History TabletopGame / Scion

22nd Apr '16 8:43:54 PM Doug86
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* BadassNormal: Simon Telamon, who was introduced in ''Companion'' as a Guide Birthright. He's just a mortal, but is too good a soldier to be a simple Follower. The only thing unusual about him is that he's the reincarnation of a mortal hero, [[Myth/ClassicalMythology Telamonian Ajax]]. For bonus points, he pulls a BigDamnHero and rescues Tommy and Yukiko from a banshee in a short story. There is also a note that reincarnations of other ostensibly mortal people of great resolve would be like this, such as AlexanderTheGreat, [[Literature/RomanceOfTheThreeKingdoms Cao Cao]] or [[UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy JFK]].

to:

* BadassNormal: Simon Telamon, who was introduced in ''Companion'' as a Guide Birthright. He's just a mortal, but is too good a soldier to be a simple Follower. The only thing unusual about him is that he's the reincarnation of a mortal hero, [[Myth/ClassicalMythology Telamonian Ajax]]. For bonus points, he pulls a BigDamnHero and rescues Tommy and Yukiko from a banshee in a short story. There is also a note that reincarnations of other ostensibly mortal people of great resolve would be like this, such as AlexanderTheGreat, UsefulNotes/AlexanderTheGreat, [[Literature/RomanceOfTheThreeKingdoms Cao Cao]] or [[UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy JFK]].
2nd Dec '15 8:13:33 PM SparkyYoungUpstart
Is there an issue? Send a Message


2e changes things up, with the corebook, ''Scion: Origins'', covering ordinary and supernaturally-touched mortals, including pre-visitation Scions, holy people of the pantheons, sorcerers and Fatebound mortals, along with minor supernaturals such as kitsune and satyrs. ''Hero'' 2e enables the creation of fully-fledged Scions, who now come in a number of types: being the child of a god, as in 1e; [[CreatingLife being directly created by a god]]; being a descendant of mortal nobility who was transformed in infancy; and being the {{reincarnation}} of a dead hero or god. It also offers ten core pantheons, nine of which are revised from 1e - Netjer (Egyptian), Theoi (Greek), Aesir (Norse), Teotl (Aztec), Amatsukami (Japanese), Orisha/Loa (Yoruba/Voodoo), Tuatha de Dannan (Irish), Shen (Chinese) and Devas (Hindu) - with the tenth being the Manitouk (Native American Algonquin). Further pantheons are planned for later books.

to:

2e changes things up, with the corebook, ''Scion: Origins'', covering ordinary and supernaturally-touched mortals, including pre-visitation Scions, holy people of the pantheons, sorcerers and Fatebound mortals, along with minor supernaturals such as kitsune and satyrs. ''Hero'' 2e enables the creation of fully-fledged Scions, who now come in a number of types: being the child of a god, as in 1e; [[CreatingLife being directly created by a god]]; being a descendant of mortal nobility who was transformed in infancy; and being the {{reincarnation}} of a dead hero or god. It also offers ten core pantheons, nine of which are revised from 1e - Netjer (Egyptian), Theoi (Greek), Aesir (Norse), Teotl (Aztec), Amatsukami (Japanese), Orisha/Loa (Yoruba/Voodoo), Tuatha de Dannan (Irish), Shen (Chinese) and Devas (Hindu) - with the tenth being the Manitouk (Native American Algonquin). Further pantheons are planned for later books.
books, including Native Australian mythology.
16th Aug '15 4:37:10 AM narm00
Is there an issue? Send a Message


2e changes things up, with the corebook, ''Scion: Origins'', covering ordinary and supernaturally-touched mortals, including pre-visitation Scions, holy people of the pantheons, sorcerers and Fatebound mortals, along with minor supernaturals such as kitsune and satyrs. ''Hero'' 2e enables the creation of fully-fledged Scions, with ten core pantheons available. Nine of the pantheons are revised from 1e - Netjer (Egyptian), Theoi (Greek), Aesir (Norse), Teotl (Aztec), Amatsukami (Japanese), Orisha/Loa (Yoruba/Voodoo), Tuatha de Dannan (Irish), Shen (Chinese) and Devas (Hindu) - with the tenth being the Manitouk (Native American Algonquin). Further pantheons are planned for later books.

to:

2e changes things up, with the corebook, ''Scion: Origins'', covering ordinary and supernaturally-touched mortals, including pre-visitation Scions, holy people of the pantheons, sorcerers and Fatebound mortals, along with minor supernaturals such as kitsune and satyrs. ''Hero'' 2e enables the creation of fully-fledged Scions, with who now come in a number of types: being the child of a god, as in 1e; [[CreatingLife being directly created by a god]]; being a descendant of mortal nobility who was transformed in infancy; and being the {{reincarnation}} of a dead hero or god. It also offers ten core pantheons available. Nine pantheons, nine of the pantheons which are revised from 1e - Netjer (Egyptian), Theoi (Greek), Aesir (Norse), Teotl (Aztec), Amatsukami (Japanese), Orisha/Loa (Yoruba/Voodoo), Tuatha de Dannan (Irish), Shen (Chinese) and Devas (Hindu) - with the tenth being the Manitouk (Native American Algonquin). Further pantheons are planned for later books.






