History TabletopGame / TunnelsAndTrolls

1st Sep '17 12:12:40 PM adzi
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* GameBreaker: In earlier editions, there was a spell allowing to permanently triple any given weapon effectiveness. A single Wizard could enchant all of his party weaponry during a TimeSkip. Later [[{{Nerf}} nerfed]] by making the effect temporary.


Added DiffLines:

* HeroicRROD: In both physical and magical varieties.
** Using a weapon without sufficient strength will temporarily drain that strength by the difference per combat round. It accumulates pretty fast. If strength is drained to 0, the character passes out, and any excessive drain is converted to actual damage - it's completely possible to tire yourself to death by trying to swing that {{BFS}}.
** Draining your Strength to 0 by spellcasting kills you.
1st Sep '17 11:50:38 AM adzi
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The Rogue class was [[AbsurdlyLowLevelCap capped]] at 7th level, after reaching it that character had to [[ClassChangeLevelReset change class]] to either 5th level Warrior (losing any and all spellcasting abilities) or 3rd level Wizard (greatly reducing combat ability, but retaining all his learned spells). As the system is mainly stat-based than level-based, the loss wasn't as harsh as in Dungeons & Dragons, but character's development was slowed for a while.

to:

** The Rogue class was [[AbsurdlyLowLevelCap capped]] at 7th level, after reaching it that character had to [[ClassChangeLevelReset change class]] to either 5th level Warrior (losing any and all spellcasting abilities) or 3rd level Wizard (greatly reducing combat ability, but retaining all his learned spells). As [[note]]As the system is mainly stat-based than level-based, the loss wasn't as harsh as in Dungeons & Dragons, but character's development was slowed for a while.[[/note]]
** Instead of [[DamageReduction reducing received damage per combat round]], armor counted as a [[BodyArmorAsHitPoints bonus]] to [[HitPoints Constitution stat]]. Player would decide how much damage was absorbed by breakable armor.
** Ranged attacks were always accurate on their own, if they were possible to be made. Targets would instead evade them completely by making saving throws.
1st Sep '17 11:36:27 AM adzi
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: The oldest editions have some quirks.
** The Rogue class was [[AbsurdlyLowLevelCap capped]] at 7th level, after reaching it that character had to [[ClassChangeLevelReset change class]] to either 5th level Warrior (losing any and all spellcasting abilities) or 3rd level Wizard (greatly reducing combat ability, but retaining all his learned spells). As the system is mainly stat-based than level-based, the loss wasn't as harsh as in Dungeons & Dragons, but character's development was slowed for a while.
17th Jun '17 2:12:12 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Up to the beginning of the 1980s, ''T & T'' enjoyed moderate success, reaching its classic 5th edition in 1979. Then competition from a large number of new games, as well as significant rewrites of older games like ''D & D'', pushed it into obscurity. According to the OtherWiki, in 1999 ''Pyramid'' magazine named ''Tunnels & Trolls'' as one of The ''Millennium's Most Underrated Games''. It still has its loyal followers in many countries, though. In 2005 a 30th Anniversary Edition (aka 7th edition) was published with modernized rules.

to:

Up to the beginning of the 1980s, ''T & T'' enjoyed moderate success, reaching its classic 5th edition in 1979. Then competition from a large number of new games, as well as significant rewrites of older games like ''D & D'', pushed it into obscurity. According to the OtherWiki, Wiki/TheOtherWiki, in 1999 ''Pyramid'' magazine named ''Tunnels & Trolls'' as one of The ''Millennium's Most Underrated Games''. It still has its loyal followers in many countries, though. In 2005 a 30th Anniversary Edition (aka 7th edition) was published with modernized rules.
15th Apr '17 4:21:10 PM CosmicFerret
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* TropesAreTools: Although it started off as a SerialNumbersFiledOff version of DungeonsAndDragons, it introduced the concept of Skills which eventually made their way back into D&D, solving a long-standing problem of how to deal with things like picking locks, disarming traps, and pretty much anything else that wasn't strict wargaming. The skill system was also the basis of the skill system in {{VideoGame/Wasteland}}, which had a considerable impact on stat-based computer roleplaying.

to:

* TropesAreTools: Although it started off as a SerialNumbersFiledOff version of DungeonsAndDragons, TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons, it introduced the concept of Skills which eventually made their way back into D&D, solving a long-standing problem of how to deal with things like picking locks, disarming traps, and pretty much anything else that wasn't strict wargaming. The skill system was also the basis of the skill system in {{VideoGame/Wasteland}}, which had a considerable impact on stat-based computer roleplaying.
9th Apr '17 12:56:20 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


--> --''{{Runequest}}'', 2nd edition rulebook

to:

--> --''{{Runequest}}'', --''TabletopGame/{{Runequest}}'', 2nd edition rulebook
20th Feb '17 12:54:13 AM jormis29
Is there an issue? Send a Message


In April 1975, Ken St. Andre borrowed a 1st edition ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' set from a friend. He found that he liked the concept but disliked the miniature wargame style of play, the use of polyhedral dice, alignments and clerics. He decided to write his own rules set and play the game with that instead. After two months of playing the game with his friends and rewriting it based on experience, he printed the forty-page 1st edition rules book in a first run of one hundred copies[[note]]until that point, the rules had been referred to as "Dungeons & Dragons", and since TSR hadn't trademarked the name at that time some playtesters argued for simply taking over the name; in the end the community decided against it: KSA's favored name was voted down and the rules were published as ''Tunnels & Trolls''[[/note]].

to:

In April 1975, Ken St. Andre borrowed a 1st edition ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' set from a friend. He found that he liked the concept but disliked the miniature wargame style of play, the use of polyhedral dice, alignments and clerics. He decided to write his own rules set and play the game with that instead. After two months of playing the game with his friends and rewriting it based on experience, he printed the forty-page 1st edition rules book in a first run of one hundred copies[[note]]until that point, the rules had been referred to as "Dungeons & Dragons", and since TSR Creator/{{TSR}} hadn't trademarked the name at that time some playtesters argued for simply taking over the name; in the end the community decided against it: KSA's favored name was voted down and the rules were published as ''Tunnels & Trolls''[[/note]].
11th Jan '17 9:11:17 PM kensu
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* TropesAreTools: Although it started off as a SerialNumbersFiledOff version of DungeonsAndDragons, it introduced the concept of Skills which eventually made their way back into D&D, solving a long-standing problem of how to deal with things like picking locks, disarming traps, and pretty much anything else that wasn't strict wargaming. The skill system was also the basis of the skill system in {{VideoGame/Wasteland}}, which had a considerable impact on stat-based computer roleplaying.
2nd Dec '16 5:38:09 AM john_e
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* CastFromStamina: Casting spells drains a magic user's Strength. Later editions avert this with a separate Wizardry stat.



* VancianMagic: (Mostly) averted. ''T & T'' has spells arranged into power levels, but capacity is governed by [[{{Mana}} spell points]].

to:

* VancianMagic: (Mostly) averted. ''T & T'' has spells arranged into power levels, but capacity is governed by [[{{Mana}} spell points]].
22nd May '15 3:44:40 AM hoodiecrow
Is there an issue? Send a Message


In April 1975, Ken St. Andre borrowed a 1st edition ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' set from a friend. He found that he liked the concept but disliked the miniature wargame style of play, the use of polyhedral dice, alignments and clerics. He decided to write his own rules set and play the game with that instead. After two months of playing the game with his friends and rewriting it based on experience, he printed the forty-page 1st edition rules book in a first run of one hundred copies as ''Tunnels & Trolls''.

to:

In April 1975, Ken St. Andre borrowed a 1st edition ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' set from a friend. He found that he liked the concept but disliked the miniature wargame style of play, the use of polyhedral dice, alignments and clerics. He decided to write his own rules set and play the game with that instead. After two months of playing the game with his friends and rewriting it based on experience, he printed the forty-page 1st edition rules book in a first run of one hundred copies copies[[note]]until that point, the rules had been referred to as "Dungeons & Dragons", and since TSR hadn't trademarked the name at that time some playtesters argued for simply taking over the name; in the end the community decided against it: KSA's favored name was voted down and the rules were published as ''Tunnels & Trolls''.
Trolls''[[/note]].



* OnceAcceptableTargets: Until recent editions, the MindControl spell was titled ''Yassa Massa.'' Thankfully corrected since.
This list shows the last 10 events of 21. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=TabletopGame.TunnelsAndTrolls