History TakeThat / ComicBooks

19th Mar '17 4:32:53 PM LondonKdS
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''[[ComicBook/NickSpencersCaptainAmerica Captain America: Sam Wilson]]'' had a gang of [[StrawmanU parody student leftists]] who wanted to murder anyone who they considered sexist or racist, who called themselves the "Bombshells". This appeared to be a slap at ''ComicBook/DCComicsBombshells'', a DC {{Elseworld}} series featuring a WorldOfActionGirls and CastFullOfGay that was popular with the kind of politically active female superhero fan who the ''Captain America'' comic was caricaturing.
9th Mar '17 2:23:28 AM AlternativeCola
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Creator/MarkWaid's ''Comicbook/KingdomCome'' series is essentially a middle finger to the 90's [[UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks era of comics]]. The irresponsible hero Magog (who causes the death of thousands of civilians) is an obvious parody of the X-Men character Comicbook/{{Cable}}, a popular character during that time period. Additionally, many of the DC heroes introduced in the 90's such as Kyle Rayner (who the artist Alex Ross has gone on record as saying he hates) and Tim Drake were completely ignored. Amusingly, Ross also designed Magog as a jab at the notorious Creator/RobLiefeld, by modeling Magog after two characters that he designed: Comicbook/{{Cable}} and Shatterstar. Magog resembles Cable with a version of Shatterstar's helmet. Ironically, since Waid wrote Magog as a three dimensional character who was an apologetic WellIntentionedExtremist who learned from his mistake, he ended up being a favorite character of the creators.

to:

* Creator/MarkWaid's ''Comicbook/KingdomCome'' series is essentially a middle finger to the 90's [[UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks era of comics]]. The irresponsible hero Magog (who causes the death of thousands of civilians) is an obvious parody of the X-Men character Comicbook/{{Cable}}, a popular character during that time period. Additionally, many of the DC heroes introduced in the 90's such as Kyle Rayner (who the artist Alex Ross has gone on record as saying he hates) hates), Bart Allen (who was co-created by Waid) and Tim Drake were completely ignored.ignored, while others like Kon-El appeared in the background as part of the Legion of Super-Heroes in the comic. Amusingly, Ross also designed Magog as a jab at the notorious Creator/RobLiefeld, by modeling Magog after two characters that he designed: Comicbook/{{Cable}} and Shatterstar. Magog resembles Cable with a version of Shatterstar's helmet. Ironically, since Waid wrote Magog as a three dimensional character who was an apologetic WellIntentionedExtremist who learned from his mistake, he ended up being a favorite character of the creators.
5th Mar '17 7:35:49 AM IndirectActiveTransport
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Creator/AlanMoore's ''LeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen'' features his interpretation of the Antichrist by way of school shooters: a boy who learns what he's destined to be and proceeds to snap and murder/rape his way through his school, including his two best friends and worst enemy, other schoolmates and staff, then hide for the next few years doing nothing but down anti-psychotics with only the head of his former headmaster (and backer, [[GoneHorriblyRight the whole Antichrist thing was his idea]]) for company. When discovered, he grows into a multiple-eyed, lightning-pissing giant and kills [[spoiler:Allan]] before being [[spoiler:curbstomped by LiteratureMaryPoppins, who might be {{God}}]]. Now, [[Literature/HarryPotter given that this school was only accessible by train, by going through a fake wall in King's Cross station...]]

to:

* Creator/AlanMoore's ''LeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen'' features his interpretation of the Antichrist by way of school shooters: a boy who learns what he's destined to be and proceeds to snap and murder/rape his way through his school, including his two best friends and worst enemy, other schoolmates and staff, then hide for the next few years doing nothing but down anti-psychotics with only the head of his former headmaster (and backer, [[GoneHorriblyRight the whole Antichrist thing was his idea]]) for company. When discovered, he grows into a multiple-eyed, lightning-pissing giant and kills [[spoiler:Allan]] before being [[spoiler:curbstomped by LiteratureMaryPoppins, Literature/MaryPoppins, who might be {{God}}]]. Now, [[Literature/HarryPotter given that this school was only accessible by train, by going through a fake wall in King's Cross station...]]
23rd Feb '17 7:24:33 AM comicwriter
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** A ''Punisher'' issue from Nathan Edmonson's run had a scene where three of the actors from the ''[[Film/FantasticFour2015 Fantastic Four]]'' reboot (Miles Teller, Kate Mara, and Jamie Bell) were apparently killed in an explosion. Ironically, the most controversial member of the cast, Creator/MichaelBJordan, was spared (due to being late to the meeting the others were attending). They also mention that "Trang" is making the sequel, a play on the movie's director Josh Trank.

to:

** A ''Punisher'' issue from Nathan Edmonson's run had a scene where three of the actors from the ''[[Film/FantasticFour2015 Fantastic Four]]'' reboot (Miles Teller, Kate Mara, (Creator/MilesTeller, Creator/KateMara, and Jamie Bell) Creator/JamieBell) were apparently killed in an explosion. Ironically, the most controversial member of the cast, Creator/MichaelBJordan, was spared (due to being late to the meeting the others were attending). They also mention that "Trang" is making the sequel, a play on the movie's director Josh Trank.