* PowerCreep: What pretty much amount the Sourcebooks NPC and your PC. In the span of a couple of years they came from mere Scions to the lowest level Gods, who somehow managed to end the entire war and personally defeat all the TITANS one by one. A feat that no pantheon or Head God can ever pretend to have even thought about it. And yet [[GameplayandStorySegregation by stats and text flavor you are still considred a whelp against the big shot gods who were loosing the war]].



* SurprisinglyEliteCannonFodder: What you became after getting Godhood. You and your team are literally at the bottom of your pantheon and yet you get the mission to DEFEAT THE TITANS, the beings that have been crushing the God-realms, from the get-go. To put in perspective, is like starting as a demigod and having as your first mission to take down Zeus and Odin to show your mettle. Oh, and you get no respect from the higher ups while doing it. At all.


Added DiffLines:

* SurprisinglyEliteCannonFodder: What you become after getting Godhood in the 1e corebook campaign. You and your team are literally at the bottom of your pantheon and yet you get the mission to DEFEAT THE TITANS, the beings that have been crushing the God-realms, from the get-go. To put it in perspective, this is like starting as a demigod and having as your first mission to take down Zeus and Odin to show your mettle. Oh, and you get no respect from the higher ups while doing it. At all.


Added DiffLines:

* TookALevelInBadass: How the journey of the 1e corebooks' pregenerated characters through the included campaign comes off. In the span of a couple of years they came from mere Scions to the lowest-level Gods, who somehow managed to end the entire war and personally defeat all the TITANS one by one. A feat that no pantheon or Head God can ever pretend to have even thought about. And yet [[GameplayandStorySegregation by stats and text flavor you are still considered a whelp against the big shot Gods who were losing the war]].
15th Aug '15 12:16:44 PM WriterInAbscence
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:



Added DiffLines:

* PowerCreep: What pretty much amount the Sourcebooks NPC and your PC. In the span of a couple of years they came from mere Scions to the lowest level Gods, who somehow managed to end the entire war and personally defeat all the TITANS one by one. A feat that no pantheon or Head God can ever pretend to have even thought about it. And yet [[GameplayandStorySegregation by stats and text flavor you are still considred a whelp against the big shot gods who were loosing the war]].


Added DiffLines:

* SurprisinglyEliteCannonFodder: What you became after getting Godhood. You and your team are literally at the bottom of your pantheon and yet you get the mission to DEFEAT THE TITANS, the beings that have been crushing the God-realms, from the get-go. To put in perspective, is like starting as a demigod and having as your first mission to take down Zeus and Odin to show your mettle. Oh, and you get no respect from the higher ups while doing it. At all.
5th Aug '15 8:03:37 AM narm00
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The second edition changes things up, with the corebook, ''Scion: Origins'', covering ordinary and supernaturally-touched mortals, including pre-visitation Scions, holy people of the pantheons, sorcerers and Fatebound mortals. ''Hero'' 2e enables the creation of fully-fledged Scions, with ten core pantheons available (the Egyptian, Greek, Norse, Japanese, Aztec, Yoruba/Voodoo, Irish, Chinese and Hindu pantheons from first edition, with some revision, plus one as yet unrevealed), and further pantheons planned for later books.

to:

The second edition 2e changes things up, with the corebook, ''Scion: Origins'', covering ordinary and supernaturally-touched mortals, including pre-visitation Scions, holy people of the pantheons, sorcerers and Fatebound mortals. mortals, along with minor supernaturals such as kitsune and satyrs. ''Hero'' 2e enables the creation of fully-fledged Scions, with ten core pantheons available (the Egyptian, Greek, Norse, Japanese, Aztec, Yoruba/Voodoo, Irish, Chinese and Hindu available. Nine of the pantheons are revised from first edition, 1e - Netjer (Egyptian), Theoi (Greek), Aesir (Norse), Teotl (Aztec), Amatsukami (Japanese), Orisha/Loa (Yoruba/Voodoo), Tuatha de Dannan (Irish), Shen (Chinese) and Devas (Hindu) - with some revision, plus one as yet unrevealed), and further the tenth being the Manitouk (Native American Algonquin). Further pantheons are planned for later books.



