History TabletopGame / Scion

4th Dec '16 9:28:06 AM DarkStorm
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** One of Br'er Rabbit's aliases is "Rascally Rabbit", heavily implying that you can make a Scion to ''WesternAnimation/BugsBunny!''
13th Nov '16 11:25:16 PM narm00
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A [[https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/200664283/scion-2nd-edition-tabletop-rpg Kickstarter campaign]] to get 2e ''Origin'' and ''Hero'' into stores launched in late September 2016. It was fully funded in less than an hour and by its end had exceeded its original goal by over $300,000. Completed stretch goals enabled, among other things, introductory fiction by Creator/KieronGillen, the game's license being opened up to fans and other companies, and the creation of a 2e ''Companion'' featuring the Loa (Voodoo), the Nemetondevos (Gaulish), and the Yazata (Persian), with 1e's Atlantean pantheon being used as the example for building your own pantheon, The current projected date for publishing is October 2017.

to:

A [[https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/200664283/scion-2nd-edition-tabletop-rpg Kickstarter campaign]] to get 2e ''Origin'' and ''Hero'' into stores launched in late September 2016. It was fully funded in less than an hour and by its end had exceeded its original goal by over $300,000. Completed stretch goals enabled, among other things, introductory fiction by Creator/KieronGillen, the game's license being opened up to fans and other companies, and the creation of a 2e ''Companion'' featuring the Loa (Voodoo), the Nemetondevos (Gaulish), and the Yazata (Persian), with 1e's Atlantean pantheon being used as the example for building your own pantheon, pantheon. The current [=PDFs=] are currently projected date for publishing is to go to backers by May 2017, and the printed books by October 2017.
2017, with public release some while after.
9th Nov '16 9:56:08 PM glasswalker
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A [[https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/200664283/scion-2nd-edition-tabletop-rpg Kickstarter campaign]] to get 2e ''Origin'' and ''Hero'' into stores launched in late September 2016. It was fully funded in less than an hour and by its end had exceeded its original goal by over $300,000. Completed stretch goals enabled, among other things, introductory fiction by Creator/KieronGillen, the game's license being opened up to fans and other companies, and the creation of a 2e ''Companion'' featuring the Loa (Voodoo), the Nemetondevos (Gaulish), and the Yazata (Persian), with 1e's Atlantean pantheon being used as the example for building your own pantheon.

to:

A [[https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/200664283/scion-2nd-edition-tabletop-rpg Kickstarter campaign]] to get 2e ''Origin'' and ''Hero'' into stores launched in late September 2016. It was fully funded in less than an hour and by its end had exceeded its original goal by over $300,000. Completed stretch goals enabled, among other things, introductory fiction by Creator/KieronGillen, the game's license being opened up to fans and other companies, and the creation of a 2e ''Companion'' featuring the Loa (Voodoo), the Nemetondevos (Gaulish), and the Yazata (Persian), with 1e's Atlantean pantheon being used as the example for building your own pantheon.
pantheon, The current projected date for publishing is October 2017.



* GunsAreWorthless: In first edition, firearms are the only weapons that don't get stronger with high attributes, making them extremely weak in Demigod and higher. For some reason Bows and even Crossbows DO get a strength-bonus though. There are numerous fan-created Knacks and Boons that alleviate this, but thus far no canon ones.

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* GunsAreWorthless: In first edition, firearms By accident or by design, 1e's official ruleset seems weighted against Scions who wish to use modern weapons. Firearms are the only weapons that don't get stronger with high attributes, making them extremely weak in Demigod and higher. For some reason Bows and even Crossbows DO get a strength-bonus though. There are numerous fan-created Knacks and Boons house-rules that alleviate ameliorate this, but thus far no canon ones.there was never an official solution.
23rd Oct '16 6:08:13 AM narm00
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2e changes things up, with the corebook, ''Scion: Origin'', covering ordinary and supernaturally-touched mortals, including pre-visitation Scions, holy people of the pantheons, sorcerers and Fatebound mortals, along with minor supernaturals such as kitsune and satyrs. ''Hero'' 2e enables the creation of fully-fledged Scions, who now come in a number of types: being the child of a god, as in 1e; [[CreatingLife being directly created by a god]]; and being a descendant of mortal nobility who was transformed in infancy (a fourth, being the {{reincarnation}} of a dead hero or god, is slated for 2e's ''God''). It also offers ten core pantheons, nine of which are revised from 1e - Netjer (Egyptian), Theoi (Greek), Aesir (Norse), Teotl (Aztec), Kami (Japanese), Orisha (Yoruba; an ancestral pantheon of Voodoo's Loa), Tuatha de Dannan (Irish), Shen (Chinese) and Devas (Hindu) - with the tenth being the Manitou (Native American Algonquin). Further pantheons are planned for later books, including Native Australian mythology. A [[https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/200664283/scion-2nd-edition-tabletop-rpg Kickstarter campaign]] to get 2e ''Origin'' and ''Hero'' into stores launched in late September 2016. It was fully funded in less than an hour and by its end had exceeded it's original goal by over $300,000. Completed stretch goals enabled the creation of a 2e ''Companion'' featuring the Loa (Voodoo), the Nemetondevos (Gaulish), and the Yazata (Persian), with 1e's Atlantean pantheon being used as the example for building your own fictional pantheon. It will also feature introductory fiction by Creator/KieronGillen.

The game's default setting has also received a major shakeup, with the assumption of a [[TabletopGame/TheWorldOfDarkness World of Darkness-like]] state in which [[{{Masquerade}} the mythical is hidden away from the public]] replaced with a more in-depth look at the [[AlternateHistory realistic implications of powerful gods and monsters existing throughout and influencing history]], both openly and behind the scenes. The modern-day World is one where pagan religions are popular and accepted, and where the mythological hides in plain sight, with tengu nests among Japan's skyscrapers and [[MemeticMutation Norwegian government troll preserves]]. [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks It goes without saying that some fans of the 1st edition were not pleased.]]

to:

2e changes things up, with the corebook, ''Scion: Origin'', covering ordinary and supernaturally-touched mortals, including pre-visitation Scions, holy people of the pantheons, sorcerers and Fatebound mortals, along with minor supernaturals such as kitsune and satyrs. ''Hero'' 2e enables the creation of fully-fledged Scions, who now come in a number of types: being the child of a god, as in 1e; [[CreatingLife being directly created by a god]]; and being a descendant of mortal nobility who was transformed in infancy (a fourth, being the {{reincarnation}} of a dead hero or god, is slated for 2e's ''God'').later in the line). It also offers ten core pantheons, nine of which are revised from 1e - Netjer (Egyptian), Theoi (Greek), Aesir (Norse), Teotl (Aztec), Kami (Japanese), Orisha (Yoruba; an ancestral pantheon of Voodoo's Loa), Tuatha de Dannan (Irish), Shen (Chinese) and Devas (Hindu) - with the tenth being the Manitou (Native American Algonquin). Further pantheons are planned for later books, including Native Australian mythology. A [[https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/200664283/scion-2nd-edition-tabletop-rpg Kickstarter campaign]] to get 2e ''Origin'' and ''Hero'' into stores launched in late September 2016. It was fully funded in less than an hour and by its end had exceeded it's original goal by over $300,000. Completed stretch goals enabled the creation of a 2e ''Companion'' featuring the Loa (Voodoo), the Nemetondevos (Gaulish), and the Yazata (Persian), with 1e's Atlantean pantheon being used as the example for building your own fictional pantheon. It will also feature introductory fiction by Creator/KieronGillen.\n\n

The game's default setting has also received a major shakeup, with the assumption of a [[TabletopGame/TheWorldOfDarkness World of Darkness-like]] state in which [[{{Masquerade}} the mythical is hidden away from the public]] replaced with a more in-depth look at the [[AlternateHistory realistic implications of powerful gods and monsters existing throughout and influencing history]], both openly and behind the scenes. The modern-day World is one where pagan religions are popular and accepted, and where the mythological mythical hides in plain sight, with tengu nests among Japan's skyscrapers and [[MemeticMutation Norwegian government troll preserves]]. [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks It goes without saying that some fans of the 1st edition were not pleased.]]
]]

A [[https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/200664283/scion-2nd-edition-tabletop-rpg Kickstarter campaign]] to get 2e ''Origin'' and ''Hero'' into stores launched in late September 2016. It was fully funded in less than an hour and by its end had exceeded its original goal by over $300,000. Completed stretch goals enabled, among other things, introductory fiction by Creator/KieronGillen, the game's license being opened up to fans and other companies, and the creation of a 2e ''Companion'' featuring the Loa (Voodoo), the Nemetondevos (Gaulish), and the Yazata (Persian), with 1e's Atlantean pantheon being used as the example for building your own pantheon.



* AlternateContinuity: First and second editions, with 2e helpfully providing a translation guide in the Companion for those who want to convert over.



