History TabletopGame / TheDarkEye

3rd Oct '17 1:51:53 PM ruthlesstyrant
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*** In 2000, the 4th edition was introduced, which was partially a reaction to the changing RPG landscape. As opposed to the 3rd edition, this one actually changed things by overhauling most of the concepts that had characterized the game for the past 16 years. For starters, instead of being fully randomized, characters were now generated using a stat budget including having access to newly introduced extensive perks/flaws lists (both changes were obvious ripoffs of the WorldOfDarkness systems) with the negative attributes being outsourced to the flaw list (and thus made entirely optional, unlike before). Also, the characters were designed with a character construction kit that made every character a combination of race/species, culture and profession (unlike before, where one was limited to be either race/species/culture, profession, or both combined as an additional option). Oh, and loads and loads of different options for each group were added. Also, levels were made meaningless because now you could buy skillups by expending XP instead of getting a fixed budget every level. Also, the skill system got expanded ''again'' by adding specializations for each skill, thus basically bloating the number of skills to over 100 with 4-5 specialization options each. The fact that players weren't necessarily forced to take up ''every'' skill (and, in fact, couldn't do so due to the nature of the stat budget-based system) alleviated this a little, but not by much. Combat got another overhaul by changing the nature of weapons (some weapons were now better than others at converting strength into damage) and adding special skills (another ripoff, this time from the feat system introduced in DnD3E) that mostly focused on combat and magic as well, and of course loads of maneuvers (usually tied to said special skills). And a lot more changes, too many too mention. The entire thing, while in theory pretty eclectic, turned TDE into a rather convoluted and not really beginner-friendly system; with the added irony that this was the system they stuck with the longest (15 years, almost the duration of all the three prior editions combined) which probably didn't help when it came to acquiring additional players during that period.

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*** In 2000, the 4th edition was introduced, which was partially a reaction to the changing RPG landscape. As opposed to the 3rd edition, this one actually changed things by overhauling most of the concepts that had characterized the game for the past 16 years. For starters, instead of being fully randomized, characters were now generated using a stat budget including having access to newly introduced extensive perks/flaws lists (both changes were obvious ripoffs of the WorldOfDarkness systems) with the negative attributes being outsourced to the flaw list (and thus made entirely optional, unlike before).before); and an additional 8th stat. Also, the characters were designed with a character construction kit that made every character a combination of race/species, culture and profession (unlike before, where one was limited to be either race/species/culture, profession, or both combined as an additional option). Oh, and loads and loads of different options for each group were added. Also, levels were made meaningless because now you could buy skillups by expending XP instead of getting a fixed budget every level. Also, the skill system got expanded ''again'' by adding specializations for each skill, thus basically bloating the number of skills to over 100 with 4-5 specialization options each. The fact that players weren't necessarily forced to take up ''every'' skill (and, in fact, couldn't do so due to the nature of the stat budget-based system) alleviated this a little, but not by much. Combat got another overhaul by changing the nature of weapons (some weapons were now better than others at converting strength into damage) and adding special skills (another ripoff, this time from the feat system introduced in DnD3E) that mostly focused on combat and magic as well, and of course loads of maneuvers (usually tied to said special skills). And a lot more changes, too many too mention. The entire thing, while in theory pretty eclectic, turned TDE into a rather convoluted and not really beginner-friendly system; with the added irony that this was the system they stuck with the longest (15 years, almost the duration of all the three prior editions combined) which probably didn't help when it came to acquiring additional players during that period.
3rd Oct '17 1:49:56 PM ruthlesstyrant
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*** In 2000, the 4th edition was introduced, which was partially a reaction to the changing RPG landscape. As opposed to the 3rd edition, this one actually changed things by overhauling most of the concepts that had characterized the game for the past 16 years. For starters, instead of being fully randomized, characters were now generated using a stat budget including having access to newly introduced extensive perks/flaws lists (both changes were obvious ripoffs of the WorldOfDarkness systems). Also, the characters were designed with a character construction kit that made every character a combination of race/species, culture and profession (unlike before, where one was limited to be either race/species/culture, profession, or both combined as an additional option). Oh, and loads and loads of different options for each group were added. Also, the skill system got expanded ''again'' by adding specializations for each skill, thus basically bloating the number of skills to over 100 with 4-5 specialization options each. The fact that players weren't necessarily forced to take up ''every'' skill (and, in fact, couldn't do so due to the nature of the stat budget-based system) alleviated this a little, but not by much. Combat got another overhaul by changing the nature of weapons (some weapons were now better than others at converting strength into damage) and adding special skills (another ripoff, this time from the feat system introduced in DnD3E) that mostly focused on combat and magic as well, and of course loads of maneuvers (usually tied to said special skills). And a lot more changes, too many too mention. The entire thing, while in theory pretty eclectic, turned TDE into a rather convoluted and not really beginner-friendly system; with the added irony that this was the system they stuck with the longest (15 years, almost the duration of all the three prior editions combined).
*** In 2015



