History TabletopGame / TheDarkEye

15th Dec '17 3:30:10 PM FungusFromYuggoth
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*** The Norbards seem like a mild-mannered Tartaric/Kirgiz people of nomadic traders, with some Jewish influences thrown in as well.

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*** The Norbards seem like a mild-mannered Tartaric/Kirgiz people of nomadic traders, with some Slavic and (Eastern European) Ashkenazi Jewish influences thrown in as well.well. [[labelnote:note]]That was acknowledged and given a nod in the original German version of ''[[{{VideoGame/ChainsOfSatinav}} Chains of Satinav]]'', where a (very minor) Norbardi NPC, whom Geron meets in the last third of the game, speaks with a -semi-convincing- Yiddish accent and manages to throw in four Yiddish words into her five lines of dialogue. Seeing as German is supposed to represent Garethi via TranslationConvention, probably the same goes for Yiddish and Alaani (the Norbards' language).[[/labelnote]] In-universe, they are actually of Tulamidian descent, being one of the ancient Tulamid tribes who migrated to the North of Aventuria ages ago, so the real-world inspirations fit somewhat.
15th Dec '17 3:15:40 PM FungusFromYuggoth
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** Dwarves believe (with some justification) that dragons, specifically the Great Dragon Pyrdacor, are the root of all evil in the world. Elves once worshipped Pyrdacor as a god.

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** Dwarves believe (with some justification) that dragons, specifically the Great Dragon Pyrdacor, are the root of all evil in the world. Elves once worshipped worshiped Pyrdacor as a god.god. [[labelnote:note]]Although that particular point is probably the least divisive issue for modern elves, seeing as they are...well, not very fond of either their former gods or the very fact that they once worshiped them. They're not much fond of the Twelver pantheon either, on that note.[[/labelnote]]
15th Dec '17 3:01:50 PM FungusFromYuggoth
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* ArtisticLicenseGeography: In the attempt to create a very large palette of distinct regions and cultures (see FantasyCounterpartCulture and FantasyKitchenSink below) - even hopping across historical eras - and, in what almost feels like a desperate attempt to avert the SingleBiomePlanet trope, the developers crammed fictional versions of nearly all real-world biomes into Aventuria. There's a polar region, multiple coastal regions ranging from temperate to Mediterranean-like, fertile farmlands, barren steps, several mountain chains, two deserts (one big, one rather small) and a tropical region. The catch is that all of this is crammed onto a continent about 3000 miles long and 2000 miles across, yielding an area of 6 million square miles. It's pointed out that an Aventurian mile is equivalent to a real-world kilometer. Basically the geological and meteorological diversity of the entire world is compressed into an area slightly smaller than real-world Australia.

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* ArtisticLicenseGeography: In the attempt to create a very large palette of distinct regions and cultures (see FantasyCounterpartCulture and FantasyKitchenSink below) - even hopping across historical eras - and, in what almost feels like a desperate attempt to avert the SingleBiomePlanet trope, the developers crammed fictional versions of nearly all real-world biomes into Aventuria. There's a polar region, multiple coastal regions ranging from temperate to Mediterranean-like, fertile farmlands, barren steps, steppes, several mountain chains, two deserts (one big, one rather small) and a tropical region. The catch is that all of this is crammed onto a continent about 3000 miles long and 2000 miles across, yielding an area of 6 million square miles. It's pointed out that an Aventurian mile is equivalent to a real-world kilometer. Basically the geological and meteorological diversity of the entire world is compressed into an area slightly smaller than real-world Australia.
15th Dec '17 2:37:27 PM FungusFromYuggoth
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** Another Aventurian example would be Artefact Magic. It's rather low-level compared to "true" Magitek settings, but the possibility of imbuing items with spells, with a set number of charges or a specific effect duration, does exist in the rules. In-universe, it's nowhere near the level of, for instance, ''[[{{TabletopGame/Eberron}} Eberron]]'', but nonetheless present, and the magic academy in Khunchom, which specializes in artefact magic and got filthy rich selling various artefacts, many of which are of the classic "magic ring" variety, but some of which straddle the line into magitek, has this as their hat. One could, for instance, imbue a metal rod with the Ignifaxius spell, used to generate a jet of flame, with the "Tight beam" modification, in which the jet becomes a narrow, very hot, focused beam of, well, essentially thermal energy, pump a set amount of charges into the artifact, specify a trigger (say, when the user of the artefact touches a "button", which could be a gem set into the rod) and voila - you got a magitek handheld combat laser.

