History Tabletopgame / DungeonsAndDragons

7th Feb '18 4:16:56 AM WildCardCourier
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* ''Ghostwalk'': The first campaign setting created for 3rd Edition, and ironically the one which almost nobody remembers. It is a setting where the underworld is a real, physical place, and the ghosts of the dead walk the earth on the way to their final journey. The main villain race is the Yuan-Ti - an ancient race of snake-people bent on awakening their patron deity so it can destroy the world and remake it in their image, with the Yuan-Ti as the ruling race. It mostly focuses on the city of Manifest, which resides near the entrance to the underworld.

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* ''Ghostwalk'': The first campaign setting created for 3rd Edition, and ironically the one which almost nobody remembers. It is a setting where the underworld is a real, physical place, and the ghosts of the dead walk the earth on the way to their final journey. The main villain race is the Yuan-Ti - an ancient race Yuan-Ti, one of snake-people bent on awakening their patron deity so it can destroy the world and remake it in their image, with many nonhuman races who's souls immediately go to the Yuan-Ti underworld, rather than stay as the ruling race.ghosts. It mostly focuses on the city of Manifest, which resides near the entrance to the underworld.



** The first version was the original home campaign, dubbed the "Original Lake Geneva Campaign" by Robert Kuntz, created after Gygax played a game of Blackmoor in 1972. Games in this version ran constantly from 1972 to 1979, slowed down from 1980 to 1985, and completely ceased on December 31, 1985, right after Gygax was ousted from Creator/{{TSR}}, with the setting itself being "destroyed" in 1988 in the last ''Gord the Rogue'' novel. Due to the number of games played each week, Gygax didn't have the time to make a world map completely from scratch and simply used a blank map of North America, filling it in as the campaign went on. Despite the name, the 1975 ''Supplement I: Greyhawk'' digest wasn't a Greyhawk setting book, but a rulebook which helped eliminate the game's dependence on ''Chainmail'', setting the groundwork for what would become Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. Not much is known about the home campaign version, apart from what is presented in the ''Gnome Cache'' novella from the earliest issues of ''Dragon'' magazine and the ''Gord the Rogue'' novel series. Despite washing his hands of the setting, fans wanted the original home campaign version of the Castle Greyhawk megadungeon to be published, so Gygax finally greenlit the project as ''Castle Zagyg'' in 2003. Although its immensely troubled production ended with just two of the proposed seven books and a small number of adventure modules and supplements being released. [[note]]The Castle Grewhawk dungeon as of 1985 had around 50 floors, meaning Gygax and Robert Kuntz had to sift through years of notes and pick the 13 best parts for publication, while Gygax had to rewrite everything that was still copyright of [=WotC=]. Gygax's health decline in 2004 led to the already slow-moving project to grind to a near halt, while Kuntz had to withdraw due to working on other projects. A few months after Gary's death in 2008, his widow Gail pulled all the licensing from Troll Lord Games and transferred them to her own company, Gygax Games, but hasn't done anything with the project since.[[/note]]
** The second version was released as the main setting for 1st Edition Advanced D&D. Surprised by the sheer popularity of the setting, Gygax spent a number of years recreating and fleshing out the setting, with a 32-page folio released in 1980 and the full boxed set released in 1983. Mainly covers the Flanaess region of the continent of Oerik, but was eventually supposed to cover the rest of Oerik and eventually the whole of Oerth. Discontinued after 3.x Edition, although it did receive a GrandFinale of sorts with the ''Living Greyhawk'' campaign that spanned the entire 3.x Edition production time (2000-2008). Semi-revived in 5th Edition, albeit as reference material.
* ''Kalibruhn'': Technically the third campaign setting for OD&D, created by D&D and Creator/{{TSR}} alumnus Robert J. Kuntz in 1973 as "Castle El Raja Key". This was the main setting where Gygax himself played as a player and the "birth home" setting of his legendary archmage, Mordenkainen. Originally planned to be the focus of a fifth supplement for OD&D, a number of problems led to Kuntz leaving Creator/{{TSR}} in 1977 and the supplement was never published. Due to never signing the IP rights away, Kuntz was able to keep and work on both versions of the setting constantly since its creation, with the history of the setting included in the [[http://www.tlbgames.com/collections/archive El Raja Key Archive]] DVD, alongside information on the original Greyhawk and Blackmoor campaigns. An oddity amongst the campaign settings listed here, ''Kalibruhn'' has gone almost completely unpublished, with the only info out there being what Kuntz has revealed over the years.

to:

** The first version was the original home campaign, dubbed the "Original Lake Geneva Campaign" by Robert Kuntz, created after Gygax played a game of Blackmoor in 1972. Games in this version ran constantly from 1972 to 1979, slowed down from 1980 to 1985, and completely ceased on December 31, 1985, right after Gygax was ousted from Creator/{{TSR}}, with the setting itself being "destroyed" in 1988 in the last ''Gord the Rogue'' novel. Due to the number of games played each week, Gygax didn't have the time to make a world map completely from scratch and simply used a blank map of North America, filling it in as the campaign went on. Despite the name, the 1975 ''Supplement I: Greyhawk'' digest wasn't a Greyhawk setting book, but a rulebook which helped eliminate the game's dependence on ''Chainmail'', setting the groundwork for what would become Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. Not much is known about the home campaign version, apart from what is presented in the ''Gnome Cache'' novella from the earliest issues of ''Dragon'' magazine and the ''Gord the Rogue'' novel series. Despite washing his hands of the setting, fans wanted the original home campaign version of the Castle Greyhawk megadungeon to be published, so Gygax finally greenlit the project as ''Castle Zagyg'' in 2003. Although its immensely troubled production ended with just two of the proposed seven books and a small number of adventure modules and supplements being released. [[note]]The Castle Grewhawk dungeon as of 1985 had around 50 floors, meaning Gygax and Robert Kuntz had to sift through years of notes and pick the 13 best parts for publication, while Gygax had to rewrite everything that was still copyright of [=WotC=]. Gygax's health decline in 2004 led to the already slow-moving project to grind to a near halt, while Kuntz had to withdraw due to working on other projects. A few months Not long after Gary's death in 2008, his widow Gail pulled all the licensing from Troll Lord Games and transferred them to her own company, Gygax Games, but hasn't done anything with the project since.[[/note]]
** The second version was released as the main setting for 1st Edition Advanced D&D. Surprised by the sheer popularity of the setting, Gygax spent a number of years recreating and fleshing out the setting, setting to make it different from the OLGC version, with a 32-page folio released in 1980 and the full boxed set released in 1983. Mainly covers the Flanaess region of the continent of Oerik, but was eventually supposed to cover the rest of Oerik and eventually the whole of Oerth. Discontinued after 3.x Edition, although it did receive a GrandFinale of sorts with the ''Living Greyhawk'' campaign that spanned the entire 3.x Edition production time (2000-2008). Semi-revived in 5th Edition, albeit Edition as reference material.
material, although the possibility for it to be revived is still there.
* ''Kalibruhn'': Technically the third campaign setting for OD&D, created by D&D and Creator/{{TSR}} alumnus Robert J. Kuntz in 1973 as the dungeon "Castle El Raja Key". This was the main setting where Gygax himself played as a player and the "birth home" setting of his legendary archmage, Mordenkainen. Originally planned to be the focus of a fifth supplement for OD&D, a number of problems led to Kuntz leaving Creator/{{TSR}} in 1977 and the supplement was never published. Due to never signing the IP rights away, Kuntz was able to keep and work on both versions of the setting constantly since its creation, with the history of the setting included in the [[http://www.tlbgames.com/collections/archive El Raja Key Archive]] DVD, alongside information on the original Greyhawk and Blackmoor campaigns. An oddity amongst the campaign settings listed here, ''Kalibruhn'' has gone almost completely unpublished, with the only info out there being what Kuntz has revealed over the years.



** '''Supplement I: Greyhawk - 1975''': Introduced the Thief class, the Paladin as a Fighting-Man subclass, Half-Elves as a playable race, and more monsters. Amended the level and class restrictions for Dwarves, Elves, and Halflings to account for the Thief class. [[note]]Dwarves, Elves, and Halflings could advance as a Thief with no level cap. Dwarves could advance to either 7th or 8th level Fighting-Man with an exceptional Strength score; they could also multiclass as either a Fighting-Man/Thief or a Fighting-Man/Cleric, although the Fighting-Man/Cleric option was NPC-only and their Cleric level capped at 7th level. Elves could advance up to 5th or 6th level Fighting-Man with an exceptional Strength score and 9th Magic-User with an exceptional Intelligence score; they could also multiclass as either a Fighting-Man/Magic-User/Cleric or a Fighting-Man/Magic-User/Thief, although FM/MU/Cleric had their Magic-User and Cleric classes capped at 6th level. Halflings could choose to be either a Fighting-Man or a Thief and had the best Thief skill bonuses of the non-human races. Half-Elves multiclass as a Fighting-Man/Magic-User by default, with both classes capped at 6th level, although exceptional Strength/Intelligence scores would raise them up to 7th or 8th level; they could also multiclass as a FM/MU/Cleric with a high enough Wisdom score, but their Cleric level capped at 4th level.[[/note]] Magic Users gained 7th-9th level spells, but only if their Intelligence score was high enough, while Clerics gained 6th and 7th level spells. Contained both new and additional rules in order to distance itself from ''Chainmail''.

