History TabletopGame / TunnelsAndTrolls

17th Jun '17 2:12:12 PM nombretomado
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Up to the beginning of the 1980s, ''T & T'' enjoyed moderate success, reaching its classic 5th edition in 1979. Then competition from a large number of new games, as well as significant rewrites of older games like ''D & D'', pushed it into obscurity. According to the OtherWiki, in 1999 ''Pyramid'' magazine named ''Tunnels & Trolls'' as one of The ''Millennium's Most Underrated Games''. It still has its loyal followers in many countries, though. In 2005 a 30th Anniversary Edition (aka 7th edition) was published with modernized rules.

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Up to the beginning of the 1980s, ''T & T'' enjoyed moderate success, reaching its classic 5th edition in 1979. Then competition from a large number of new games, as well as significant rewrites of older games like ''D & D'', pushed it into obscurity. According to the OtherWiki, Wiki/TheOtherWiki, in 1999 ''Pyramid'' magazine named ''Tunnels & Trolls'' as one of The ''Millennium's Most Underrated Games''. It still has its loyal followers in many countries, though. In 2005 a 30th Anniversary Edition (aka 7th edition) was published with modernized rules.
15th Apr '17 4:21:10 PM CosmicFerret
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* TropesAreTools: Although it started off as a SerialNumbersFiledOff version of DungeonsAndDragons, it introduced the concept of Skills which eventually made their way back into D&D, solving a long-standing problem of how to deal with things like picking locks, disarming traps, and pretty much anything else that wasn't strict wargaming. The skill system was also the basis of the skill system in {{VideoGame/Wasteland}}, which had a considerable impact on stat-based computer roleplaying.

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* TropesAreTools: Although it started off as a SerialNumbersFiledOff version of DungeonsAndDragons, TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons, it introduced the concept of Skills which eventually made their way back into D&D, solving a long-standing problem of how to deal with things like picking locks, disarming traps, and pretty much anything else that wasn't strict wargaming. The skill system was also the basis of the skill system in {{VideoGame/Wasteland}}, which had a considerable impact on stat-based computer roleplaying.
9th Apr '17 12:56:20 PM nombretomado
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--> --''{{Runequest}}'', 2nd edition rulebook

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--> --''{{Runequest}}'', --''TabletopGame/{{Runequest}}'', 2nd edition rulebook
20th Feb '17 12:54:13 AM jormis29
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In April 1975, Ken St. Andre borrowed a 1st edition ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' set from a friend. He found that he liked the concept but disliked the miniature wargame style of play, the use of polyhedral dice, alignments and clerics. He decided to write his own rules set and play the game with that instead. After two months of playing the game with his friends and rewriting it based on experience, he printed the forty-page 1st edition rules book in a first run of one hundred copies[[note]]until that point, the rules had been referred to as "Dungeons & Dragons", and since TSR hadn't trademarked the name at that time some playtesters argued for simply taking over the name; in the end the community decided against it: KSA's favored name was voted down and the rules were published as ''Tunnels & Trolls''[[/note]].

to:

In April 1975, Ken St. Andre borrowed a 1st edition ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' set from a friend. He found that he liked the concept but disliked the miniature wargame style of play, the use of polyhedral dice, alignments and clerics. He decided to write his own rules set and play the game with that instead. After two months of playing the game with his friends and rewriting it based on experience, he printed the forty-page 1st edition rules book in a first run of one hundred copies[[note]]until that point, the rules had been referred to as "Dungeons & Dragons", and since TSR Creator/{{TSR}} hadn't trademarked the name at that time some playtesters argued for simply taking over the name; in the end the community decided against it: KSA's favored name was voted down and the rules were published as ''Tunnels & Trolls''[[/note]].
11th Jan '17 9:11:17 PM kensu
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Added DiffLines:

* TropesAreTools: Although it started off as a SerialNumbersFiledOff version of DungeonsAndDragons, it introduced the concept of Skills which eventually made their way back into D&D, solving a long-standing problem of how to deal with things like picking locks, disarming traps, and pretty much anything else that wasn't strict wargaming. The skill system was also the basis of the skill system in {{VideoGame/Wasteland}}, which had a considerable impact on stat-based computer roleplaying.
2nd Dec '16 5:38:09 AM john_e
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* CastFromStamina: Casting spells drains a magic user's Strength. Later editions avert this with a separate Wizardry stat.



* VancianMagic: (Mostly) averted. ''T & T'' has spells arranged into power levels, but capacity is governed by [[{{Mana}} spell points]].

