History Tabletopgame / DungeonsAndDragons

19th Feb '17 7:35:51 PM jormis29
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The original TabletopRPG, ''Dungeons & Dragons'' was first published in 1974 by TSR (Tactical Studies Rules). TSR founder Creator/GaryGygax based the system of the game on TSR's miniatures combat system, ''Chainmail''. The game revolves around the now-classic set-up of a GameMaster (known in official D&D terms as the Dungeon Master), who controls all the non-player characters, and the players, who each control a Player Character and deal with the challenges provided by the Dungeon Master.

to:

The original TabletopRPG, ''Dungeons & Dragons'' was first published in 1974 by TSR Creator/{{TSR}} (Tactical Studies Rules). TSR founder Creator/GaryGygax based the system of the game on TSR's miniatures combat system, ''Chainmail''. The game revolves around the now-classic set-up of a GameMaster (known in official D&D terms as the Dungeon Master), who controls all the non-player characters, and the players, who each control a Player Character and deal with the challenges provided by the Dungeon Master.



After TSR was bought by WizardsOfTheCoast (makers of ''MagicTheGathering'', and now a subsidiary of Hasbro), they published ''Dungeons & Dragons 3rd Edition'' using the TabletopGame/D20System. A major overhaul of the entire rules set, 3rd edition cleared off the crust that had accumulated around 2nd and unified a scattered assortment of rules and procedures into something more coherent. It was a huge hit and revitalized the game, leading to new players aplenty. Then came an incremental edition known as "v3.5", which was largely concerned with fixing a few very obvious {{Game Breaker}}s and {{Spoony Bard}}s in 3rd Edition.

to:

After TSR was bought by WizardsOfTheCoast Creator/WizardsOfTheCoast (makers of ''MagicTheGathering'', ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'', and now a subsidiary of Hasbro), they published ''Dungeons & Dragons 3rd Edition'' using the TabletopGame/D20System. A major overhaul of the entire rules set, 3rd edition cleared off the crust that had accumulated around 2nd and unified a scattered assortment of rules and procedures into something more coherent. It was a huge hit and revitalized the game, leading to new players aplenty. Then came an incremental edition known as "v3.5", which was largely concerned with fixing a few very obvious {{Game Breaker}}s and {{Spoony Bard}}s in 3rd Edition.



* ''Blackmoor'', a.k.a. ''The First Fantasy Campaign'': The '''very''' first campaign setting, originating from Dave Arneson's wargaming days, the result of a slow weekend in October 1970 consisting of '50s monster movies, "fantasy hero" novels, a slump during his most recent wargame session, and the thought of "I can do better than this". So he drew a six floor dungeon layout, then created a castle and town from a Sicilian castle model he had lying around. The new setting was a huge hit amongst his fellow ''Braunstein'' players and when he showed the game to Gygax in 1972, the rest, as they say, was history. Your typical Good-vs-Evil setting, rather than Law-vs-Chaos, with the various duchies vying for power while the mysterious Egg of Coot pulls strings from the shadows. While the "official" version was a released in 1977 as gazetteer by Judges Guild, alternate versions appeared in both Greyhawk (as an archbarony near the Land of Black Ice) and Mystara (as a kingdom from the world's distant past that [[AndManGrewProud rose to great heights]] [[CataclysmBackstory and quickly fell, changing the world in the process]]). The setting only had four adventure modules released for it during it's TSR days: ''Adventures in Blackmoor'', ''Temple of the Frog'', ''City of the Gods'', and ''The Duchy of Ten''. While officially discontinued during AD&D 2nd Edition, Arneson was able to keep the rights for the setting and eventually worked with Zeitgiest Games to release setting books for 3.5 and 4th Editions. Blackmoor proudly has the honor of being one of the longest continuously played fantasy role playing campaigns in existence, even spawning an epic play-by-post game called ''The Last Fantasy Campaign'', which ran from 2005 to 2015.

to:

* ''Blackmoor'', a.k.a. ''The First Fantasy Campaign'': The '''very''' first campaign setting, originating from Dave Arneson's wargaming days, the result of a slow weekend in October 1970 consisting of '50s monster movies, "fantasy hero" novels, a slump during his most recent wargame session, and the thought of "I can do better than this". So he drew a six floor dungeon layout, then created a castle and town from a Sicilian castle model he had lying around. The new setting was a huge hit amongst his fellow ''Braunstein'' players and when he showed the game to Gygax in 1972, the rest, as they say, was history. Your typical Good-vs-Evil setting, rather than Law-vs-Chaos, with the various duchies vying for power while the mysterious Egg of Coot pulls strings from the shadows. While the "official" version was a released in 1977 as gazetteer by Judges Guild, alternate versions appeared in both Greyhawk (as an archbarony near the Land of Black Ice) and Mystara (as a kingdom from the world's distant past that [[AndManGrewProud rose to great heights]] [[CataclysmBackstory and quickly fell, changing the world in the process]]). The setting only had four adventure modules released for it during it's TSR Creator/{{TSR}} days: ''Adventures in Blackmoor'', ''Temple of the Frog'', ''City of the Gods'', and ''The Duchy of Ten''. While officially discontinued during AD&D 2nd Edition, Arneson was able to keep the rights for the setting and eventually worked with Zeitgiest Games to release setting books for 3.5 and 4th Editions. Blackmoor proudly has the honor of being one of the longest continuously played fantasy role playing campaigns in existence, even spawning an epic play-by-post game called ''The Last Fantasy Campaign'', which ran from 2005 to 2015.



** The first version was the original home campaign, created after Gygax played a game of Blackmoor in 1972. Games in this version ran constantly from 1972 to 1979, slowed down from 1980 to 1985, and completely ceased on December 31, 1985, right after Gygax was ousted from TSR, with the setting itself being "destroyed" in 1988 in the last ''Gord the Rogue'' novel. Due to the number of games played each week, Gygax didn't have the time to make a world map completely from scratch and simply used a blank map of North America, filling it in as the campaign went on. Despite the name, the 1975 ''Supplement I: Greyhawk'' digest wasn't a Greyhawk setting book, but a rulebook which helped eliminate the game's dependence on ''Chainmail'', setting the groundwork for what would become Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. Not much is known about the home campaign version, apart from what is presented in the ''Gnome Cache'' novella from the first issues of ''Dragon'' magazine and the ''Gord the Rogue'' novel series. Despite washing his hands of the setting, fans wanted the original home campaign version of the Castle Greyhawk megadungeon to be published, so Gygax finally greenlit the project as ''Castle Zagyg'' in 2003. Although it's immensely troubled production ended with just two or three of the proposed seven books and a small number of adventure modules and supplements being released.[[note]]The Castle Grewhawk dungeon as of 1985 had around 50 floors, meaning Gygax and Robert Kuntz had to sift through years of notes and pick the 13 best parts for publication, while Gygax had to rewrite everything that was still copyright of [=WotC=]. Gygax's health decline in 2004 led to the already slow-moving project to grind to a near halt, while Kuntz had to withdraw due to working on other projects. A few months after Gary's death in 2008, his widow Gail pulled all the licensing from Troll Lord Games and transferred them to her own company, Gygax Games, but hasn't done anything with the project since.[[/note]]

to:

** The first version was the original home campaign, created after Gygax played a game of Blackmoor in 1972. Games in this version ran constantly from 1972 to 1979, slowed down from 1980 to 1985, and completely ceased on December 31, 1985, right after Gygax was ousted from TSR, Creator/{{TSR}}, with the setting itself being "destroyed" in 1988 in the last ''Gord the Rogue'' novel. Due to the number of games played each week, Gygax didn't have the time to make a world map completely from scratch and simply used a blank map of North America, filling it in as the campaign went on. Despite the name, the 1975 ''Supplement I: Greyhawk'' digest wasn't a Greyhawk setting book, but a rulebook which helped eliminate the game's dependence on ''Chainmail'', setting the groundwork for what would become Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. Not much is known about the home campaign version, apart from what is presented in the ''Gnome Cache'' novella from the first issues of ''Dragon'' magazine and the ''Gord the Rogue'' novel series. Despite washing his hands of the setting, fans wanted the original home campaign version of the Castle Greyhawk megadungeon to be published, so Gygax finally greenlit the project as ''Castle Zagyg'' in 2003. Although it's immensely troubled production ended with just two or three of the proposed seven books and a small number of adventure modules and supplements being released.[[note]]The Castle Grewhawk dungeon as of 1985 had around 50 floors, meaning Gygax and Robert Kuntz had to sift through years of notes and pick the 13 best parts for publication, while Gygax had to rewrite everything that was still copyright of [=WotC=]. Gygax's health decline in 2004 led to the already slow-moving project to grind to a near halt, while Kuntz had to withdraw due to working on other projects. A few months after Gary's death in 2008, his widow Gail pulled all the licensing from Troll Lord Games and transferred them to her own company, Gygax Games, but hasn't done anything with the project since.[[/note]]



