History TabletopGame / TwilightStruggle

2nd Jul '16 8:16:24 AM Kollega
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In December 2010, ''Twilight Struggle'' became the highest-ranked game on BoardGameGeek, displacing ''Puerto Rico.'' It has also won several awards. Online play is popular, with tournaments being held annually.

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In December 2010, ''Twilight Struggle'' became the highest-ranked game on BoardGameGeek, [=BoardGameGeek=], displacing ''Puerto Rico.'' It has also won several awards. Online play is popular, with tournaments being held annually.



* HeartbeatSoundtrack: The computer game adaptation features a slow music theme in this fashion, punctuated by steel percussion, radio static, telegraph noises, and era-appropriate sound bites from both sides of the Iron Curtain. The resulting mix really gets across the tense, uncertain Cold War atmosphere.

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* HeartbeatSoundtrack: The computer game adaptation features a slow music theme in this fashion, punctuated by steel percussion, gunfire, radio static, telegraph and air raid siren noises, and era-appropriate sound bites from both sides of the Iron Curtain. The resulting mix really gets across the tense, uncertain Cold War atmosphere.
2nd Jul '16 7:42:34 AM Kollega
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* FollowTheLeader: ''Twilight Struggle'' is by no means the first card-driven board game created (the concept had been around for at least a decade prior to its introduction) or even the first one published by GMT Games, but the success and popularity of this game means similar games almost inevitably get compared to it. This is especially true if the game in question shares the same publisher, one of its creators, or a not-strictly-military theme.


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* HeartbeatSoundtrack: The computer game adaptation features a slow music theme in this fashion, punctuated by steel percussion, radio static, telegraph noises, and era-appropriate sound bites from both sides of the Iron Curtain. The resulting mix really gets across the tense, uncertain Cold War atmosphere.
21st Jun '16 9:00:45 AM megarockman
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* CompensatingForSomething: Invoked with the "Missile Envy" card, which forces your opponent to give you the highest-ops card (event goes off if its your event or neutral, get to play ops for free if the card's event is your opponent's) in his hand and then must play "Missile Envy" themselves for ops on the next Action Round - the card is only worth 2 ops. The idea behind the card (termed by Dr. Helen Caldicott) was that some decisions made by the superpowers (and their generally-male leadership) were influenced by the desire not to appear "un-manly" in front of their adversary, which led them to make otherwise fairly nonconstructive decisions. The background text for the card makes it more explicit:
-->When one examines the terminology of [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything "deep penetration" and "multiple reentry"]] one wonders if she had a point.
25th May '16 1:27:57 PM megarockman
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All cards (except scoring cards) have both an event and an operations number (ops for short). Some events are playable by both superpowers, others are associated with one or the other. If you play a card that has one of your opponent's events, the event happens anyway. Cards can be used to play the event or for ops. Ops can be used to directly place influence on the board (adjacent to where you already are), or for a coup attempt. This involves a die roll plus the ops value of the card; if you roll well enough, then you can replace an opponent's influence in a country with some of your own, or at least reduce his or her influence in the country. Some countries are more vulnerable to coups than others. Cards can also be played to advance on the space race, though generally only one card can be used on the space race per turn. The significance of this is that if you play a card with one of your opponent's events on the space race, the event does ''not'' happen. There are also scoring cards, such as "Asia Scoring". When this card is played, the player with the superior position in that region (here, Asia) will earn victory points ([=VPs=]).

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All cards (except scoring cards) have both an event and an operations number (ops for short). Some events are playable by both superpowers, others are associated with one or the other. If you play a card that has one of your opponent's events, the event happens anyway. Cards can be used to play the event or for ops. Ops can be used to directly place influence on the board (adjacent to where you already are), or for a coup attempt. This involves a die roll plus the ops value of the card; if you roll well enough, then you can replace an opponent's influence in a country with some of your own, or at least reduce his or her influence in the country. Some Less-stable countries are more vulnerable to coups than others. coups. Cards can also be played to advance on the space race, though generally only one card can be used on the space race per turn. The significance of this is that if you play a card with one of your opponent's events on the space race, the event does ''not'' happen. There are also scoring cards, such as "Asia Scoring". When Scoring"; when this card is played, the player with the superior position in that region (here, Asia) will earn victory points ([=VPs=]).



* DefconFive: Used correctly; Defcon Five is the starting setting (i.e. "no danger"), while Defcon One instantly triggers WorldWarIII.

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* DefconFive: Used correctly; Defcon Five is the starting setting (i.e. "no danger"), while Defcon One instantly triggers WorldWarIII.WorldWarIII and a game over to whoever started it (which isn't necessarily the one who actually brought it down that far).



