History TabletopGame / GURPS

18th Jan '17 9:48:03 PM Alas_Poor_Donny
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** Actually, if you multiply your character's score by 10 (making the average 100 and the usual for a human "smart guy" 120) it pretty much corresponds to the real-life IQ spectrum (which is a normal distribution with the average at 100 and a deviation of 15). The point at which it goes from being a bit dim to being completely debilitating is even when it drops from 8 to 7... IQ 70 is a typical real-life cutoff where a person will be classified as learning disabled and assigned a social worker. And the upper limit for human characters is 20, with IQ 200 being the point where the real-life IQ scale has become essentially useless as a measure of intellectual capacity. The various mental tasks you can perform with the IQ stat alone more or less back this up, and the expenditure of skill points and training time being more important to most "smart" skills than the stat itself also reflects reality fairly well.
18th Jan '17 9:34:55 PM Alas_Poor_Donny
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** The stand-out example of a combinatorial multiplier is GURPS' massively excessive number of hit locations, which go down to individual fingers and consider the head, the eyes, and the brain to be different 'targets', for instance. This adds up quickly to potentially over fifty hit locations per person, which multiplies the entire armor table directly (with rules causing armor for various locations to be altered with different values), weapons (with various types having different modifiers for different hit locations), and pretty much the entire power list and combat-applicable skill table, and to some extent even the health table. There is a reason most house rules run along the lines of "all armored jackets have sleeves of the same armor value" and "there are no such things as fingerless gloves".
29th Dec '16 4:24:36 AM hatchi804
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Several supplements have their own pages: ''TabletopGame/GURPSAlternateEarths'', ''{{TabletopGame/Banestorm}}'', ''[[TabletopGame/GURPSReignOfSteel Reign of Steel]]'', ''[[TabletopGame/GURPSSupers Supers]]'', ''TabletopGame/InfiniteWorlds'', ''TabletopGame/TalesOfTheSolarPatrol'', the ''DiscworldRolePlayingGame'', ''TabletopGame/TranshumanSpace'' and ''TabletopGame/GURPSTechnomancer''.

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Several supplements have their own pages: ''TabletopGame/GURPSAlternateEarths'', ''{{TabletopGame/Banestorm}}'', ''[[TabletopGame/GURPSReignOfSteel Reign of Steel]]'', ''[[TabletopGame/GURPSSupers Supers]]'', ''TabletopGame/InfiniteWorlds'', ''TabletopGame/TalesOfTheSolarPatrol'', the ''DiscworldRolePlayingGame'', ''TabletopGame/DiscworldRolePlayingGame'', ''TabletopGame/TranshumanSpace'' and ''TabletopGame/GURPSTechnomancer''.
27th Dec '16 2:18:21 PM LBHills
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** The Daredevil advantage gives a bonus to all rolls made in situations where you're taking unnecessary risks, because that makes you cool.

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** The Daredevil advantage gives a bonus to all rolls made in situations where you're taking unnecessary risks, risks - and preserves you from suffering a critical failure - because that makes you cool.cool



* SharpenedToASingleAtom: Superfine blades divide damage resistance by two. Monowire blades divide damage resistance by ten. Nanothorn blades divide damage resistance by ten and ''shreds'' the bonds that hold the atoms in molecules together.

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* SharpenedToASingleAtom: Superfine blades divide damage resistance by two. Monowire blades divide damage resistance by ten. Nanothorn blades divide damage resistance by ten and ''shreds'' ''shred'' the bonds that hold the atoms in molecules together.
2nd Dec '16 7:45:39 AM Elyandarin
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* CastFromStamina: Fatigue is measured by loss of Strength points. If Strength reaches zero, the character falls unconscious. When a mage casts magic spells, each spell cast drains a certain amount of either [[CastFromHitPoints Health]] or Strength (Fatigue). The more spells you cast, the weaker you get.
11th Nov '16 7:03:19 AM ProfessorDetective
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[[caption-width-right:150:What it says on the tin.]]