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* VancianMagic: (Mostly) averted. ''T & T'' has spells arranged into power levels, but capacity is governed by [[{{Mana}} spell points]].
22nd May '15 3:44:40 AM hoodiecrow
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In April 1975, Ken St. Andre borrowed a 1st edition ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' set from a friend. He found that he liked the concept but disliked the miniature wargame style of play, the use of polyhedral dice, alignments and clerics. He decided to write his own rules set and play the game with that instead. After two months of playing the game with his friends and rewriting it based on experience, he printed the forty-page 1st edition rules book in a first run of one hundred copies as ''Tunnels & Trolls''.

to:

In April 1975, Ken St. Andre borrowed a 1st edition ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' set from a friend. He found that he liked the concept but disliked the miniature wargame style of play, the use of polyhedral dice, alignments and clerics. He decided to write his own rules set and play the game with that instead. After two months of playing the game with his friends and rewriting it based on experience, he printed the forty-page 1st edition rules book in a first run of one hundred copies copies[[note]]until that point, the rules had been referred to as "Dungeons & Dragons", and since TSR hadn't trademarked the name at that time some playtesters argued for simply taking over the name; in the end the community decided against it: KSA's favored name was voted down and the rules were published as ''Tunnels & Trolls''.
Trolls''[[/note]].



* OnceAcceptableTargets: Until recent editions, the MindControl spell was titled ''Yassa Massa.'' Thankfully corrected since.
21st May '15 3:01:17 PM oknazevad
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In April 1975, Ken St. Andre borrowed a 1st edition ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' set from a friend. He found that he liked the concept but disliked the miniature wargame style of play, the use of polyhedral dice, alignments and clerics. He decided to write his own rules set and play the game with that instead. After two months of playing the game with his friends and rewriting it based on experience, he printed the forty-page 1st edition rules book in a first run of one hundred copies. By then, ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' had effectively trademarked what had been a generic term for tabletop role-playing games -- so his first choice was out. The rules were instead published as ''Tunnels & Trolls''.

to:

In April 1975, Ken St. Andre borrowed a 1st edition ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' set from a friend. He found that he liked the concept but disliked the miniature wargame style of play, the use of polyhedral dice, alignments and clerics. He decided to write his own rules set and play the game with that instead. After two months of playing the game with his friends and rewriting it based on experience, he printed the forty-page 1st edition rules book in a first run of one hundred copies. By then, ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' had effectively trademarked what had been a generic term for tabletop role-playing games -- so his first choice was out. The rules were instead published copies as ''Tunnels & Trolls''.
2nd Mar '15 6:19:42 AM SeptimusHeap
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In April 1975, Ken St. Andre borrowed a 1st edition ''DungeonsAndDragons'' set from a friend. He found that he liked the concept but disliked the miniature wargame style of play, the use of polyhedral dice, alignments and clerics. He decided to write his own rules set and play the game with that instead. After two months of playing the game with his friends and rewriting it based on experience, he printed the forty-page 1st edition rules book in a first run of one hundred copies. By then, ''DungeonsAndDragons'' had effectively trademarked what had been a generic term for tabletop role-playing games -- so his first choice was out. The rules were instead published as ''Tunnels & Trolls''.

to:

In April 1975, Ken St. Andre borrowed a 1st edition ''DungeonsAndDragons'' ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' set from a friend. He found that he liked the concept but disliked the miniature wargame style of play, the use of polyhedral dice, alignments and clerics. He decided to write his own rules set and play the game with that instead. After two months of playing the game with his friends and rewriting it based on experience, he printed the forty-page 1st edition rules book in a first run of one hundred copies. By then, ''DungeonsAndDragons'' ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' had effectively trademarked what had been a generic term for tabletop role-playing games -- so his first choice was out. The rules were instead published as ''Tunnels & Trolls''.



''Tunnels & Trolls'' uses only six-sided dice for game mechanics, and the principle of simplicity and uniformity permeates the rules. Compared to the infamously convoluted and cryptic 1st ed ''DungeonsAndDragons'' rules, the ''Tunnels & Trolls'' rules were clearly laid out and well-explained. ''T & T'' was also less serious-minded than ''D & D'': the tone was lighter, gameplay was oriented towards having fun, the spell names are mostly cute or punny, or both. However, the game is not joke-oriented as a whole -- it is a sound RPG.

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''Tunnels & Trolls'' uses only six-sided dice for game mechanics, and the principle of simplicity and uniformity permeates the rules. Compared to the infamously convoluted and cryptic 1st ed ''DungeonsAndDragons'' ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' rules, the ''Tunnels & Trolls'' rules were clearly laid out and well-explained. ''T & T'' was also less serious-minded than ''D & D'': the tone was lighter, gameplay was oriented towards having fun, the spell names are mostly cute or punny, or both. However, the game is not joke-oriented as a whole -- it is a sound RPG.
3rd Apr '14 8:30:06 AM VeronicaWakefield
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Added DiffLines:

* OnceAcceptableTargets: Until recent editions, the MindControl spell was titled ''Yassa Massa.'' Thankfully corrected since.
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