History TabletopGame / DungeonsAndDragons

31st Oct '17 6:11:18 PM WildCardCourier
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* ''Kalibruhn'': The third campaign setting for OD&D, created by D&D alumni Robert J. Kuntz in 1973 as "Castle El Raja Key". This was the main setting where Gygax himself played as a player and the "birth home" setting of his legendary archmage, Mordenkainen. Originally planned to be the focus of a fifth supplement for OD&D, a number of problems led to Kuntz leaving Creator/{{TSR}} in 1977 and the supplement was never published. Due to never signing the rights away, Kuntz was able to work on the setting constantly since its creation, with the history of the setting included in the [[http://www.tlbgames.com/collections/archive El Raja Key Archive]] DVD, alongside information on the original Greyhawk and Blackmoor campaigns. An oddity amongst the campaign settings listed here, ''Kalibruhn'' has gone almost completely unpublished, with the only info out there being what Kuntz has revealed over the years.

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* ''Kalibruhn'': The Technically the third campaign setting for OD&D, created by D&D alumni and Creator/{{TSR}} alumnus Robert J. Kuntz in 1973 as "Castle El Raja Key". This was the main setting where Gygax himself played as a player and the "birth home" setting of his legendary archmage, Mordenkainen. Originally planned to be the focus of a fifth supplement for OD&D, a number of problems led to Kuntz leaving Creator/{{TSR}} in 1977 and the supplement was never published. Due to never signing the rights away, Kuntz was able to keep and work on the setting constantly since its creation, with the history of the setting included in the [[http://www.tlbgames.com/collections/archive El Raja Key Archive]] DVD, alongside information on the original Greyhawk and Blackmoor campaigns. An oddity amongst the campaign settings listed here, ''Kalibruhn'' has gone almost completely unpublished, with the only info out there being what Kuntz has revealed over the years.



* '''"Original" Dungeons & Dragons (OD&D) - 1974-1976''': Also known as "The Original Game". Co-written by Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson and published by Creator/{{TSR}} in 1974 as a boxed set consisting of three digest-sized books (the "little brown books" a.k.a. lbb): ''Men & Magic'', ''Monsters & Treasure'', ''The Underworld & Wilderness Adventures''. There were three original classes (Fighting-Man, Cleric and Magic User) and only three alignments (Law, Neutrality, Chaos). Humans could choose between all three classes and advance in their chosen class without limit, while non-human races were severely restricted. [[note]]Dwarves could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 6th level. Elves were multiclass by default and could freely switch between Fighting-Man and Magic-User on an adventure-by-adventure basis, with their level caps being 4th level for Fighting-Man and 8th level for Magic User. Halflings could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 4th level.[[/note]] Hit Points, damage, and initiative were all rolled using a d6. Spell levels were limited to 6th level spells for Magic Users and 5th level spells for Clerics. Received numerous supplements, both officially released and from magazine articles. Unfortunately, it required the ''Chainmail'' rulebook to properly play.
** '''Supplement I: Greyhawk - 1975''': Introduced the Thief class, the Paladin as a Fighting-Man subclass, Half-Elves as a playable race, and more monsters. Amended the level and class restrictions for Dwarves, Elves, and Halflings to account for the Thief class. [[note]]Dwarves, Elves, and Halflings could advance as a Thief with no level cap. Dwarves could advance to either 7th or 8th level Fighting-Man with an exceptional Strength score; they could also multiclass as either a Fighting-Man/Thief or a Fighting-Man/Cleric, although the Fighting-Man/Cleric option was NPC-only and their Cleric level capped at 7th level. Elves could advance up to 5th or 6th level Fighting-Man with an exceptional Strength score and 9th Magic-User with an exceptional Intelligence score; they could also multiclass as either a Fighting-Man/Magic-User/Cleric or a Fighting-Man/Magic-User/Thief, although FM/MU/Cleric had their Magic-User and Cleric classes capped at 6th level. Halflings could choose to be either a Fighting-Man or a Thief and had the best Thief skill bonuses of the non-human races. Half-Elves multiclass as a Fighting-Man/Magic-User by default, with both classes capped at 6th level, although exceptional Strength/Intelligence scores would raise them up to 7th or 8th level; they could also multiclass as a FM/MU/Cleric with a high enough Wisdom score, but their Cleric level capped at 4th level.[[/note]] Magic Users gained 7th-9th level spells, but only if their Intelligence score was high enough, while Clerics gained 6th and 7th level spells. Contained new and additional rules in order to distance itself from ''Chainmail''.