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[[caption-width-right:150:What [[caption-width-right:350:What it says on the tin.]]
11th Nov '16 7:02:09 AM ProfessorDetective
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[[quoteright:150:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/gurps_basic1_6517.jpg]]

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[[quoteright:150:http://static.[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/gurps_basic1_6517.jpg]]org/pmwiki/pub/images/basic1_lg.jpg]]



''GURPS'' has been described as a "simulationist" system, because it includes lots of rules that tell you what's happening in the gameworld without much affecting the outcome of the relevant event. For example, when an attacker succeeds at his roll to hit, the defender always gets to choose how to defend, and makes the appropriate defense roll (unless it was a critical hit, or a surprise). The defense could be handled as penalties applied to the attack roll, and the odds of dealing damage would be the same--but in that case, should your opponent avoid taking damage, you wouldn't know if it was because you missed entirely, or nearly-hit but the defender dodged, or hit too soft to do any damage, or hit hard enough to do damage but your opponent is too much of a badass to notice. This is helpful to game masters narrating the combat, because it tells them exactly what to narrate, but it does take longer.

''GURPS'' has been criticized as being very math heavy and overly complex compared to other systems like [[TabletopGame/D20System d20]]. These are only fair criticisms if one uses a bunch of optional rules; basic character creation and basic gameplay require no mathematics more advanced than simple addition. The extra rules mostly take the form of modifiers to apply to rolls in specific situations, and each optional rule helps and hurts everyone about equally, so those rules can be safely ignored without affecting game balance. However, there are few systems with quite so ''many'' optional rules as ''GURPS'', so {{Rules Lawyer}}s are naturally attracted to the system. The complexity can range quite widely depending on the game master.

The "''GURPS'' is too math heavy" critique that people level at it tends to stem from the overly complex ''GURPS'' ''Vehicles''. The book was notoriously convoluted, requiring the designer to specify the surface area of various parts of the vehicle, and keep track of power requirements in kilowatts. The outcome of all that number-crunching was an insanely detailed listing of items--that is, you didn't find out until the '''end''' of the design process that you had 120% of your vehicle's volume occupied, or that you'd badly underestimated the amount of kW compared to the final mass and so can't meet your performance goals (like, say, driving on the freeway). A computer spreadsheet made it possible to actually design vehicles in less than 4 hours of work. Even the majority of ''GURPS'' players didn't like this, so they used the much simpler and more flexible character creation rules to make their own custom cars. This new method was so much more popular that in Fourth Edition it became the standard of vehicle creation.

Perhaps the best feature of ''GURPS'' is the huge number of {{Sourcebook}}s that have been written for it. Pick any genre or topic, and you will probably find at least one ''GURPS'' book covering it (often available in PDF rather than print form these days). Broad categories are covered in genre books; specific settings may receive [[TabletopGame/GURPSSettings their own books]]. In addition to suggestions and notes regarding the topic of the {{Sourcebook}}, each volume invariably includes additions to and errata for the basic rules set.[[note]]With the release of 4th ed., sourcebooks shifted to showing applications and examples of existing Basic Set rules rather than inventing new rules whole cloth. However, rules like Styles, Social Engineering mechanics, and Power Modifiers push the envelope, and several popular books like Spaceships, Ritual Path Magic, and Technical Grappling still do introduce new/optional rules.[[/note]] This has led people to ask why they should buy a so-called "universal system" that requires the purchase of a new rulebook every time the players wish to use that system to play in a new genre. Because of this, ''GURPS'' is often compared unfavorably with the TabletopGame/HeroSystem, a universal gaming system whose sourcebooks and supplements have never had to add new rules to the Core Set -- though the 4th edition evolution has made such additions less extensive.