* ''Kalibruhn'': The third campaign setting for OD&D, created by D&D alumni Robert J. Kuntz in 1973 as "Castle El Raja Key". This was the main setting where Gygax himself played as a player and the "birth home" setting of his legendary archmage, Mordenkainen. Originally planned to be the focus of a fifth supplement for OD&D, a number of problems led to Kuntz leaving TSR in 1977 and the supplement was never published. Due to never signing the rights away, Kuntz was able to work on the setting constantly since it's creation, with the history of the setting included in the [[http://www.tlbgames.com/collections/archive El Raja Key Archive]] DVD, alongside information on the original Greyhawk and Blackmoor campaigns. An oddity amongst the campaign settings listed here, ''Kalibruhn'' has gone almost completely unpublished, with the only info out there being what Kuntz has revealed over the years.

to:

* ''Kalibruhn'': The third campaign setting for OD&D, created by D&D alumni Robert J. Kuntz in 1973 as "Castle El Raja Key". This was the main setting where Gygax himself played as a player and the "birth home" setting of his legendary archmage, Mordenkainen. Originally planned to be the focus of a fifth supplement for OD&D, a number of problems led to Kuntz leaving TSR Creator/{{TSR}} in 1977 and the supplement was never published. Due to never signing the rights away, Kuntz was able to work on the setting constantly since it's creation, with the history of the setting included in the [[http://www.tlbgames.com/collections/archive El Raja Key Archive]] DVD, alongside information on the original Greyhawk and Blackmoor campaigns. An oddity amongst the campaign settings listed here, ''Kalibruhn'' has gone almost completely unpublished, with the only info out there being what Kuntz has revealed over the years.



* ''Pelinore'': A little-known setting created by TSR's UK branch for AD&D 1st Edition and published in ''Imagine'' magazine, which ran from 1983-1985. Set in what is presumably a FlatWorld, at the supposed center lies the rumored Worldheart, the nexus of harmony and peace, with the lands extending beyond it becoming more chaotic until it reaches The Rim, the edge of the world where chaos reigns. However, most gameplay was set within the City League, a metropolis within the Country of Cerwyn, with Cerwyn being set in a region of the world called The Domains. A fan-made "collected" version is available [[https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8l15nXmXT3BRUs3TUU0V2w3Ums/view here]] for download.

to:

* ''Pelinore'': A little-known setting created by TSR's Creator/{{TSR}}'s UK branch for AD&D 1st Edition and published in ''Imagine'' magazine, which ran from 1983-1985. Set in what is presumably a FlatWorld, at the supposed center lies the rumored Worldheart, the nexus of harmony and peace, with the lands extending beyond it becoming more chaotic until it reaches The Rim, the edge of the world where chaos reigns. However, most gameplay was set within the City League, a metropolis within the Country of Cerwyn, with Cerwyn being set in a region of the world called The Domains. A fan-made "collected" version is available [[https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8l15nXmXT3BRUs3TUU0V2w3Ums/view here]] for download.



* '''"Original" Dungeons & Dragons (OD&D) - 1974-1976''': Also known as "The Original Game". Co-written by Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson and published by TSR in 1974 as a boxed set consisting of three digest-sized books (the "little brown books" a.k.a. lbb): ''Men & Magic'', ''Monsters & Treasure'', ''The Underworld & Wilderness Adventures''. There were three original classes (Fighting-Man, Cleric and Magic User) and only three alignments (Law, Neutrality, Chaos). Humans could choose between all three classes and advance in their chosen class without limit, while non-human races were severely restricted. [[note]]Dwarves could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 6th level. Elves were multiclass by default and could freely switch between Fighting-Man and Magic-User on an adventure-by-adventure basis, with their level caps being 4th level for Fighting-Man and 8th level for Magic User. Halflings could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 4th level.[[/note]] Hit Points, damage, and initiative were all rolled using a d6. Spell levels were limited to 6th level spells for Magic Users and 5th level spells for Clerics. Received numerous supplements, both officially released and from magazine articles.

to:

* '''"Original" Dungeons & Dragons (OD&D) - 1974-1976''': Also known as "The Original Game". Co-written by Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson and published by TSR Creator/{{TSR}} in 1974 as a boxed set consisting of three digest-sized books (the "little brown books" a.k.a. lbb): ''Men & Magic'', ''Monsters & Treasure'', ''The Underworld & Wilderness Adventures''. There were three original classes (Fighting-Man, Cleric and Magic User) and only three alignments (Law, Neutrality, Chaos). Humans could choose between all three classes and advance in their chosen class without limit, while non-human races were severely restricted. [[note]]Dwarves could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 6th level. Elves were multiclass by default and could freely switch between Fighting-Man and Magic-User on an adventure-by-adventure basis, with their level caps being 4th level for Fighting-Man and 8th level for Magic User. Halflings could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 4th level.[[/note]] Hit Points, damage, and initiative were all rolled using a d6. Spell levels were limited to 6th level spells for Magic Users and 5th level spells for Clerics. Received numerous supplements, both officially released and from magazine articles.
22nd Jan '17 9:35:46 PM MisterDT
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** ''VideoGame/DungeonsAndDragonsChroniclesOfMystara''
22nd Jan '17 9:22:57 PM MisterDT
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** ''TabletopGame/KeepOnTheBorderlands''


Added DiffLines:

** ''TabletopGame/KeepOnTheBorderlands''
21st Jan '17 11:51:11 PM Orbiting
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* CrystalWeapon: Weapons can be forged from "deep crystal" that's as hard as steel and can channel the user's PsychicPowers to deal extra damage.
19th Jan '17 4:42:11 PM rmctagg09
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* LimitedUseMagicalDevice:
** D&D is the TropeCodifier; its scrolls allow spellcasters to cast the contained spell once without using a spell slot, after which the writing on the scroll is erased and the scroll becomes magically inert. Unlike many later examples, the caster must still be able to cast spells of the proper type ([[MutuallyExclusiveMagic arcane or divine]]); a MagicallyIneptFighter can't use a scroll to cast fireballs[[note]]Some editions have the Use Magic Device skill, which anyone can use, that can allow faking spellcasting ability long enough to use a scroll, wand, etc.[[/note]]. Also, many scrolls contain more than one spell (even the weakest can hold up to three).
** In early editions of AD&D magic-users/wizards can only cast spells that they have prepared beforehand by expending a spell slot, not by reading them directly from their spellbooks. However, in the AD&D 1st Edition ''Unearthed Arcana'' supplement Gary Gygax changed the official rules to allow magic-users to read spells from their spellbooks as if they were scrolls in an emergency situation. Doing so destroys the spell in the spellbook (essentially "unlearning" the spell), has a 1% chance per spell level of destroying the two adjacent spells in the spellbook, and a 1% chance of destroying the whole spellbook.
** Many magical items such as wands or rings have a limited number of "charges", some of which are consumed every time the spell within the item is cast. Once the charges are consumed the item becomes useless.
17th Jan '17 5:00:23 AM UltraWanker
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[quoteright:354:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/a8d227364f9098b7d31ce050cfaa2c0f.jpg]]

to:

[[quoteright:354:http://static.[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/a8d227364f9098b7d31ce050cfaa2c0f.jpg]]
org/pmwiki/pub/images/dnd.png]]
14th Jan '17 9:10:16 PM WaterBlap
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* LifeDeathJuxtaposition: In the ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' cosmology and those derived from it (e.g. ''TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}}''), the positive energy plane is the origin of all life and provides energy for magical healing and resurrection while the negative energy plane is the origin of TheUndead and its energy weakens or outright destroys all living matter.
4th Jan '17 4:20:42 AM WildCardCourier
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The core rule books contain no "official" background setting material. Dungeon Masters are invited to either make up their own setting or use one of a number of published campaign settings. Of course, stuff from some settings leaked in anyway -- after all, one cannot roleplay in a vacuum. Advanced D&D has elements of Gygax's own TabletopGame/{{Greyhawk}} as the implied setting (the wizards whose names attached to spells of the core list are classical TabletopGame/{{Greyhawk}} characters), 3rd Edition even included the top of TabletopGame/{{Greyhawk}}'s pantheon and 4th Edition books' assumptions unofficially form a vaguely defined setting called the "TabletopGame/NentirVale". 5th Edition somewhat bucks this trend, using a clear "default setting", the ''TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms''.

to:

The core rule books contain no "official" background setting material. Dungeon Masters are invited to either make up their own setting or use one of a number of published campaign settings. Of course, stuff from some settings leaked in anyway -- after all, one cannot roleplay in a vacuum. Advanced D&D has elements of Gygax's own TabletopGame/{{Greyhawk}} as the implied setting (the wizards whose names attached to spells of the core list are classical TabletopGame/{{Greyhawk}} characters), 3rd Edition even included the top of TabletopGame/{{Greyhawk}}'s pantheon and 4th Edition books' assumptions unofficially form a vaguely defined setting called the "TabletopGame/NentirVale". 5th Edition somewhat bucks this trend, through using a clear "default setting", the ''TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms''.
''TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms'' as the main source of fluff material.