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* '''"Original" Dungeons & Dragons (OD&D) - 1974-1976''': Also known as "The Original Game". Co-written by Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson and published by Creator/{{TSR}} in 1974 as a boxed set consisting of three digest-sized books (the "little brown books" a.k.a. lbb): ''Men & Magic'', ''Monsters & Treasure'', ''The Underworld & Wilderness Adventures''. There were three original classes (Fighting-Man, Cleric and Magic User) and only three alignments (Law, Neutrality, Chaos). [[note]]''Strategic Review #2.1'' had an article that adds a 5-point alignment chart (Lawful Good, Chaotic Good, Neutral, Lawful Evil, Chaotic Evil)[[/note]] Humans could choose between all three classes and advance in their chosen class without limit, while non-human races were severely restricted. [[note]]Dwarves could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 6th level. Elves were multiclass by default and could freely switch between Fighting-Man and Magic-User on an adventure-by-adventure basis, with their level caps being 4th level for Fighting-Man and 8th level for Magic User. Halflings could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 4th level.[[/note]] Hit Points, damage, and initiative were all rolled using a d6. Spell levels were limited to 6th level spells for Magic Users and 5th level spells for Clerics. Received numerous supplements, both officially released and from magazine articles. Unfortunately, it required the ''Chainmail'' rulebook to properly play.
** '''Supplement I: Greyhawk - 1975''': Introduced the Thief class, the Paladin as a Fighting-Man subclass, Half-Elves as a playable race, and more monsters. Amended the level and class restrictions for Dwarves, Elves, and Halflings to account for the Thief class. [[note]]Dwarves, Elves, and Halflings could advance as a Thief with no level cap. Dwarves could advance to either 7th or 8th level Fighting-Man with an exceptional Strength score; they could also multiclass as either a Fighting-Man/Thief or a Fighting-Man/Cleric, although the Fighting-Man/Cleric option was NPC-only and their Cleric level capped at 7th level. Elves could advance up to 5th or 6th level Fighting-Man with an exceptional Strength score and 9th Magic-User with an exceptional Intelligence score; they could also multiclass as either a Fighting-Man/Magic-User/Cleric or a Fighting-Man/Magic-User/Thief, although FM/MU/Cleric had their Magic-User and Cleric classes capped at 6th level. Halflings could choose to be either a Fighting-Man or a Thief and had the best Thief skill bonuses of the non-human races. Half-Elves multiclass as a Fighting-Man/Magic-User by default, with both classes capped at 6th level, although exceptional Strength/Intelligence scores would raise them up to 7th or 8th level; they could also multiclass as a FM/MU/Cleric with a high enough Wisdom score, but their Cleric level capped at 4th level.[[/note]] Magic Users gained 7th-9th level spells, but only if their Intelligence score was high enough, while Clerics gained 6th and 7th level spells. Contained both new and additional rules in order to distance itself from ''Chainmail''.



** In an effort to keep things "fresh", [=WotC=] is releasing just two storyline-based adventure modules each year, commissioning third party publishers such as Kobold Press, Sasquatch Game Studio, and Green Ronin to help develop them.

to:

** In an effort to keep things "fresh", [=WotC=] is releasing just two storyline-based adventure modules each year, commissioning third party publishers such as Kobold Press, Sasquatch Game Studio, and Green Ronin to help develop write them.



* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Swords+%26+Wizardry Swords and Wizardry]]''': Created by Mythmere Games. One of the more well-known retroclones, this game goes all the way back to the original 1974 edition of D&D. Notable for having only one saving throw instead of five, although it includes the option to use the original system. You get to choose whether you want to play with original descending AC or ascending AC. Has a number of variants based on the system, such as ''[=WhiteHack=]''. ''White Star'', and ''Crypts & Things''. There are four versions of this game, all of which are free to download:

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* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Swords+%26+Wizardry Swords and Wizardry]]''': Created by Mythmere Games. One of the more well-known retroclones, this game goes all the way back to the original 1974 edition of D&D. Notable for having only one saving throw instead of five, although it includes the option to use the original system. You get to choose whether you want to play with original descending AC or ascending AC. Has a number of variants based on the system, such as ''[=WhiteHack=]''. ''[=WhiteHack=]'', ''White Star'', and ''Crypts & Things''. There are four versions of this game, all of which are free to download:



** ''Swords & Wizardry: Light'', a version created by [[http://www.tenkarstavern.com/ Erik "Tenkar" Stiene of Tenkar's Tavern]], [[http://www.tenkarstavern.com/2016/08/its-official-frog-god-games-to-publish.html officially endorsed by Mythmere Games and to be published by Frog God Games]]. Essentially what Basic D&D was to AD&D: an easier to play version designed to help people learn the system. It heavily condenses the White Box Rules book down to 4 print-and-play pages. While the launch version runs from 1st level to 3rd level, with players converting to one of the three other versions at 4th level, an expanded version called ''Continual Light'' extends it to 7th level and introduces subclass variants for the default four classes.

