFire a fire starts in the attic]] and eventually severely damages the house. The fire destroyed many of the family's possessions, but the piece bringing about the tearjerker trope was the charred remains of a photograph of Valerie. After being allowed back in their home and investigating the ruins, eldest son David (JasonBateman) goes into his room and finds the burned photo on the nightstand, immediately breaking down in tears; Sandy comes in and, comforting David, shares his grief. The episode financed and sponsored by McDonalds well-received by critics and fans alike, not only for the safety aspect but presenting a reality some families face in dealing with grief: losing a loved one, and not long thereafter a fire destroys most, if not all, of the momentoes momentos of that person.
** Late in the episode, David reveals his emotions on the night of the fire. He had been returning home from a date when he found his street blocked off for a house fire; when he realized that it was his house, he is initially prevented from finding his family, before breaking free from a police officer and eventually finding his family.reuniting with them. In the moments in between seeing that his house was burning and finding his family, he admits that he was scared that his family was trapped inside. He tells his family, family that as he ran toward the house, he prayed: "Dear God, I just lost my mother. Please don't take them too."
29th Nov '12 10:04:47 AM Briguy52748
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* When original series star Valerie Harper was dismissed from the series in 1987 and [[McLeaned written out as being killed in a traffic accident]], several stories during the following season focused on the family grieving the death of her character (Valerie, the Hogan family matriarch). The one that made the most impact by far was the episode "Burned Out," where [[HouseFire a fire starts in the attic]] and eventually severely damages the house. The fire destroyed many of the family's possessions, but the piece bringing about the tearjerker trope was the charred remains of a photograph of Valerie. After being allowed back in their home and investigating the ruins, eldest son David (JasonBateman) goes into his room and finds the burned photo on the nightstand, immediately breaking down in tears; Sandy comes in and, comforting David, shares his grief. The episode financed and sponsored by McDonalds well-received by critics and fans alike, not only for the safety aspect but presenting a reality some families face in dealing with grief: losing a loved one, and not long thereafter a fire destroys most, if not all, of the momentoes of that person.
** Late in the episode, David reveals his emotions on the night of the fire. He had been out on a date when, upon pulling onto the street of his house, sees the street cordoned off. When he sees that it is his house that was on fire, he runs down the street, scared that his family is trapped inside. He tells his brothers (who had been complaining that they were not going to be able to move back into their home for several months) that he had just lost his mother, and had a "Dear God" moment that he hoped his family wasn't killed, too.

to:

* When original series star Valerie Harper was dismissed from the series in 1987 and [[McLeaned written out as being killed in a traffic accident]], several stories during the following season (Season 3) focused on the family grieving the death of her character (Valerie, the Hogan family matriarch). The one that made the most impact by far was the episode "Burned Out," Out" (aired October 5, 1987), where [[HouseFire a fire starts in the attic]] and eventually severely damages the house. The fire destroyed many of the family's possessions, but the piece bringing about the tearjerker trope was the charred remains of a photograph of Valerie. After being allowed back in their home and investigating the ruins, eldest son David (JasonBateman) goes into his room and finds the burned photo on the nightstand, immediately breaking down in tears; Sandy comes in and, comforting David, shares his grief. The episode financed and sponsored by McDonalds well-received by critics and fans alike, not only for the safety aspect but presenting a reality some families face in dealing with grief: losing a loved one, and not long thereafter a fire destroys most, if not all, of the momentoes of that person.
** Late in the episode, David reveals his emotions on the night of the fire. He had been out on returning home from a date when, upon pulling onto the when he found his street of blocked off for a house fire; when he realized that it was his house, sees he is initially prevented from finding his family, before breaking free from a police officer and eventually finding his family. In the street cordoned off. When he sees moments in between seeing that it is his house was burning and finding his family, he admits that he was on fire, he runs down the street, scared that his family is was trapped inside. He tells his brothers (who had been complaining that they were not going to be able to move back into their home for several months) that he had just lost his mother, and had a family, "Dear God" moment God, I just lost my mother. Please don't take them too."
* The series finale, aired in December 1990 and titled "Best of Friends, Worst of Times," details David's best friend Rich being stricken with [=AIDS=]. In an episode filled with emotion, where David and his other close friend, Burt, help Rich live out his final days to the fullest, the most emotional scene comes at the end. David (along with Sandy, who by now is vice-principal at the local high school) is invited to speak at the assembly about HIV and AIDS. David touches upon his experiences with Rich, dispels common myths associated with the disease and how to prevent it ... and fights back tears as he reveals
that he hoped his family wasn't killed, too.Rich had died one night earlier.
29th Nov '12 9:55:50 AM Briguy52748
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* When original series star Valerie Harper was dismissed from the series in 1987 and [[McLeaned written out as being killed in a traffic accident]], several stories during the following season focused on the family grieving the death of her character (Valerie, the Hogan family matriarch). The one that made the most impact by far was the episode "Burned Out," where [[HouseFire a fire starts in the attic]] and eventually severely damages the house. The fire destroyed many of the family's possessions, but the piece bringing about the tearjerker trope was the charred remains of a photograph of Valerie. After being allowed back in their home and investigating the ruins, eldest son David (JasonBateman) goes into his room and finds the burned photo on the nightstand, immediately breaking down in tears; Sandy comes in and, comforting David, shares his grief. The episode financed and sponsored by McDonalds well-received by critics and fans alike, not only for the safety aspect but presenting a reality some families face in dealing with grief: losing a loved one, and not long thereafter a fire destroys most, if not all, of the momentoes of that person.
** Late in the episode, David reveals his emotions on the night of the fire. He had been out on a date when, upon pulling onto the street of his house, sees the street cordoned off. When he sees that it is his house that was on fire, he runs down the street, scared that his family is trapped inside. He tells his brothers (who had been complaining that they were not going to be able to move back into their home for several months) that he had just lost his mother, and had a "Dear God" moment that he hoped his family wasn't killed, too.
This list shows the last 8 events of 8. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=TearJerker.TheHoganFamily