History TabletopGame / Scion

26th Sep '16 12:37:34 AM narm00
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2e changes things up, with the corebook, ''Scion: Origins'', covering ordinary and supernaturally-touched mortals, including pre-visitation Scions, holy people of the pantheons, sorcerers and Fatebound mortals, along with minor supernaturals such as kitsune and satyrs. ''Hero'' 2e enables the creation of fully-fledged Scions, who now come in a number of types: being the child of a god, as in 1e; [[CreatingLife being directly created by a god]]; being a descendant of mortal nobility who was transformed in infancy; and being the {{reincarnation}} of a dead hero or god. It also offers ten core pantheons, nine of which are revised from 1e - Netjer (Egyptian), Theoi (Greek), Aesir (Norse), Teotl (Aztec), Amatsukami (Japanese), Orisha (Yoruba; an ancestral pantheon of Voodoo's Loa), Tuatha de Dannan (Irish), Shen (Chinese) and Devas (Hindu) - with the tenth being the Manitouk (Native American Algonquin). Further pantheons are planned for later books, including Native Australian mythology. The game's default setting has also received a major shakeup, with the assumption of a WorldOfDarkness like state in which [[{{Masquerade}} the mythical is hidden away from the public]] replaced with a more in-depth look at the [[AlternateHistory realistic implications of powerful gods and monsters existing throughout and influencing history]]. Whereas the 1st edition's main inspiration was AmericanGods, the 2nd owes more to TheWickedAndTheDivine, with historical figures widely known to have been Scions, gods openly running businesses and being treated as celebrities, [[MemeticMutation Norwegian government troll preserves]] and pagan religions being popular and accepted. [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks It goes without saying that fans of the 1st edition were not pleased.]]

to:

2e changes things up, with the corebook, ''Scion: Origins'', covering ordinary and supernaturally-touched mortals, including pre-visitation Scions, holy people of the pantheons, sorcerers and Fatebound mortals, along with minor supernaturals such as kitsune and satyrs. ''Hero'' 2e enables the creation of fully-fledged Scions, who now come in a number of types: being the child of a god, as in 1e; [[CreatingLife being directly created by a god]]; and being a descendant of mortal nobility who was transformed in infancy; and infancy (a fourth, being the {{reincarnation}} of a dead hero or god. god, is slated for 2e's ''God''). It also offers ten core pantheons, nine of which are revised from 1e - Netjer (Egyptian), Theoi (Greek), Aesir (Norse), Teotl (Aztec), Amatsukami Kami (Japanese), Orisha (Yoruba; an ancestral pantheon of Voodoo's Loa), Tuatha de Dannan (Irish), Shen (Chinese) and Devas (Hindu) - with the tenth being the Manitouk Manitou (Native American Algonquin). 2e's ''Companion'' features the Loa (Voodoo) and the Nemetondevos (Gaulish). Further pantheons are planned for later books, including Native Australian mythology. mythology.

The game's default setting has also received a major shakeup, with the assumption of a WorldOfDarkness like [[TabletopGame/TheWorldOfDarkness World of Darkness-like]] state in which [[{{Masquerade}} the mythical is hidden away from the public]] replaced with a more in-depth look at the [[AlternateHistory realistic implications of powerful gods and monsters existing throughout and influencing history]]. Whereas the 1st edition's main inspiration was AmericanGods, the 2nd owes more to TheWickedAndTheDivine, with historical figures widely known to have been Scions, gods history]], both openly running businesses and being treated as celebrities, behind the scenes. The modern-day World is one where pagan religions are popular and accepted, and where the mythological hides in plain sight, with tengu nests among Japan's skyscrapers and [[MemeticMutation Norwegian government troll preserves]] and pagan religions being popular and accepted. preserves]]. [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks It goes without saying that some fans of the 1st edition were not pleased.]]