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** ''Swords & Wizardry: Light'', a version created by [[http://www.tenkarstavern.com/ Erik "Tenkar" Stiene of Tenkar's Tavern]], [[http://www.tenkarstavern.com/2016/08/its-official-frog-god-games-to-publish.html officially endorsed by Mythmere Games and to be published by Frog God Games]]. Essentially what Basic D&D was to AD&D: an easier to play version designed to help people learn the system. It heavily condenses the White Box Rules book down to 4 print-and-play pages. While the launch version runs from 1st level to 3rd level, with players converting to one of the three other versions at 4th level, an expanded version called ''Continual Light'' extends it to 7th level and introduces subclass variants for the default four classes.
6th Oct '17 7:09:27 PM intastiel
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* MurderIntoMalevolence:
** This is built into the rules for making a ghost in some editions; their CharacterAlignment becomes NeutralEvil regardless of who they were in life.
** Victims of undead with the "create spawn" ability (such as wights and ghouls) always fit this trope: they return as AlwaysChaoticEvil shadows of their former selves (literally in the case of LivingShadows), which must be slain to resurrect them or allow them to pass on to the afterlife.
** 1[[superscript:st]] Edition AD&D ''Fiend Folio'': the revenant is an undead that can be created when a humanoid creature dies a violent death. It is dedicated to hunting down the creature that killed it, as well as any creatures that helped in the killing. Once it finds them, it will try to strangle its killer(s) to death.
5th Oct '17 10:45:45 AM dangerdan97
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After TSR was bought by Creator/WizardsOfTheCoast (makers of ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'', and now a subsidiary of Hasbro), they published ''Dungeons & Dragons 3rd Edition'' using the TabletopGame/D20System. A major overhaul of the entire rules set, 3rd edition cleared off the crust that had accumulated around 2nd and unified a scattered assortment of rules and procedures into something more coherent. It was a huge hit and revitalized the game, leading to new players aplenty. Then came an incremental edition known as "v3.5", which was largely concerned with fixing a few very obvious {{Game Breaker}}s and {{Spoony Bard}}s in 3rd Edition.

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After TSR was bought by Creator/WizardsOfTheCoast (makers of ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'', and now a subsidiary of Hasbro), they published ''Dungeons & Dragons 3rd Edition'' in 2000 using the TabletopGame/D20System. A major overhaul of the entire rules set, 3rd edition cleared off the crust that had accumulated around 2nd and unified a scattered assortment of rules and procedures into something more coherent. It was a huge hit and revitalized the game, leading to new players aplenty. Then came an incremental edition known as "v3.5", which was largely concerned with fixing a few very obvious {{Game Breaker}}s and {{Spoony Bard}}s in 3rd Edition.
4th Oct '17 8:53:59 AM Jubileus57
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* SwordfishSabre: Swordfishes can be used as swords. While they do have an irritating smell on land, they can be used with no penalty underwater.
24th Sep '17 11:31:39 AM WildCardCourier
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* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Swords+%26+Wizardry Swords and Wizardry]]''': Created by Mythmere Games. One of the more well-known retroclones, this game goes all the way back to the original 1974 edition of D&D. Notable for having only one saving throw instead of five, although it includes the option to use the original system. You get to choose whether you want to play with original descending AC or ascending AC. Has a number of variants based on the system, such as ''[=WhiteHack=]'' and ''Crypts & Things''. There are four versions of this game, all of which are free to download:

to:

* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Swords+%26+Wizardry Swords and Wizardry]]''': Created by Mythmere Games. One of the more well-known retroclones, this game goes all the way back to the original 1974 edition of D&D. Notable for having only one saving throw instead of five, although it includes the option to use the original system. You get to choose whether you want to play with original descending AC or ascending AC. Has a number of variants based on the system, such as ''[=WhiteHack=]'' ''[=WhiteHack=]''. ''White Star'', and ''Crypts & Things''. There are four versions of this game, all of which are free to download:



** The [[https://www.froggodgames.com/swords-wizardry-complete-rulebook Complete Rulebook]], which incorporates Supplements 1-3, parts of ''Swords & Spells'', and content from ''Strategic Review'', resulting in something of a middle-road between Basic D&D and 1e AD&D that is quite easily compatible with much of the contents for both.
** ''Swords & Wizardry: Light'', a version created by [[http://www.tenkarstavern.com/ Erik "Tenkar" Stiene of Tenkar's Tavern]], [[http://www.tenkarstavern.com/2016/08/its-official-frog-god-games-to-publish.html officially endorsed by Mythmere Games and to be published by Frog God Games]]. Essentially what Basic D&D was to AD&D: an easier to play version designed to help people learn the system. It heavily condenses the White Box Rules book down to 4 print-and-play pages. While the launch version runs from 1st level to 3rd level, with players converting to one of the three other versions at 4th level, one of the long-term ideas is to produce supplements that go beyond that.

to:

** The [[https://www.froggodgames.com/swords-wizardry-complete-rulebook Complete Rulebook]], which incorporates Supplements 1-3, parts of ''Swords & Spells'', 1-3 and content from ''Strategic Review'', resulting in something of a middle-road between Basic D&D and 1e AD&D that is quite easily compatible with much of the contents for both.
** ''Swords & Wizardry: Light'', a version created by [[http://www.tenkarstavern.com/ Erik "Tenkar" Stiene of Tenkar's Tavern]], [[http://www.tenkarstavern.com/2016/08/its-official-frog-god-games-to-publish.html officially endorsed by Mythmere Games and to be published by Frog God Games]]. Essentially what Basic D&D was to AD&D: an easier to play version designed to help people learn the system. It heavily condenses the White Box Rules book down to 4 print-and-play pages. While the launch version runs from 1st level to 3rd level, with players converting to one of the three other versions at 4th level, one of an expanded version called ''Continual Light'' extends it to 7th level and introduces subclass variants for the long-term ideas is to produce supplements that go beyond that.default four classes.



* '''[=WhiteHack=]''': A variant of the ''Swords & Wizardry'' White Box system. Classes are defined down to archetypes: [[FighterMageThief the Strong, the Deft, and the Wise]]. The "Deft" are rangers, monks, thieves, etc., and can "attune" to something so that they use them for extraordinary feats. The "Strong" are soldiers, pit fighters, paladins, etc., and can choose between 8 special combat maneuvers and can "absorb" a single power from a defeated enemy, so long as they're the one to deal the finishing blow. The "Wise" are mages, healers, alchemists, scientists, etc., and can perform "Miracles" at the expense of HP and can't be healed through magical means, but heal naturally at twice the normal rate. The Miracles that the Wise use don't have to outright be actual magic, they could be alchemical or scientific experiments. Despite the "class", all characters can chose from joining at least two "groups" that they are a member from lists of species, vocations, and affiliations, leading to hybrid skill sets. Has 4 AC tables: two versions of Ascending AC (one at base 10 and one at base 0) and two versions of Descending AC (one at base 9 and the other at base 10). The level cap is 10, and it's recommended that the players retire their characters at that point and make new ones, although there are a couple optional rules for playing beyond 10th level.

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* '''[=WhiteHack=]''': A variant of the ''Swords & Wizardry'' White Box system.system, created by Christian Mehrstam. Classes are defined down to archetypes: [[FighterMageThief the Strong, the Deft, and the Wise]]. The "Deft" are rangers, monks, thieves, etc., and can "attune" to something so that they use them for extraordinary feats. The "Strong" are soldiers, pit fighters, paladins, etc., and can choose between 8 special combat maneuvers and can "absorb" a single power from a defeated enemy, so long as they're the one to deal the finishing blow. The "Wise" are mages, healers, alchemists, scientists, etc., and can perform "Miracles" at the expense of HP and can't be healed through magical means, but heal naturally at twice the normal rate. The Miracles that the Wise use don't have to outright be actual magic, they could be alchemical or scientific experiments. Despite the "class", all characters can chose from joining at least two "groups" that they are a member from lists of species, vocations, and affiliations, leading to hybrid skill sets. Has 4 AC tables: two versions of Ascending AC (one at base 10 and one at base 0) and two versions of Descending AC (one at base 9 and the other at base 10). The level cap is 10, and it's recommended that the players retire their characters at that point and make new ones, although there are a couple optional rules for playing beyond 10th level.level.
* '''White Star''': A variant of the ''Swords & Wizardry'' White Box system, created by James M. Spahn. Basically ''Swords & Wizardry'' InSpace, giving a sci-fi spin to the fantasy system. Has 4 humanoid classes (Aristocrat, Pilot, Mercenary, and Star Knight) and 3 nonhuman classes (Alien Brute, Alien Mystic, and Robot).
2nd Sep '17 3:52:23 PM nombretomado
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* AdaptationDistillation: {{Capcom}} managed to apply the rather complex ''D&D'' system into two very competent VideoGame/DungeonsAndDragons arcade {{BeatEm Up}} games that no company has ever been able to do right since.