** About the only major exception is Miclantecuhtli of the Aztlanti, who is pretty much a JerkAss - ''Hero'' describes him as "suffering a permanent case of schadenfreude". Then again, with the possible exceptions of Quetzalcoátl and Tlazolteotl[[note]]And she's a goddess of ''shit''[[/note]], none of the Aztlanti are really portrayed in a flattering light. This extends to the Scions; of the four official examples, one is a psychotic self-mutilator, one is a male-to-female transsexual who uses the flayed skin of a woman to change sexes, one is a self-hating DeathSeeker, and the other, after ascending to godhood, is pretty much disgusted with his own pantheon.

to:

** About the only major exception is Miclantecuhtli of the Aztlanti, Atzlanti, who is pretty much a JerkAss - ''Hero'' describes him as "suffering a permanent case of schadenfreude". Then again, with the possible exceptions of Quetzalcoátl and Tlazolteotl[[note]]And she's a goddess of ''shit''[[/note]], none of the Aztlanti Atzlanti are really portrayed in a flattering light. This extends to the Scions; of the four official examples, one is a psychotic self-mutilator, one is a male-to-female transsexual who uses the flayed skin of a woman to change sexes, one is a self-hating DeathSeeker, and the other, after ascending to godhood, is pretty much disgusted with his own pantheon.



* GoodIsNotNice: The Aztláni are described this way in the introduction to their section in the core book:

to:

* GoodIsNotNice: The Aztláni Atzlánti are described this way in the introduction to their section in the core book:
14th Jun '15 5:18:09 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* BadassNormal: Simon Telamon, who was introduced in ''Companion'' as a Guide Birthright. He's just a mortal, but is too good a soldier to be a simple Follower. The only thing unusual about him is that he's the reincarnation of a mortal hero, [[Myth/ClassicalMythology Telamonian Ajax]]. For bonus points, he pulls a BigDamnHero and rescues Tommy and Yukiko from a banshee in a short story. There is also a note that reincarnations of other ostensibly mortal people of great resolve would be like this, such as AlexanderTheGreat, [[Literature/RomanceOfTheThreeKingdoms Cao Cao]] or [[JohnFKennedy JFK]].

to:

* BadassNormal: Simon Telamon, who was introduced in ''Companion'' as a Guide Birthright. He's just a mortal, but is too good a soldier to be a simple Follower. The only thing unusual about him is that he's the reincarnation of a mortal hero, [[Myth/ClassicalMythology Telamonian Ajax]]. For bonus points, he pulls a BigDamnHero and rescues Tommy and Yukiko from a banshee in a short story. There is also a note that reincarnations of other ostensibly mortal people of great resolve would be like this, such as AlexanderTheGreat, [[Literature/RomanceOfTheThreeKingdoms Cao Cao]] or [[JohnFKennedy [[UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy JFK]].
22nd May '15 12:36:01 PM narm00
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The rulebook (''Scion: Hero'') includes six possible pantheons to choose from, using the time-tested White Wolf concept of [[RagtagBunchOfMisfits making members of different groups team up into a motley crew]]. They are: the Pesedjet (Egyptian), Dodekatheon (Greek), Aesir (Norse), Amatsukami (Japanese), Atzlanti (Aztec), and Loa (Voodoo). Game extensions include the Tuatha De Danann (Irish), the Celestial Bureaucracy (Chinese), and the Devas (Hindu) from ''Scion Companion'', as well as nationalistic pantheons of America and the Allies in the same sourcebook for running games during WorldWarTwo, and it's implied that yet more pantheons exist as well (indeed, there's a PDF covering the Yazata, the Persian pantheon (''Yazata: The Persian Gods''), as well as a supplement not available in English detailing the Gaulish pantheon; several fan-made pantheons can be found on the net as well). There is also the Atlantean pantheon, although they are canonically dead after having been corrupted by the Titans; details on the actual Pantheon and their Cosmology are in ''Demigod'', while the Pantheon's original Virtues (Duty, Intellect, Order, Piety) and Purview (Scire) are in the Scion ''Companion''.

to:

The rulebook (''Scion: Hero'') includes six possible pantheons to choose from, using the time-tested White Wolf concept of [[RagtagBunchOfMisfits making members of different groups team up into a motley crew]]. They are: the Pesedjet (Egyptian), Dodekatheon (Greek), Aesir (Norse), Amatsukami (Japanese), Atzlanti (Aztec), and Loa (Voodoo). Game extensions Additional pantheons include the Tuatha De Danann (Irish), the Celestial Bureaucracy (Chinese), and the Devas (Hindu) from ''Scion Companion'', as well as nationalistic pantheons of America and the Allies in the same sourcebook for running games during WorldWarTwo, and it's implied that yet more pantheons exist as well (indeed, - there's a PDF covering the Yazata, the Persian pantheon (''Yazata: The Persian Gods''), as well as a supplement not available in English detailing the Gaulish pantheon; several fan-made pantheons can be found on the net as well).well. There is also the Atlantean pantheon, although they are canonically dead after having been corrupted by the Titans; details on the actual Pantheon and their Cosmology are in ''Demigod'', while the Pantheon's original Virtues (Duty, Intellect, Order, Piety) and Purview (Scire) are in the Scion ''Companion''.