* AntiVillain: Out of the six sample "evil" Scions, only two - [[BigBad Kane Taoka]] and Seth Farrow - are truly nasty. Sly's a pawn, Orlanda's a victim of LoveMakesYouEvil, Marie's just egotistical (and pulls a HeelFaceTurn in ''God''), and Victor's just following orders (he ''is'' a soldier).
** ''God'' also offers another group of antagonists, the "Keepers of The World", a group of gods who are pissed at their pantheons and want to seperate the mortal world from other realms. None of them are truly evil (unless the Storyteller takes the suggestion to have one of them turn to the Titans, and even then TheMole is most likely a WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds or WellIntentionedExtremist), and considering their background story, their goal is rather justified.
** The [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madame_White_Snake White Snake]], from ''Companion'', who strove to prove she could be a person rather than a supernatural beast, fought to save her mortal husband's life... and ended up getting imprisoned for several centuries. Consequently, driven by her intense loyalty, she wants revenge on the Celestial Bureaucracy.

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* AntiVillain: Out of the six sample "evil" Scions, Scions in first edition, only two - [[BigBad Kane Taoka]] and Seth Farrow - are truly nasty. Sly's a pawn, Orlanda's a victim of LoveMakesYouEvil, Marie's just egotistical (and pulls a HeelFaceTurn in ''God''), and Victor's just following orders (he ''is'' a soldier).
** 1e ''God'' also offers another group of antagonists, the "Keepers of The World", a group of gods who are pissed at their pantheons and want to seperate the mortal world from other realms. None of them are truly evil (unless the Storyteller takes the suggestion to have one of them turn to the Titans, and even then TheMole is most likely a WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds or WellIntentionedExtremist), and considering their background story, their goal is rather justified.
** The [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madame_White_Snake White Snake]], from the 1e ''Companion'', who strove to prove she could be a person rather than a supernatural beast, fought to save her mortal husband's life... and ended up getting imprisoned for several centuries. Consequently, driven by her intense loyalty, she wants revenge on the Celestial Bureaucracy.



** Also the Anauša (from ''Companion''), who come from any royal guard or army that tied itself to the reputation of the Persian Immortals, from the classical era up through the 1970s.

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** Also the Anauša (from the 1e ''Companion''), who come from any royal guard or army that tied itself to the reputation of the Persian Immortals, from the classical era up through the 1970s.



* BadassNormal: Simon Telamon, who was introduced in ''Companion'' as a Guide Birthright. He's just a mortal, but is too good a soldier to be a simple Follower. The only thing unusual about him is that he's the reincarnation of a mortal hero, [[Myth/ClassicalMythology Telamonian Ajax]]. For bonus points, he pulls a BigDamnHero and rescues Tommy and Yukiko from a banshee in a short story. There is also a note that reincarnations of other ostensibly mortal people of great resolve would be like this, such as UsefulNotes/AlexanderTheGreat, [[Literature/RomanceOfTheThreeKingdoms Cao Cao]] or [[UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy JFK]].
* BeethovenWasAnAlienSpy: Hitler's SpearOfDestiny was actually Odin's spear Gungnir, given him by [[MagnificentBastard Loki]] in the alternate setting set out in chapter six of Scion Companion. Lady Liberty, Br'er Rabbit, Uncle Sam, Robin Hood, Britannia, d'Artagnan, Baba Yaga and sundry others are all gods. The French, Russian and British ones work together out of the need to fight the Germans whereas the American ones are a different Pantheon.

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* BadassNormal: Simon Telamon, who was introduced in the 1e ''Companion'' as a Guide Birthright. He's just a mortal, but is too good a soldier to be a simple Follower. The only thing unusual about him is that he's the reincarnation of a mortal hero, [[Myth/ClassicalMythology Telamonian Ajax]]. For bonus points, he pulls a BigDamnHero and rescues Tommy and Yukiko from a banshee in a short story. There is also a note that reincarnations of other ostensibly mortal people of great resolve would be like this, such as UsefulNotes/AlexanderTheGreat, [[Literature/RomanceOfTheThreeKingdoms Cao Cao]] or [[UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy JFK]].
* BeethovenWasAnAlienSpy: Hitler's SpearOfDestiny was actually Odin's spear Gungnir, given him by [[MagnificentBastard Loki]] in the alternate setting set out in chapter six of Scion the 1e Companion. Lady Liberty, Br'er Rabbit, Uncle Sam, Robin Hood, Britannia, d'Artagnan, Baba Yaga and sundry others are all gods. The French, Russian and British ones work together out of the need to fight the Germans whereas the American ones are a different Pantheon.



* BoringButPractical: The Greek pantheon's purview of Arete just grants bonus dice instead of awesome abilities, but damn if those dice don't come in handy.

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* BoringButPractical: The Greek pantheon's first edition purview of Arete just grants bonus dice instead of awesome abilities, but damn if those dice don't come in handy.



* CelestialBureaucracy: Loaded, especially the [[Myth/ChineseMythology Shen]], who are called the Celestial Bureaucracy in ''Companion''.

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* CelestialBureaucracy: Loaded, especially the [[Myth/ChineseMythology Shen]], who are called the Celestial Bureaucracy in 1e ''Companion''.



* CorruptChurch: Monotheism as a religious concept is portrayed this way, born of a Titan-worshipping servant of Akhetaten's attempts to try and use Deific Fatebinding to destroy the Gods. However, even if this is the true secret origin of Judaism, Christianity and Islam, it's emphatically stated that they don't ''know that'' - even the Order of Divine Glory, the true secret cult at the heart of things, is not only regarded by the mainstream churches as just a particularly eccentric group of missonaries, but actually believes its own doctrine, to the point it's noted it would probably execute its own inner circle as heretics for admitting that there really are other Gods besides God Himself.

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* CorruptChurch: Monotheism as a religious concept is portrayed this way, way in first edition, born of a Titan-worshipping servant of Akhetaten's attempts to try and use Deific Fatebinding to destroy the Gods. However, even if this is the true secret origin of Judaism, Christianity and Islam, it's emphatically stated that they don't ''know that'' - even the Order of Divine Glory, the true secret cult at the heart of things, is not only regarded by the mainstream churches as just a particularly eccentric group of missonaries, but actually believes its own doctrine, to the point it's noted it would probably execute its own inner circle as heretics for admitting that there really are other Gods besides God Himself.



* CrossoverCosmology: Inherent in the very premise. The rulebook has the pantheons of six different cultures. ''Scion Companion'' adds three more and hints of other pantheons in the distance.

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* CrossoverCosmology: Inherent in the very premise. The First edition's rulebook has the pantheons of six different cultures. ''Scion Companion'' 1e ''Companion'' adds three more and hints of other pantheons in the distance.



** Second edition has ten pantheons in ''Hero'' and three more in the Companion.



* DepletedPhlebotinumShells: Certain boons (specifically Fire 4: Flamin' Bullets, Sky 6: Levin Fury, and Sun 4: Flare Missile) allow a player to use the elements themselves as projectiles for ranged weapons. In addition, relic weapons can be supernaturally enhanced (with increased accuracy, responsiveness, and stopping power).

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* DepletedPhlebotinumShells: Certain first edition boons (specifically Fire 4: Flamin' Bullets, Sky 6: Levin Fury, and Sun 4: Flare Missile) allow a player to use the elements themselves as projectiles for ranged weapons. In addition, relic weapons can be supernaturally enhanced (with increased accuracy, responsiveness, and stopping power).



* DevilButNoGod: The various Gods and Titans are all eventually killable making them simply more powerful forms of mortal life. There is a Titan imitating God, but God as a Supreme Being and Creator of All does not appear. The closest you get is Fate itself, but that is controlled by mortals. There are a fair number of beings that appear to be Christian but are actually divine identity hijackers (which is an easy way of gaining legend and power). There is mention that Jehovah actually existed but promptly disappeared and was replaced by Aten [[GodIsEvil who is a frickin Titan]]. Pan has taken on the role of Lucifer and because of fatebinding actually [[TheDarkSide BECAME demonic]]. Then again, it's not as if TheDevil is present in the setting either.
** The ''Companion'' reveals that the Abrahamic God does not exist - anymore, at least, and if he ever lived he was a normal God. Aten hijacked his image as part of a XanatosGambit that spectacularly backfired when the Order of Divine Glory developed an ideology anathema to the Titan. He may someday, though, if the Order has its way...

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* DevilButNoGod: The In first edition, the various Gods and Titans are all eventually killable making them simply more powerful forms of mortal life. There is a Titan imitating God, but God as a Supreme Being and Creator of All does not appear. The closest you get is Fate itself, but that is controlled by mortals. There are a fair number of beings that appear to be Christian but are actually divine identity hijackers (which is an easy way of gaining legend and power). There is mention that Jehovah actually existed but promptly disappeared and was replaced by Aten [[GodIsEvil who is a frickin Titan]]. Pan has taken on the role of Lucifer and because of fatebinding actually [[TheDarkSide BECAME demonic]]. Then again, it's not as if TheDevil is present in the setting either.
** The 1e ''Companion'' reveals that the Abrahamic God does not exist - anymore, at least, and if he ever lived he was a normal God. Aten hijacked his image as part of a XanatosGambit that spectacularly backfired when the Order of Divine Glory developed an ideology anathema to the Titan. He may someday, though, if the Order has its way...