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** '''Supplement I: Greyhawk - 1975''': Introduced the Thief class, the Paladin as a Fighting-Man subclass, Half-Elves as a playable race, and more monsters. Amended Changed the level and class restrictions for Dwarves, Elves, and Halflings to account for the Thief class. [[note]]Dwarves, Elves, and Halflings could advance as a Thief with no level cap. Dwarves could advance to either 7th or 8th level Fighting-Man with an exceptional Strength score; they could also multiclass as either a Fighting-Man/Thief or a Fighting-Man/Cleric, although the Fighting-Man/Cleric option was NPC-only and their Cleric level capped at 7th level. Elves could advance up to 5th or 6th level Fighting-Man with an exceptional Strength score and 9th Magic-User with an exceptional Intelligence score; they could also multiclass as either a Fighting-Man/Magic-User/Cleric or a Fighting-Man/Magic-User/Thief, although FM/MU/Cleric had their Magic-User and Cleric classes capped at 6th level. Halflings could choose to be either a Fighting-Man or a Thief and had the best Thief skill bonuses of the non-human races. Half-Elves multiclass as a Fighting-Man/Magic-User by default, with both classes capped at 6th level, although exceptional Strength/Intelligence scores would raise them up to 7th or 8th level; they could also multiclass as a FM/MU/Cleric with a high enough Wisdom score, but their Cleric level capped at 4th level.[[/note]] Magic Users gained 7th-9th level spells, but only if their Intelligence score was high enough, while Clerics gained 6th and 7th level spells. Contained both new and additional rules in order to distance itself from ''Chainmail''.



* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Swords+%26+Wizardry Swords and Wizardry]]''': Created by Mythmere Games. One of the more well-known retroclones, this game goes all the way back to the original 1974 edition of D&D. Notable for having only one saving throw instead of five, although it includes the option to use the original system. You get to choose whether you want to play with original descending AC or ascending AC. Has a number of variants based on the system, such as ''[=WhiteHack=]'', ''White Star'', and ''Crypts & Things''. There are four versions of this game, all of which are free to download:
** The [[http://www.lulu.com/us/en/shop/matthew-finch/swords-wizardry-whitebox-rulebook-pdf/ebook/product-14956259.html White Box Rules]], which closely emulates the rules of the core box of OD&D.

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* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Swords+%26+Wizardry Swords and Wizardry]]''': Created by Mythmere Games. One of the more well-known retroclones, this game goes all the way back to the original 1974 edition of D&D. Notable for having only one condensing the original five saving throw instead of five, throws into a single one, although it includes the option to use the original system. You get to choose whether you want to play with original descending AC or ascending AC. Has a number of variants based on the system, such as ''[=WhiteHack=]'', ''White Star'', and ''Crypts & Things''. There are four versions of this game, all of which are free to download:
** The [[http://www.lulu.com/us/en/shop/matthew-finch/swords-wizardry-whitebox-rulebook-pdf/ebook/product-14956259.html White Box Rules]], which closely emulates the rules of the core box three [=LBBs=] of OD&D.



** The [[https://www.froggodgames.com/swords-wizardry-complete-rulebook Complete Rulebook]], which incorporates Supplements 1-3 and content from ''Strategic Review'', resulting in something of a middle-road between Basic D&D and 1e AD&D that is quite easily compatible with much of the contents for both.

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** The [[https://www.froggodgames.com/swords-wizardry-complete-rulebook Complete Rulebook]], which incorporates Supplements 1-3 and content from ''Strategic Review'', resulting in something of a middle-road middle road between Basic D&D and 1e AD&D that is quite easily compatible with much of the contents for both.



* '''Crypts & Things''': Created by D101 Games. A variant of the ''Swords & Wizardry'' Core system that more mirrors the classic SwordAndSorcery stories of Fritz Leiber, Robert E. Howard, and Clark Ashton Smith, instead of the more traditional Tolkienesque HighFantasy flare. Humans are the only playable race. There are only four classes: barbarian, fighter, thief, and sorcerer. Clerics don't exist, meaning that there's no ability to turn undead, with the Sorcerer using a combination of Cleric and Wizard spells. Magic is divided into White, Gray, and Black Magic. WhiteMagic consists of healing and protection magic and can be cast without penalty, but draws the attention of the forces of darkness; Gray Magic consists of illusions and mind magics, and costs the caster some HP; BlackMagic is offensive magic such as 'fireball' and often requires a sacrifice of some sort and a loss of sanity. Hit Points gauge the PC's mental faculties rather than their physical health; once their HP is gone, they take Constitution damage until death. As such, healing magic and potions only heal Constitution, not HP. Wisdom doubles as a character's sanity score, so once their Wisdom hits 0, the character is rendered insane. Magic items carry a hefty penalty more often than not and are very rare. Characters get a Life Path, which dictates their background and grants them specific bonuses.
** '''Crypts & Things Remastered''': A revised version of the original ''Crypts & Things''. Adds five new "exotic" classes: Beast Hybrid, Disciple, Elementalist, Lizard Man, and Serpent Noble. The Elementalist has their own magic list, separate from the Sorcerer class, and can only use their magic while they're in good standing with the Elemental Order. Serpent Nobles can use Black Magic naturally and without becoming corrupt, must learn Gray Magic from other people, and can't use White Magic at all. Disciples are a cross between Monks and Paladins, walking one of three Monastic Paths which gives them special abilities.

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* '''Crypts & Things''': Created by D101 Games. A variant of the ''Swords & Wizardry'' Core system that more mirrors the classic SwordAndSorcery stories of Fritz Leiber, Robert E. Howard, and Clark Ashton Smith, instead of the more traditional Tolkienesque HighFantasy flare. Humans are the only playable race. race and alignment is done away with. There are only four classes: barbarian, fighter, thief, Barbarian, Fighter, Thief, and sorcerer. Magician. Clerics don't exist, meaning that there's no ability to turn undead, with the Sorcerer Magician using a combination of Cleric and Wizard spells. Magic spells, which is then divided into White, Gray, and Black Magic. WhiteMagic consists of healing and protection magic and can be cast without penalty, but draws the attention of the forces of darkness; Gray Magic consists of illusions and mind magics, and costs the caster some HP; BlackMagic is offensive magic such as 'fireball' and often requires a sacrifice of some sort and a loss of sanity. Hit Points gauge the PC's mental faculties rather than their physical health; once their HP is gone, they take Constitution damage until death. As such, healing magic and potions only heal Constitution, not HP. Wisdom doubles as a character's sanity score, so once their Wisdom hits 0, the character is rendered insane. Magic items carry a hefty penalty more often than not and are very rare. Characters get a three Life Path, Events, which dictates their background and grants them specific bonuses.
** '''Crypts & Things Remastered''': A revised version of the original ''Crypts & Things''. Adds five new "exotic" classes: Beast Hybrid, Disciple, Elementalist, Lizard Man, and Serpent Noble. Beast Hybrids are something of a werebeast, shifting between human and beast mode. The Elementalist has their own magic list, separate from the Sorcerer class, and can only use their magic while they're in good standing with the Elemental Order.Order, but otherwise have no drawbacks from casting it. Serpent Nobles can use Black Magic naturally and without becoming corrupt, must learn Gray Magic from other people, and can't use White Magic at all. Disciples are a cross between Monks and Paladins, walking one of three Monastic Paths which gives them special abilities. Life Events where changed: the Barbarian, Fighter, Sorcerer, Thief, Disciple, and Elementalist get two Life Events (homeland and how they learned their trade), while the Beast Hybrid, Serpent Noble, and Lizard Man get only one.
11th Jan '18 1:02:21 PM JackDavid
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The original TabletopRPG, ''Dungeons & Dragons'' was first published in 1974 by Creator/{{TSR}} (Tactical Studies Rules). TSR founder Creator/GaryGygax based the system of the game on TSR's miniatures combat system, ''Chainmail''. The game revolves around the now-classic set-up of a GameMaster (known in official D&D terms as the Dungeon Master), who controls all the non-player characters, and the players, who each control a Player Character and deal with the challenges provided by the Dungeon Master.