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* AdaptationDistillation: {{Capcom}} Creator/{{Capcom}} managed to apply the rather complex ''D&D'' system into two very competent VideoGame/DungeonsAndDragons arcade {{BeatEm Up}} games that no company has ever been able to do right since.
30th Aug '17 6:11:36 PM WildCardCourier
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** '''Supplement IV: Gods, Demi-Gods & Heroes - 1976''': The last official supplement. Introduced deities, demi-gods, and legendary heroes from mythology and religions both real (Egyptian, Celtic, Norse) and fictional ([[Franchise/ConanTheBarbarian Hyborean]] and [[Literature/TheElricSaga Melnibonéan]]) for two purposes: 1) as a means of integrating pre-established mythologies into campaigns, and 2) a last ditch effort for reaching the "Monty Hall" style [=DMs=] who ran giveaway campaigns and to show the absurdity of 40+ level characters by giving them opponents that could wipe the floor with them. Unfortunately started the concept of "if you stat it, they will kill it".
** '''Swords & Spells - 1976''': The unnumbered fifth supplement, written by Gygax. Touted as the "grandson" of ''Chainmail'', this sourcebook introduced rules for upscaling the combat in order to portray large scale battles. The supplement was not that well received, and was not included in the 40th Anniversary White Box collection.

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** '''Supplement IV: Gods, Demi-Gods & Heroes - 1976''': The last official supplement. Introduced deities, demi-gods, and legendary heroes from mythology and religions both real (Egyptian, Celtic, Norse) and fictional ([[Franchise/ConanTheBarbarian Hyborean]] and [[Literature/TheElricSaga Melnibonéan]]) for two purposes: 1) as a means of integrating pre-established mythologies into campaigns, and 2) a last ditch effort for reaching the "Monty Hall" style [=DMs=] who ran giveaway campaigns and to show the absurdity of 40+ level characters by giving them opponents that could wipe the floor with them. Unfortunately started the concept of "if you stat it, they will kill it".
it". Modern reprints dropped the fictional pantheons due to licensing issues.
** '''Swords & Spells - 1976''': The unnumbered fifth supplement, written by Gygax. Touted as the "grandson" of ''Chainmail'', this sourcebook introduced rules for upscaling the combat in order to portray large scale battles. The supplement was not that well received, received when it was released, and was not included in the 40th Anniversary White Box collection.



** In an effort to keep things "fresh", [=WotC=] is releasing two storyline-based adventure modules each year, commissioning third party publishers such as Kobold Press, Sasquatch Game Studio, and Green Ronin to help out.

to:

** In an effort to keep things "fresh", [=WotC=] is releasing just two storyline-based adventure modules each year, commissioning third party publishers such as Kobold Press, Sasquatch Game Studio, and Green Ronin to help out.develop them.



** The [[https://www.froggodgames.com/swords-wizardry-complete-rulebook Complete Rulebook]], which incorporates Supplements 1-3 and ''Swords & Spells'', resulting in something of a middle-road between BD&D and AD&D that is quite easily compatible with much of the contents for both.

to:

** The [[https://www.froggodgames.com/swords-wizardry-complete-rulebook Complete Rulebook]], which incorporates Supplements 1-3 and 1-3, parts of ''Swords & Spells'', and content from ''Strategic Review'', resulting in something of a middle-road between BD&D Basic D&D and 1e AD&D that is quite easily compatible with much of the contents for both.
23rd Aug '17 9:47:56 AM thatmadork
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* CombatPragmatist: Away from specific class examples, players are often encouraged to try to be this. ''Sandstorm'' adds rules and feats for bliding opponents with sand, while ''Stormwrack'' adds rules for grappling with opponents and ''holding them underwater until they drown''. The Dirty Trick feats allow characters to attack in all manner of unsporting ways, like {{Groin Attack}}s and eye gouging.
19th Aug '17 8:14:37 AM MorningStar1337
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** ''TabletopGame/DarkMatter''

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** ''TabletopGame/DarkMatter''''TabletopGame/DarkMatter1999''
19th Aug '17 2:36:56 AM JustaUsername
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** ''Sandbox/{{Starfinder}}''

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** ''Sandbox/{{Starfinder}}''''TabletopGame/{{Starfinder}}''
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