* EvenEvilHasStandards: The ''Scion Companion'' takes pains to note that, though Loki did arrange the rise of Hitler in Germany as part of his plan to avert Ragnarok, he had no knowledge whatsoever of the Holocaust, and (along with the rest of the Aesir) takes great pains to punish those responsible, even in death.

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* EvenEvilHasStandards: The ''Scion Companion'' 1e ''Companion'' takes pains to note that, though Loki did arrange the rise of Hitler in Germany as part of his plan to avert Ragnarok, he had no knowledge whatsoever of the Holocaust, and (along with the rest of the Aesir) takes great pains to punish those responsible, even in death.



** About the only major exception is Miclantecuhtli of the Atzlanti, who is pretty much a JerkAss - ''Hero'' describes him as "suffering a permanent case of schadenfreude". Then again, with the possible exceptions of Quetzalcoátl and Tlazolteotl[[note]]And she's a goddess of ''shit''[[/note]], none of the Atzlanti are really portrayed in a flattering light. This extends to the Scions; of the four official examples, one is a psychotic self-mutilator, one is a male-to-female transsexual who uses the flayed skin of a woman to change sexes, one is a self-hating DeathSeeker, and the other, after ascending to godhood, is pretty much disgusted with his own pantheon.

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** About the only major exception is Miclantecuhtli of the Atzlanti, who is pretty much a JerkAss - 1e ''Hero'' describes him as "suffering a permanent case of schadenfreude". Then again, with the possible exceptions of Quetzalcoátl and Tlazolteotl[[note]]And she's a goddess of ''shit''[[/note]], none of the Atzlanti are really portrayed in a flattering light. This extends to the Scions; of the four official examples, one is a psychotic self-mutilator, one is a male-to-female transsexual who uses the flayed skin of a woman to change sexes, one is a self-hating DeathSeeker, and the other, after ascending to godhood, is pretty much disgusted with his own pantheon.



** The Shinsengumi, at first. They're stated outright to be mostly {{Worthy Opponent}}s, and most of them perform a collective HeelFaceTurn in ''God'' when Kane's actions come to light.

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** The Shinsengumi, at first. They're stated outright to be mostly {{Worthy Opponent}}s, and most of them perform a collective HeelFaceTurn in first edition ''God'' when Kane's actions come to light.



* {{Ghostapo}}: Both the Allied and Axis forces were using Scions and divine power in World War II, which was known as the Axis War by the gods (due to the fact that they were trying to conquer one another's Axes Mundi while mortals fought over the world).

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* {{Ghostapo}}: Both In first edition, both the Allied and Axis forces were using Scions and divine power in World War II, which was known as the Axis War by the gods (due to the fact that they were trying to conquer one another's Axes Mundi while mortals fought over the world).



* GlorifiedSpermDonor: Scion reactions to learning they have divine parentage are... mixed. Among the sample characters, Kane actively hates his divine mother and Donnie is disgusted with his, while the others tend to be more "I wish they'd respect me more, but eh."
* GodIsEvil: The closest thing to the Abrahamic {{God}} to be found in the setting is Akhetaten, the Titan of Light, and it would appear that anything genuinely good to be found in the Judeo-Christian-Islamic religions stems from ''misinterpretation'' of his attempts to rule everything.

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* GlorifiedSpermDonor: Scion reactions to learning they have divine parentage are... mixed. Among the 1e's sample characters, Kane actively hates his divine mother and Donnie is disgusted with his, while the others tend to be more "I wish they'd respect me more, but eh."
* GodIsEvil: The In first edition, the closest thing to the Abrahamic {{God}} to be found in the setting is Akhetaten, the Titan of Light, and it would appear that anything genuinely good to be found in the Judeo-Christian-Islamic religions stems from ''misinterpretation'' of his attempts to rule everything.



** And justified; it's stated in the God book the Gods have their hands full holding the Titans at bay in the Overworld and just performing the Visitations for their new Scions is risky both because the Gods have to power down and become weaker to enter the World without incurring Fate's unwanted and undivided attention, making them vulnerable to Titanspawn, and because it takes them away from the main front of the war that is implied not to be going well.
* GoodIsNotNice: The Atzlánti are described this way in the introduction to their section in the core book:

to:

** And justified; it's stated in the 1e's God book that the Gods have their hands full holding the Titans at bay in the Overworld Overworld, and just performing the Visitations for their new Scions is risky both because the Gods have to power down and become weaker to enter the World without incurring Fate's unwanted and undivided attention, making them vulnerable to Titanspawn, and because it takes them away from the main front of the war that is implied not to be going well.
* GoodIsNotNice: The Atzlánti are described this way in the introduction to their section in the 1e core book:



* GunsAreWorthless: Firearms are the only weapons that don't get stronger with high attributes, making them extremely weak in Demigod and higher. For some reason Bows and even Crossbows DO get a strength-bonus though. There are numerous fan-created Knacks and Boons that alleviate this, but thus far no canon ones.

to:

* GunsAreWorthless: Firearms In first edition, firearms are the only weapons that don't get stronger with high attributes, making them extremely weak in Demigod and higher. For some reason Bows and even Crossbows DO get a strength-bonus though. There are numerous fan-created Knacks and Boons that alleviate this, but thus far no canon ones.



* HeroicLineage[=/=]InTheBlood: Scions are expected to take after their divine parents in personality as well as ability, with the writeup for each god going into specifics. Since those specifics are intended for presumably-heroic player characters, the former trope is more likely to be played up than the latter. For instance, Scions of [[Myth/EgyptianMythology Set]] are known for doing DirtyBusiness, Scions of [[Myth/AztecMythology Tezcatlipoca]] stir up controversy for a cause, and Scions of [[{{Voudoun}} Kalfu]] are likely to be DrivenToVillainy troublemakers more than actually malicious. Those fathered by Caligula, who's detailed in the WWII supplement as the reason the Greek Gods are supporting the Axis, on the other hand, are just terrible people.

to:

* HeroicLineage[=/=]InTheBlood: In first edition, Scions are expected to take after their divine parents in personality as well as ability, with the writeup for each god going into specifics. Since those specifics are intended for presumably-heroic player characters, the former trope is more likely to be played up than the latter. For instance, Scions of [[Myth/EgyptianMythology Set]] are known for doing DirtyBusiness, Scions of [[Myth/AztecMythology Tezcatlipoca]] stir up controversy for a cause, and Scions of [[{{Voudoun}} Kalfu]] are likely to be DrivenToVillainy troublemakers more than actually malicious. Those fathered by Caligula, who's detailed in the WWII supplement as the reason the Greek Gods are supporting the Axis, on the other hand, are just terrible people.



* ALoadOfBull: The Minotaurs are a OneGenderRace of humanoid bulls likely to be encountered as opponents (and, possibly, followers) of demigods. It turns out that, in the Scionverse, the Cretan Bull actually '''raped''' first Pasiphaë and then any Cretan woman it could find after emerging from the sea, as none of the Cretans would even dare to try and corral it for fear of Poseidon's wrath. Poseidon made no effort to stop it; they were saved from its rampages only when Heracles came and took the Cretan Bull as his Seventh Labour.
* LonelyAtTheTop: Can be applicable in this setting, once a PC reaches apotheosis (considering that you'll be very much a junior deity in your pantheon, and your contact with your Band-mates from other pantheons may become very limited). Indeed, the signature characters seem to be suffering from this in the opening fiction from ''Scion: God'' (Horace is chafing in the celestial equivalent of a desk job, Donnie and Yukiko are essentially glorified errand boys (well, errand ''girl'' in Yukiko's case) for their parents, and Dr. Tigrillo finds himself philosophically isolated from most of the other Atzlanti. Only Eric and Brigitte seem to be really fitting into godhood comfortably).

to:

* ALoadOfBull: The Minotaurs are a OneGenderRace of humanoid bulls likely to be encountered as opponents (and, possibly, followers) of demigods. It turns out that, in the 1e's Scionverse, the Cretan Bull actually '''raped''' first Pasiphaë and then any Cretan woman it could find after emerging from the sea, as none of the Cretans would even dare to try and corral it for fear of Poseidon's wrath. Poseidon made no effort to stop it; they were saved from its rampages only when Heracles came and took the Cretan Bull as his Seventh Labour.
* LonelyAtTheTop: Can be applicable in this setting, once a PC reaches apotheosis (considering that you'll be very much a junior deity in your pantheon, and your contact with your Band-mates from other pantheons may become very limited). Indeed, the signature characters seem to be suffering from this in the opening fiction from ''Scion: God'' 1e's ''God'' (Horace is chafing in the celestial equivalent of a desk job, Donnie and Yukiko are essentially glorified errand boys (well, errand ''girl'' in Yukiko's case) for their parents, and Dr. Tigrillo finds himself philosophically isolated from most of the other Atzlanti. Only Eric and Brigitte seem to be really fitting into godhood comfortably).