to:

*** In 2000, the 4th edition was introduced, which was partially a reaction to the changing RPG landscape. As opposed to the 3rd edition, this one actually changed things by overhauling most of the concepts that had characterized the game for the past 16 years. For starters, instead of being fully randomized, characters were now generated using a stat budget including having access to newly introduced extensive perks/flaws lists (both changes were obvious ripoffs of the WorldOfDarkness systems).systems) with the negative attributes being outsourced to the flaw list (and thus made entirely optional, unlike before). Also, the characters were designed with a character construction kit that made every character a combination of race/species, culture and profession (unlike before, where one was limited to be either race/species/culture, profession, or both combined as an additional option). Oh, and loads and loads of different options for each group were added. Also, levels were made meaningless because now you could buy skillups by expending XP instead of getting a fixed budget every level. Also, the skill system got expanded ''again'' by adding specializations for each skill, thus basically bloating the number of skills to over 100 with 4-5 specialization options each. The fact that players weren't necessarily forced to take up ''every'' skill (and, in fact, couldn't do so due to the nature of the stat budget-based system) alleviated this a little, but not by much. Combat got another overhaul by changing the nature of weapons (some weapons were now better than others at converting strength into damage) and adding special skills (another ripoff, this time from the feat system introduced in DnD3E) that mostly focused on combat and magic as well, and of course loads of maneuvers (usually tied to said special skills). And a lot more changes, too many too mention. The entire thing, while in theory pretty eclectic, turned TDE into a rather convoluted and not really beginner-friendly system; with the added irony that this was the system they stuck with the longest (15 years, almost the duration of all the three prior editions combined).combined) which probably didn't help when it came to acquiring additional players during that period.
*** In 2015


2015, the staff decided to do something really novel and outrageous: for the first time in the history of the game, they actually downsized the rule system instead of restricting themselves to only adding things. A lot of things were downsized, streamlined and cut (like the number of skills, special skills, weapons, perks, flaws etc.), the character creation process was streamlined with the leveling process (players got an XP budget at the start to design their character instead of having a different budget for either process), the character creation kit lists were now streamlined in a way that every preset race/species, culture and profession could be perfectly recreated using the creation system (before, this wasn't possible) which increased player autonomy. Combat stats were made easier to calculate by removing extensive formulas and so on. Whether all changes were for the better is up to debate, but given the drastic measures that were undertaken, at least it's feasible to say that the staff realized that something had been amiss with the 4th edition.
3rd Oct '17 1:37:28 PM ruthlesstyrant
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*** In 2000, the 4th edition was introduced, which was partially a reaction to the changing RPG landscape. As opposed to the 3rd edition, this one actually changed things by overhauling most of the concepts that had characterized the game for the past 16 years. For starters, instead of being fully randomized, characters were now generated using a stat budget including having access to newly introduced extensive perks/flaws lists (both changes were obvious ripoffs of the WorldOfDarkness systems). Also, the characters were designed with a character construction kit that made every character a combination of race/species, culture and profession (unlike before, where one was limited to be either race/species/culture, profession, or both combined as an additional option). Oh, and loads and loads of different options for each group were added. Also, the skill system got expanded ''again'' by adding specializations for each skill, thus basically bloating the number of skills to over 100 with 4-5 specialization options each. The fact that players weren't necessarily forced to take up ''every'' skill (and, in fact, couldn't do so due to the nature of the stat budget-based system) alleviated this a little, but not by much. Combat got another overhaul by changing the nature of weapons (some weapons were now better than others at converting strength into damage) and adding special skills (another ripoff, this time from the feat system introduced in DnD3E) that mostly focused on combat and magic as well, and of course loads of maneuvers (usually tied to said special skills). And a lot more changes, too many too mention. The entire thing, while in theory pretty eclectic, turned TDE into a rather convoluted and not really beginner-friendly system; with the added irony that this was the system they stuck with the longest (15 years, almost the duration of all the three prior editions combined).
*** In 2015