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The original TabletopRPG, TabletopRPG (or at least the original modern TabletopRPG), ''Dungeons & Dragons'' was first published in 1974 by Creator/{{TSR}} (Tactical Studies Rules). TSR founder Creator/GaryGygax based the system of the game on TSR's miniatures combat system, ''Chainmail''. The game revolves around the now-classic set-up of a GameMaster (known in official D&D terms as the Dungeon Master), who controls all the non-player characters, and the players, who each control a Player Character and deal with the challenges provided by the Dungeon Master.
7th Jan '18 7:50:28 AM WildCardCourier
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The core rule books contain no "official" background setting material. Dungeon Masters are invited to either make up their own setting or use one of a number of published campaign settings. Of course, stuff from some settings leaked in anyway -- after all, one cannot roleplay in a vacuum. BECMI era D&D was wholesale set in ''TabletopGame/{{Mystara}}''. Advanced D&D has elements of Gygax's own ''TabletopGame/{{Greyhawk}}'' as the implied setting (the wizards whose names attached to spells of the core list are classical TabletopGame/{{Greyhawk}} characters), 3rd Edition even included the top of TabletopGame/{{Greyhawk}}'s pantheon and 4th Edition books' assumptions unofficially form a vaguely defined setting called the "TabletopGame/NentirVale". 5th Edition mostly uses the ''TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms'' as the main source of fluff material this time around, but also supplements it with elements from other settings like ''Eberron'', ''Greyhawk'', and ''Dragonlance''.

to:

The core rule books contain no "official" background setting material. Dungeon Masters are invited to either make up their own setting or use one of a number of published campaign settings. Of course, stuff from some settings leaked in anyway -- after all, one cannot roleplay in a vacuum. BECMI era D&D was wholesale set in ''TabletopGame/{{Mystara}}''.''The Known World''/''TabletopGame/{{Mystara}}''. Advanced D&D has elements of Gygax's own ''TabletopGame/{{Greyhawk}}'' as the implied setting (the wizards whose names attached to spells of the core list are classical TabletopGame/{{Greyhawk}} characters), 3rd Edition even included the top of TabletopGame/{{Greyhawk}}'s pantheon and 4th Edition books' assumptions unofficially form a vaguely defined setting called the "TabletopGame/NentirVale". 5th Edition mostly uses the ''TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms'' as the main source of fluff material this time around, but also supplements it with elements from other settings like ''Eberron'', ''Greyhawk'', and ''Dragonlance''.



* ''Blackmoor'', a.k.a. ''The First Fantasy Campaign'': The '''very''' first campaign setting, originating from Dave Arneson's wargaming days, the result of a slow weekend in October 1970 consisting of '50s monster movies, "fantasy hero" novels, a slump during his most recent wargame session, and the thought of "I can do better than this". So he drew a six floor dungeon layout, then created a castle and town from a Sicilian castle model he had lying around. The new setting was a huge hit amongst his fellow ''Braunstein'' players and when he showed the game to Gygax in 1972, the rest, as they say, was history. Your typical Good-vs-Evil setting, rather than Law-vs-Chaos, with the various duchies vying for power while the mysterious Egg of Coot pulls strings from the shadows. While the "official" version was a released in 1977 as a combination battle report and gazetteer by Judges Guild, alternate versions appeared in both Greyhawk (as an archbarony near the Land of Black Ice) and Mystara (as a kingdom from the world's distant past that [[AndManGrewProud rose to great heights]] [[CataclysmBackstory and quickly fell, changing the world in the process]]). The setting only had four adventure modules released for it during its Creator/{{TSR}} days: ''Adventures in Blackmoor'', ''Temple of the Frog'', ''City of the Gods'', and ''The Duchy of Ten''. While officially discontinued during AD&D 2nd Edition, Arneson was able to keep the rights for the setting and eventually worked with Zeitgiest Games to release setting books for 3.5 and 4th Editions. Blackmoor proudly has the honor of being one of the longest continuously played fantasy role playing campaigns in existence, even spawning an epic play-by-post game called ''The Last Fantasy Campaign'', which ran from 2005 to 2015.

to:

* ''Blackmoor'', a.k.a. ''The First Fantasy Campaign'': The '''very''' first campaign setting, originating from Dave Arneson's wargaming days, the result of a slow weekend in October 1970 consisting of '50s monster movies, "fantasy hero" novels, a slump during his most recent wargame session, and the thought of "I can do better than this". So he drew a six floor dungeon layout, then created a castle and town from a Sicilian castle model he had lying around. The new setting was a huge hit amongst his fellow ''Braunstein'' players and when he showed the game to Gygax in 1972, the rest, as they say, was history. Your typical It was portrayed as a Good-vs-Evil setting, rather than Law-vs-Chaos, a Law-vs-Chaos one, with the various duchies vying for power while the mysterious Egg of Coot pulls strings from the shadows. While the "official" version was a released in 1977 as a combination battle report and gazetteer by Judges Guild, alternate versions appeared in both Greyhawk (as an archbarony near the Land of Black Ice) and Mystara (as a kingdom from the world's distant past that [[AndManGrewProud rose to great heights]] [[CataclysmBackstory and quickly fell, changing the world in the process]]). The setting only had four adventure modules released for it during its Creator/{{TSR}} days: ''Adventures in Blackmoor'', ''Temple of the Frog'', ''City of the Gods'', and ''The Duchy of Ten''. While officially discontinued during AD&D 2nd Edition, Arneson was able to keep the rights for the setting and eventually worked with Zeitgiest Games to release setting books for 3.5 and 4th Editions. Blackmoor proudly has the honor of being one of the longest continuously played fantasy role playing campaigns in existence, even spawning an epic play-by-post game called ''The Last Fantasy Campaign'', which ran from 2005 to 2015.



* ''Literature/{{Dragonlance}}'': The purest HighFantasy setting of them all and hews closest to Creator/JRRTolkien's works, arguably. The most major difference would probably be Tolkien preferred to imply the influence of Providence, while in Dragonlance the intervention of deities tends to be much more explicit. More popular for its series of novels, which have come out non-stop for years, than for its sporadically-published game products.

to:

* ''Literature/{{Dragonlance}}'': The purest HighFantasy setting of them all and hews closest to Creator/JRRTolkien's works, arguably. The most major difference would probably be Tolkien preferred to imply the influence of Divine Providence, while in Dragonlance the intervention of deities tends to be much more explicit. More popular for its series of novels, which have come out non-stop for years, than for its sporadically-published game products.



** The first version was the original home campaign, created after Gygax played a game of Blackmoor in 1972. Games in this version ran constantly from 1972 to 1979, slowed down from 1980 to 1985, and completely ceased on December 31, 1985, right after Gygax was ousted from Creator/{{TSR}}, with the setting itself being "destroyed" in 1988 in the last ''Gord the Rogue'' novel. Due to the number of games played each week, Gygax didn't have the time to make a world map completely from scratch and simply used a blank map of North America, filling it in as the campaign went on. Despite the name, the 1975 ''Supplement I: Greyhawk'' digest wasn't a Greyhawk setting book, but a rulebook which helped eliminate the game's dependence on ''Chainmail'', setting the groundwork for what would become Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. Not much is known about the home campaign version, apart from what is presented in the ''Gnome Cache'' novella from the first issues of ''Dragon'' magazine and the ''Gord the Rogue'' novel series. Despite washing his hands of the setting, fans wanted the original home campaign version of the Castle Greyhawk megadungeon to be published, so Gygax finally greenlit the project as ''Castle Zagyg'' in 2003. Although its immensely troubled production ended with just two of the proposed seven books and a small number of adventure modules and supplements being released. [[note]]The Castle Grewhawk dungeon as of 1985 had around 50 floors, meaning Gygax and Robert Kuntz had to sift through years of notes and pick the 13 best parts for publication, while Gygax had to rewrite everything that was still copyright of [=WotC=]. Gygax's health decline in 2004 led to the already slow-moving project to grind to a near halt, while Kuntz had to withdraw due to working on other projects. A few months after Gary's death in 2008, his widow Gail pulled all the licensing from Troll Lord Games and transferred them to her own company, Gygax Games, but hasn't done anything with the project since.[[/note]]

to:

** The first version was the original home campaign, dubbed the "Original Lake Geneva Campaign" by Robert Kuntz, created after Gygax played a game of Blackmoor in 1972. Games in this version ran constantly from 1972 to 1979, slowed down from 1980 to 1985, and completely ceased on December 31, 1985, right after Gygax was ousted from Creator/{{TSR}}, with the setting itself being "destroyed" in 1988 in the last ''Gord the Rogue'' novel. Due to the number of games played each week, Gygax didn't have the time to make a world map completely from scratch and simply used a blank map of North America, filling it in as the campaign went on. Despite the name, the 1975 ''Supplement I: Greyhawk'' digest wasn't a Greyhawk setting book, but a rulebook which helped eliminate the game's dependence on ''Chainmail'', setting the groundwork for what would become Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. Not much is known about the home campaign version, apart from what is presented in the ''Gnome Cache'' novella from the first earliest issues of ''Dragon'' magazine and the ''Gord the Rogue'' novel series. Despite washing his hands of the setting, fans wanted the original home campaign version of the Castle Greyhawk megadungeon to be published, so Gygax finally greenlit the project as ''Castle Zagyg'' in 2003. Although its immensely troubled production ended with just two of the proposed seven books and a small number of adventure modules and supplements being released. [[note]]The Castle Grewhawk dungeon as of 1985 had around 50 floors, meaning Gygax and Robert Kuntz had to sift through years of notes and pick the 13 best parts for publication, while Gygax had to rewrite everything that was still copyright of [=WotC=]. Gygax's health decline in 2004 led to the already slow-moving project to grind to a near halt, while Kuntz had to withdraw due to working on other projects. A few months after Gary's death in 2008, his widow Gail pulled all the licensing from Troll Lord Games and transferred them to her own company, Gygax Games, but hasn't done anything with the project since.[[/note]]



* ''Kalibruhn'': Technically the third campaign setting for OD&D, created by D&D and Creator/{{TSR}} alumnus Robert J. Kuntz in 1973 as "Castle El Raja Key". This was the main setting where Gygax himself played as a player and the "birth home" setting of his legendary archmage, Mordenkainen. Originally planned to be the focus of a fifth supplement for OD&D, a number of problems led to Kuntz leaving Creator/{{TSR}} in 1977 and the supplement was never published. Due to never signing the rights away, Kuntz was able to keep and work on the setting constantly since its creation, with the history of the setting included in the [[http://www.tlbgames.com/collections/archive El Raja Key Archive]] DVD, alongside information on the original Greyhawk and Blackmoor campaigns. An oddity amongst the campaign settings listed here, ''Kalibruhn'' has gone almost completely unpublished, with the only info out there being what Kuntz has revealed over the years.

to:

* ''Kalibruhn'': Technically the third campaign setting for OD&D, created by D&D and Creator/{{TSR}} alumnus Robert J. Kuntz in 1973 as "Castle El Raja Key". This was the main setting where Gygax himself played as a player and the "birth home" setting of his legendary archmage, Mordenkainen. Originally planned to be the focus of a fifth supplement for OD&D, a number of problems led to Kuntz leaving Creator/{{TSR}} in 1977 and the supplement was never published. Due to never signing the IP rights away, Kuntz was able to keep and work on both versions of the setting constantly since its creation, with the history of the setting included in the [[http://www.tlbgames.com/collections/archive El Raja Key Archive]] DVD, alongside information on the original Greyhawk and Blackmoor campaigns. An oddity amongst the campaign settings listed here, ''Kalibruhn'' has gone almost completely unpublished, with the only info out there being what Kuntz has revealed over the years.



* ''Wilderlands of High Fantasy'': The first officially licensed and published third-party campaign setting for OD&D, created by Judges Guild after the success of their ''City State of the Invincible Overlord'' city setting and released in a collection of 4 32-page booklets. In 2002, Judges Guild ended up working together with Necromancer Games to release a boxed version for 3.5 Edition. Rather than go for the "megadungeon" style of early Blackmoor and Greyhawk, the Wilderlands went the sandbox route: 18 maps that altogether cover an area about 780 miles wide by 1080 miles long, roughly the size of the Mediterranean. Each individual map contains a number of pre-established points-of-interest, with the accompanying books containing entry upon entry for every bastion of civilization, set of ruins, and monster lair within each region. The Wilderlands sticks to the gonzo origins of D&D, a time when the lines between sci-fi and fantasy were very murky and SchizoTech was everywhere, meaning you could have people who just invented the wheel potentially meet people who use calculus and ''then'' have them potentially happen upon a crashed alien spaceship from an age long before recorded history.

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* ''Wilderlands of High Fantasy'': The first officially licensed and published third-party campaign setting for OD&D, created by Judges Guild after the success of their ''City State of the Invincible Overlord'' city setting and released in a collection of 4 32-page booklets. In 2002, Judges Guild ended up working together with Necromancer Games to release a boxed version for 3.5 Edition. Rather than go for the "megadungeon" style of very early Blackmoor and Greyhawk, the Wilderlands went the sandbox route: 18 maps that altogether cover an area about 780 miles wide by 1080 miles long, roughly the size of the Mediterranean. Each individual map contains a number of pre-established points-of-interest, with the accompanying books containing entry upon entry for every bastion of civilization, set of ruins, and monster lair within each region. The Wilderlands sticks to the gonzo origins of D&D, a time when the lines between sci-fi and fantasy were very murky and SchizoTech was everywhere, meaning you could have people who just invented the wheel potentially meet people who use calculus and ''then'' have them potentially happen upon a crashed alien spaceship from an age long before recorded history.



* '''"Original" Dungeons & Dragons (OD&D) - 1974-1976''': Also known as "The Original Game". Co-written by Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson and published by Creator/{{TSR}} in 1974 as a boxed set consisting of three digest-sized books (the "little brown books" a.k.a. lbb): ''Men & Magic'', ''Monsters & Treasure'', ''The Underworld & Wilderness Adventures''. There were three original classes (Fighting-Man, Cleric and Magic User) and only three alignments (Law, Neutrality, Chaos). [[note]]''Strategic Review #2.1'' had an article that adds a 5-point alignment chart (Lawful Good, Chaotic Good, Neutral, Lawful Evil, Chaotic Evil)[[/note]] Humans could choose between all three classes and advance in their chosen class without limit, while non-human races were severely restricted. [[note]]Dwarves could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 6th level. Elves were multiclass by default and could freely switch between Fighting-Man and Magic-User on an adventure-by-adventure basis, with their level caps being 4th level for Fighting-Man and 8th level for Magic User. Halflings could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 4th level.[[/note]] Hit Points, damage, and initiative were all rolled using a d6. Spell levels were limited to 6th level spells for Magic Users and 5th level spells for Clerics. Received numerous supplements, both officially released and from magazine articles. Unfortunately, it required the ''Chainmail'' rulebook to properly play.

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* '''"Original" Dungeons & Dragons (OD&D) - 1974-1976''': Also known as "The Original Game". Co-written by Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson and published by Creator/{{TSR}} in 1974 as a boxed set consisting of three digest-sized books (the "little brown books" a.k.a. lbb): ''Men & Magic'', ''Monsters & Treasure'', ''The Underworld & Wilderness Adventures''. There were three original classes (Fighting-Man, Cleric and Magic User) and only three alignments (Law, Neutrality, Chaos). [[note]]''Strategic Review #2.1'' had an article that adds a 5-point alignment chart (Lawful Good, Chaotic Good, Neutral, Lawful Evil, Chaotic Evil)[[/note]] Humans could choose between all three classes and advance in their chosen class without limit, while non-human races were severely restricted. [[note]]Dwarves could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 6th level. Elves were multiclass by default and could freely switch between Fighting-Man and Magic-User on an adventure-by-adventure basis, with their level caps being 4th level for Fighting-Man and 8th level for Magic User. Halflings could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 4th level.[[/note]] Hit Points, damage, and initiative were all rolled using a d6. Spell levels were limited to 6th level spells for Magic Users and 5th level spells for Clerics. Received numerous supplements, both officially released and from magazine articles. Unfortunately, it required the ''Chainmail'' rulebook to properly play, and even with ''Chainmail'' it was something of a hassle to play.



** '''Supplement III: Eldritch Wizardry - 1976''': Introduced the Druid as a Cleric subclass, the option for human psionics (restricted to Fighting-Men, Magic Users, Clerics, and Thieves). Marks the first appearances of Orcus, Demogorgon, and Vecna.

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** '''Supplement III: Eldritch Wizardry - 1976''': Introduced the Druid as a Cleric subclass, the option for human psionics (restricted to Fighting-Men, Magic Users, Clerics, and Thieves). Marks the first appearances of Orcus, the Demon Princes Orcus and Demogorgon, and the lich-turned-deity Vecna.



** '''Swords & Spells - 1976''': The unnumbered fifth supplement, written by Gygax. Touted as the "grandson" of ''Chainmail'', this sourcebook introduced rules for upscaling the combat in order to portray large scale battles. The supplement was not that well received when it was released, and was not included in the 40th Anniversary White Box collection.

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** '''Swords & Spells - 1976''': The unnumbered fifth "fifth" supplement, written by Gygax. Touted as the "grandson" of ''Chainmail'', this sourcebook introduced rules for upscaling the combat in order to portray large scale battles. The supplement was not that well received when it was released, and was not included in the 40th Anniversary White Box collection.