* AlternateHistory: One of the biggest thematic changes in the 2nd edition was to replace the implied yet poorly implemented {{Masquerade}} of the first one with an explicit UrbanFantasy setting in which the influence of the gods is acknowledged. Julius Caesar, for example, is known to have been a Scion of Venus, his campaign in Gaul is known to have involved a supernatural war with the local divinities, and large temples to the Greek gods exist side by side with temples and synagogues in modern cities.

to:

* AlternateHistory: One of the biggest thematic changes in the 2nd edition was to replace the implied yet poorly implemented {{Masquerade}} of the first one with an explicit UrbanFantasy setting in which the influence of [[BeethovenWasAnAlienSpy the gods is acknowledged. Julius Caesar, for example, is known to have been a Scion of Venus, his campaign in Gaul is known to have involved a supernatural war with in human history]], such as the local divinities, Knights Templar aiming to wipe out pantheistic worship during the Crusades and large temples Julius Caesar conquering Gaul to eliminate the Greek gods exist side by side with temples Gaulish pantheon and synagogues secure his own apotheosis. By default, divine meddling in modern cities. history isn't public knowledge, but the setting can be customised to suit taste.



* BonusMaterial: [[http://theonyxpath.com/since-you-can-get-this-in-print-now-something-extra-for-scion-extras/ Irusan]], the King of Cats, from the Tuatha.



* InSpiteOfANail: Previews of the 2nd edition setting imply that despite the existence of [[AllMythsAreTrue all myths being true]] being common knowledge throughout history, the world has [[RuleOfFun somehow]] ended up looking mostly like our own with some aesthetic and cultural changes, rather than being utterly unrecognizable.



* {{Masquerade}}: This was implied to be the case in the 1st edition, with the books mentioning [[UnusuallyUninterestingSight mortals seeing massive fire giants as irregularly large people with severe burns]], the fictional adventures always taking place outside the public eye and the world being described as looking, on the surface, just like our own. Unfortunately, the books included no details on how to enforce such secrecy in play, with the amount of power given to the players making it all but impossible, outside of [[DeusExMachina GM's fiat]], to stop them from irrevocably changing the world by punching a dragon straight through the Empire States building. Imagine trying to maintain the status quo of the WorldOfDarkness, but instead of vampires, it's Marvel superheroes who are walking around. The 2nd edition decided to make away with the silliness and just go for an explicit AlternateHistory UrbanFantasy setting.

to:

* {{Masquerade}}: This was implied to be the case in the 1st edition, with the books mentioning [[UnusuallyUninterestingSight mortals seeing massive fire giants as irregularly large people with severe burns]], the fictional adventures always taking place outside the public eye and the world being described as looking, on the surface, just like our own. Unfortunately, the books included no details on how to enforce such secrecy in play, with the amount of power given to the players making it all but impossible, outside of [[DeusExMachina GM's fiat]], to stop them from irrevocably changing the world by punching a dragon straight through the Empire States building. Imagine trying to maintain the status quo of the WorldOfDarkness, TabletopGame/TheWorldOfDarkness, but instead of vampires, it's Marvel superheroes who are walking around. The 2nd edition decided to make away with the silliness and just go for an explicit AlternateHistory UrbanFantasy setting.



* NeverWasThisUniverse: The presence of the divine in the history of 2e's World has resulted in a present-day setting that's much like our own in the broad strokes, with certain differences apparent on closer inspection.



** 2E plays with this; it becomes harder and harder to Screw Destiny the greater in power you are (it's the one thing that keeps a God constrained enough to not be a Titan), but Fate selects against this trope-because it only assigns Fatebound roles to people who are currently amenable to the idea (so it only make someone who already has good chemistry with you a Paramour, and only someone with reason to hate you a Nemesis). Even once that happens, mortals and people lower on the Legend pole still have mostly free will-it doesn't influence their actions, it [[WindsOfDestinyChange changes probability]] so that actions that further their roles become easier and narratively fitting (it induces [[RomanticRain affectionate]] [[SnowMeansLove scenes]] around the Paramour, and gives the Nemesis [[VillainExitStageLeft lucky escapes]] and [[TookALevelInBadass chances to get strong enough to pose a fair fight]]). And if you're a mortal, that's all it does-if you go against your role, it results in some bad luck before Fate gets the message and either de-Binds you or changes your role. Fear of ''stronger'' Fatebinding is why Gods remain hands off (they don't want to be Fatebound to their own versions of Ragnarok).