** Many of the "DEFCON suicide" cards, though, are that way because they permit the opponent to coup a battleground country and reduce DEFCON from 2 to 1. However, if they're under "Cuban Missile Crisis" (coup ''anywhere'' and you lose automatically) and can't cancel it by forfeiting the necessary two influence in the required countries (Cuba for the USSR, West Germany or Turkey for the US), ''they'' lose instead because the fact there was a coup supersedes the reduction of the DEFCON level.

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** Many of the "DEFCON suicide" cards, though, are that way because they permit the opponent to coup a battleground country and reduce DEFCON from 2 to 1.1 (since you're the one who played the first card in that sequence, the fault and defeat lies on you). However, if they're under "Cuban Missile Crisis" (coup ''anywhere'' and you lose automatically) and can't cancel it by forfeiting the necessary two influence in the required countries (Cuba for the USSR, West Germany or Turkey for the US), ''they'' lose instead because the fact there was a coup supersedes the reduction of the DEFCON level.



* InSpiteOfANail: As mentioned above, the separation of the deck into Early War, Mid-War, and Late War serves to keep some resemblance to the RealLife sequence of events.
** Sometimes can lead to weird situations, such as a Soviet-backed North Korean invasion of a South Korea also controlled by the Soviets via influence placement.
* InstantWinCondition: Any time your opponent sets off nuclear war, or if you have control of Europe[[note]]more controlled countries in Europe and all battlegrounds of France, Italy, Poland, and both Germanies[[/note]] when the Europe Scoring card is played, or if one side has a 20-point lead before the end of the 10th and final turn.

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* InSpiteOfANail: As mentioned above, the separation of the deck into Early War, Mid-War, and Late War serves to keep some resemblance to the RealLife sequence of events.
** Sometimes
events. It can sometimes can lead to weird situations, such as a Soviet-backed North Korean invasion of a South Korea also already controlled by the Soviets via influence placement.
* InstantWinCondition: Any time your opponent sets off nuclear war, or if you have control of Europe[[note]]more Europe (more controlled countries in Europe and all battlegrounds of France, Italy, Poland, and both Germanies[[/note]] Germanies) when the Europe Scoring card is played, or if one side has a 20-point lead before the end of the 10th and final turn.



* InternationalShowdownByProxy: On a broad level, the whole game is like this for the US and Soviet Union through control of countries or specific card events (i.e., Arms Race, Kitchen Debates, Summit, etc.), as measured by the VP track.

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* InternationalShowdownByProxy: On a broad level, the whole game is like this for the US and Soviet Union through control of countries or specific card events (i.e.(e.g., Arms Race, Kitchen Debates, Summit, OPEC, etc.), as measured by the VP track.



* [[LethalJokeCharacter Lethal Joke Card]]: The Early War US-only CIA Created card is only worth 1 op point, but if the Soviet player has it and doesn't treat it with care it can make him automatically lose[[note]]The card's text explicitly gives the US player 1 op point, so if there is '''any''' Soviet influence in a battleground country in Latin America or Africa (i.e., Cuba post-Castro) and DEFCON is at 2, the US can coup there, force DEFCON to level one, and win automatically because it was the Soviet player who played it[[/note]]. Ditto for the Mid-War "Lone Gunman" card for the American.

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* [[LethalJokeCharacter Lethal Joke Card]]: LethalJokeCharacter: Or "card", rather. The Early War US-only CIA Created card is only worth 1 op point, but if the Soviet player has it and doesn't treat it with care it can make him automatically lose[[note]]The card's text explicitly gives the US player 1 op point, so if there is '''any''' Soviet influence in a battleground country in Latin America or Africa (i.e., Cuba post-Castro) and DEFCON is at 2, the US can coup there, force DEFCON to level one, and win automatically because it was the Soviet player who played it[[/note]]. Ditto for the Mid-War "Lone Gunman" card for the American.



* TheSpaceRace: Operates as a safety valve in-game in that players can rid a card from their hand that would help their opponent each turn. If successful, it also awards VP as well as special benefits, such as forcing your opponent to show his headline card first, if you're in the lead (at least until he catches up).