On the other hand, new rules aside, many of the supplements are useful enough as setting sourcebooks that people using other {{Game System}}s will occasionally buy them as references; this was, in fact, part of the original mission statement for the the game, and the reason the "U" stands for "Universal". The opposite is also true; with a little work, most game worlds can be converted to ''GURPS'', usually with an increase in utility and flexibility. The intention was that, by building the game around "real world" units of measurement instead of "rounds" and "hexes", it would be easier for people using other systems to make use of the information in the supplements. Of course [[CreatorProvincialism "real world" in this context means the USA]]; pounds, feet, yards as originally developed in the UK (international editions, however, are metricated). ''GURPS {{Traveller}}'' subjects the previously-metric Third Imperium to this CulturalTranslation (though the original was also American) on the grounds of "fitting in with existing products". Some 3rd edition products would [[UnitConfusion randomly throw in some metric units anyway]], because trying to use two unit systems at the same time [[http://www.cnn.com/TECH/space/9909/30/mars.metric.02/ always works]]. As of the 4th edition official conversions from and to metric units are printed at the beginning of the basic set.

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''GURPS'' has been described as a "simulationist" system, because it includes lots of rules that tell you what's happening in the gameworld game-world without much affecting the outcome of the relevant event. For example, when an attacker succeeds at his roll to hit, the defender always gets to choose how to defend, defend and makes the appropriate defense roll (unless it was a critical hit, hit or a surprise). The defense could be handled as penalties applied to the attack roll, and the odds of dealing damage would be the same--but in that case, should your opponent avoid taking damage, you wouldn't know if it was because you missed entirely, or nearly-hit nearly hit but the defender dodged, or hit too soft to do any damage, or hit hard enough to do damage but your opponent is too much of a badass to notice. This is helpful to game masters narrating the combat, combat because it tells them exactly what to narrate, but it does take longer.

''GURPS'' has been criticized as being very math heavy and overly complex compared to other systems like [[TabletopGame/D20System d20]]. These are only fair criticisms if one uses a bunch of optional rules; basic character creation and basic gameplay require no mathematics more advanced than simple addition. The extra rules mostly take the form of modifiers to apply to dice rolls in specific situations, and each optional rule helps and hurts everyone about equally, so those rules can be safely ignored without affecting game balance. However, there are few systems with quite so ''many'' optional rules as ''GURPS'', so {{Rules Lawyer}}s are naturally attracted to the system. The complexity can range quite widely depending on the game master.

The "''GURPS'' is too math heavy" critique that people level at it tends to stem from the overly complex ''GURPS'' ''Vehicles''. The book was notoriously convoluted, requiring the designer to specify the surface area of various parts of the vehicle, vehicle and keep track of power requirements in kilowatts. The outcome of all that number-crunching was an insanely detailed listing of items--that is, you didn't find out until the '''end''' of the design process that you had 120% of your vehicle's volume occupied, or that you'd badly underestimated the amount of kW compared to the final mass and so can't meet your performance goals (like, say, driving on the freeway). A computer spreadsheet made it possible to actually design vehicles in less than 4 hours of work. Even the majority of ''GURPS'' players didn't like this, so they used the much simpler and more flexible character creation rules to make their own custom cars. This new method was so much more popular that in Fourth Edition it became the standard of vehicle creation.

Perhaps the best feature of ''GURPS'' is the huge number of {{Sourcebook}}s that have been written for it. Pick any genre or topic, and you will probably find at least one ''GURPS'' book covering it (often available in PDF rather than print form these days). Broad categories are covered in genre books; specific settings may receive [[TabletopGame/GURPSSettings their own books]]. In addition to suggestions and notes regarding the topic of the {{Sourcebook}}, each volume invariably includes additions to and errata for the basic rules set.[[note]]With the release of 4th ed., sourcebooks shifted to showing applications and examples of existing Basic Set rules rule rather than inventing new rules whole cloth. However, rules like Styles, Social Engineering mechanics, and Power Modifiers push the envelope, and several popular books like Spaceships, Ritual Path Magic, and Technical Grappling still do introduce new/optional rules.[[/note]] This has led people to ask why they should buy a so-called "universal system" that requires the purchase of a new rulebook every time the players wish to use that system to play in a new genre. Because of this, ''GURPS'' is often compared unfavorably with the TabletopGame/HeroSystem, a universal gaming system whose sourcebooks and supplements have never had to add new rules to the Core Set -- though the 4th edition evolution has made such additions less extensive.