3rd Oct '17 1:23:45 PM ruthlesstyrant
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** Also, the ruleset has undergone a very particular development over time.
*** 1984, it started out as a super-simple DnD knockoff with 5 stats, only 5 character archetypes (generic adventurer, warrior, mage, elf, dwarf) a handfull of weapons and armor items, around 15 magic spells and no skill system to speak of. Pretty early on, the whole thing got expanded to include a few more archetypes, partially scattered throughout other adventures or background modules (druid, sylvan elf, rogue, all sorts of priests etc.), introduced a simple skill system and added a few arcane and divine spells as well as more items, and added a fairly extensive critical success/failure system for combat.
*** In 1988, the 2nd edition introduced human cultures as separate archetypes for the first time, but other than them mostly stuck to the existing archetype already introduced during the four years before. However, it added 5 negative attributes (which had preciously little impact to be honest) and introduced the trademark TDE skill system with 3d20 skill checks and expanded the skillset in general. The combat system got an overhaul as well by adding a few maneuvers (and by doing away with the overly ludicrous critical success/failure tables); combat stats became far more intricate (also due to the new skill system), and the spell lists (also streamlined with the skill system) got expanded ''a lot''.
*** In 1991, the 3rd edition hit the shelfs, though it was actually more of a 2.5e given the fact that it wasn't really that much of a leap from the edition of 1988, but just restricted itself to expanding on the concepts introduced before. The most fundamental change was that the system got another 2 positive and negative attributes each, but other than that it was just a lot of polishing and upgrading: even more skills and spells, more creatures and demons, more special rules for everything (from wilderness to social to combat), more archetypes.
28th Aug '17 1:24:04 AM Ion288
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** There is also the goddess of magic herself. Born of a mortal and the goddess of wisdom she wanted to free all mortals from the thralls of the gods by allowing them to wield magic and determine their own fate. She nearly succeeded, brought magic in the world and a select few mortals actually developed the power to use it. Too bad that she weakened creation so much through her actions that the demons of the [[EvilIsDeathlyCold nether hells][[NiceJobBreakingItHero found entry into Ethra, too]].
*** [[spoiler: Retconned with the Historia Aventurica - Mada wasn't a demigod who fucked up, but simply the first God of Magic who handed out the gift of the arcane to the mortals, which seriously pissed off the other Gods (who up until that point had a monopoly on supernatural feats by gifting chosen mortals with a part of their power). Later the Gots got used to mortals wielding magic, but back then they were as comfortable with it as the Church was with the Enlightenment.]]
* WeaponOfChoice: Weapon skills are expensive to increase, so it is very useful to specialise for most warriors.