** The first version was the original home campaign, created after Gygax played a game of Blackmoor in 1972. Games in this version ran constantly from 1972 to 1979, slowed down from 1980 to 1985, and completely ceased on December 31, 1985, right after Gygax was ousted from TSR, with the setting itself being "destroyed" in 1988 in the last ''Gord the Rogue'' novel. Due to the number of games played each week, Gygax didn't have the time to make a world map completely from scratch and simply used a blank map of North America, filling it in as the campaign went on. Despite the name, the 1975 ''Supplement I: Greyhawk'' digest wasn't a Greyhawk setting book, but a rulebook which helped eliminate the game's dependence on ''Chainmail'', setting the groundwork for what would become Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. Not much is known about the home campaign version, apart from what is presented in the ''Gnome Cache'' novella from the first issues of ''Dragon'' magazine and the ''Gord the Rogue'' novel series. Despite washing his hands of the setting and years of talks about releasing the original Castle Greyhawk megadungeon, the project was finally greenlit as ''Castle Zagyg'' in 2003, although it's immensely troubled production ended with just two or three of the proposed seven books and a small number of adventure modules and supplements being released.[[note]]The Castle Grewhawk dungeon as of 1985 had around 50 floors, meaning Gygax and Robert Kuntz had to sift through years of notes and pick the 13 best parts for publication, while Gygax had to rewrite everything that was still copyright of [=WotC=]. Gygax's health decline in 2004 led to the already slow-moving project to grind to a near halt, while Kuntz had to withdraw due to working on other projects. Three months after Gary's death in 2008, his widow Gail pulled all the licensing from Troll Lord Games and transferred them to her own company, Gygax Games, but hasn't done anything with the project since.[[/note]]

to:

** The first version was the original home campaign, created after Gygax played a game of Blackmoor in 1972. Games in this version ran constantly from 1972 to 1979, slowed down from 1980 to 1985, and completely ceased on December 31, 1985, right after Gygax was ousted from TSR, with the setting itself being "destroyed" in 1988 in the last ''Gord the Rogue'' novel. Due to the number of games played each week, Gygax didn't have the time to make a world map completely from scratch and simply used a blank map of North America, filling it in as the campaign went on. Despite the name, the 1975 ''Supplement I: Greyhawk'' digest wasn't a Greyhawk setting book, but a rulebook which helped eliminate the game's dependence on ''Chainmail'', setting the groundwork for what would become Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. Not much is known about the home campaign version, apart from what is presented in the ''Gnome Cache'' novella from the first issues of ''Dragon'' magazine and the ''Gord the Rogue'' novel series. Despite washing his hands of the setting and years of talks about releasing setting, fans wanted the original home campaign version of the Castle Greyhawk megadungeon, the project was megadungeon to be published, so Gygax finally greenlit the project as ''Castle Zagyg'' in 2003, although 2003. Although it's immensely troubled production ended with just two or three of the proposed seven books and a small number of adventure modules and supplements being released.[[note]]The Castle Grewhawk dungeon as of 1985 had around 50 floors, meaning Gygax and Robert Kuntz had to sift through years of notes and pick the 13 best parts for publication, while Gygax had to rewrite everything that was still copyright of [=WotC=]. Gygax's health decline in 2004 led to the already slow-moving project to grind to a near halt, while Kuntz had to withdraw due to working on other projects. Three A few months after Gary's death in 2008, his widow Gail pulled all the licensing from Troll Lord Games and transferred them to her own company, Gygax Games, but hasn't done anything with the project since.[[/note]]