On the other hand, new rules aside, many of the supplements are useful enough as setting sourcebooks that people using other {{Game System}}s will occasionally buy them as references; this was, in fact, part of the original mission statement for the the game, game and the reason the "U" stands for "Universal". The opposite is also true; with a little work, most game worlds can be converted to ''GURPS'', usually with an increase in utility and flexibility. The intention was that, that by building the game around "real world" units of measurement instead of "rounds" and "hexes", it would be easier for people using other systems to make use of the information in the supplements. Of course [[CreatorProvincialism "real world" in this context means the USA]]; pounds, feet, yards as originally developed in the UK (international editions, however, are metricated). ''GURPS {{Traveller}}'' subjects the previously-metric Third Imperium to this CulturalTranslation (though the original was also American) on the grounds of "fitting in with existing products". Some 3rd edition products would [[UnitConfusion randomly throw in some metric units anyway]], because trying to use two unit systems at the same time [[http://www.cnn.com/TECH/space/9909/30/mars.metric.02/ always works]]. As of the 4th edition fourth edition, official conversions from and to metric units are printed at the beginning of the basic set.



** ''Ultra-Tech'' has smart missiles that are statted as characters. Any ability a character can have, and any item a character can carry, can be the payload of a smart missile.

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** ''Ultra-Tech'' has smart missiles that are statted stated as characters. Any ability a character can have, and any item a character can carry, can be the payload of a smart missile.



** In ''GURPS: Technomancer'', strories of [[TheFairFolk Seelie]] abductions serve in place of TheGreys, and the mythology surrounding them includes mysterious "Mages in Black".

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** In ''GURPS: Technomancer'', strories stories of [[TheFairFolk Seelie]] abductions serve in place of TheGreys, and the mythology surrounding them includes mysterious "Mages in Black".



* {{Multishot}}: Appears in ''Imbuments''.

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* {{Multishot}}: Appears in ''Imbuments''.''Imbuements''.
8th Nov '16 10:21:11 AM dlchen145
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''GURPS'' has been described as a "simulationist" system, because it includes lots of rules that tell you what's happening in the gameworld without much affecting the outcome of the relevant event. For example, when an attacker succeeds at his roll to hit, the defender always gets to choose how to defend, and makes the appropriate defense roll (unless it was a critical hit, or a surprise). The defense could be handled as penalties applied to the attack roll, and the odds of dealing damage would be the same--but in that case, should your opponent avoid taking damage, you wouldn't know if it was because you missed entirely, or nearly-hit but the defender dodged, or hit too soft to do any damage, or hit hard enough to do damage but your opponent is too much of a BadAss to notice. This is helpful to game masters narrating the combat, because it tells them exactly what to narrate, but it does take longer.

to:

''GURPS'' has been described as a "simulationist" system, because it includes lots of rules that tell you what's happening in the gameworld without much affecting the outcome of the relevant event. For example, when an attacker succeeds at his roll to hit, the defender always gets to choose how to defend, and makes the appropriate defense roll (unless it was a critical hit, or a surprise). The defense could be handled as penalties applied to the attack roll, and the odds of dealing damage would be the same--but in that case, should your opponent avoid taking damage, you wouldn't know if it was because you missed entirely, or nearly-hit but the defender dodged, or hit too soft to do any damage, or hit hard enough to do damage but your opponent is too much of a BadAss badass to notice. This is helpful to game masters narrating the combat, because it tells them exactly what to narrate, but it does take longer.
30th Oct '16 10:03:20 AM nombretomado
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!!{{GURPS}} provides examples of the following tropes:

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!!{{GURPS}} !!GURPS provides examples of the following tropes:



* AmmunitionBackpack: ''{{GURPS}} Technomancer'' - the Portable Mana Disruptor, the Manpack Necrolaser and flamethrowers.