to:

** 2E plays with this; it becomes harder and harder to Screw Destiny the greater in power you are (it's the one thing that keeps a God constrained enough to not be a Titan), but Fate selects against this trope-because it only assigns Fatebound roles to people who are currently amenable to the idea (so it only make someone who already has good chemistry with you a Paramour, and only someone with reason to hate you a Nemesis). Even once that happens, mortals and people lower on the Legend pole still have mostly free will-it doesn't influence their actions, it [[WindsOfDestinyChange changes probability]] so that actions that further their roles become easier and narratively fitting (it induces [[RomanticRain affectionate]] [[SnowMeansLove scenes]] around the Paramour, and gives the Nemesis [[VillainExitStageLeft lucky escapes]] and [[TookALevelInBadass chances to get strong enough to pose a fair fight]]). And if you're a mortal, that's all it does-if you go against your role, it results in some bad luck before Fate gets the message and either de-Binds you or changes your role. Fear of ''stronger'' Fatebinding is why Gods remain hands off hands-off (they don't want to be Fatebound to their own versions of Ragnarok).



* YouAreTheTranslatedForeignWord: In response to many complaints by fans of the 1st edition that the featured Pantheon names were historically, mythologically or linguistically inaccurate (for example, the word "Dodekatheon" specifically refers to the Twelve Olympians of Greek mythology, and as such shouldn't include Hades), Onyx Path Productions has decided to go down this route. [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks Almost as soon as this was revealed, a minority among the fans has started complaining]] that this didn't actually make things any better, since "the word 'Gods' in each people's language" is perfectly applicable, by the speakers of each, to all gods everywhere, rather than just the members of each culture's own Pantheon (e.g. to a Japanese speaker, Poseidon is every bit as much of a "Kami" as Izanagi). A third group argues that, with most ancient people's having not designed their views of the cosmos with the intention of accommodating the creation of future roleplaying games and thus not ''having'' a special title for their own gods, considered to be a natural part of the world, the only intellectually honest way of going about things was to either use the [[BoringButPractical boring but accurate]] "The [Culture's] Gods" for all the Pantheons, or to embrace the silliness fully and use whatever sounds cooler.

to:

* YouAreTheTranslatedForeignWord: In response to many complaints by fans of the 1st edition that the featured Pantheon names were historically, mythologically or linguistically inaccurate (for example, the word "Dodekatheon" specifically refers to the Twelve Olympians of Greek mythology, and as such shouldn't include Hades), Onyx Path Productions Publishing has decided to go down this route. [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks Almost as soon as this was revealed, a minority among the fans has started complaining]] that this didn't actually make things any better, since "the word 'Gods' in each people's language" is perfectly applicable, by the speakers of each, to all gods everywhere, rather than just the members of each culture's own Pantheon (e.g. to a Japanese speaker, Poseidon is every bit as much of a "Kami" as Izanagi). A third group argues that, with most ancient people's peoples having not designed their views of the cosmos with the intention of accommodating the creation of future roleplaying games and thus not ''having'' a special title for their own gods, considered to be a natural part of the world, the only intellectually honest way of going about things was to either use the [[BoringButPractical boring but accurate]] "The [Culture's] Gods" for all the Pantheons, or to embrace the silliness fully and use whatever sounds cooler.
25th Sep '16 4:22:56 AM InsomniacWeasel
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2e changes things up, with the corebook, ''Scion: Origins'', covering ordinary and supernaturally-touched mortals, including pre-visitation Scions, holy people of the pantheons, sorcerers and Fatebound mortals, along with minor supernaturals such as kitsune and satyrs. ''Hero'' 2e enables the creation of fully-fledged Scions, who now come in a number of types: being the child of a god, as in 1e; [[CreatingLife being directly created by a god]]; being a descendant of mortal nobility who was transformed in infancy; and being the {{reincarnation}} of a dead hero or god. It also offers ten core pantheons, nine of which are revised from 1e - Netjer (Egyptian), Theoi (Greek), Aesir (Norse), Teotl (Aztec), Amatsukami (Japanese), Orisha (Yoruba; an ancestral pantheon of Voodoo's Loa), Tuatha de Dannan (Irish), Shen (Chinese) and Devas (Hindu) - with the tenth being the Manitouk (Native American Algonquin). Further pantheons are planned for later books, including Native Australian mythology. The game's default setting has also received a major shakeup, with the assumption of a WorldOfDarkness like state in which [[{{Masquerade}} the mythical is hidden away from the public]] replaced with a more in-depth look at the [[AlternateHistory realistic implications of powerful gods and monsters existing throughout and influencing history]]. Whereas the 1st editions main inspiration was AmericanGods, the 2nd owes more to TheWickedAndTheDivine, with historical figures widely known to have been Scions, gods openly running businesses and being treated as celebrities, [[MemeticMutation Norwegian government troll preserves]] and pagan religions being popular and accepted. [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks It goes without saying that fans of the 1st edition were not pleased.]]