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** There is also the goddess of magic herself. Born of a mortal and the goddess of wisdom she wanted to free all mortals from the thralls of the gods by allowing them to wield magic and determine their own fate. She nearly succeeded, brought magic in the world and a select few mortals actually developed the power to use it. Too bad that she weakened creation so much through her actions that the demons of the [[EvilIsDeathlyCold nether hells][[NiceJobBreakingItHero hells]] [[NiceJobBreakingItHero found entry into Ethra, too]].
*** [[spoiler: Retconned with the Historia Aventurica [[spoiler: - Mada wasn't a demigod who fucked up, but simply the first God of Magic who handed out the gift of the arcane to the mortals, which seriously pissed off the other Gods (who up until that point had a monopoly on supernatural feats by gifting chosen mortals with a part of their power). Later the Gots Gods got used to mortals wielding magic, but back then they were as comfortable with it as the Church was with the Enlightenment.]]
* WeaponOfChoice: Weapon skills are expensive to increase, so it is very useful to specialise specialize for most warriors.
19th Jul '17 2:52:39 PM justanid
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[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/the_dark_eye_logo.png]]
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'''Tropes in this System:'''

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'''Tropes in this System:'''!!This tabletop RPG provides examples of:
30th Mar '17 4:29:32 AM valar55
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** This is ''literally'' an example of a AWizardDidIt, though. [[spoiler: Thousands of years ago, a semidivine dragon used his power over the elements to separate the different elements from one another and started to concentrate them in separate places, thus extracting them from other places. He started by concentrating the Ice in the North, thus raising fertility levels in the rest of the world (according to the hexagonic TDE elemental system, Ice and fertile Earth, or Humus, are opposites, while the counterpart to Air is barren Earth, or Stone). Then he concentrated Humus in the South. He couldn't go through with his plan, but his work brought different climate zones to Ethra.

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** This is ''literally'' an example of a AWizardDidIt, though. [[spoiler: Thousands of years ago, a semidivine dragon used his power over the elements to separate the different elements from one another and started to concentrate them in separate places, thus extracting them from other places. He started by concentrating the Ice in the North, thus raising fertility levels in the rest of the world (according to the hexagonic TDE elemental system, Ice and fertile Earth, or Humus, are opposites, while the counterpart to Air is barren Earth, or Stone). Then he concentrated Humus in the South. He couldn't go through with his plan, but his work brought different climate zones to Ethra. ]]
23rd Mar '17 9:33:12 PM Ulkomaalainen
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'''Attributes''': The 8 Attributes are courage, strength, mobility, dexterity, intuition, smarts, charisma and constitution. The default starting value is 8, 11 is average for a starter character and they cannot exceed 14 on character creation, not taking into account certain bonuses/penalties from racial or cultural choices. They influence things like life and mana points, basic attack and defense values, are important for talent checks, and can later be increased with adventure points.

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'''Attributes''': The 8 Attributes are courage, strength, mobility, dexterity, intuition, smarts, charisma and constitution. The default starting value is 8, 8 on a scale from 1 to 20, 11 is average for a starter character and they cannot exceed 14 on character creation, not taking into account certain bonuses/penalties from racial or cultural choices. They influence things like life and mana points, basic attack and defense values, are important for talent checks, and can later be increased with adventure points.
6th Mar '17 3:01:05 AM InsaneMystic
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* DyingRace: [[AllTrollsAreDifferent Trolls]]. One of the oldest civilizations of the world, in a long gone age; nowadays, just a few hundred are alive, scattered far and wide through the world. One sourcebook describes their language as due to join the ranks of dead languages soon, as it's a rare occurrence for even two trolls to meet each other anymore to actually hold a conversation in it.
7th Feb '17 1:34:50 AM ruthlesstyrant
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* RaceLift: In-universe, the first emperor of the Middenrealm, Raul of Gareth, was (posthumously) subjected to this: Raul originally was a Tulamid whose family was killed off by the [[GodSaveUsFromTheQueen evil empress]] Hela-Horas who had a deep hatred against everything Tulamid ([[FreudianExcuse her father was killed in a war against them]]). Later on, Raul became the leader of the resistance who crushed the Bosparanian Empire and founded the "New Empire" (the Middenrealm). Since all this was basically a {{Retcon}} 25 years after the character of Raul was invented, the fact that his heritage has never been mentioned was handwaved away by stating that he was subjected to a RaceLift by the historians.


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** Also depending on the writer. Ulrich Kiesow was said to be particularly fond of this, even among his colleagues.
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