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* AmmunitionBackpack: ''{{GURPS}} ''GURPS Technomancer'' - the Portable Mana Disruptor, the Manpack Necrolaser and flamethrowers.



** ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}: Fantasy'' treats Tiamut as this, giving stats for a minor avatar of hers that, while not particularly odd looking (it's an enormous dragon with four eyes), can still cause terror from just looking at it. Said avatar automatically regenerates every year, making the effort of trying to kill it futile. To get rid of it permanently, you'd have to track down and kill the real Tiamut... who is half the size of the universe (about 2.24* 10^18 HitPoints), so good luck with that. There's even a Lovecraft quote after the stat block.
** The game has a few more from different settings and splatbooks: ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}: Cabal'', with its cosmology based on the qabbalah's Sephirot, has the creatures of Qlipoth and its Ur-Lords; ''Creatures of the Night'' has the godlike Betweeners, the force called "[[DarkIsEvil the darksome]]", which is responsible for the creation of the literal organ-farmer [[SplitPersonality Darklings]], and many of the non-undead creatures described; a few licenced settings (like ''Cthulhupunk'' and ''Literature/TheWarAgainstTheChtorr'') have their own native abominations; and ''Infinite Worlds'', the meta-setting that ties TheMultiverse together, not only makes ''all'' the previous settings inter-accessible, but also has at least one world (Taft-7) where humanity never evolved in the first place because of Great Old One (or similar) influence 50 million years back - and although they're long gone, they left enough "Fun Stuff" behind (and the risk of attracting their attention is great enough) for the agencies overseeing interdimensional travel to quarantine the world from any travel there whatever the reason.
** ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' newsletter ''Roleplayer'' #10 (May 1988), adventure "The Isle of Night". T'Soquat is a minor Thing That Man Was Not Meant To Know. It resembles a giant lobster with pale gray-green skin and [[RedEyesTakeWarning glowing red eyes]]. It has an acidic secretion SuperSpit, SuperStrength and large PowerPincers, and each HumanSacrifice it receives improves its defenses against being harmed.

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** ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}: ''GURPS: Fantasy'' treats Tiamut as this, giving stats for a minor avatar of hers that, while not particularly odd looking (it's an enormous dragon with four eyes), can still cause terror from just looking at it. Said avatar automatically regenerates every year, making the effort of trying to kill it futile. To get rid of it permanently, you'd have to track down and kill the real Tiamut... who is half the size of the universe (about 2.24* 10^18 HitPoints), so good luck with that. There's even a Lovecraft quote after the stat block.
** The game has a few more from different settings and splatbooks: ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}: ''GURPS: Cabal'', with its cosmology based on the qabbalah's Sephirot, has the creatures of Qlipoth and its Ur-Lords; ''Creatures of the Night'' has the godlike Betweeners, the force called "[[DarkIsEvil the darksome]]", which is responsible for the creation of the literal organ-farmer [[SplitPersonality Darklings]], and many of the non-undead creatures described; a few licenced settings (like ''Cthulhupunk'' and ''Literature/TheWarAgainstTheChtorr'') have their own native abominations; and ''Infinite Worlds'', the meta-setting that ties TheMultiverse together, not only makes ''all'' the previous settings inter-accessible, but also has at least one world (Taft-7) where humanity never evolved in the first place because of Great Old One (or similar) influence 50 million years back - and although they're long gone, they left enough "Fun Stuff" behind (and the risk of attracting their attention is great enough) for the agencies overseeing interdimensional travel to quarantine the world from any travel there whatever the reason.
** ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' ''GURPS'' newsletter ''Roleplayer'' #10 (May 1988), adventure "The Isle of Night". T'Soquat is a minor Thing That Man Was Not Meant To Know. It resembles a giant lobster with pale gray-green skin and [[RedEyesTakeWarning glowing red eyes]]. It has an acidic secretion SuperSpit, SuperStrength and large PowerPincers, and each HumanSacrifice it receives improves its defenses against being harmed.