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** Another Aventurian example would be Artefact Magic. It's rather low-level compared to "true" Magitek settings, but the possibility of imbuing items with spells, with a set number of charges or a specific effect duration, does exist in the rules. In-universe, it's nowhere near the level of, for instance, ''[[{{TabletopGame/Eberron}} Eberron]]'', Eberron]]'' (or Myranor, for that matter), but nonetheless present, and the magic academy in Khunchom, which specializes in artefact magic and got filthy rich selling various artefacts, many of which are of the classic "magic ring" variety, but some of which straddle the line into magitek, has this as their hat. One could, for instance, imbue a metal rod with the Ignifaxius spell, used to generate a jet of flame, with the "Tight beam" modification, in which the jet becomes a narrow, very hot, focused beam of, well, essentially thermal energy, pump a set amount of charges into the artifact, specify a trigger (say, when the user of the artefact touches a "button", which could be a gem set into the rod) and voila - you got a magitek handheld combat laser.
15th Dec '17 2:36:38 PM FungusFromYuggoth
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** Another Aventurian example would be Artefact Magic. It's rather low-level compared to "true" Magitek settings, but the possibility of imbuing items with spells, with a set number of charges or a specific effect duration, does exist in the rules. In-universe, it's nowhere near the level of, for instance, ''TabletopGame/Eberron'', but nonetheless present, and the magic academy in Khunchom, which specializes in artefact magic and got filthy rich selling various artefacts, many of which are of the classic "magic ring" variety, but some of which straddle the line into magitek. One could, for instance, imbue a metal rod with the Ignifaxius spell, used to generate a jet of flame, with the "Tight beam" modification, in which the jet becomes a narrow, very hot focused beam of, well, thermal energy, pump a set amount of charges into the artifact, specify a trigger (say, when the user of the artefact touches a "button", which could be a gem set into the rod) and voila - handheld combat laser.

to:

** Another Aventurian example would be Artefact Magic. It's rather low-level compared to "true" Magitek settings, but the possibility of imbuing items with spells, with a set number of charges or a specific effect duration, does exist in the rules. In-universe, it's nowhere near the level of, for instance, ''TabletopGame/Eberron'', ''[[{{TabletopGame/Eberron}} Eberron]]'', but nonetheless present, and the magic academy in Khunchom, which specializes in artefact magic and got filthy rich selling various artefacts, many of which are of the classic "magic ring" variety, but some of which straddle the line into magitek. magitek, has this as their hat. One could, for instance, imbue a metal rod with the Ignifaxius spell, used to generate a jet of flame, with the "Tight beam" modification, in which the jet becomes a narrow, very hot hot, focused beam of, well, essentially thermal energy, pump a set amount of charges into the artifact, specify a trigger (say, when the user of the artefact touches a "button", which could be a gem set into the rod) and voila - you got a magitek handheld combat laser.
15th Dec '17 2:33:18 PM FungusFromYuggoth
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Added DiffLines:

** Another Aventurian example would be Artefact Magic. It's rather low-level compared to "true" Magitek settings, but the possibility of imbuing items with spells, with a set number of charges or a specific effect duration, does exist in the rules. In-universe, it's nowhere near the level of, for instance, ''TabletopGame/Eberron'', but nonetheless present, and the magic academy in Khunchom, which specializes in artefact magic and got filthy rich selling various artefacts, many of which are of the classic "magic ring" variety, but some of which straddle the line into magitek. One could, for instance, imbue a metal rod with the Ignifaxius spell, used to generate a jet of flame, with the "Tight beam" modification, in which the jet becomes a narrow, very hot focused beam of, well, thermal energy, pump a set amount of charges into the artifact, specify a trigger (say, when the user of the artefact touches a "button", which could be a gem set into the rod) and voila - handheld combat laser.
15th Dec '17 2:14:04 PM FungusFromYuggoth
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* SufficientlyAnalyzedMagic: With magic being of the FunctionalMagic variety, this trope is very much in effect among the three Mage Guilds, whose members are generally (to varying extent) of the "rational" and "scientific" mindset, leading to copious amounts of Magibabble. Much less prominent/nearly non-existent among magic users with a WildMagic mindset, like Elves, witches, druids or shamans. For Guild mages, it sometimes crosses the line into outright [[{{Expy}} expies]] of real-world academia, with -quite faithfully rendered- typical academic behaviour, jargon, bureaucratic peculiarities etc. The reason for this is likely that the magic system in TDE, as well as large parts of the initial magic-related fluff, has been strongly influenced by Thomas Römer (a longtime key member of the TDE core design team), who happened to have studied (at a university, that is) physics and astronomy, but left before obtaining a degree. This exposure to a) hard sciences and b) the academic world very much shows in his TDE work.

to:

* SufficientlyAnalyzedMagic: With magic being of the FunctionalMagic variety, this trope is very much in effect among the three Mage Guilds, whose members are generally (to varying extent) of the "rational" and "scientific" mindset, leading to copious amounts of Magibabble.MagiBabble. Much less prominent/nearly non-existent among magic users with a WildMagic mindset, like Elves, witches, druids or shamans. For Guild mages, it sometimes crosses the line into outright [[{{Expy}} expies]] of real-world academia, with -quite faithfully rendered- typical academic behaviour, jargon, bureaucratic peculiarities etc. The reason for this is likely that the magic system in TDE, as well as large parts of the initial magic-related fluff, has been strongly influenced by Thomas Römer (a longtime key member of the TDE core design team), who happened to have studied (at a university, that is) physics and astronomy, but left before obtaining a degree. This exposure to a) hard sciences and b) the academic world very much shows in his TDE work.
15th Dec '17 2:12:33 PM FungusFromYuggoth
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Added DiffLines:

* SufficientlyAnalyzedMagic: With magic being of the FunctionalMagic variety, this trope is very much in effect among the three Mage Guilds, whose members are generally (to varying extent) of the "rational" and "scientific" mindset, leading to copious amounts of Magibabble. Much less prominent/nearly non-existent among magic users with a WildMagic mindset, like Elves, witches, druids or shamans. For Guild mages, it sometimes crosses the line into outright [[{{Expy}} expies]] of real-world academia, with -quite faithfully rendered- typical academic behaviour, jargon, bureaucratic peculiarities etc. The reason for this is likely that the magic system in TDE, as well as large parts of the initial magic-related fluff, has been strongly influenced by Thomas Römer (a longtime key member of the TDE core design team), who happened to have studied (at a university, that is) physics and astronomy, but left before obtaining a degree. This exposure to a) hard sciences and b) the academic world very much shows in his TDE work.
21st Oct '17 11:15:37 PM Jerry
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* ShoutOut: The sinister black mage [[PaulBearer Pôlberra]]
3rd Oct '17 1:51:53 PM ruthlesstyrant
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*** In 2000, the 4th edition was introduced, which was partially a reaction to the changing RPG landscape. As opposed to the 3rd edition, this one actually changed things by overhauling most of the concepts that had characterized the game for the past 16 years. For starters, instead of being fully randomized, characters were now generated using a stat budget including having access to newly introduced extensive perks/flaws lists (both changes were obvious ripoffs of the WorldOfDarkness systems) with the negative attributes being outsourced to the flaw list (and thus made entirely optional, unlike before). Also, the characters were designed with a character construction kit that made every character a combination of race/species, culture and profession (unlike before, where one was limited to be either race/species/culture, profession, or both combined as an additional option). Oh, and loads and loads of different options for each group were added. Also, levels were made meaningless because now you could buy skillups by expending XP instead of getting a fixed budget every level. Also, the skill system got expanded ''again'' by adding specializations for each skill, thus basically bloating the number of skills to over 100 with 4-5 specialization options each. The fact that players weren't necessarily forced to take up ''every'' skill (and, in fact, couldn't do so due to the nature of the stat budget-based system) alleviated this a little, but not by much. Combat got another overhaul by changing the nature of weapons (some weapons were now better than others at converting strength into damage) and adding special skills (another ripoff, this time from the feat system introduced in DnD3E) that mostly focused on combat and magic as well, and of course loads of maneuvers (usually tied to said special skills). And a lot more changes, too many too mention. The entire thing, while in theory pretty eclectic, turned TDE into a rather convoluted and not really beginner-friendly system; with the added irony that this was the system they stuck with the longest (15 years, almost the duration of all the three prior editions combined) which probably didn't help when it came to acquiring additional players during that period.

to:

*** In 2000, the 4th edition was introduced, which was partially a reaction to the changing RPG landscape. As opposed to the 3rd edition, this one actually changed things by overhauling most of the concepts that had characterized the game for the past 16 years. For starters, instead of being fully randomized, characters were now generated using a stat budget including having access to newly introduced extensive perks/flaws lists (both changes were obvious ripoffs of the WorldOfDarkness systems) with the negative attributes being outsourced to the flaw list (and thus made entirely optional, unlike before).before); and an additional 8th stat. Also, the characters were designed with a character construction kit that made every character a combination of race/species, culture and profession (unlike before, where one was limited to be either race/species/culture, profession, or both combined as an additional option). Oh, and loads and loads of different options for each group were added. Also, levels were made meaningless because now you could buy skillups by expending XP instead of getting a fixed budget every level. Also, the skill system got expanded ''again'' by adding specializations for each skill, thus basically bloating the number of skills to over 100 with 4-5 specialization options each. The fact that players weren't necessarily forced to take up ''every'' skill (and, in fact, couldn't do so due to the nature of the stat budget-based system) alleviated this a little, but not by much. Combat got another overhaul by changing the nature of weapons (some weapons were now better than others at converting strength into damage) and adding special skills (another ripoff, this time from the feat system introduced in DnD3E) that mostly focused on combat and magic as well, and of course loads of maneuvers (usually tied to said special skills). And a lot more changes, too many too mention. The entire thing, while in theory pretty eclectic, turned TDE into a rather convoluted and not really beginner-friendly system; with the added irony that this was the system they stuck with the longest (15 years, almost the duration of all the three prior editions combined) which probably didn't help when it came to acquiring additional players during that period.
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