* {{Masquerade}}: This was implied to be the case in the 1st edition, with the books mentioning [[UnusuallyUninterestingSight mortals seeing massive fire giants as irregularly large people with severe burns]], the fictional adventures always taking place outside the public eye and the world being described as looking, on the surface, just like our own. Unfortunately, the books included no details on how to enforce such secrecy in play, with the amount of power given to the players making it all but impossible, outside of [[DeusExMachina GM's fiat]], to stop them from irrevocably changing the world by punching a dragon straight through the Empire States building. Imagine trying to maintain the status quo of TabletopGame/TheWorldOfDarkness, but instead of vampires, it's Marvel superheroes who are walking around. The 2nd edition decided to make away with the silliness and just go for an explicit AlternateHistory UrbanFantasy setting.

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* {{Masquerade}}: This was implied to be the case in the 1st edition, with the books mentioning [[UnusuallyUninterestingSight mortals seeing massive fire giants as irregularly large people with severe burns]], the fictional adventures always taking place outside the public eye and the world being described as looking, on the surface, just like our own. Unfortunately, the books included no details on how to enforce such secrecy in play, with the amount of power given to the players making it all but impossible, outside of [[DeusExMachina GM's fiat]], to stop them from irrevocably changing the world by punching a dragon straight through the Empire States State building. Imagine trying to maintain the status quo of TabletopGame/TheWorldOfDarkness, but instead of vampires, it's Marvel superheroes who are walking around. The 2nd edition decided to make away with the silliness and just go for an explicit AlternateHistory UrbanFantasy setting.



* MythologyUpgrade: Isn't it amusing how advanced technology can improve already deadly Nemeans? Examples include Centaurs as half-human and half-Harley-Davidson motorcycle, Scylla has machines replace its monster heads and Surtr's main fortress in Muspelheim can transform into a HumongousMecha.

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* MythologyUpgrade: Isn't it amusing how advanced technology can improve already deadly Nemeans? Examples include Centaurs as half-human and half-Harley-Davidson motorcycle, Scylla has having machines replace its monster heads and Surtr's main fortress in Muspelheim can being able to transform into a HumongousMecha.



* NoCelebritiesWereHarmed: ''Scion: Extras'', an April Fools' Day supplement, features Amatsukami Scion 'Sci', inventor of "Scion Style", riffing on PSY and Gangnam Style (with lyrics for "Scion Style" provided). Somewhat closer to home is Tuatha Scion Jack Caricature, a game developer who herds cats - a good-natured spoof of Scion 2e developer Joe Carriker.

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* NoCelebritiesWereHarmed: ''Scion: Extras'', an April Fools' Day supplement, features Amatsukami Scion 'Sci', inventor of "Scion Style", riffing on PSY and Gangnam Style (with lyrics for "Scion Style" provided). Somewhat closer to home is Tuatha Scion Jack Caricature, a game developer who herds cats - a good-natured spoof of former Scion 2e developer Joe Carriker.



* NoSuchThingAsWizardJesus: While God ''may'' be evil (if he is Aten, if Aten is aping God however then the jury is out) and [[PublicDomainArtifact the Holy Grail]] exists, Jesus is left alone.
* NobleDemon: ''Companion'' adds two as rather unusual Guide Birthrights.

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* NoSuchThingAsWizardJesus: While In first edition, while God ''may'' be evil (if he is Aten, if Aten is aping God however then the jury is out) and [[PublicDomainArtifact the Holy Grail]] exists, Jesus is left alone.
* NobleDemon: The 1e ''Companion'' adds two as rather unusual Guide Birthrights.



* OmnicidalManiac: Two titan avatars, Nu and Shu, have very simple goals - they want to turn the world into [[WorldOfSilence nothing else but their preferred element]] (water for Nu, air for Shu), where no creature, not even the avatar themselves, exists. They're a contrast to the typical OmnicidalManiac, though, [[BewareTheQuietOnes as Nu is reclusive and patient whle Shu is calm and peaceful]]. Fortunately, neither of them are the dominant avatar of their Titan. Then ''Scion Companion'' introduces Crom Cruach, the Greater Titan of Earth, whose goal is equally simple: crush all things into rot and decay, then die itself.
* OrderVersusChaos: Explicitly defined as part of the core rules - normal Virtues define a code of behavior, while the Titanic Dark Virtues are [[SocialDarwinist raw survivalism, with a side of selfishness]].

to:

* OmnicidalManiac: Two titan avatars, Nu and Shu, have very simple goals - they want to turn the world into [[WorldOfSilence nothing else but their preferred element]] (water for Nu, air for Shu), where no creature, not even the avatar themselves, exists. They're a contrast to the typical OmnicidalManiac, though, [[BewareTheQuietOnes as Nu is reclusive and patient whle Shu is calm and peaceful]]. Fortunately, neither of them are the dominant avatar of their Titan. Then ''Scion Companion'' 1e ''Companion'' introduces Crom Cruach, the Greater Titan of Earth, whose goal is equally simple: crush all things into rot and decay, then die itself.
* OrderVersusChaos: Explicitly defined as part of the core rules in first edition - normal Virtues define a code of behavior, while the Titanic Dark Virtues are [[SocialDarwinist raw survivalism, with a side of selfishness]].



* ReligiousHorror. But of the non-Christian kind, unless of course you're dealing with the Church of Divine Glory and Akhetaten.
* ReptilesAreAbhorrent: The only sample villain who's an irredeemable monster is Seth Farrow, who ultimately becomes the God of Snakes.
* RequiredSecondaryPowers: The first dot in each Purview is usually something completely innocuous on its face, but which you will dearly wish you'd picked up if you try using one of the more advanced powers without it.

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* ReligiousHorror. ReligiousHorror: But of the non-Christian kind, unless of course you're dealing with the Church of Divine Glory and Akhetaten.
* ReptilesAreAbhorrent: The only 1e sample villain who's an irredeemable monster is Seth Farrow, who ultimately becomes the God of Snakes.
* RequiredSecondaryPowers: The In first edition, the first dot in each Purview is usually something completely innocuous on its face, but which you will dearly wish you'd picked up if you try using one of the more advanced powers without it.



* RuleOfCool: Stunting, a ''literal'' rule. The more badass you make it, the better it works. White Wolf first used this idea in ''{{Exalted}}''.
* RunningGag: "What the heck happened to my -insert item here- ?" Appears at the end of the fiction section that starts each core rulebook.

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* RuleOfCool: Stunting, a ''literal'' rule. The more badass you make it, the better it works. White Wolf first used this idea in ''{{Exalted}}''.
''TabletopGame/{{Exalted}}''.
* RunningGag: "What the heck happened to my -insert item here- ?" Appears at the end of the fiction section that starts each first edition core rulebook.



* SealedEvilInACan: The Titans used to be. Of course, they still are if you happen to play during World War II.

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* SealedEvilInACan: The Titans used to be. Of course, they still are in first edition if you happen to play during World War II.



** Title of a sidebar in the first game's included story: "What's in the Egg?" First line of the article: [[Film/{{Se7en}} "Gwyneth Paltrow's head!]] Just kidding."
** In the first included story, one task (assigned by Aphrodite) is to bring a strained couple to love...any sort. The default assumption is that they'll split up, but crafty players can rekindle their love for each other. The paragraph discussing this ends with ''[[WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons "In your face, space coyote!"]]''

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** Title of a sidebar in the first game's edition Hero's included story: "What's in the Egg?" First line of the article: [[Film/{{Se7en}} "Gwyneth Paltrow's head!]] Just kidding."
** In the first 1e Hero's included story, one task (assigned by Aphrodite) is to bring a strained couple to love...any sort. The default assumption is that they'll split up, but crafty players can rekindle their love for each other. The paragraph discussing this ends with ''[[WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons "In your face, space coyote!"]]''



*** Not to mention that the story at the beginning of ''Hero'' reveals that Thor has been known to use the alias ''Don.'' Donald Blake was the secret identity of the comic book Thor.

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*** Not to mention that the story at the beginning of 1e ''Hero'' reveals that Thor has been known to use the alias ''Don.'' Donald Blake was the secret identity of the comic book Thor.



** One of the relics in ''Companion'' is the Gun Wing mask, which [[Franchise/{{Gundam}} "looks exactly like a flight helmet from any modern-day anime with giant robots and psychic pilots."]]

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** One of the relics in the 1e ''Companion'' is the Gun Wing mask, which [[Franchise/{{Gundam}} "looks exactly like a flight helmet from any modern-day anime with giant robots and psychic pilots."]]