* FollowTheLeader: ''{{GURPS}}'' was this to ''{{Champions}}''.

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* FollowTheLeader: ''{{GURPS}}'' ''GURPS'' was this to ''{{Champions}}''.''TabletopGame/{{Champions}}''.



* HumanSacrifice: ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' newsletter ''Roleplayer'' #10 (May 1988), adventure "The Isle of Night". Colonel Fitzhugh has been possessed by the spirit of the Wizard-Chief of the island natives. He tries to summon the EldritchAbomination T'Soquat into our world and sacrifice his daughter Alicia to it.

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* HumanSacrifice: ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' ''GURPS'' newsletter ''Roleplayer'' #10 (May 1988), adventure "The Isle of Night". Colonel Fitzhugh has been possessed by the spirit of the Wizard-Chief of the island natives. He tries to summon the EldritchAbomination T'Soquat into our world and sacrifice his daughter Alicia to it.



* ImpossibleItemDrop: Parodied in ''{{GURPS}}: Creatures of the Night'' which includes a completely immobile plant monster that comes complete with a treasure trove full of things that are useful when trying to kill plant monsters. Why? Because it enjoys murdering adventurers and taking their stuff (which it then buries somehow).

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* ImpossibleItemDrop: Parodied in ''{{GURPS}}: ''GURPS: Creatures of the Night'' which includes a completely immobile plant monster that comes complete with a treasure trove full of things that are useful when trying to kill plant monsters. Why? Because it enjoys murdering adventurers and taking their stuff (which it then buries somehow).



* IntrinsicVow: ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}} Castle Falkenstein''. If a Faerie uses Enchantment or a Pixie uses Love Charm and asks the victim to do something against their basic beliefs, the victim can resist the effect.
* IslandBase: ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}} Illuminati''. One potential location for the Illuminati main base is on a private secret island that has been erased from the world's maps, possibly in the Bermuda Triangle.

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* IntrinsicVow: ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}} ''GURPS Castle Falkenstein''. If a Faerie uses Enchantment or a Pixie uses Love Charm and asks the victim to do something against their basic beliefs, the victim can resist the effect.
* IslandBase: ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}} ''GURPS Illuminati''. One potential location for the Illuminati main base is on a private secret island that has been erased from the world's maps, possibly in the Bermuda Triangle.



* PowerPincers: ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' newsletter ''Roleplayer'' #10 (May 1988), adventure "The Isle of Night". The EldritchAbomination T'Soquat has large claws that can do 4-14 HitPoints of damage. If the spell to summon it succeeds, the native villagers under its control will transform and their hands will become claws that do 1-6 HitPoints of damage.

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* PowerPincers: ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' ''GURPS'' newsletter ''Roleplayer'' #10 (May 1988), adventure "The Isle of Night". The EldritchAbomination T'Soquat has large claws that can do 4-14 HitPoints of damage. If the spell to summon it succeeds, the native villagers under its control will transform and their hands will become claws that do 1-6 HitPoints of damage.



** ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' newsletter ''Roleplayer'' #10 (May 1988), adventure "The Isle of Night". The extremely evil EldritchAbomination T'Soquat and its minions have glowing red eyes.

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** ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' ''GURPS'' newsletter ''Roleplayer'' #10 (May 1988), adventure "The Isle of Night". The extremely evil EldritchAbomination T'Soquat and its minions have glowing red eyes.



* [[ShoutOut/TabletopGames Shout Out]]: In ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' ''International Super Teams'', ''Steam-Tech'' and ''Illuminati''.

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* [[ShoutOut/TabletopGames Shout Out]]: In ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' ''GURPS'' ''International Super Teams'', ''Steam-Tech'' and ''Illuminati''.



* SuperSpit: ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' newsletter ''Roleplayer'' #10 (May 1988), adventure "The Isle of Night". The EldritchAbomination T'Soquat can spit an acidic secretion doing 1-11 HitPoints of damage.