* ''Kalibruhn'': The third campaign setting for OD&D, created by D&D alumni Robert J. Kuntz in 1973 as "Castle El Raja Key". This was the main setting where Gygax himself played as a player and the "birthhome" setting of his legendary archmage, Mordenkainen. Originally planned to be the focus of a fifth supplement for OD&D, a number of problems led to Kuntz leaving TSR in 1977 and the supplement was never published. Due to never signing the rights away, Kuntz was able to work on the setting constantly since it's creation, with the history of the setting included in the [[http://www.tlbgames.com/collections/archive El Raja Key Archive]] DVD, alongside information on the original Greyhawk and Blackmoor campaigns. An oddity amongst the campaign settings listed here, ''Kalibruhn'' has gone almost completely unpublished, with the only info out there being what Kuntz has revealed over the years, either trough adventure modules or via the El Raja Key Archive.

to:

* ''Kalibruhn'': The third campaign setting for OD&D, created by D&D alumni Robert J. Kuntz in 1973 as "Castle El Raja Key". This was the main setting where Gygax himself played as a player and the "birthhome" "birth home" setting of his legendary archmage, Mordenkainen. Originally planned to be the focus of a fifth supplement for OD&D, a number of problems led to Kuntz leaving TSR in 1977 and the supplement was never published. Due to never signing the rights away, Kuntz was able to work on the setting constantly since it's creation, with the history of the setting included in the [[http://www.tlbgames.com/collections/archive El Raja Key Archive]] DVD, alongside information on the original Greyhawk and Blackmoor campaigns. An oddity amongst the campaign settings listed here, ''Kalibruhn'' has gone almost completely unpublished, with the only info out there being what Kuntz has revealed over the years, either trough adventure modules or via the El Raja Key Archive.years.



* ''Wilderlands of High Fantasy'': The first officially licensed and published third-party campaign setting for OD&D, created by Judges Guild after the success of their ''City State of the Invincible Overlord'' city setting and released in a collection of 4 32-page booklets. In 2002, Judges Guild ended up working together with Necromancer Games to release a boxed version for 3.5 Edition. Rather than go for the "megadungeon" style of early Blackmoor and Greyhawk, the Wilderlands went the sandbox route: 18 maps that altogether cover an area about 780 miles wide by 1080 miles long, roughly the size of the Mediterranean. Each individual map contained a number of pre-established points-of-interest, with the accompanying books containing entry upon entry for every bastion of civilization, set of ruins, and monster lair within the region. The Wilderlands sticks to the origins of D&D, a time when the lines between sci-fi and fantasy were very murky and SchizoTech was everywhere. Meaning you could have people who's greatest technological achievement is the wheel potentially meet people who's greatest technological achievement is calculus, ''then'' have them potentially happen upon a crashed alien spaceship from an age long before recorded history.

to:

* ''Wilderlands of High Fantasy'': The first officially licensed and published third-party campaign setting for OD&D, created by Judges Guild after the success of their ''City State of the Invincible Overlord'' city setting and released in a collection of 4 32-page booklets. In 2002, Judges Guild ended up working together with Necromancer Games to release a boxed version for 3.5 Edition. Rather than go for the "megadungeon" style of early Blackmoor and Greyhawk, the Wilderlands went the sandbox route: 18 maps that altogether cover an area about 780 miles wide by 1080 miles long, roughly the size of the Mediterranean. Each individual map contained contains a number of pre-established points-of-interest, with the accompanying books containing entry upon entry for every bastion of civilization, set of ruins, and monster lair within the each region. The Wilderlands sticks to the origins of D&D, a time when the lines between sci-fi and fantasy were very murky and SchizoTech was everywhere. Meaning you could have people who's greatest technological achievement is who just invented the wheel potentially meet people who's greatest technological achievement is who use calculus, ''then'' have them potentially happen upon a crashed alien spaceship from an age long before recorded history.



* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Dark+Dungeons Dark Dungeons]]''': Named after the infamous [[ComicBook/ChickTracts Jack Chick]] tract, this is a very faithful retroclone of the BECMI / Rules Cyclopedia version of basic D&D, that covers all five boxed sets (including the Immortals rules, although from RC's Wrath of the Immortals supplement rather than the BECMI box) in one book, merging in the optional rules from the later sets directly into the core rules and including a ''TabletopGame/{{Spelljammer}}'' inspired cosmology.

to:

* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Dark+Dungeons Dark Dungeons]]''': Named after the infamous [[ComicBook/ChickTracts Jack Chick]] tract, this is a very faithful retroclone of the BECMI / Rules Cyclopedia version of basic Basic D&D, that covers all five boxed sets (including the Immortals rules, although from RC's Wrath of the Immortals supplement rather than the BECMI box) in one book, merging in the optional rules from the later sets directly into the core rules and including a ''TabletopGame/{{Spelljammer}}'' inspired cosmology.



* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Swords+%26+Wizardry Swords and Wizardry]]''': Created by Mythmere Games. One of the more well-known retroclones, this game goes all the way back to the original 1974 edition of D&D. Notable for having only one saving throw as opposed to the five used in regular old-school D&D, although it includes the option to use the original five. You get to choose whether you want to play with original descending AC or ascending AC. Has a number of variants based on the system, such as ''[=WhiteHack=]'' and ''Crypts & Things''. There are four versions of this game, all of which are free to download:

to:

* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Swords+%26+Wizardry Swords and Wizardry]]''': Created by Mythmere Games. One of the more well-known retroclones, this game goes all the way back to the original 1974 edition of D&D. Notable for having only one saving throw as opposed to the five used in regular old-school D&D, throw, although it includes the option to use the original five. You get to choose whether you want to play with original descending AC or ascending AC. Has a number of variants based on the system, such as ''[=WhiteHack=]'' and ''Crypts & Things''. There are four versions of this game, all of which are free to download:



* '''[=WhiteHack=]''': A variant of the ''Swords & Wizardry'' [=WhiteBox=] system. Classes are defined down to archetypes: [[FighterMageThief the Strong, the Deft, and the Wise]]. The "Deft" are rangers, monks, thieves, etc., and can "attune" to something so that they use them for extraordinary feats. The "Strong" are soldiers, pit fighters, paladins, etc., and can choose between 8 special combat maneuvers and can "absorb" a single power from a defeated enemy, so long as they're the one to deal the finishing blow. The "Wise" are mages, healers, alchemists, scientists, etc., and can perform "Miracles" at the expense of HP and can't be healed through magical means, but heal naturally at twice the normal rate. The Miracles that the Wise use don't have to outright be actual magic, it could be an alchemical or scientific experiment. Despite the "class", all characters can chose from joining at least two "groups" that they are a member from lists of species, vocations, and affiliations, leading to hybrid skill sets. Has 4 AC tables: two versions of Ascending AC (one at base 10 and one at base 0) and two versions of Descending AC (one at base 9 and the other at base 10). The level cap is 10, and it's recommended that the players retire their characters at that point and make new ones, although there are a couple optional rules for playing beyond 10th level.

to:

* '''[=WhiteHack=]''': A variant of the ''Swords & Wizardry'' [=WhiteBox=] system. Classes are defined down to archetypes: [[FighterMageThief the Strong, the Deft, and the Wise]]. The "Deft" are rangers, monks, thieves, etc., and can "attune" to something so that they use them for extraordinary feats. The "Strong" are soldiers, pit fighters, paladins, etc., and can choose between 8 special combat maneuvers and can "absorb" a single power from a defeated enemy, so long as they're the one to deal the finishing blow. The "Wise" are mages, healers, alchemists, scientists, etc., and can perform "Miracles" at the expense of HP and can't be healed through magical means, but heal naturally at twice the normal rate. The Miracles that the Wise use don't have to outright be actual magic, it they could be an alchemical or scientific experiment.experiments. Despite the "class", all characters can chose from joining at least two "groups" that they are a member from lists of species, vocations, and affiliations, leading to hybrid skill sets. Has 4 AC tables: two versions of Ascending AC (one at base 10 and one at base 0) and two versions of Descending AC (one at base 9 and the other at base 10). The level cap is 10, and it's recommended that the players retire their characters at that point and make new ones, although there are a couple optional rules for playing beyond 10th level.
31st Dec '16 12:29:42 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The spell Arcane Mark can functionally be an invisible ink. The campaign setting {{Eberron}} notices this, and [[{{Deconstruction}} uses it on documents to increase the difficulty of forging]].

to:

** The spell Arcane Mark can functionally be an invisible ink. The campaign setting {{Eberron}} TabletopGame/{{Eberron}} notices this, and [[{{Deconstruction}} uses it on documents to increase the difficulty of forging]].
30th Dec '16 3:28:13 AM DarkSoldier
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** During the Third Edition era, the d20 System Trademark License program allowed publishers who followed a legal agreement to create material that was openly compatible with the game.
This list shows the last 10 events of 808. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Tabletopgame.DungeonsAndDragons