** '''Unearthed Arcana - 1985''': A codification of many of the new rules and options introduced in various magazines up to that point. Added 3 classes: Cavalier, Barbarian, and Thief-Acrobat -- which were also the same 3 classes that appeared in the WesternAnimation/DungeonsAndDragons cartoon show that didn't already exist in the Player's Handbook. While thief-acrobat was just a specialization of thief, and barbarian was another fighter subclass, cavalier was a whole new top-level class category in its own right; paladins were now subclasses of cavaliers instead of subclasses of fighters, which meant that some previously legitimate paladin characters no longer had high enough stats to be paladins any more. Also added a boatload of new spells and magic items. Clarified some rules, but also had several misprints and introduced as many new problems[[note]]Especially when it added to the haystack of non-uniform rules, like plate armor damage absorption![[/note]] as it solved.

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** '''Unearthed Arcana - 1985''': A codification of many of the new rules and options introduced in various magazines up to that point. Added 3 classes: Cavalier, Barbarian, and Thief-Acrobat -- which were also the same 3 classes that appeared in the WesternAnimation/DungeonsAndDragons ''WesternAnimation/DungeonsAndDragons'' cartoon show that didn't already exist in the Player's Handbook. While thief-acrobat was just a specialization of thief, and barbarian was another fighter subclass, cavalier was a whole new top-level class category in its own right; paladins were now subclasses of cavaliers instead of subclasses of fighters, which meant that some previously legitimate paladin characters no longer had high enough stats to be paladins any more. Also added a boatload of new spells and magic items. Clarified some rules, but also had several misprints and introduced as many new problems[[note]]Especially when it added to the haystack of non-uniform rules, like plate armor damage absorption![[/note]] as it solved.



* '''Dungeons & Dragons (3rd edition) - 2000''': 3rd edition made major simplifications to the rules by using the TabletopGame/D20System (which was originally created specifically for D&D 3.0) based on roll-over used in TabletopGame/GammaWorld long ago. The simplification was comprehensive enough to mean that nearly all character actions will fall into one of three areas - combat, skills and magic. This means that 3rd edition is also more flexible than 2nd; skills and abilities are more universal, with every class being able to attempt actions like "bluff" or "hide", where as only specific classes had access to them before. This time the CharacterClassSystem dominates the weaker race system and for powerful and unusual creatures what was racial HD is treated as "class". The standard level limit was set at 20 (higher levels were covered in the ''TabletopGame/EpicLevelHandbook''), again without racial restrictions of any kind, although each race had a "favored class" that factored into multiclassing. The previous, crufty system of "weapon proficiency slots" was revamped into a somewhat-less-crufty system of Feats. Overall, the game became a lot simpler to use without losing very much of its depth. In addition, much of the material thrown out in 2nd edition - half-orcs, monks, battles with demons, and so on, were added back in (some in the core rulebooks, others in supplements). The most obvious flaws: indecisive unification [[note]]Such as class feature "skill works differently" -- e.g. out-of-table Rogue abilities to deal with difficult and magic traps. Or prestige classes awkwardly referring to the base class -- like with "+1 to existing spellcasting class" or "we don't say Druid, we say requires Wild Shape... which has nothing to do with the class".[[/note]], skill rank inflation, feats handled separately without any common meaning to them[[note]]''Complete Scoundrel'' later tried to abate two latter problems at once with "[[http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=dnd/ex/20070105a&page=5 skill tricks]]" mechanics.[[/note]] and LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards on steroids.

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* '''Dungeons & Dragons (3rd edition) - 2000''': 3rd edition made major simplifications to the rules by using the TabletopGame/D20System (which was originally created specifically for D&D 3.0) based on roll-over used in TabletopGame/GammaWorld ''TabletopGame/GammaWorld'' long ago. The simplification was comprehensive enough to mean that nearly all character actions will fall into one of three areas - combat, skills and magic. This means that 3rd edition is also more flexible than 2nd; skills and abilities are more universal, with every class being able to attempt actions like "bluff" or "hide", where as only specific classes had access to them before. This time the CharacterClassSystem dominates the weaker race system and for powerful and unusual creatures what was racial HD is treated as "class". The standard level limit was set at 20 (higher levels were covered in the ''TabletopGame/EpicLevelHandbook''), again without racial restrictions of any kind, although each race had a "favored class" that factored into multiclassing. The previous, crufty system of "weapon proficiency slots" was revamped into a somewhat-less-crufty system of Feats. Overall, the game became a lot simpler to use without losing very much of its depth. In addition, much of the material thrown out in 2nd edition - half-orcs, monks, battles with demons, and so on, were added back in (some in the core rulebooks, others in supplements). The most obvious flaws: indecisive unification [[note]]Such as class feature "skill works differently" -- e.g. out-of-table Rogue abilities to deal with difficult and magic traps. Or prestige classes awkwardly referring to the base class -- like with "+1 to existing spellcasting class" or "we don't say Druid, we say requires Wild Shape... which has nothing to do with the class".[[/note]], skill rank inflation, feats handled separately without any common meaning to them[[note]]''Complete Scoundrel'' later tried to abate two latter problems at once with "[[http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=dnd/ex/20070105a&page=5 skill tricks]]" mechanics.[[/note]] and LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards on steroids.



* '''Dungeons & Dragons (4th edition) - 2008''': A major overhaul that changed a lot of the mechanics, making it easier for new players to get used to the basic D&D concepts. Its setting and rules are a lot less varied than 3.5 - there's no more crafting system, most magic and attacks are made into "powers" that vary by each class, and magic items have been slimmed down - and there's more pluses in the game rather than minuses (i.e. most races get two + 2 to abilities, rather than the usual 3.5 one of +2 to one, -2 to one). To this end, the game is more fitting (and clearly designed) for a heroic campaign that is combat-heavy and very fantasy-oriented, with very few guidelines on the role-playing portion. Combat itself has been highly revised so that each class is equally capable, but in different roles: Wizards have area-attack spells and debuffs, fighters draw attention and punish enemies who don't attack them, rangers do heavy damage with an assortment of multi-attack powers, etc., and all of these are presented in a standardized format to keep classes more or less balanced. The main problems that scared fans away included concerns that it plays too much like a {{MMORPG}}, and/or a tabletop miniatures war game. Indeed, the assumption that players use miniatures on a map is even expressed throughout the core rules, such as movement being described in squares, not feet. Fans were also unhappy with changes to published settings from the time period as well.

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* '''Dungeons & Dragons (4th edition) - 2008''': A major overhaul that changed a lot of the mechanics, making it easier for new players to get used to the basic D&D concepts. Its setting and rules are a lot less varied than 3.5 - there's no more crafting system, most magic and attacks are made into "powers" that vary by each class, and magic items have been slimmed down - and there's more pluses in the game rather than minuses (i.e. most races get two + 2 to abilities, rather than the usual 3.5 one of +2 to one, -2 to one). To this end, the game is more fitting (and clearly designed) for a heroic campaign that is combat-heavy and very fantasy-oriented, with very few guidelines on the role-playing portion. Combat itself has been highly revised so that each class is equally capable, but in different roles: Wizards have area-attack spells and debuffs, fighters draw attention and punish enemies who don't attack them, rangers do heavy damage with an assortment of multi-attack powers, etc., and all of these are presented in a standardized format to keep classes more or less balanced. The main problems that scared fans away included concerns that it plays too much like a {{MMORPG}}, {{MMORPG}} and/or a tabletop miniatures war game. Indeed, the assumption that players use miniatures on a map is even expressed throughout the core rules, such as movement being described in squares, not feet. Fans were also unhappy with changes to published settings from the time period as well.



* '''Dungeons & Dragons (5th Edition) - 2014''': Developed under the title ''D&D Next'' and officially launched in 2014, 5th edition was an attempt by Wizards to recapture and unite some of the fractured fanbase. The basic mechanics resemble a mixture of 2nd and 3rd editions with some influences by 4th edition. The overall power levels have been reduced: the max level cap is 20 ''period'', magic items are much more rare and do not scale in levels, and the bonuses/penalties to an action seldom break double digits. Stacking modifiers have been replaced with a simple advantage/disadvantage system where the character with the advantage/disadvantage rolls two dice for the action and picks the higher/lower die. Magic spells with durations are now 'concentration' type, meaning a magic user can ever only have one such spell active at any time. Most major, world-altering magics are rituals that take minutes if not hours and days to cast. Each class is now firmly wedded to a single character concept, with class archetypes and character backgrounds (representing social class and upbringing) chosen at creation being used to hybridize characters. Most post-creation exclusives are gone, but multiclassing has been returned to 3rd edition standards and feats are completely optional, although they are fewer in number but much more powerful and robust than before. Roleplaying and flavor have been increased in importance, with the old 2nd edition alignment system restored and canonical D&D characters from related media being used as examples of their respective classes, alignments and backgrounds. Pinning down the primary world for Fifth Edition is a bit dodgy: while the core books are mostly written in a multiverse view and are near-completely adaptable to any setting, all of the official Adventurer's League material for organized play is primarily set in the ''Forgotten Realms''.[[note]]The ''Princes of the Apocalypse'' adventure, which is "what if the Cult of Elemental Evil arrived in Faerûn", but includes info for adapting the content for Dark Sun, Dragonlance, Greyhawk, Eberron, and home campaigns; while ''The Curse of Strahd'' is a combination enhanced remake of the original Ravenloft adventure and a return to Ravenloft as a campaign setting.[[/note]] Fan response has been mostly positive, with some praising the return to a more roleplaying-based system based on in-universe-justified abilities, while others bemoan a lack of character options on release and argue that the game has returned to LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards.