to:

2e changes things up, with the corebook, ''Scion: Origins'', covering ordinary and supernaturally-touched mortals, including pre-visitation Scions, holy people of the pantheons, sorcerers and Fatebound mortals, along with minor supernaturals such as kitsune and satyrs. ''Hero'' 2e enables the creation of fully-fledged Scions, who now come in a number of types: being the child of a god, as in 1e; [[CreatingLife being directly created by a god]]; being a descendant of mortal nobility who was transformed in infancy; and being the {{reincarnation}} of a dead hero or god. It also offers ten core pantheons, nine of which are revised from 1e - Netjer (Egyptian), Theoi (Greek), Aesir (Norse), Teotl (Aztec), Amatsukami (Japanese), Orisha (Yoruba; an ancestral pantheon of Voodoo's Loa), Tuatha de Dannan (Irish), Shen (Chinese) and Devas (Hindu) - with the tenth being the Manitouk (Native American Algonquin). Further pantheons are planned for later books, including Native Australian mythology. The game's default setting has also received a major shakeup, with the assumption of a WorldOfDarkness like state in which [[{{Masquerade}} the mythical is hidden away from the public]] replaced with a more in-depth look at the [[AlternateHistory realistic implications of powerful gods and monsters existing throughout and influencing history]]. Whereas the 1st editions edition's main inspiration was AmericanGods, the 2nd owes more to TheWickedAndTheDivine, with historical figures widely known to have been Scions, gods openly running businesses and being treated as celebrities, [[MemeticMutation Norwegian government troll preserves]] and pagan religions being popular and accepted. [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks It goes without saying that fans of the 1st edition were not pleased.]]



* InSpiteOfANail: Previews of the 2nd edition setting imply that despite the existence of [[AllMythsAreTrue all myths being true]] being common knowledge throughout history, the world has [[RuleOfFun somehow]] ended up looking mostly like our own with some aesthetic and cultural changes, rather than being utterly unrecognizable.



* {{Masquerade}}: This was implied to be the case in the 1st edition, with the books mentioning[[UnusuallyUninterestingSight mortals seeing massive fire giants as irregularly large people with severe burns]], the fictional adventures always taking place outside the public eye and the world being described as looking, on the surface, just like our own. Unfortunately, the books included no details on how to enforce such secrecy in play, with the amount of power given to the players making it all but impossible, outside of [[DeusExMachina GM's fiat]], to stop them from irrevocably changing the world by punching a dragon straight through the Empire States building. Imagine trying to maintain the status quo of the WorldOfDarkness, but instead of vampires, it's Marvel superheroes who are walking around. The 2nd edition decided to make away with the silliness and just go for an explicit AlternateHistory UrbanFantasy setting.

to:

* {{Masquerade}}: This was implied to be the case in the 1st edition, with the books mentioning[[UnusuallyUninterestingSight mentioning [[UnusuallyUninterestingSight mortals seeing massive fire giants as irregularly large people with severe burns]], the fictional adventures always taking place outside the public eye and the world being described as looking, on the surface, just like our own. Unfortunately, the books included no details on how to enforce such secrecy in play, with the amount of power given to the players making it all but impossible, outside of [[DeusExMachina GM's fiat]], to stop them from irrevocably changing the world by punching a dragon straight through the Empire States building. Imagine trying to maintain the status quo of the WorldOfDarkness, but instead of vampires, it's Marvel superheroes who are walking around. The 2nd edition decided to make away with the silliness and just go for an explicit AlternateHistory UrbanFantasy setting.
25th Sep '16 3:29:04 AM InsomniacWeasel
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Think of it as ''TabletopGame/{{Exalted}}'' [[XMeetsY meets]] ''Literature/AmericanGods''; in fact the game designers acknowledge ''Literature/AmericanGods'' among their influences.

to:

Think of it as ''TabletopGame/{{Exalted}}'' [[XMeetsY meets]] ''Literature/AmericanGods''; in fact the game designers acknowledge ''Literature/AmericanGods'' among their influences.
or ''Comicbook/TheWickedAndTheDivine''.



2e changes things up, with the corebook, ''Scion: Origins'', covering ordinary and supernaturally-touched mortals, including pre-visitation Scions, holy people of the pantheons, sorcerers and Fatebound mortals, along with minor supernaturals such as kitsune and satyrs. ''Hero'' 2e enables the creation of fully-fledged Scions, who now come in a number of types: being the child of a god, as in 1e; [[CreatingLife being directly created by a god]]; being a descendant of mortal nobility who was transformed in infancy; and being the {{reincarnation}} of a dead hero or god. It also offers ten core pantheons, nine of which are revised from 1e - Netjer (Egyptian), Theoi (Greek), Aesir (Norse), Teotl (Aztec), Amatsukami (Japanese), Orisha (Yoruba; an ancestral pantheon of Voodoo's Loa), Tuatha de Dannan (Irish), Shen (Chinese) and Devas (Hindu) - with the tenth being the Manitouk (Native American Algonquin). Further pantheons are planned for later books, including Native Australian mythology.

to:

2e changes things up, with the corebook, ''Scion: Origins'', covering ordinary and supernaturally-touched mortals, including pre-visitation Scions, holy people of the pantheons, sorcerers and Fatebound mortals, along with minor supernaturals such as kitsune and satyrs. ''Hero'' 2e enables the creation of fully-fledged Scions, who now come in a number of types: being the child of a god, as in 1e; [[CreatingLife being directly created by a god]]; being a descendant of mortal nobility who was transformed in infancy; and being the {{reincarnation}} of a dead hero or god. It also offers ten core pantheons, nine of which are revised from 1e - Netjer (Egyptian), Theoi (Greek), Aesir (Norse), Teotl (Aztec), Amatsukami (Japanese), Orisha (Yoruba; an ancestral pantheon of Voodoo's Loa), Tuatha de Dannan (Irish), Shen (Chinese) and Devas (Hindu) - with the tenth being the Manitouk (Native American Algonquin). Further pantheons are planned for later books, including Native Australian mythology.
mythology. The game's default setting has also received a major shakeup, with the assumption of a WorldOfDarkness like state in which [[{{Masquerade}} the mythical is hidden away from the public]] replaced with a more in-depth look at the [[AlternateHistory realistic implications of powerful gods and monsters existing throughout and influencing history]]. Whereas the 1st editions main inspiration was AmericanGods, the 2nd owes more to TheWickedAndTheDivine, with historical figures widely known to have been Scions, gods openly running businesses and being treated as celebrities, [[MemeticMutation Norwegian government troll preserves]] and pagan religions being popular and accepted. [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks It goes without saying that fans of the 1st edition were not pleased.]]


Added DiffLines:

* AlternateHistory: One of the biggest thematic changes in the 2nd edition was to replace the implied yet poorly implemented {{Masquerade}} of the first one with an explicit UrbanFantasy setting in which the influence of the gods is acknowledged. Julius Caesar, for example, is known to have been a Scion of Venus, his campaign in Gaul is known to have involved a supernatural war with the local divinities, and large temples to the Greek gods exist side by side with temples and synagogues in modern cities.