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* TheSpaceRace: Operates as a safety valve in-game in that players can rid a card from their hand that would help their opponent each turn. If successful, it can also awards award VP as well as special benefits, benefits if you're in the lead, such as forcing your opponent to show his headline card first, if you're in the lead (at least until first (until he catches up).
9th May '16 8:38:42 AM megarockman
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* UsefulNotes/WithEuropeButNotOfIt: As the UK is not considered a battleground country it is not necessary for the Soviets to gain control of it in order to score Control of Europe for the InstantWinCondition; indeed, it would make the task nigh-impossible for the Soviet player if the UK was since it starts out US-controlled and has the highest stability level of any country on the map with 5. "Socialist Governments" and "Suez Crisis" can reduce US influence in the UK, but "Marshall Plan" can put one back, "The Iron Lady" wipes out any Soviet influence in the UK, and "Special Relationship" means the US has an additional incentive to keep the UK on their side.
2nd May '16 10:24:02 AM megarockman
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A computer adaption was announced in November 2010; it was released on Steam on April 22, 2016.

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A computer adaption was announced in November 2010; it was released on Steam on April 22, 14, 2016.
2nd May '16 10:23:23 AM megarockman
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A computer adaption was announced in November 2010, which is confirmed to still be in the works.

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A computer adaption was announced in November 2010, which is confirmed to still be in the works.
2010; it was released on Steam on April 22, 2016.



** The "Turn Zero" expansion enables this to six different events that took place at the close of World War 2 (Yalta/Potsdam Conferences, VE Day, the founding of Israel, the 1945 UK elections, the Chinese Civil War, and VJ Day), which allows alternate starting influence set-ups to the board before the game even starts.



* LuckManipulationMechanic: The optional "Our Man in Tehran" allows the US player to draw the top 5 cards in the draw deck, discard what they want, and shuffle the rest back (provided there is at least one US-controlled country in the Middle East).

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* LuckManipulationMechanic: The optional "Our Man in Tehran" card allows the US player to draw the top 5 cards in the draw deck, discard what they want, and shuffle the rest back (provided there is at least one US-controlled country in the Middle East).


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** In 2015 an expansion pack called "Turn Zero" was released (first to those who donated to a Kickstarter campaign) whose big selling point was allowing for more variable starting set-ups and alterations to the deck via possible AlternateHistory outcomes of six events that happened at the close of World War 2, as well as some additional cards. For example, if the Soviets get past the Elbe River (i.e., they get a really fortunate roll for the "VE Day" event resolution) they would get both 2 additional influence in Eastern Europe during starting set-up (for a total of eight) and 1 extra influence in Austria and West Germany.
1st Apr '16 1:04:55 PM megarockman
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* TheCoup: An action a superpower can initiate with ops or with certain events. Coups count towards military operations[[note]]except for "Junta"[[/note]] (to placate the hawks in one's camp that want to stand tough against those communists/capitalists), and coups in battlegrounds degrade the DEFCON meter and push the world closer to nuclear war.

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* TheCoup: An action a superpower can initiate with ops or with certain events. Coups count towards military operations[[note]]except operations[[note]]this doesn't apply for events where a coup is specifically granted, like "Junta"[[/note]] (to placate the hawks in one's camp that want to stand tough against those communists/capitalists), and coups in battlegrounds degrade the DEFCON meter and push the world closer to nuclear war.


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* LuckManipulationMechanic: The optional "Our Man in Tehran" allows the US player to draw the top 5 cards in the draw deck, discard what they want, and shuffle the rest back (provided there is at least one US-controlled country in the Middle East).
18th Mar '16 11:01:51 AM megarockman
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* NoSell: "UN Intervention" lets a player play a card with the opponent's event on it without the event going off - the card gets discarded and the player gets the operation points.

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* NoSell: "UN Intervention" lets a player play a card with the opponent's event on it without the event going off - the card gets discarded and the player gets the operation points. The US card "Defectors" also allows them to cancel a Soviet headline card if played at that phase.
18th Mar '16 10:58:58 AM megarockman
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** Many of the "DEFCON suicide" cards, though, are that way because they permit the opponent to coup a battleground country and reduce DEFCON from 2 to 1. However, if they're under "Cuban Missile Crisis" (coup ''anywhere'' and you lose automatically) and can't cancel it by forfeiting the necessary two influence in the require countries (Cuba for the USSR, West Germany or Turkey for the US), ''they'' lose instead because the fact there was a coup supersedes the reduction of the DEFCON level.

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** Many of the "DEFCON suicide" cards, though, are that way because they permit the opponent to coup a battleground country and reduce DEFCON from 2 to 1. However, if they're under "Cuban Missile Crisis" (coup ''anywhere'' and you lose automatically) and can't cancel it by forfeiting the necessary two influence in the require required countries (Cuba for the USSR, West Germany or Turkey for the US), ''they'' lose instead because the fact there was a coup supersedes the reduction of the DEFCON level.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=TabletopGame.TwilightStruggle