Added DiffLines:

The second edition changes things up, with the corebook, ''Scion: Origins'', covering ordinary and supernaturally-touched mortals, including pre-visitation Scions, holy people of the pantheons, sorcerers and Fatebound mortals. ''Hero'' 2e enables the creation of fully-fledged Scions, with ten core pantheons available (the Egyptian, Greek, Norse, Japanese, Aztec, Yoruba/Voodoo, Irish, Chinese and Hindu pantheons from first edition, with some revision, plus one as yet unrevealed), and further pantheons planned for later books.
4th May '15 11:09:55 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* BadassNormal: Simon Telamon, who was introduced in ''Companion'' as a Guide Birthright. He's just a mortal, but is too good a soldier to be a simple Follower. The only thing unusual about him is that he's the reincarnation of a mortal hero, [[ClassicalMythology Telamonian Ajax]]. For bonus points, he pulls a BigDamnHero and rescues Tommy and Yukiko from a banshee in a short story. There is also a note that reincarnations of other ostensibly mortal people of great resolve would be like this, such as AlexanderTheGreat, [[Literature/RomanceOfTheThreeKingdoms Cao Cao]] or [[JohnFKennedy JFK]].

to:

* BadassNormal: Simon Telamon, who was introduced in ''Companion'' as a Guide Birthright. He's just a mortal, but is too good a soldier to be a simple Follower. The only thing unusual about him is that he's the reincarnation of a mortal hero, [[ClassicalMythology [[Myth/ClassicalMythology Telamonian Ajax]]. For bonus points, he pulls a BigDamnHero and rescues Tommy and Yukiko from a banshee in a short story. There is also a note that reincarnations of other ostensibly mortal people of great resolve would be like this, such as AlexanderTheGreat, [[Literature/RomanceOfTheThreeKingdoms Cao Cao]] or [[JohnFKennedy JFK]].
3rd May '15 6:18:16 PM Smurfton
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* TheTopicOfCancer: The [[AnthropomorphicPersonification Titan of the Blighted Earth,]] [[CelticMythology Crom Cruach, nemesis of the Tuatha De Danaan,]] is associated with stillbirth, madness, fungi, vermin, rot, ''mutation and cancer'', and has a very strong theme of the "perversion of life". His minions, the giant fomorians, are generally horribly disfigured, and their ugliness is said to often include tumors all over their body.

to:

* TheTopicOfCancer: The [[AnthropomorphicPersonification Titan of the Blighted Earth,]] [[CelticMythology [[Myth/CelticMythology Crom Cruach, nemesis of the Tuatha De Danaan,]] is associated with stillbirth, madness, fungi, vermin, rot, ''mutation and cancer'', and has a very strong theme of the "perversion of life". His minions, the giant fomorians, are generally horribly disfigured, and their ugliness is said to often include tumors all over their body.
19th Apr '15 8:37:45 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* HeroicLineage[=/=]InTheBlood: Scions are expected to take after their divine parents in personality as well as ability, with the writeup for each god going into specifics. Since those specifics are intended for presumably-heroic player characters, the former trope is more likely to be played up than the latter. For instance, Scions of [[Myth/EgyptianMythology Set]] are known for doing DirtyBusiness, Scions of [[UsefulNotes/AztecMythology Tezcatlipoca]] stir up controversy for a cause, and Scions of [[{{Voudoun}} Kalfu]] are likely to be DrivenToVillainy troublemakers more than actually malicious. Those fathered by Caligula, who's detailed in the WWII supplement as the reason the Greek Gods are supporting the Axis, on the other hand, are just terrible people.

to:

* HeroicLineage[=/=]InTheBlood: Scions are expected to take after their divine parents in personality as well as ability, with the writeup for each god going into specifics. Since those specifics are intended for presumably-heroic player characters, the former trope is more likely to be played up than the latter. For instance, Scions of [[Myth/EgyptianMythology Set]] are known for doing DirtyBusiness, Scions of [[UsefulNotes/AztecMythology [[Myth/AztecMythology Tezcatlipoca]] stir up controversy for a cause, and Scions of [[{{Voudoun}} Kalfu]] are likely to be DrivenToVillainy troublemakers more than actually malicious. Those fathered by Caligula, who's detailed in the WWII supplement as the reason the Greek Gods are supporting the Axis, on the other hand, are just terrible people.
This list shows the last 10 events of 107. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=TabletopGame.Scion