Added DiffLines:

* {{Masquerade}}: This was implied to be the case in the 1st edition, with the books mentioning[[UnusuallyUninterestingSight mortals seeing massive fire giants as irregularly large people with severe burns]], the fictional adventures always taking place outside the public eye and the world being described as looking, on the surface, just like our own. Unfortunately, the books included no details on how to enforce such secrecy in play, with the amount of power given to the players making it all but impossible, outside of [[DeusExMachina GM's fiat]], to stop them from irrevocably changing the world by punching a dragon straight through the Empire States building. Imagine trying to maintain the status quo of the WorldOfDarkness, but instead of vampires, it's Marvel superheroes who are walking around. The 2nd edition decided to make away with the silliness and just go for an explicit AlternateHistory UrbanFantasy setting.
24th Sep '16 4:29:54 AM InsomniacWeasel
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Added DiffLines:

* YouAreTheTranslatedForeignWord: In response to many complaints by fans of the 1st edition that the featured Pantheon names were historically, mythologically or linguistically inaccurate (for example, the word "Dodekatheon" specifically refers to the Twelve Olympians of Greek mythology, and as such shouldn't include Hades), Onyx Path Productions has decided to go down this route. [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks Almost as soon as this was revealed, a minority among the fans has started complaining]] that this didn't actually make things any better, since "the word 'Gods' in each people's language" is perfectly applicable, by the speakers of each, to all gods everywhere, rather than just the members of each culture's own Pantheon (e.g. to a Japanese speaker, Poseidon is every bit as much of a "Kami" as Izanagi). A third group argues that, with most ancient people's having not designed their views of the cosmos with the intention of accommodating the creation of future roleplaying games and thus not ''having'' a special title for their own gods, considered to be a natural part of the world, the only intellectually honest way of going about things was to either use the [[BoringButPractical boring but accurate]] "The [Culture's] Gods" for all the Pantheons, or to embrace the silliness fully and use whatever sounds cooler.
31st Jul '16 1:29:57 PM Leliel
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Added DiffLines:

*** And if you are a mortal who happens to have ''really'' pissed off Fate in some way, it may retaliate and [[BlessedWithSuck gift]] you the power of [[TheCassandra Doomsaying]]-not not only are you instinctively aware of everything bad that's Fated to happen, listening to you ''[[CharmPerson hypnotizes people into guaranteeing it happens]]''.
31st Jul '16 1:11:58 PM Leliel
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Added DiffLines:

** 2E plays with this; it becomes harder and harder to Screw Destiny the greater in power you are (it's the one thing that keeps a God constrained enough to not be a Titan), but Fate selects against this trope-because it only assigns Fatebound roles to people who are currently amenable to the idea (so it only make someone who already has good chemistry with you a Paramour, and only someone with reason to hate you a Nemesis). Even once that happens, mortals and people lower on the Legend pole still have mostly free will-it doesn't influence their actions, it [[WindsOfDestinyChange changes probability]] so that actions that further their roles become easier and narratively fitting (it induces [[RomanticRain affectionate]] [[SnowMeansLove scenes]] around the Paramour, and gives the Nemesis [[VillainExitStageLeft lucky escapes]] and [[TookALevelInBadass chances to get strong enough to pose a fair fight]]). And if you're a mortal, that's all it does-if you go against your role, it results in some bad luck before Fate gets the message and either de-Binds you or changes your role. Fear of ''stronger'' Fatebinding is why Gods remain hands off (they don't want to be Fatebound to their own versions of Ragnarok).
6th Jun '16 1:17:22 PM narm00
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2e changes things up, with the corebook, ''Scion: Origins'', covering ordinary and supernaturally-touched mortals, including pre-visitation Scions, holy people of the pantheons, sorcerers and Fatebound mortals, along with minor supernaturals such as kitsune and satyrs. ''Hero'' 2e enables the creation of fully-fledged Scions, who now come in a number of types: being the child of a god, as in 1e; [[CreatingLife being directly created by a god]]; being a descendant of mortal nobility who was transformed in infancy; and being the {{reincarnation}} of a dead hero or god. It also offers ten core pantheons, nine of which are revised from 1e - Netjer (Egyptian), Theoi (Greek), Aesir (Norse), Teotl (Aztec), Amatsukami (Japanese), Orisha/Loa (Yoruba/Voodoo), Tuatha de Dannan (Irish), Shen (Chinese) and Devas (Hindu) - with the tenth being the Manitouk (Native American Algonquin). Further pantheons are planned for later books, including Native Australian mythology.