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* SuperSpit: ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' ''GURPS'' newsletter ''Roleplayer'' #10 (May 1988), adventure "The Isle of Night". The EldritchAbomination T'Soquat can spit an acidic secretion doing 1-11 HitPoints of damage.



** ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' newsletter ''Roleplayer'' #10 (May 1988), adventure "The Isle of Night". The EldritchAbomination T'Soquat has a strength of 300, which is fantastically high by the game's standards. When it hits it does approximately 30-180 HitPoints of damage.

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** ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' ''GURPS'' newsletter ''Roleplayer'' #10 (May 1988), adventure "The Isle of Night". The EldritchAbomination T'Soquat has a strength of 300, which is fantastically high by the game's standards. When it hits it does approximately 30-180 HitPoints of damage.



* WhenTheClockStrikesTwelve: ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' newsletter ''Roleplayer'' #10 (May 1988), adventure "The Isle of Night". When the {{PC}}s' ship approaches the island time will suddenly start passing at an accelerated rate. After the {{PC}}s land on the island time will stop moving forward at exactly midnight, and stay there until the summoning is completed.

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* WhenTheClockStrikesTwelve: ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' ''GURPS'' newsletter ''Roleplayer'' #10 (May 1988), adventure "The Isle of Night". When the {{PC}}s' ship approaches the island time will suddenly start passing at an accelerated rate. After the {{PC}}s land on the island time will stop moving forward at exactly midnight, and stay there until the summoning is completed.
17th Oct '16 3:50:59 AM Morgenthaler
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Perhaps the best feature of ''GURPS'' is the huge number of {{Sourcebook}}s that have been written for it. Pick any genre or topic, and you will probably find at least one ''GURPS'' book covering it (often available in PDF rather than print form these days). Broad categories are covered in genre books; specific settings may receive [[TabletopGame/GURPSSettings their own books]]. In addition to suggestions and notes regarding the topic of the {{Sourcebook}}, each volume invariably includes additions to and errata for the basic rules set.[[note]]With the release of 4th ed., sourcebooks shifted to showing applications and examples of existing Basic Set rules rather than inventing new rules whole cloth. However, rules like Styles, Social Engineering mechanics, and Power Modifiers push the envelope, and several popular books like Spaceships, Ritual Path Magic, and Technical Grappling still do introduce new/optional rules.[[/note]] This has led people to ask why they should buy a so-called "universal system" that requires the purchase of a new rulebook every time the players wish to use that system to play in a new genre. Because of this, ''GURPS'' is often compared unfavorably with the HeroSystem, a universal gaming system whose sourcebooks and supplements have never had to add new rules to the Core Set -- though the 4th edition evolution has made such additions less extensive.

to:

Perhaps the best feature of ''GURPS'' is the huge number of {{Sourcebook}}s that have been written for it. Pick any genre or topic, and you will probably find at least one ''GURPS'' book covering it (often available in PDF rather than print form these days). Broad categories are covered in genre books; specific settings may receive [[TabletopGame/GURPSSettings their own books]]. In addition to suggestions and notes regarding the topic of the {{Sourcebook}}, each volume invariably includes additions to and errata for the basic rules set.[[note]]With the release of 4th ed., sourcebooks shifted to showing applications and examples of existing Basic Set rules rather than inventing new rules whole cloth. However, rules like Styles, Social Engineering mechanics, and Power Modifiers push the envelope, and several popular books like Spaceships, Ritual Path Magic, and Technical Grappling still do introduce new/optional rules.[[/note]] This has led people to ask why they should buy a so-called "universal system" that requires the purchase of a new rulebook every time the players wish to use that system to play in a new genre. Because of this, ''GURPS'' is often compared unfavorably with the HeroSystem, TabletopGame/HeroSystem, a universal gaming system whose sourcebooks and supplements have never had to add new rules to the Core Set -- though the 4th edition evolution has made such additions less extensive.
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