History TabletopGame / TwilightStruggle

12th Feb '18 9:04:04 PM nombretomado
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* RiskStyleMap: Countries are grouped into regions (Europe[[note]]further divided into Eastern and Western[[/note]], Asia[[note]]with a Southeast Asia subregion[[/note]], Middle East, Central America, South America, and Africa). Individual countries border each other via lines drawn on the game board rather than strictly by geography (e.g., Chile and Bolivia physically border each other in real life but do not border each other in the game owing to [[WarOfThePacific historical animosity]]). Borders come into play chiefly when playing a card for ops for influence (you can only place influence in a country where you already have influence or a country bordering it) or realignment (controlling neighboring countries gives you a +1 to your roll) - some card events also take borders into account (i.e., rolls for war cards have a -1 for each neighbor of the target your opponent controls).

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* RiskStyleMap: Countries are grouped into regions (Europe[[note]]further divided into Eastern and Western[[/note]], Asia[[note]]with a Southeast Asia subregion[[/note]], Middle East, Central America, South America, and Africa). Individual countries border each other via lines drawn on the game board rather than strictly by geography (e.g., Chile and Bolivia physically border each other in real life but do not border each other in the game owing to [[WarOfThePacific [[UsefulNotes/WarOfThePacific historical animosity]]). Borders come into play chiefly when playing a card for ops for influence (you can only place influence in a country where you already have influence or a country bordering it) or realignment (controlling neighboring countries gives you a +1 to your roll) - some card events also take borders into account (i.e., rolls for war cards have a -1 for each neighbor of the target your opponent controls).
26th Jan '18 2:31:44 PM Matt620
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** The Early-Middle-Late War division of cards means events go off roughly around the time they went off in RealLife (e.g., the Early War Castro card will probably go off earlier than the Late War Chernobyl card), though events can be deferred to a later turn. The situation on the board will likely turn out this way to varying extents as the game progresses (e.g., Italy or South Korea falling under Soviet control early on).
** The "Turn Zero" expansion enables this to six different events that took place at the close of World War 2 (Yalta/Potsdam Conferences, VE Day, the founding of Israel, the 1945 UK elections, the Chinese Civil War, and VJ Day), which allows alternate starting influence set-ups and possible rule changes (e.g., a very good result for the US in the "Chinese Civil War" event would make Taiwan a permanent battleground country, add three US influence to make it start US-controlled, and replace the "Formosan Resolution" card with a "Nationalist China" card - in-universe it's the result of the Nationalists under Chiang Kai-Shek getting very rapid US support and being able to hold on to the south part of the Mainland) to the board before the game even starts.

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** The Early-Middle-Late War division of cards means events go off roughly around the time they went off in RealLife (e.g., the Early War Castro card will probably go off earlier than the Late War Chernobyl card), though events can be deferred to a later turn. The situation on the board will likely turn out this way to varying extents as As the game progresses (e.g., Italy or South Korea falling under Soviet control early on).
is based on real life events, almost assuredly the game's playthrough creates an Alternate History of the Cold War.
** The "Turn Zero" expansion enables this to six different events that took place at the close of either during World War 2 (Yalta/Potsdam Conferences, VE Day, II or just after it. Depending on the founding of Israel, die rolls, it makes even more alternate history.
*** V-E Day could have
the 1945 UK elections, Allies reach Berlin before the Soviets do, creating Allied support in East Germany. Alternatively, the Wehrmacht could collapse early, creating Soviet influence in West Germany and Austria.
*** The
Chinese Civil War, War could allow the US to give Chaing Kai-Shek more material support, creating a battleground state in Taiwan and VJ Day), allowing the Nationalist China card, which allows alternate starting influence set-ups and possible rule changes (e.g., a very good result for the US to place Influence in the "Chinese Civil War" event would make Taiwan a permanent battleground country, add three US influence to make it start US-controlled, and replace the "Formosan Resolution" card with a "Nationalist China" card - in-universe it's the result of the Nationalists under Chiang Kai-Shek getting very rapid US support and being able to hold on to the south part of the Mainland) to the board before the game even starts.Asia.



* LethalJokeCharacter: Or "card", rather. The Early War US-only CIA Created card is only worth 1 op point, but if the Soviet player has it and doesn't treat it with care it can make him automatically lose[[note]]The card's text explicitly gives the US player 1 op point, so if there is '''any''' Soviet influence in a battleground country in Latin America or Africa (i.e., Cuba post-Castro) and DEFCON is at 2, the US can coup there, force DEFCON to level one, and win automatically because it was the Soviet player who played it[[/note]]. Ditto for the Mid-War "Lone Gunman" card for the American.