* In the pages of Marvel Comic's ''Comicbook/IncredibleHulk'', Bruce Banner, who was walking around big and green and smart, was in a quandary. His friend was dying of AIDS and wanted a Hulk-blood transfusion in order to get Hulk-healing powers. Bruce, afraid of Hulk 2.0 smashing up crap (with good reason, since a gamma-contaminated transfusion from him had already been the origin of She-Hulk), declined. The same plot happened in Erik Larsen's Savage Dragon, but the Dragon said yes, saying, paraphrased, only an idiot would say no to the possibility. The friend who received Dragon's blood then exploded. So...um. [[InvertedTrope Yeah]].

to:

* ** In the pages of Marvel Comic's ''Comicbook/IncredibleHulk'', Bruce Banner, who was walking around big and green and smart, was in a quandary. His friend was dying of AIDS and wanted a Hulk-blood transfusion in order to get Hulk-healing powers. Bruce, afraid of Hulk 2.0 smashing up crap (with good reason, since a gamma-contaminated transfusion from him had already been the origin of She-Hulk), declined. The same plot happened in Erik Larsen's Savage Dragon, but the Dragon said yes, saying, paraphrased, only an idiot would say no to the possibility. The friend who received Dragon's blood then exploded. So...um. [[InvertedTrope Yeah]].
22nd Feb '17 10:38:22 AM comicwriter
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Buck Wild from ''Comicbook/{{Icon}}'' was both a TakeThat and an AffectionateParody of the early superheroes of the {{Blaxploitation}} years. Comicbook/BlackLightning, Comicbook/TheFalcon, Black Goliath, and Comicbook/{{Luke Cage|HeroForHire}} are all explicitly parodied, and Icon states that Buck's antics were often highly embarrassing. However, he also that despite being a [[CaptainEthnic caricature]], Buck is deserving of respect, since he paved the way for the less-offensive black superheroes of today.

to:

* Buck Wild from ''Comicbook/{{Icon}}'' was both a TakeThat and an AffectionateParody of the early superheroes of the {{Blaxploitation}} years. Comicbook/BlackLightning, Comicbook/TheFalcon, Black Goliath, and Comicbook/{{Luke Cage|HeroForHire}} are all explicitly parodied, and Icon states that Buck's antics were often highly embarrassing. However, he also says that despite being a [[CaptainEthnic caricature]], Buck is deserving of respect, since he paved the way for the less-offensive black superheroes of today.
22nd Feb '17 7:36:13 AM comicwriter
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* From issue #4 of the 2016 ''Comicbook/JosieAndThePussyCats'' [[Comicbook/ArchieComics2015 reboot]]:
-->'''Valerie''': Dammit, Melody! Crime-fighting isn't in our contract! [[Film/BatmanVSupermanDawnOfJustice None of our moms are named Martha!]]
9th Feb '17 5:18:12 PM Madrugada
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''Comicbook/NewAvengers'' #47, Comicbook/LukeCage stops a limo in order to allow an ambulance to get through. A rich guy strongly resembling UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump steps out and threatens to sue, only to make a terrified retreat after Luke screams "Get your ass back in the car!"



* The first villain in ''Comicbook/USAvengers'' is the Golden Skull, a wealth-obsessed megalomaniac. When asked how a horrible man like that could have so many ardent followers, Dani Cage says that the Skull is able to inspire loyalty by making lavish, grandiose promises to desperate people without any intention of actually fulfilling them. Many have interpreted this as a shot at UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump.
21st Jan '17 8:06:28 PM comicwriter
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''Comicbook/NewAvengers'' #47, Comicbook/LukeCage stops a limo in order to allow an ambulance to get through. A rich guy strongly resembling [[UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump steps out and threatens to sue]], only to make a terrified retreat after Luke screams "Get your ass back in the car!"

to:

* In ''Comicbook/NewAvengers'' #47, Comicbook/LukeCage stops a limo in order to allow an ambulance to get through. A rich guy strongly resembling [[UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump steps out and threatens to sue]], sue, only to make a terrified retreat after Luke screams "Get your ass back in the car!"
20th Jan '17 5:06:44 PM comicwriter
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* The first villain in ''Comicbook/USAvengers'' is the Golden Skull, a wealth-obsessed megalomaniac. When asked how a horrible man like that could have so many ardent followers, Dani Cage says that the Skull is able to inspire loyalty by making lavish, grandiose promises to desperate people without any intention of actually fulfilling them. Many have interpreted this as a shot at UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump.
20th Jan '17 2:55:31 PM HighCrate
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* During Roger Stern's run on ''Comicbook/TheAvengers'', a construction worker asked why heroes don't use {{phone booth}}s to change or shout "UpUpAndAway" anymore. Comicbook/SheHulk coyly responded by saying [[Franchise/{{Superman}} such things]] [[DeaderThanDisco went out of style in the 60's]].

to:

* During Roger Stern's run on ''Comicbook/TheAvengers'', a construction worker asked why heroes don't use {{phone booth}}s to change or shout "UpUpAndAway" anymore. Comicbook/SheHulk coyly responded by saying [[Franchise/{{Superman}} such things]] [[DeaderThanDisco went out of style in the 60's]].TheSixties.
This list shows the last 10 events of 428. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=TakeThat.ComicBooks