to:

2e changes things up, with the corebook, ''Scion: Origins'', covering ordinary and supernaturally-touched mortals, including pre-visitation Scions, holy people of the pantheons, sorcerers and Fatebound mortals, along with minor supernaturals such as kitsune and satyrs. ''Hero'' 2e enables the creation of fully-fledged Scions, who now come in a number of types: being the child of a god, as in 1e; [[CreatingLife being directly created by a god]]; being a descendant of mortal nobility who was transformed in infancy; and being the {{reincarnation}} of a dead hero or god. It also offers ten core pantheons, nine of which are revised from 1e - Netjer (Egyptian), Theoi (Greek), Aesir (Norse), Teotl (Aztec), Amatsukami (Japanese), Orisha/Loa (Yoruba/Voodoo), Orisha (Yoruba; an ancestral pantheon of Voodoo's Loa), Tuatha de Dannan (Irish), Shen (Chinese) and Devas (Hindu) - with the tenth being the Manitouk (Native American Algonquin). Further pantheons are planned for later books, including Native Australian mythology.
22nd Apr '16 8:43:54 PM Doug86
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* BadassNormal: Simon Telamon, who was introduced in ''Companion'' as a Guide Birthright. He's just a mortal, but is too good a soldier to be a simple Follower. The only thing unusual about him is that he's the reincarnation of a mortal hero, [[Myth/ClassicalMythology Telamonian Ajax]]. For bonus points, he pulls a BigDamnHero and rescues Tommy and Yukiko from a banshee in a short story. There is also a note that reincarnations of other ostensibly mortal people of great resolve would be like this, such as AlexanderTheGreat, [[Literature/RomanceOfTheThreeKingdoms Cao Cao]] or [[UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy JFK]].

to:

* BadassNormal: Simon Telamon, who was introduced in ''Companion'' as a Guide Birthright. He's just a mortal, but is too good a soldier to be a simple Follower. The only thing unusual about him is that he's the reincarnation of a mortal hero, [[Myth/ClassicalMythology Telamonian Ajax]]. For bonus points, he pulls a BigDamnHero and rescues Tommy and Yukiko from a banshee in a short story. There is also a note that reincarnations of other ostensibly mortal people of great resolve would be like this, such as AlexanderTheGreat, UsefulNotes/AlexanderTheGreat, [[Literature/RomanceOfTheThreeKingdoms Cao Cao]] or [[UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy JFK]].
2nd Dec '15 8:13:33 PM SparkyYoungUpstart
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2e changes things up, with the corebook, ''Scion: Origins'', covering ordinary and supernaturally-touched mortals, including pre-visitation Scions, holy people of the pantheons, sorcerers and Fatebound mortals, along with minor supernaturals such as kitsune and satyrs. ''Hero'' 2e enables the creation of fully-fledged Scions, who now come in a number of types: being the child of a god, as in 1e; [[CreatingLife being directly created by a god]]; being a descendant of mortal nobility who was transformed in infancy; and being the {{reincarnation}} of a dead hero or god. It also offers ten core pantheons, nine of which are revised from 1e - Netjer (Egyptian), Theoi (Greek), Aesir (Norse), Teotl (Aztec), Amatsukami (Japanese), Orisha/Loa (Yoruba/Voodoo), Tuatha de Dannan (Irish), Shen (Chinese) and Devas (Hindu) - with the tenth being the Manitouk (Native American Algonquin). Further pantheons are planned for later books.

to:

2e changes things up, with the corebook, ''Scion: Origins'', covering ordinary and supernaturally-touched mortals, including pre-visitation Scions, holy people of the pantheons, sorcerers and Fatebound mortals, along with minor supernaturals such as kitsune and satyrs. ''Hero'' 2e enables the creation of fully-fledged Scions, who now come in a number of types: being the child of a god, as in 1e; [[CreatingLife being directly created by a god]]; being a descendant of mortal nobility who was transformed in infancy; and being the {{reincarnation}} of a dead hero or god. It also offers ten core pantheons, nine of which are revised from 1e - Netjer (Egyptian), Theoi (Greek), Aesir (Norse), Teotl (Aztec), Amatsukami (Japanese), Orisha/Loa (Yoruba/Voodoo), Tuatha de Dannan (Irish), Shen (Chinese) and Devas (Hindu) - with the tenth being the Manitouk (Native American Algonquin). Further pantheons are planned for later books.
books, including Native Australian mythology.
16th Aug '15 4:37:10 AM narm00
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2e changes things up, with the corebook, ''Scion: Origins'', covering ordinary and supernaturally-touched mortals, including pre-visitation Scions, holy people of the pantheons, sorcerers and Fatebound mortals, along with minor supernaturals such as kitsune and satyrs. ''Hero'' 2e enables the creation of fully-fledged Scions, with ten core pantheons available. Nine of the pantheons are revised from 1e - Netjer (Egyptian), Theoi (Greek), Aesir (Norse), Teotl (Aztec), Amatsukami (Japanese), Orisha/Loa (Yoruba/Voodoo), Tuatha de Dannan (Irish), Shen (Chinese) and Devas (Hindu) - with the tenth being the Manitouk (Native American Algonquin). Further pantheons are planned for later books.

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2e changes things up, with the corebook, ''Scion: Origins'', covering ordinary and supernaturally-touched mortals, including pre-visitation Scions, holy people of the pantheons, sorcerers and Fatebound mortals, along with minor supernaturals such as kitsune and satyrs. ''Hero'' 2e enables the creation of fully-fledged Scions, with who now come in a number of types: being the child of a god, as in 1e; [[CreatingLife being directly created by a god]]; being a descendant of mortal nobility who was transformed in infancy; and being the {{reincarnation}} of a dead hero or god. It also offers ten core pantheons available. Nine pantheons, nine of the pantheons which are revised from 1e - Netjer (Egyptian), Theoi (Greek), Aesir (Norse), Teotl (Aztec), Amatsukami (Japanese), Orisha/Loa (Yoruba/Voodoo), Tuatha de Dannan (Irish), Shen (Chinese) and Devas (Hindu) - with the tenth being the Manitouk (Native American Algonquin). Further pantheons are planned for later books.






* PowerCreep: What pretty much amount the Sourcebooks NPC and your PC. In the span of a couple of years they came from mere Scions to the lowest level Gods, who somehow managed to end the entire war and personally defeat all the TITANS one by one. A feat that no pantheon or Head God can ever pretend to have even thought about it. And yet [[GameplayandStorySegregation by stats and text flavor you are still considred a whelp against the big shot gods who were loosing the war]].



* SurprisinglyEliteCannonFodder: What you became after getting Godhood. You and your team are literally at the bottom of your pantheon and yet you get the mission to DEFEAT THE TITANS, the beings that have been crushing the God-realms, from the get-go. To put in perspective, is like starting as a demigod and having as your first mission to take down Zeus and Odin to show your mettle. Oh, and you get no respect from the higher ups while doing it. At all.


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* SurprisinglyEliteCannonFodder: What you become after getting Godhood in the 1e corebook campaign. You and your team are literally at the bottom of your pantheon and yet you get the mission to DEFEAT THE TITANS, the beings that have been crushing the God-realms, from the get-go. To put it in perspective, this is like starting as a demigod and having as your first mission to take down Zeus and Odin to show your mettle. Oh, and you get no respect from the higher ups while doing it. At all.


Added DiffLines:

* TookALevelInBadass: How the journey of the 1e corebooks' pregenerated characters through the included campaign comes off. In the span of a couple of years they came from mere Scions to the lowest-level Gods, who somehow managed to end the entire war and personally defeat all the TITANS one by one. A feat that no pantheon or Head God can ever pretend to have even thought about. And yet [[GameplayandStorySegregation by stats and text flavor you are still considered a whelp against the big shot Gods who were losing the war]].
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