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* '''Dungeons & Dragons (5th Edition) - 2014''': Developed under the title ''D&D Next'' and officially launched in 2014, 5th edition was an attempt by Wizards to recapture and unite some of the fractured fanbase. The basic mechanics resemble a mixture of 2nd and 3rd editions with some influences by 4th edition. The overall power levels have been reduced: the max level cap is 20 ''period'', magic items are much more rare and do not scale in levels, and the bonuses/penalties to an action seldom seldom, if ever, break double digits. Stacking modifiers have been replaced with a simple advantage/disadvantage system where the character with the advantage/disadvantage rolls two dice for the action and picks the higher/lower die. Magic spells with durations are now 'concentration' type, meaning a magic user can ever only have one such spell active at any time. Most major, world-altering magics are rituals that take minutes if not hours and days to cast. Each class is now firmly wedded to a single character concept, with class archetypes and character backgrounds (representing social class and upbringing) chosen at creation being used to hybridize characters. Most post-creation exclusives are gone, but multiclassing has been returned to 3rd edition standards and feats are completely optional, although they are fewer in number but much more powerful and robust than before. Roleplaying and flavor have been increased in importance, with the old 2nd edition alignment system restored and canonical D&D characters from related media being used as examples of their respective classes, alignments and backgrounds. Pinning down the primary world for Fifth Edition is a bit dodgy: while the core books are mostly written in a multiverse view and are near-completely adaptable to any setting, all of the official Adventurer's League material for organized play is primarily set in the ''Forgotten Realms''.[[note]]The ''Princes of the Apocalypse'' adventure, which is "what if the Cult of Elemental Evil arrived in Faerûn", but includes info for adapting the content for Dark Sun, Dragonlance, Greyhawk, Eberron, and home campaigns; while ''The Curse of Strahd'' is a combination enhanced remake of the original Ravenloft adventure and a return to Ravenloft as a campaign setting.[[/note]] Fan response has been mostly positive, with some praising the return to a more roleplaying-based system based on in-universe-justified abilities, while others bemoan a lack of character options on release and argue that the game has returned to LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards.



In addition to all this, some die-hard gamers have elected to go back to the roots of D&D, launching an "Old School Renaissance" that consists of playing and writing new adventures for the older editions and using the OGL to provide "retro-clone" games that do their best to recreate the feel of the out-of-print older editions for the gaming audience of today.

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In addition to all this, some die-hard gamers have elected to go back to the roots of D&D, launching an "Old School Renaissance" that consists of playing and writing new adventures for the older editions and using the OGL Open Game License to provide "retro-clone" games that do their best to recreate the feel of the out-of-print older editions for the gaming audience of today.
28th Dec '17 7:25:40 PM Ramidel
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Added DiffLines:

* RainbowPimpGear: Magic items generally aren't chosen because they fit well together aesthetically, but because they give powerful bonuses. Getting the best bonus combinations can fall into this.
22nd Dec '17 4:31:33 AM Alas_Poor_Donny
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* NoGearLevel: Stripping gear tends to occur if you get captured or contained. The impact varies based on edition: Basic has fighting-classes hit hard, 1e and 2e also impact spells that require somantic components, 3e also has unarmed attacks provoke attacks of opportunity (unless you have a feat), and 4e allows all weapon or implement powers to work (unless the power explicitly requires one) with no special penalty (beyond lack of proficiency bonus.)

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* NoGearLevel: Stripping gear tends to occur if you get captured or contained. The impact varies based on edition: Basic has fighting-classes hit hard, 1e and 2e also impact spells that require somantic components, 3e also has unarmed attacks provoke attacks of opportunity (unless you have a feat), and 4e allows all weapon or implement powers to work (unless the power explicitly requires one) with no special penalty (beyond lack of proficiency bonus.) ) 5e reduces characters to their most basic, infinitely-usable spells and attacks unless the character has gone out of its way to learn, prepare, or equip abilities that don't require gear, but the game is designed around those basic abilities being reasonably viable in combat and navigation.



* SquareRaceRoundClass: One way to make a memorable player character is by flipping common expectations. Classic examples include making the Orc a bard[[note]]Though FridgeBrilliance would suggest this makes more sense than it seems: a race of largely illiterate barbarians would very likely have a strong tradition for singing and oral storytelling to commemorate their heroes and warriors[[/note]], the [[BadassAdorable Halfling]] a [[PintSizedPowerhouse barbarian]], and making the [[OurDemonsAreDifferent Tiefling]] a [[ThePaladin paladin]].

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* SquareRaceRoundClass: One way to make a memorable player character is by flipping common expectations. Classic examples include making the Orc a bard[[note]]Though FridgeBrilliance would suggest this makes more sense than it seems: a race of largely illiterate barbarians would very likely have a strong tradition for singing and oral storytelling to commemorate their heroes and warriors[[/note]], the [[BadassAdorable Halfling]] a [[PintSizedPowerhouse barbarian]], barbarian]][[note]]Though this too has legitimate advantages, such as canceling out the primary halfling disadvantage of slow move speed and reduced damage very quickly while they retain the full benefit of increased defenses and stealth[[/note]], and making the [[OurDemonsAreDifferent Tiefling]] a [[ThePaladin paladin]].
6th Dec '17 7:59:52 PM WildCardCourier
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The core rule books contain no "official" background setting material. Dungeon Masters are invited to either make up their own setting or use one of a number of published campaign settings. Of course, stuff from some settings leaked in anyway -- after all, one cannot roleplay in a vacuum. Advanced D&D has elements of Gygax's own TabletopGame/{{Greyhawk}} as the implied setting (the wizards whose names attached to spells of the core list are classical TabletopGame/{{Greyhawk}} characters), 3rd Edition even included the top of TabletopGame/{{Greyhawk}}'s pantheon and 4th Edition books' assumptions unofficially form a vaguely defined setting called the "TabletopGame/NentirVale". 5th Edition somewhat bucks this trend, through using the ''TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms'' as the main source of fluff material this time around.

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The core rule books contain no "official" background setting material. Dungeon Masters are invited to either make up their own setting or use one of a number of published campaign settings. Of course, stuff from some settings leaked in anyway -- after all, one cannot roleplay in a vacuum. BECMI era D&D was wholesale set in ''TabletopGame/{{Mystara}}''. Advanced D&D has elements of Gygax's own TabletopGame/{{Greyhawk}} ''TabletopGame/{{Greyhawk}}'' as the implied setting (the wizards whose names attached to spells of the core list are classical TabletopGame/{{Greyhawk}} characters), 3rd Edition even included the top of TabletopGame/{{Greyhawk}}'s pantheon and 4th Edition books' assumptions unofficially form a vaguely defined setting called the "TabletopGame/NentirVale". 5th Edition somewhat bucks this trend, through using mostly uses the ''TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms'' as the main source of fluff material this time around.
around, but also supplements it with elements from other settings like ''Eberron'', ''Greyhawk'', and ''Dragonlance''.