** Header for a sidebar in ''Companion'' on giving all Scions the Scent the Divine Knack: "I can sense you, Film/{{Highlander}}".

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** Header for a sidebar in the 1e ''Companion'' on giving all Scions the Scent the Divine Knack: "I can sense you, Film/{{Highlander}}".



* StrollingThroughTheChaos: The one-dot Boon of - naturally - the Chaos Purview, so long as one does not get involved in whatever chaotic event is occurring.
* SuperCellReception: One of the Relics in the Companion book is the iGjallahar, based on the ancient horn of Nordic myth that summons the glorious dead from Valhalla for Ragnarok. It's a special cell phone that gets a signal anywhere because it transmits to a tower in the Overworld.

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* StrollingThroughTheChaos: The one-dot Boon of - naturally - the Chaos Purview, Purview in 1e, so long as one does not get involved in whatever chaotic event is occurring.
* SuperCellReception: One of the Relics in the 1e Companion book is the iGjallahar, based on the ancient horn of Nordic myth that summons the glorious dead from Valhalla for Ragnarok. It's a special cell phone that gets a signal anywhere because it transmits to a tower in the Overworld.



* TricksterGod: Loki, Baron Samedi, Hermes and Susano-o, Odin.

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* TricksterGod: First edition ''Hero'' offers Loki, Odin, Baron Samedi, Hermes and Susano-o, Odin.Susano-o.



*** And the Scion Companion adds Manannan mac Lir, Nezha, [[Literature/JourneyToTheWest Sun Wukong]], and Br'er Rabbit to the mix. In fact, it's heavily implied that Br'er Rabbit ''is'' Coyote, under an alias.
* TrueCompanions: A Band can be these. The signature-character "protagonist" Band in the core trilogy seems to be this. By the time of ''God'''s opening fiction, when they are settling into godhood in their pantheon's homelands, most of them genuinely miss each other.

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*** And the Scion 1e Companion adds Manannan mac Lir, Nezha, [[Literature/JourneyToTheWest Sun Wukong]], and Br'er Rabbit to the mix. In fact, it's heavily implied that Br'er Rabbit ''is'' Coyote, under an alias.
* TrueCompanions: A Band can be these. The signature-character "protagonist" Band in the first edition's core trilogy seems to be this. By the time of ''God'''s opening fiction, when they are settling into godhood in their pantheon's homelands, most of them genuinely miss each other.



** [[spoiler: This is revealed to be the primary motivation behind Loki's convoluted plan in the core books. ''He succeeds'', breaking free from his Fate-given role by hijacking Muspelheim and becoming a Greater Titan himself.]].

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** [[spoiler: This is revealed to be the primary motivation behind Loki's convoluted plan in the 1e's core books. ''He succeeds'', breaking free from his Fate-given role by hijacking Muspelheim and becoming a Greater Titan himself.]].
22nd Oct '16 10:09:33 AM SparkyYoungUpstart
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2e changes things up, with the corebook, ''Scion: Origin'', covering ordinary and supernaturally-touched mortals, including pre-visitation Scions, holy people of the pantheons, sorcerers and Fatebound mortals, along with minor supernaturals such as kitsune and satyrs. ''Hero'' 2e enables the creation of fully-fledged Scions, who now come in a number of types: being the child of a god, as in 1e; [[CreatingLife being directly created by a god]]; and being a descendant of mortal nobility who was transformed in infancy (a fourth, being the {{reincarnation}} of a dead hero or god, is slated for 2e's ''God''). It also offers ten core pantheons, nine of which are revised from 1e - Netjer (Egyptian), Theoi (Greek), Aesir (Norse), Teotl (Aztec), Kami (Japanese), Orisha (Yoruba; an ancestral pantheon of Voodoo's Loa), Tuatha de Dannan (Irish), Shen (Chinese) and Devas (Hindu) - with the tenth being the Manitou (Native American Algonquin). Further pantheons are planned for later books, including Native Australian mythology. A [[https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/200664283/scion-2nd-edition-tabletop-rpg Kickstarter campaign]] to get 2e ''Origin'' and ''Hero'' into stores launched in late September 2016, and funded in less than an hour, its stretch goals including the creation of a 2e ''Companion'' featuring the Loa (Voodoo), the Nemetondevos (Gaulish), and the Yazata (Persian), with 1e's Atlantean pantheon being used as the example for building your own fictional pantheon.

to:

2e changes things up, with the corebook, ''Scion: Origin'', covering ordinary and supernaturally-touched mortals, including pre-visitation Scions, holy people of the pantheons, sorcerers and Fatebound mortals, along with minor supernaturals such as kitsune and satyrs. ''Hero'' 2e enables the creation of fully-fledged Scions, who now come in a number of types: being the child of a god, as in 1e; [[CreatingLife being directly created by a god]]; and being a descendant of mortal nobility who was transformed in infancy (a fourth, being the {{reincarnation}} of a dead hero or god, is slated for 2e's ''God''). It also offers ten core pantheons, nine of which are revised from 1e - Netjer (Egyptian), Theoi (Greek), Aesir (Norse), Teotl (Aztec), Kami (Japanese), Orisha (Yoruba; an ancestral pantheon of Voodoo's Loa), Tuatha de Dannan (Irish), Shen (Chinese) and Devas (Hindu) - with the tenth being the Manitou (Native American Algonquin). Further pantheons are planned for later books, including Native Australian mythology. A [[https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/200664283/scion-2nd-edition-tabletop-rpg Kickstarter campaign]] to get 2e ''Origin'' and ''Hero'' into stores launched in late September 2016, and 2016. It was fully funded in less than an hour, hour and by its end had exceeded it's original goal by over $300,000. Completed stretch goals including enabled the creation of a 2e ''Companion'' featuring the Loa (Voodoo), the Nemetondevos (Gaulish), and the Yazata (Persian), with 1e's Atlantean pantheon being used as the example for building your own fictional pantheon.
pantheon. It will also feature introductory fiction by Creator/KieronGillen.
3rd Oct '16 4:58:05 AM narm00
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The rulebook (''Scion: Hero'') includes six possible pantheons to choose from, using the time-tested White Wolf concept of [[RagtagBunchOfMisfits making members of different groups team up into a motley crew]]. They are: the Pesedjet (Egyptian), Dodekatheon (Greek), Aesir (Norse), Amatsukami (Japanese), Atzlanti (Aztec), and Loa (Voodoo). Additional pantheons include the Tuatha De Danann (Irish), the Celestial Bureaucracy (Chinese), and the Devas (Hindu) from ''Scion Companion'', as well as nationalistic pantheons of America and the Allies in the same sourcebook for running games during WorldWarTwo, and it's implied that yet more pantheons exist as well - there's a PDF covering the Yazata, the Persian pantheon (''Yazata: The Persian Gods''), as well as a supplement not available in English detailing the Gaulish pantheon; several fan-made pantheons can be found on the net as well. There is also the Atlantean pantheon, although they are canonically dead after having been corrupted by the Titans; details on the actual Pantheon and their Cosmology are in ''Demigod'', while the Pantheon's original Virtues (Duty, Intellect, Order, Piety) and Purview (Scire) are in the Scion ''Companion''.

to:

The rulebook (''Scion: Hero'') includes six possible pantheons to choose from, using the time-tested White Wolf concept of [[RagtagBunchOfMisfits making members of different groups team up into a motley crew]]. They are: the Pesedjet (Egyptian), Dodekatheon (Greek), Aesir (Norse), Amatsukami (Japanese), Atzlanti (Aztec), and Loa (Voodoo). Additional pantheons include the Tuatha De Danann (Irish), the Celestial Bureaucracy (Chinese), and the Devas (Hindu) from ''Scion Companion'', as well as nationalistic pantheons of America and the Allies in the same sourcebook for running games during WorldWarTwo, UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, and it's implied that yet more pantheons exist as well - there's a PDF covering the Yazata, the Persian pantheon (''Yazata: The Persian Gods''), as well as a supplement not available in English detailing the Gaulish pantheon; several fan-made pantheons can be found on the net as well. There is also the Atlantean pantheon, although they are canonically dead after having been corrupted by the Titans; details on the actual Pantheon and their Cosmology are in ''Demigod'', while the Pantheon's original Virtues (Duty, Intellect, Order, Piety) and Purview (Scire) are in the Scion ''Companion''.