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* LethalJokeCharacter: Or "card", rather. The Early War US-only CIA Created card is only worth 1 op point, but if the Soviet player has it and doesn't treat it with care it can make him automatically lose[[note]]The card's text explicitly gives the US player 1 op point, so if there is '''any''' Soviet influence in a battleground country in Latin America or Africa (i.e., Cuba post-Castro) and DEFCON is at 2, the US can coup there, force DEFCON to level one, and win automatically because it was the Soviet player who played it[[/note]]. Ditto for the Mid-War "Lone Gunman" card for the American. The "First Lightning" Soviet card can cause this for both players, since it will degrade DEFCON one rank if either player plays it for Operations.
22nd Nov '17 7:18:10 PM nombretomado
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* CubanMissileCrisis: An in-game card that can be used by either player. Sicking it on your opponent means DEFCON immediately goes to two and they are not allowed to coup anywhere on the board, or else it will start nuclear war and s/he will automatically lose. There's also an escape clause mirroring what happened in RealLife - he may cancel the card by forfeiting two influence in certain countries (Cuba for the Soviets, West Germany or Turkey for the US).
26th Oct '17 5:44:53 PM Drago_13
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* ActuallyFourMooks: Several "countries" on the board are actually several countries being represented as one space: Spain/Portugal in Europe, Laos/Cambodia in Asia, the Gulf States in the Middle East, and a bunch in Africa[[note]]West African States, Saharan States, SE African States[[/note]].

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* ActuallyFourMooks: Several "countries" on the board are actually several countries being represented as one space: Spain/Portugal and Benelux (Belgium, the Netherlands, and Luxembourg) in Europe, Laos/Cambodia in Asia, the Gulf States in the Middle East, and a bunch in Africa[[note]]West African States, Saharan States, SE African States[[/note]].
21st May '17 2:59:36 PM nombretomado
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* ChessMotifs: As befitting a game set in the Cold War - as noted by the game's designers, entire countries are treated as little more than pawns in the grand game against the opposing superpower, with the occasional bishop in battleground countries like France and China acting as a rook or perhaps queen. In-game it's invoked in the "''{{Wargames}}''" card, which has the outline of a rook on it and includes the famous "How about a nice game of chess?".

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* ChessMotifs: As befitting a game set in the Cold War - as noted by the game's designers, entire countries are treated as little more than pawns in the grand game against the opposing superpower, with the occasional bishop in battleground countries like France and China acting as a rook or perhaps queen. In-game it's invoked in the "''{{Wargames}}''" "''Film/{{Wargames}}''" card, which has the outline of a rook on it and includes the famous "How about a nice game of chess?".
13th May '17 1:26:00 PM nombretomado
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* IronLady: ''[[TropeNamer The]]'' [[MargaretThatcher Iron Lady]] is a Late War card that wipes out any Soviet influence from the UK as well as neutralize the Socialist Governments card (allows the Soviet player to remove US influence from Western Europe). It also gives the Soviets one influence in Argentina thanks to the Falklands War.

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* IronLady: ''[[TropeNamer The]]'' [[MargaretThatcher [[UsefulNotes/MargaretThatcher Iron Lady]] is a Late War card that wipes out any Soviet influence from the UK as well as neutralize the Socialist Governments card (allows the Soviet player to remove US influence from Western Europe). It also gives the Soviets one influence in Argentina thanks to the Falklands War.
19th Apr '17 11:46:45 AM megarockman
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Added DiffLines:

* TurbulentPriest: The Mid-War "Pope John Paul II Elected" card for the Soviet player, the counterpart for Poland what De Gaulle is for France - remove 2 Soviet influence and add 1 US influence. Actually, the card is potentially more damaging than "De Gaulle", as its play also allows the Late War "Solidarity" event to happen (add 3 US influence in Poland).
16th Apr '17 2:37:53 PM nombretomado
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* TheSpaceRace: Operates as a safety valve in-game in that players can rid a card from their hand that would help their opponent each turn. If successful, it can also award VP as well as special benefits if you're in the lead, such as forcing your opponent to show his headline card first (until he catches up).
17th Mar '17 11:02:11 AM megarockman
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* LuckManipulationMechanic: The optional "Our Man in Tehran" card allows the US player to draw the top 5 cards in the draw deck, discard what they want, and shuffle the rest back (provided there is at least one US-controlled country in the Middle East). The alternate space race track also allows this for a player that reaches the "lunar landing" spot and the other hasn't gotten there yet - they may re-roll a coup attempt once per turn.

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* LuckManipulationMechanic: The optional "Our Man in Tehran" card allows the US player to draw the top 5 cards in the draw deck, discard what they want, and shuffle the rest back (provided there is at least one US-controlled country in the Middle East). The alternate space race track also allows this for a player that reaches the "lunar landing" sixth spot and the other hasn't gotten there yet - they may re-roll a coup attempt once per turn.
17th Mar '17 10:56:38 AM megarockman
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* LuckManipulationMechanic: The optional "Our Man in Tehran" card allows the US player to draw the top 5 cards in the draw deck, discard what they want, and shuffle the rest back (provided there is at least one US-controlled country in the Middle East).

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* LuckManipulationMechanic: The optional "Our Man in Tehran" card allows the US player to draw the top 5 cards in the draw deck, discard what they want, and shuffle the rest back (provided there is at least one US-controlled country in the Middle East). The alternate space race track also allows this for a player that reaches the "lunar landing" spot and the other hasn't gotten there yet - they may re-roll a coup attempt once per turn.
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