** The first version was the original home campaign, created after Gygax played a game of Blackmoor in 1972. Games in this version ran constantly from 1972 to 1979, slowed down from 1980 to 1985, and completely ceased on December 31, 1985, right after Gygax was ousted from Creator/{{TSR}}, with the setting itself being "destroyed" in 1988 in the last ''Gord the Rogue'' novel. Due to the number of games played each week, Gygax didn't have the time to make a world map completely from scratch and simply used a blank map of North America, filling it in as the campaign went on. Despite the name, the 1975 ''Supplement I: Greyhawk'' digest wasn't a Greyhawk setting book, but a rulebook which helped eliminate the game's dependence on ''Chainmail'', setting the groundwork for what would become Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. Not much is known about the home campaign version, apart from what is presented in the ''Gnome Cache'' novella from the first issues of ''Dragon'' magazine and the ''Gord the Rogue'' novel series. Despite washing his hands of the setting, fans wanted the original home campaign version of the Castle Greyhawk megadungeon to be published, so Gygax finally greenlit the project as ''Castle Zagyg'' in 2003. Although its immensely troubled production ended with just two or three of the proposed seven books and a small number of adventure modules and supplements being released. [[note]]The Castle Grewhawk dungeon as of 1985 had around 50 floors, meaning Gygax and Robert Kuntz had to sift through years of notes and pick the 13 best parts for publication, while Gygax had to rewrite everything that was still copyright of [=WotC=]. Gygax's health decline in 2004 led to the already slow-moving project to grind to a near halt, while Kuntz had to withdraw due to working on other projects. A few months after Gary's death in 2008, his widow Gail pulled all the licensing from Troll Lord Games and transferred them to her own company, Gygax Games, but hasn't done anything with the project since.[[/note]]

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** The first version was the original home campaign, created after Gygax played a game of Blackmoor in 1972. Games in this version ran constantly from 1972 to 1979, slowed down from 1980 to 1985, and completely ceased on December 31, 1985, right after Gygax was ousted from Creator/{{TSR}}, with the setting itself being "destroyed" in 1988 in the last ''Gord the Rogue'' novel. Due to the number of games played each week, Gygax didn't have the time to make a world map completely from scratch and simply used a blank map of North America, filling it in as the campaign went on. Despite the name, the 1975 ''Supplement I: Greyhawk'' digest wasn't a Greyhawk setting book, but a rulebook which helped eliminate the game's dependence on ''Chainmail'', setting the groundwork for what would become Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. Not much is known about the home campaign version, apart from what is presented in the ''Gnome Cache'' novella from the first issues of ''Dragon'' magazine and the ''Gord the Rogue'' novel series. Despite washing his hands of the setting, fans wanted the original home campaign version of the Castle Greyhawk megadungeon to be published, so Gygax finally greenlit the project as ''Castle Zagyg'' in 2003. Although its immensely troubled production ended with just two or three of the proposed seven books and a small number of adventure modules and supplements being released. [[note]]The Castle Grewhawk dungeon as of 1985 had around 50 floors, meaning Gygax and Robert Kuntz had to sift through years of notes and pick the 13 best parts for publication, while Gygax had to rewrite everything that was still copyright of [=WotC=]. Gygax's health decline in 2004 led to the already slow-moving project to grind to a near halt, while Kuntz had to withdraw due to working on other projects. A few months after Gary's death in 2008, his widow Gail pulled all the licensing from Troll Lord Games and transferred them to her own company, Gygax Games, but hasn't done anything with the project since.[[/note]]



* '''Dungeons & Dragons (5th Edition) - 2014''': Developed under the title ''D&D Next'' and officially launched in 2014, 5th edition was an attempt by Wizards to recapture and unite some of the fractured fanbase. The basic mechanics resemble a mixture of 2nd and 3rd editions with some influences by 4th edition. The overall power levels have been reduced: the max level cap is 20 ''period'', magic items are much more rare and do not scale in levels, and the bonuses/penalties to an action seldom break double digits. Stacking modifiers have been replaced with a simple advantage/disadvantage system where the character with the advantage/disadvantage rolls two dice for the action and picks the higher/lower die. Magic spells with durations are now 'concentration' type, meaning a magic user can ever only have one such spell active at any time. Most major, world-altering magics are rituals that take minutes if not hours and days to cast. Each class is now firmly wedded to a single character concept, with class archetypes and character backgrounds (representing social class and upbringing) chosen at creation being used to hybridize characters. Most post-creation exclusives are gone, but multiclassing has been returned to 3rd edition standards and feats are completely optional, although they are much more powerful and robust than before. Roleplaying and flavor have been increased in importance, with the old 2nd edition alignment system restored and canonical D&D characters from related media being used as examples of their respective classes, alignments and backgrounds. Pinning down the primary world for Fifth Edition is a bit dodgy: while the core books are mostly written in a multiverse view and are near-completely adaptable to any setting, all of the official Adventurer's League material for organized play is primarily set in the ''Forgotten Realms''.[[note]]The ''Princes of the Apocalypse'' adventure, which is "what if the Cult of Elemental Evil arrived in Faerûn", but includes info for adapting the content for Dark Sun, Dragonlance, Greyhawk, Eberron, and home campaigns; while ''The Curse of Strahd'' is a combination enhanced remake of the original Ravenloft adventure and a return to Ravenloft as a campaign setting.[[/note]] Fan response has been mostly positive, with some praising the return to a more roleplaying-based system based on in-universe-justified abilities, while others bemoan a lack of character options on release and argue that the game has returned to LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards.

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* '''Dungeons & Dragons (5th Edition) - 2014''': Developed under the title ''D&D Next'' and officially launched in 2014, 5th edition was an attempt by Wizards to recapture and unite some of the fractured fanbase. The basic mechanics resemble a mixture of 2nd and 3rd editions with some influences by 4th edition. The overall power levels have been reduced: the max level cap is 20 ''period'', magic items are much more rare and do not scale in levels, and the bonuses/penalties to an action seldom break double digits. Stacking modifiers have been replaced with a simple advantage/disadvantage system where the character with the advantage/disadvantage rolls two dice for the action and picks the higher/lower die. Magic spells with durations are now 'concentration' type, meaning a magic user can ever only have one such spell active at any time. Most major, world-altering magics are rituals that take minutes if not hours and days to cast. Each class is now firmly wedded to a single character concept, with class archetypes and character backgrounds (representing social class and upbringing) chosen at creation being used to hybridize characters. Most post-creation exclusives are gone, but multiclassing has been returned to 3rd edition standards and feats are completely optional, although they are fewer in number but much more powerful and robust than before. Roleplaying and flavor have been increased in importance, with the old 2nd edition alignment system restored and canonical D&D characters from related media being used as examples of their respective classes, alignments and backgrounds. Pinning down the primary world for Fifth Edition is a bit dodgy: while the core books are mostly written in a multiverse view and are near-completely adaptable to any setting, all of the official Adventurer's League material for organized play is primarily set in the ''Forgotten Realms''.[[note]]The ''Princes of the Apocalypse'' adventure, which is "what if the Cult of Elemental Evil arrived in Faerûn", but includes info for adapting the content for Dark Sun, Dragonlance, Greyhawk, Eberron, and home campaigns; while ''The Curse of Strahd'' is a combination enhanced remake of the original Ravenloft adventure and a return to Ravenloft as a campaign setting.[[/note]] Fan response has been mostly positive, with some praising the return to a more roleplaying-based system based on in-universe-justified abilities, while others bemoan a lack of character options on release and argue that the game has returned to LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards.
1st Dec '17 11:36:56 PM Kalaong
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* SuperSargassoSea: Unsoncy. The center of the plane is a rotating disk of debris that comes out of a singularity in the middle. Items lost on other planes of the universe end up here. The Immortal who controls the plane always looks here first when he loses a pair of socks in his washing machine.
1st Dec '17 7:29:17 AM EternalNothingness
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* SpiritualAntithesis: Is this to the original ''Chainmail''. Compared to ''Chainmail'', where each player commands an army against another player's army, ''Dungeons & Dragons'' was -- and continues to be -- a cooperative experience with each player controlling just one [[CharacterCustomization customizable character]] rather than an army.
31st Oct '17 6:11:18 PM WildCardCourier
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* ''Kalibruhn'': The third campaign setting for OD&D, created by D&D alumni Robert J. Kuntz in 1973 as "Castle El Raja Key". This was the main setting where Gygax himself played as a player and the "birth home" setting of his legendary archmage, Mordenkainen. Originally planned to be the focus of a fifth supplement for OD&D, a number of problems led to Kuntz leaving Creator/{{TSR}} in 1977 and the supplement was never published. Due to never signing the rights away, Kuntz was able to work on the setting constantly since its creation, with the history of the setting included in the [[http://www.tlbgames.com/collections/archive El Raja Key Archive]] DVD, alongside information on the original Greyhawk and Blackmoor campaigns. An oddity amongst the campaign settings listed here, ''Kalibruhn'' has gone almost completely unpublished, with the only info out there being what Kuntz has revealed over the years.

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* ''Kalibruhn'': The Technically the third campaign setting for OD&D, created by D&D alumni and Creator/{{TSR}} alumnus Robert J. Kuntz in 1973 as "Castle El Raja Key". This was the main setting where Gygax himself played as a player and the "birth home" setting of his legendary archmage, Mordenkainen. Originally planned to be the focus of a fifth supplement for OD&D, a number of problems led to Kuntz leaving Creator/{{TSR}} in 1977 and the supplement was never published. Due to never signing the rights away, Kuntz was able to keep and work on the setting constantly since its creation, with the history of the setting included in the [[http://www.tlbgames.com/collections/archive El Raja Key Archive]] DVD, alongside information on the original Greyhawk and Blackmoor campaigns. An oddity amongst the campaign settings listed here, ''Kalibruhn'' has gone almost completely unpublished, with the only info out there being what Kuntz has revealed over the years.