2e changes things up, with the corebook, ''Scion: Origins'', covering ordinary and supernaturally-touched mortals, including pre-visitation Scions, holy people of the pantheons, sorcerers and Fatebound mortals, along with minor supernaturals such as kitsune and satyrs. ''Hero'' 2e enables the creation of fully-fledged Scions, who now come in a number of types: being the child of a god, as in 1e; [[CreatingLife being directly created by a god]]; and being a descendant of mortal nobility who was transformed in infancy (a fourth, being the {{reincarnation}} of a dead hero or god, is slated for 2e's ''God''). It also offers ten core pantheons, nine of which are revised from 1e - Netjer (Egyptian), Theoi (Greek), Aesir (Norse), Teotl (Aztec), Kami (Japanese), Orisha (Yoruba; an ancestral pantheon of Voodoo's Loa), Tuatha de Dannan (Irish), Shen (Chinese) and Devas (Hindu) - with the tenth being the Manitou (Native American Algonquin). 2e's ''Companion'' features the Loa (Voodoo) and the Nemetondevos (Gaulish). Further pantheons are planned for later books, including Native Australian mythology and a rework of the Yazata from 1e. It is currently being funded via Kickstarter [[https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/200664283/scion-2nd-edition-tabletop-rpg here]].

to:

2e changes things up, with the corebook, ''Scion: Origins'', Origin'', covering ordinary and supernaturally-touched mortals, including pre-visitation Scions, holy people of the pantheons, sorcerers and Fatebound mortals, along with minor supernaturals such as kitsune and satyrs. ''Hero'' 2e enables the creation of fully-fledged Scions, who now come in a number of types: being the child of a god, as in 1e; [[CreatingLife being directly created by a god]]; and being a descendant of mortal nobility who was transformed in infancy (a fourth, being the {{reincarnation}} of a dead hero or god, is slated for 2e's ''God''). It also offers ten core pantheons, nine of which are revised from 1e - Netjer (Egyptian), Theoi (Greek), Aesir (Norse), Teotl (Aztec), Kami (Japanese), Orisha (Yoruba; an ancestral pantheon of Voodoo's Loa), Tuatha de Dannan (Irish), Shen (Chinese) and Devas (Hindu) - with the tenth being the Manitou (Native American Algonquin). 2e's ''Companion'' features the Loa (Voodoo) and the Nemetondevos (Gaulish). Further pantheons are planned for later books, including Native Australian mythology and a rework of the Yazata from 1e. It is currently being funded via Kickstarter mythology. A [[https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/200664283/scion-2nd-edition-tabletop-rpg here]].
Kickstarter campaign]] to get 2e ''Origin'' and ''Hero'' into stores launched in late September 2016, and funded in less than an hour, its stretch goals including the creation of a 2e ''Companion'' featuring the Loa (Voodoo), the Nemetondevos (Gaulish), and the Yazata (Persian), with 1e's Atlantean pantheon being used as the example for building your own fictional pantheon.
2nd Oct '16 10:35:51 PM SparkyYoungUpstart
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2e changes things up, with the corebook, ''Scion: Origins'', covering ordinary and supernaturally-touched mortals, including pre-visitation Scions, holy people of the pantheons, sorcerers and Fatebound mortals, along with minor supernaturals such as kitsune and satyrs. ''Hero'' 2e enables the creation of fully-fledged Scions, who now come in a number of types: being the child of a god, as in 1e; [[CreatingLife being directly created by a god]]; and being a descendant of mortal nobility who was transformed in infancy (a fourth, being the {{reincarnation}} of a dead hero or god, is slated for 2e's ''God''). It also offers ten core pantheons, nine of which are revised from 1e - Netjer (Egyptian), Theoi (Greek), Aesir (Norse), Teotl (Aztec), Kami (Japanese), Orisha (Yoruba; an ancestral pantheon of Voodoo's Loa), Tuatha de Dannan (Irish), Shen (Chinese) and Devas (Hindu) - with the tenth being the Manitou (Native American Algonquin). 2e's ''Companion'' features the Loa (Voodoo) and the Nemetondevos (Gaulish). Further pantheons are planned for later books, including Native Australian mythology.

to:

2e changes things up, with the corebook, ''Scion: Origins'', covering ordinary and supernaturally-touched mortals, including pre-visitation Scions, holy people of the pantheons, sorcerers and Fatebound mortals, along with minor supernaturals such as kitsune and satyrs. ''Hero'' 2e enables the creation of fully-fledged Scions, who now come in a number of types: being the child of a god, as in 1e; [[CreatingLife being directly created by a god]]; and being a descendant of mortal nobility who was transformed in infancy (a fourth, being the {{reincarnation}} of a dead hero or god, is slated for 2e's ''God''). It also offers ten core pantheons, nine of which are revised from 1e - Netjer (Egyptian), Theoi (Greek), Aesir (Norse), Teotl (Aztec), Kami (Japanese), Orisha (Yoruba; an ancestral pantheon of Voodoo's Loa), Tuatha de Dannan (Irish), Shen (Chinese) and Devas (Hindu) - with the tenth being the Manitou (Native American Algonquin). 2e's ''Companion'' features the Loa (Voodoo) and the Nemetondevos (Gaulish). Further pantheons are planned for later books, including Native Australian mythology.
mythology and a rework of the Yazata from 1e. It is currently being funded via Kickstarter [[https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/200664283/scion-2nd-edition-tabletop-rpg here]].



* AlternateHistory: One of the biggest thematic changes in the 2nd edition was to replace the implied yet poorly implemented {{Masquerade}} of the first one with an UrbanFantasy setting in which [[BeethovenWasAnAlienSpy the gods have been involved in human history]], such as the Knights Templar aiming to wipe out pantheistic worship during the Crusades and Julius Caesar conquering Gaul to eliminate the Gaulish pantheon and secure his own apotheosis. By default, divine meddling in history isn't public knowledge, but the setting can be customised to suit taste.

to:

* AlternateHistory: One of the biggest thematic changes in the 2nd edition was to replace the implied yet poorly implemented {{Masquerade}} of the first one with an UrbanFantasy setting in which [[BeethovenWasAnAlienSpy the gods have been involved in human history]], such as the Knights Templar aiming to wipe out pantheistic worship during the Crusades and Julius Caesar conquering Gaul to eliminate the Gaulish pantheon and secure his own apotheosis. By default, divine meddling in history isn't public knowledge, but the setting can be customised customized to suit taste.
26th Sep '16 12:37:34 AM narm00
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2e changes things up, with the corebook, ''Scion: Origins'', covering ordinary and supernaturally-touched mortals, including pre-visitation Scions, holy people of the pantheons, sorcerers and Fatebound mortals, along with minor supernaturals such as kitsune and satyrs. ''Hero'' 2e enables the creation of fully-fledged Scions, who now come in a number of types: being the child of a god, as in 1e; [[CreatingLife being directly created by a god]]; being a descendant of mortal nobility who was transformed in infancy; and being the {{reincarnation}} of a dead hero or god. It also offers ten core pantheons, nine of which are revised from 1e - Netjer (Egyptian), Theoi (Greek), Aesir (Norse), Teotl (Aztec), Amatsukami (Japanese), Orisha (Yoruba; an ancestral pantheon of Voodoo's Loa), Tuatha de Dannan (Irish), Shen (Chinese) and Devas (Hindu) - with the tenth being the Manitouk (Native American Algonquin). Further pantheons are planned for later books, including Native Australian mythology. The game's default setting has also received a major shakeup, with the assumption of a WorldOfDarkness like state in which [[{{Masquerade}} the mythical is hidden away from the public]] replaced with a more in-depth look at the [[AlternateHistory realistic implications of powerful gods and monsters existing throughout and influencing history]]. Whereas the 1st edition's main inspiration was AmericanGods, the 2nd owes more to TheWickedAndTheDivine, with historical figures widely known to have been Scions, gods openly running businesses and being treated as celebrities, [[MemeticMutation Norwegian government troll preserves]] and pagan religions being popular and accepted. [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks It goes without saying that fans of the 1st edition were not pleased.]]

to:

2e changes things up, with the corebook, ''Scion: Origins'', covering ordinary and supernaturally-touched mortals, including pre-visitation Scions, holy people of the pantheons, sorcerers and Fatebound mortals, along with minor supernaturals such as kitsune and satyrs. ''Hero'' 2e enables the creation of fully-fledged Scions, who now come in a number of types: being the child of a god, as in 1e; [[CreatingLife being directly created by a god]]; and being a descendant of mortal nobility who was transformed in infancy; and infancy (a fourth, being the {{reincarnation}} of a dead hero or god. god, is slated for 2e's ''God''). It also offers ten core pantheons, nine of which are revised from 1e - Netjer (Egyptian), Theoi (Greek), Aesir (Norse), Teotl (Aztec), Amatsukami Kami (Japanese), Orisha (Yoruba; an ancestral pantheon of Voodoo's Loa), Tuatha de Dannan (Irish), Shen (Chinese) and Devas (Hindu) - with the tenth being the Manitouk Manitou (Native American Algonquin). 2e's ''Companion'' features the Loa (Voodoo) and the Nemetondevos (Gaulish). Further pantheons are planned for later books, including Native Australian mythology. mythology.