* '''"Original" Dungeons & Dragons (OD&D) - 1974-1976''': Also known as "The Original Game". Co-written by Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson and published by Creator/{{TSR}} in 1974 as a boxed set consisting of three digest-sized books (the "little brown books" a.k.a. lbb): ''Men & Magic'', ''Monsters & Treasure'', ''The Underworld & Wilderness Adventures''. There were three original classes (Fighting-Man, Cleric and Magic User) and only three alignments (Law, Neutrality, Chaos). Humans could choose between all three classes and advance in their chosen class without limit, while non-human races were severely restricted. [[note]]Dwarves could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 6th level. Elves were multiclass by default and could freely switch between Fighting-Man and Magic-User on an adventure-by-adventure basis, with their level caps being 4th level for Fighting-Man and 8th level for Magic User. Halflings could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 4th level.[[/note]] Hit Points, damage, and initiative were all rolled using a d6. Spell levels were limited to 6th level spells for Magic Users and 5th level spells for Clerics. Received numerous supplements, both officially released and from magazine articles. Unfortunately, it required the ''Chainmail'' rulebook to properly play.
** '''Supplement I: Greyhawk - 1975''': Introduced the Thief class, the Paladin as a Fighting-Man subclass, Half-Elves as a playable race, and more monsters. Amended the level and class restrictions for Dwarves, Elves, and Halflings to account for the Thief class. [[note]]Dwarves, Elves, and Halflings could advance as a Thief with no level cap. Dwarves could advance to either 7th or 8th level Fighting-Man with an exceptional Strength score; they could also multiclass as either a Fighting-Man/Thief or a Fighting-Man/Cleric, although the Fighting-Man/Cleric option was NPC-only and their Cleric level capped at 7th level. Elves could advance up to 5th or 6th level Fighting-Man with an exceptional Strength score and 9th Magic-User with an exceptional Intelligence score; they could also multiclass as either a Fighting-Man/Magic-User/Cleric or a Fighting-Man/Magic-User/Thief, although FM/MU/Cleric had their Magic-User and Cleric classes capped at 6th level. Halflings could choose to be either a Fighting-Man or a Thief and had the best Thief skill bonuses of the non-human races. Half-Elves multiclass as a Fighting-Man/Magic-User by default, with both classes capped at 6th level, although exceptional Strength/Intelligence scores would raise them up to 7th or 8th level; they could also multiclass as a FM/MU/Cleric with a high enough Wisdom score, but their Cleric level capped at 4th level.[[/note]] Magic Users gained 7th-9th level spells, but only if their Intelligence score was high enough, while Clerics gained 6th and 7th level spells. Contained new and additional rules in order to distance itself from ''Chainmail''.

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* '''"Original" Dungeons & Dragons (OD&D) - 1974-1976''': Also known as "The Original Game". Co-written by Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson and published by Creator/{{TSR}} in 1974 as a boxed set consisting of three digest-sized books (the "little brown books" a.k.a. lbb): ''Men & Magic'', ''Monsters & Treasure'', ''The Underworld & Wilderness Adventures''. There were three original classes (Fighting-Man, Cleric and Magic User) and only three alignments (Law, Neutrality, Chaos). [[note]]''Strategic Review #2.1'' had an article that adds a 5-point alignment chart (Lawful Good, Chaotic Good, Neutral, Lawful Evil, Chaotic Evil)[[/note]] Humans could choose between all three classes and advance in their chosen class without limit, while non-human races were severely restricted. [[note]]Dwarves could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 6th level. Elves were multiclass by default and could freely switch between Fighting-Man and Magic-User on an adventure-by-adventure basis, with their level caps being 4th level for Fighting-Man and 8th level for Magic User. Halflings could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 4th level.[[/note]] Hit Points, damage, and initiative were all rolled using a d6. Spell levels were limited to 6th level spells for Magic Users and 5th level spells for Clerics. Received numerous supplements, both officially released and from magazine articles. Unfortunately, it required the ''Chainmail'' rulebook to properly play.
** '''Supplement I: Greyhawk - 1975''': Introduced the Thief class, the Paladin as a Fighting-Man subclass, Half-Elves as a playable race, and more monsters. Amended the level and class restrictions for Dwarves, Elves, and Halflings to account for the Thief class. [[note]]Dwarves, Elves, and Halflings could advance as a Thief with no level cap. Dwarves could advance to either 7th or 8th level Fighting-Man with an exceptional Strength score; they could also multiclass as either a Fighting-Man/Thief or a Fighting-Man/Cleric, although the Fighting-Man/Cleric option was NPC-only and their Cleric level capped at 7th level. Elves could advance up to 5th or 6th level Fighting-Man with an exceptional Strength score and 9th Magic-User with an exceptional Intelligence score; they could also multiclass as either a Fighting-Man/Magic-User/Cleric or a Fighting-Man/Magic-User/Thief, although FM/MU/Cleric had their Magic-User and Cleric classes capped at 6th level. Halflings could choose to be either a Fighting-Man or a Thief and had the best Thief skill bonuses of the non-human races. Half-Elves multiclass as a Fighting-Man/Magic-User by default, with both classes capped at 6th level, although exceptional Strength/Intelligence scores would raise them up to 7th or 8th level; they could also multiclass as a FM/MU/Cleric with a high enough Wisdom score, but their Cleric level capped at 4th level.[[/note]] Magic Users gained 7th-9th level spells, but only if their Intelligence score was high enough, while Clerics gained 6th and 7th level spells. Contained both new and additional rules in order to distance itself from ''Chainmail''.



** In an effort to keep things "fresh", [=WotC=] is releasing just two storyline-based adventure modules each year, commissioning third party publishers such as Kobold Press, Sasquatch Game Studio, and Green Ronin to help develop them.

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** In an effort to keep things "fresh", [=WotC=] is releasing just two storyline-based adventure modules each year, commissioning third party publishers such as Kobold Press, Sasquatch Game Studio, and Green Ronin to help develop write them.



* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Swords+%26+Wizardry Swords and Wizardry]]''': Created by Mythmere Games. One of the more well-known retroclones, this game goes all the way back to the original 1974 edition of D&D. Notable for having only one saving throw instead of five, although it includes the option to use the original system. You get to choose whether you want to play with original descending AC or ascending AC. Has a number of variants based on the system, such as ''[=WhiteHack=]''. ''White Star'', and ''Crypts & Things''. There are four versions of this game, all of which are free to download:

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* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Swords+%26+Wizardry Swords and Wizardry]]''': Created by Mythmere Games. One of the more well-known retroclones, this game goes all the way back to the original 1974 edition of D&D. Notable for having only one saving throw instead of five, although it includes the option to use the original system. You get to choose whether you want to play with original descending AC or ascending AC. Has a number of variants based on the system, such as ''[=WhiteHack=]''. ''[=WhiteHack=]'', ''White Star'', and ''Crypts & Things''. There are four versions of this game, all of which are free to download:



** ''Swords & Wizardry: Light'', a version created by [[http://www.tenkarstavern.com/ Erik "Tenkar" Stiene of Tenkar's Tavern]], [[http://www.tenkarstavern.com/2016/08/its-official-frog-god-games-to-publish.html officially endorsed by Mythmere Games and to be published by Frog God Games]]. Essentially what Basic D&D was to AD&D: an easier to play version designed to help people learn the system. It heavily condenses the White Box Rules book down to 4 print-and-play pages. While the launch version runs from 1st level to 3rd level, with players converting to one of the three other versions at 4th level, an expanded version called ''Continual Light'' extends it to 7th level and introduces subclass variants for the default four classes.

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** ''Swords & Wizardry: Light'', a version created by [[http://www.tenkarstavern.com/ Erik "Tenkar" Stiene of Tenkar's Tavern]], [[http://www.tenkarstavern.com/2016/08/its-official-frog-god-games-to-publish.html officially endorsed by Mythmere Games and to be published by Frog God Games]]. Essentially what Basic D&D was to AD&D: an easier to play version designed to help people learn the system. It heavily condenses the White Box Rules book down to 4 print-and-play pages. While the launch version runs from 1st level to 3rd level, with players converting to one of the three other versions at 4th level, an expanded version called ''Continual Light'' extends it to 7th level and introduces subclass variants for the default four classes.
6th Oct '17 7:09:27 PM intastiel
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* MurderIntoMalevolence:
** This is built into the rules for making a ghost in some editions; their CharacterAlignment becomes NeutralEvil regardless of who they were in life.
** Victims of undead with the "create spawn" ability (such as wights and ghouls) always fit this trope: they return as AlwaysChaoticEvil shadows of their former selves (literally in the case of LivingShadows), which must be slain to resurrect them or allow them to pass on to the afterlife.
** 1[[superscript:st]] Edition AD&D ''Fiend Folio'': the revenant is an undead that can be created when a humanoid creature dies a violent death. It is dedicated to hunting down the creature that killed it, as well as any creatures that helped in the killing. Once it finds them, it will try to strangle its killer(s) to death.
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