The game's default setting has also received a major shakeup, with the assumption of a WorldOfDarkness like [[TabletopGame/TheWorldOfDarkness World of Darkness-like]] state in which [[{{Masquerade}} the mythical is hidden away from the public]] replaced with a more in-depth look at the [[AlternateHistory realistic implications of powerful gods and monsters existing throughout and influencing history]]. Whereas the 1st edition's main inspiration was AmericanGods, the 2nd owes more to TheWickedAndTheDivine, with historical figures widely known to have been Scions, gods history]], both openly running businesses and being treated as celebrities, behind the scenes. The modern-day World is one where pagan religions are popular and accepted, and where the mythological hides in plain sight, with tengu nests among Japan's skyscrapers and [[MemeticMutation Norwegian government troll preserves]] and pagan religions being popular and accepted. preserves]]. [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks It goes without saying that some fans of the 1st edition were not pleased.]]



* AlternateHistory: One of the biggest thematic changes in the 2nd edition was to replace the implied yet poorly implemented {{Masquerade}} of the first one with an explicit UrbanFantasy setting in which the influence of the gods is acknowledged. Julius Caesar, for example, is known to have been a Scion of Venus, his campaign in Gaul is known to have involved a supernatural war with the local divinities, and large temples to the Greek gods exist side by side with temples and synagogues in modern cities.

to:

* AlternateHistory: One of the biggest thematic changes in the 2nd edition was to replace the implied yet poorly implemented {{Masquerade}} of the first one with an explicit UrbanFantasy setting in which the influence of [[BeethovenWasAnAlienSpy the gods is acknowledged. Julius Caesar, for example, is known to have been a Scion of Venus, his campaign in Gaul is known to have involved a supernatural war with in human history]], such as the local divinities, Knights Templar aiming to wipe out pantheistic worship during the Crusades and large temples Julius Caesar conquering Gaul to eliminate the Greek gods exist side by side with temples Gaulish pantheon and synagogues secure his own apotheosis. By default, divine meddling in modern cities. history isn't public knowledge, but the setting can be customised to suit taste.



* BonusMaterial: [[http://theonyxpath.com/since-you-can-get-this-in-print-now-something-extra-for-scion-extras/ Irusan]], the King of Cats, from the Tuatha.



* InSpiteOfANail: Previews of the 2nd edition setting imply that despite the existence of [[AllMythsAreTrue all myths being true]] being common knowledge throughout history, the world has [[RuleOfFun somehow]] ended up looking mostly like our own with some aesthetic and cultural changes, rather than being utterly unrecognizable.



* {{Masquerade}}: This was implied to be the case in the 1st edition, with the books mentioning [[UnusuallyUninterestingSight mortals seeing massive fire giants as irregularly large people with severe burns]], the fictional adventures always taking place outside the public eye and the world being described as looking, on the surface, just like our own. Unfortunately, the books included no details on how to enforce such secrecy in play, with the amount of power given to the players making it all but impossible, outside of [[DeusExMachina GM's fiat]], to stop them from irrevocably changing the world by punching a dragon straight through the Empire States building. Imagine trying to maintain the status quo of the WorldOfDarkness, but instead of vampires, it's Marvel superheroes who are walking around. The 2nd edition decided to make away with the silliness and just go for an explicit AlternateHistory UrbanFantasy setting.

to:

* {{Masquerade}}: This was implied to be the case in the 1st edition, with the books mentioning [[UnusuallyUninterestingSight mortals seeing massive fire giants as irregularly large people with severe burns]], the fictional adventures always taking place outside the public eye and the world being described as looking, on the surface, just like our own. Unfortunately, the books included no details on how to enforce such secrecy in play, with the amount of power given to the players making it all but impossible, outside of [[DeusExMachina GM's fiat]], to stop them from irrevocably changing the world by punching a dragon straight through the Empire States building. Imagine trying to maintain the status quo of the WorldOfDarkness, TabletopGame/TheWorldOfDarkness, but instead of vampires, it's Marvel superheroes who are walking around. The 2nd edition decided to make away with the silliness and just go for an explicit AlternateHistory UrbanFantasy setting.



* NeverWasThisUniverse: The presence of the divine in the history of 2e's World has resulted in a present-day setting that's much like our own in the broad strokes, with certain differences apparent on closer inspection.



** 2E plays with this; it becomes harder and harder to Screw Destiny the greater in power you are (it's the one thing that keeps a God constrained enough to not be a Titan), but Fate selects against this trope-because it only assigns Fatebound roles to people who are currently amenable to the idea (so it only make someone who already has good chemistry with you a Paramour, and only someone with reason to hate you a Nemesis). Even once that happens, mortals and people lower on the Legend pole still have mostly free will-it doesn't influence their actions, it [[WindsOfDestinyChange changes probability]] so that actions that further their roles become easier and narratively fitting (it induces [[RomanticRain affectionate]] [[SnowMeansLove scenes]] around the Paramour, and gives the Nemesis [[VillainExitStageLeft lucky escapes]] and [[TookALevelInBadass chances to get strong enough to pose a fair fight]]). And if you're a mortal, that's all it does-if you go against your role, it results in some bad luck before Fate gets the message and either de-Binds you or changes your role. Fear of ''stronger'' Fatebinding is why Gods remain hands off (they don't want to be Fatebound to their own versions of Ragnarok).

to:

** 2E plays with this; it becomes harder and harder to Screw Destiny the greater in power you are (it's the one thing that keeps a God constrained enough to not be a Titan), but Fate selects against this trope-because it only assigns Fatebound roles to people who are currently amenable to the idea (so it only make someone who already has good chemistry with you a Paramour, and only someone with reason to hate you a Nemesis). Even once that happens, mortals and people lower on the Legend pole still have mostly free will-it doesn't influence their actions, it [[WindsOfDestinyChange changes probability]] so that actions that further their roles become easier and narratively fitting (it induces [[RomanticRain affectionate]] [[SnowMeansLove scenes]] around the Paramour, and gives the Nemesis [[VillainExitStageLeft lucky escapes]] and [[TookALevelInBadass chances to get strong enough to pose a fair fight]]). And if you're a mortal, that's all it does-if you go against your role, it results in some bad luck before Fate gets the message and either de-Binds you or changes your role. Fear of ''stronger'' Fatebinding is why Gods remain hands off hands-off (they don't want to be Fatebound to their own versions of Ragnarok).



* YouAreTheTranslatedForeignWord: In response to many complaints by fans of the 1st edition that the featured Pantheon names were historically, mythologically or linguistically inaccurate (for example, the word "Dodekatheon" specifically refers to the Twelve Olympians of Greek mythology, and as such shouldn't include Hades), Onyx Path Productions has decided to go down this route. [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks Almost as soon as this was revealed, a minority among the fans has started complaining]] that this didn't actually make things any better, since "the word 'Gods' in each people's language" is perfectly applicable, by the speakers of each, to all gods everywhere, rather than just the members of each culture's own Pantheon (e.g. to a Japanese speaker, Poseidon is every bit as much of a "Kami" as Izanagi). A third group argues that, with most ancient people's having not designed their views of the cosmos with the intention of accommodating the creation of future roleplaying games and thus not ''having'' a special title for their own gods, considered to be a natural part of the world, the only intellectually honest way of going about things was to either use the [[BoringButPractical boring but accurate]] "The [Culture's] Gods" for all the Pantheons, or to embrace the silliness fully and use whatever sounds cooler.

to:

* YouAreTheTranslatedForeignWord: In response to many complaints by fans of the 1st edition that the featured Pantheon names were historically, mythologically or linguistically inaccurate (for example, the word "Dodekatheon" specifically refers to the Twelve Olympians of Greek mythology, and as such shouldn't include Hades), Onyx Path Productions Publishing has decided to go down this route. [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks Almost as soon as this was revealed, a minority among the fans has started complaining]] that this didn't actually make things any better, since "the word 'Gods' in each people's language" is perfectly applicable, by the speakers of each, to all gods everywhere, rather than just the members of each culture's own Pantheon (e.g. to a Japanese speaker, Poseidon is every bit as much of a "Kami" as Izanagi). A third group argues that, with most ancient people's peoples having not designed their views of the cosmos with the intention of accommodating the creation of future roleplaying games and thus not ''having'' a special title for their own gods, considered to be a natural part of the world, the only intellectually honest way of going about things was to either use the [[BoringButPractical boring but accurate]] "The [Culture's] Gods" for all the Pantheons, or to embrace the silliness fully and use whatever sounds cooler.
25th Sep '16 4:22:56 AM InsomniacWeasel
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2e changes things up, with the corebook, ''Scion: Origins'', covering ordinary and supernaturally-touched mortals, including pre-visitation Scions, holy people of the pantheons, sorcerers and Fatebound mortals, along with minor supernaturals such as kitsune and satyrs. ''Hero'' 2e enables the creation of fully-fledged Scions, who now come in a number of types: being the child of a god, as in 1e; [[CreatingLife being directly created by a god]]; being a descendant of mortal nobility who was transformed in infancy; and being the {{reincarnation}} of a dead hero or god. It also offers ten core pantheons, nine of which are revised from 1e - Netjer (Egyptian), Theoi (Greek), Aesir (Norse), Teotl (Aztec), Amatsukami (Japanese), Orisha (Yoruba; an ancestral pantheon of Voodoo's Loa), Tuatha de Dannan (Irish), Shen (Chinese) and Devas (Hindu) - with the tenth being the Manitouk (Native American Algonquin). Further pantheons are planned for later books, including Native Australian mythology. The game's default setting has also received a major shakeup, with the assumption of a WorldOfDarkness like state in which [[{{Masquerade}} the mythical is hidden away from the public]] replaced with a more in-depth look at the [[AlternateHistory realistic implications of powerful gods and monsters existing throughout and influencing history]]. Whereas the 1st editions main inspiration was AmericanGods, the 2nd owes more to TheWickedAndTheDivine, with historical figures widely known to have been Scions, gods openly running businesses and being treated as celebrities, [[MemeticMutation Norwegian government troll preserves]] and pagan religions being popular and accepted. [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks It goes without saying that fans of the 1st edition were not pleased.]]

to:

2e changes things up, with the corebook, ''Scion: Origins'', covering ordinary and supernaturally-touched mortals, including pre-visitation Scions, holy people of the pantheons, sorcerers and Fatebound mortals, along with minor supernaturals such as kitsune and satyrs. ''Hero'' 2e enables the creation of fully-fledged Scions, who now come in a number of types: being the child of a god, as in 1e; [[CreatingLife being directly created by a god]]; being a descendant of mortal nobility who was transformed in infancy; and being the {{reincarnation}} of a dead hero or god. It also offers ten core pantheons, nine of which are revised from 1e - Netjer (Egyptian), Theoi (Greek), Aesir (Norse), Teotl (Aztec), Amatsukami (Japanese), Orisha (Yoruba; an ancestral pantheon of Voodoo's Loa), Tuatha de Dannan (Irish), Shen (Chinese) and Devas (Hindu) - with the tenth being the Manitouk (Native American Algonquin). Further pantheons are planned for later books, including Native Australian mythology. The game's default setting has also received a major shakeup, with the assumption of a WorldOfDarkness like state in which [[{{Masquerade}} the mythical is hidden away from the public]] replaced with a more in-depth look at the [[AlternateHistory realistic implications of powerful gods and monsters existing throughout and influencing history]]. Whereas the 1st editions edition's main inspiration was AmericanGods, the 2nd owes more to TheWickedAndTheDivine, with historical figures widely known to have been Scions, gods openly running businesses and being treated as celebrities, [[MemeticMutation Norwegian government troll preserves]] and pagan religions being popular and accepted. [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks It goes without saying that fans of the 1st edition were not pleased.]]



* InSpiteOfANail: Previews of the 2nd edition setting imply that despite the existence of [[AllMythsAreTrue all myths being true]] being common knowledge throughout history, the world has [[RuleOfFun somehow]] ended up looking mostly like our own with some aesthetic and cultural changes, rather than being utterly unrecognizable.



* {{Masquerade}}: This was implied to be the case in the 1st edition, with the books mentioning[[UnusuallyUninterestingSight mortals seeing massive fire giants as irregularly large people with severe burns]], the fictional adventures always taking place outside the public eye and the world being described as looking, on the surface, just like our own. Unfortunately, the books included no details on how to enforce such secrecy in play, with the amount of power given to the players making it all but impossible, outside of [[DeusExMachina GM's fiat]], to stop them from irrevocably changing the world by punching a dragon straight through the Empire States building. Imagine trying to maintain the status quo of the WorldOfDarkness, but instead of vampires, it's Marvel superheroes who are walking around. The 2nd edition decided to make away with the silliness and just go for an explicit AlternateHistory UrbanFantasy setting.

to:

* {{Masquerade}}: This was implied to be the case in the 1st edition, with the books mentioning[[UnusuallyUninterestingSight mentioning [[UnusuallyUninterestingSight mortals seeing massive fire giants as irregularly large people with severe burns]], the fictional adventures always taking place outside the public eye and the world being described as looking, on the surface, just like our own. Unfortunately, the books included no details on how to enforce such secrecy in play, with the amount of power given to the players making it all but impossible, outside of [[DeusExMachina GM's fiat]], to stop them from irrevocably changing the world by punching a dragon straight through the Empire States building. Imagine trying to maintain the status quo of the WorldOfDarkness, but instead of vampires, it's Marvel superheroes who are walking around. The 2nd edition decided to make away with the silliness and just go for an explicit AlternateHistory UrbanFantasy setting.
25th Sep '16 3:29:04 AM InsomniacWeasel
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Think of it as ''TabletopGame/{{Exalted}}'' [[XMeetsY meets]] ''Literature/AmericanGods''; in fact the game designers acknowledge ''Literature/AmericanGods'' among their influences.

to:

Think of it as ''TabletopGame/{{Exalted}}'' [[XMeetsY meets]] ''Literature/AmericanGods''; in fact the game designers acknowledge ''Literature/AmericanGods'' among their influences.
or ''Comicbook/TheWickedAndTheDivine''.



2e changes things up, with the corebook, ''Scion: Origins'', covering ordinary and supernaturally-touched mortals, including pre-visitation Scions, holy people of the pantheons, sorcerers and Fatebound mortals, along with minor supernaturals such as kitsune and satyrs. ''Hero'' 2e enables the creation of fully-fledged Scions, who now come in a number of types: being the child of a god, as in 1e; [[CreatingLife being directly created by a god]]; being a descendant of mortal nobility who was transformed in infancy; and being the {{reincarnation}} of a dead hero or god. It also offers ten core pantheons, nine of which are revised from 1e - Netjer (Egyptian), Theoi (Greek), Aesir (Norse), Teotl (Aztec), Amatsukami (Japanese), Orisha (Yoruba; an ancestral pantheon of Voodoo's Loa), Tuatha de Dannan (Irish), Shen (Chinese) and Devas (Hindu) - with the tenth being the Manitouk (Native American Algonquin). Further pantheons are planned for later books, including Native Australian mythology.

to:

2e changes things up, with the corebook, ''Scion: Origins'', covering ordinary and supernaturally-touched mortals, including pre-visitation Scions, holy people of the pantheons, sorcerers and Fatebound mortals, along with minor supernaturals such as kitsune and satyrs. ''Hero'' 2e enables the creation of fully-fledged Scions, who now come in a number of types: being the child of a god, as in 1e; [[CreatingLife being directly created by a god]]; being a descendant of mortal nobility who was transformed in infancy; and being the {{reincarnation}} of a dead hero or god. It also offers ten core pantheons, nine of which are revised from 1e - Netjer (Egyptian), Theoi (Greek), Aesir (Norse), Teotl (Aztec), Amatsukami (Japanese), Orisha (Yoruba; an ancestral pantheon of Voodoo's Loa), Tuatha de Dannan (Irish), Shen (Chinese) and Devas (Hindu) - with the tenth being the Manitouk (Native American Algonquin). Further pantheons are planned for later books, including Native Australian mythology.
mythology. The game's default setting has also received a major shakeup, with the assumption of a WorldOfDarkness like state in which [[{{Masquerade}} the mythical is hidden away from the public]] replaced with a more in-depth look at the [[AlternateHistory realistic implications of powerful gods and monsters existing throughout and influencing history]]. Whereas the 1st editions main inspiration was AmericanGods, the 2nd owes more to TheWickedAndTheDivine, with historical figures widely known to have been Scions, gods openly running businesses and being treated as celebrities, [[MemeticMutation Norwegian government troll preserves]] and pagan religions being popular and accepted. [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks It goes without saying that fans of the 1st edition were not pleased.]]


Added DiffLines:

* AlternateHistory: One of the biggest thematic changes in the 2nd edition was to replace the implied yet poorly implemented {{Masquerade}} of the first one with an explicit UrbanFantasy setting in which the influence of the gods is acknowledged. Julius Caesar, for example, is known to have been a Scion of Venus, his campaign in Gaul is known to have involved a supernatural war with the local divinities, and large temples to the Greek gods exist side by side with temples and synagogues in modern cities.


Added DiffLines:

* {{Masquerade}}: This was implied to be the case in the 1st edition, with the books mentioning[[UnusuallyUninterestingSight mortals seeing massive fire giants as irregularly large people with severe burns]], the fictional adventures always taking place outside the public eye and the world being described as looking, on the surface, just like our own. Unfortunately, the books included no details on how to enforce such secrecy in play, with the amount of power given to the players making it all but impossible, outside of [[DeusExMachina GM's fiat]], to stop them from irrevocably changing the world by punching a dragon straight through the Empire States building. Imagine trying to maintain the status quo of the WorldOfDarkness, but instead of vampires, it's Marvel superheroes who are walking around. The 2nd edition decided to make away with the silliness and just go for an explicit AlternateHistory UrbanFantasy setting.
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