History TabletopGame / DungeonsAndDragons

20th Aug '16 9:56:58 AM nombretomado
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* RocksFallEveryoneDies: A few modules are hilariously lethal. Also, {{Dragonlance}} and later ForgottenRealms settings were hammered apart so thoroughly that [[FanonDiscontinuity instead]] of dealing with the future [[ExecutiveMeddling additions]], fans switched to playing either classical versions or their own timelines.

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* RocksFallEveryoneDies: A few modules are hilariously lethal. Also, {{Dragonlance}} Literature/{{Dragonlance}} and later ForgottenRealms settings were hammered apart so thoroughly that [[FanonDiscontinuity instead]] of dealing with the future [[ExecutiveMeddling additions]], fans switched to playing either classical versions or their own timelines.
18th Aug '16 5:04:16 PM Tre
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For the animated series based on the game, see ''WesternAnimation/DungeonsAndDragons''. For the Creator/{{Bally}} {{pinball}} game, see ''Pinball/DungeonsAndDragons''. There are also three movies. The first (''Film/DungeonsAndDragons'') is InNameOnly. The second (''[[Film/DungeonsAndDragonsWrathOfTheDragonGod Wrath of the Dragon God]]'') [[SurprisinglyImprovedSequel is a lot better]], despite being made on a low budget. The third, ''Film/DungeonsAndDragonsTheBookOfVileDarkness'', was a made-for-cable-TV affair that premiered on the SyFy channel in November 2012. A reboot of the ''Dungeons and Dragons'' film franchise is currently planned by Warner Brothers.

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For the animated series based on the game, see ''WesternAnimation/DungeonsAndDragons''. For the Creator/{{Bally}} {{pinball}} game, see ''Pinball/DungeonsAndDragons''. There are also three movies. The first (''Film/DungeonsAndDragons'') is InNameOnly. The second (''[[Film/DungeonsAndDragonsWrathOfTheDragonGod Wrath of the Dragon God]]'') [[SurprisinglyImprovedSequel is a lot better]], despite being made on a low budget. The third, ''Film/DungeonsAndDragonsTheBookOfVileDarkness'', was a made-for-cable-TV affair that premiered on the SyFy channel Creator/{{Syfy}} in November 2012. A reboot of the ''Dungeons and Dragons'' film franchise is currently planned by Warner Brothers.
11th Aug '16 4:52:00 PM Arivne
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Added DiffLines:

* NoCampaignForTheWicked
** The new edition lists the good and neutral deities up front in the character creation section, while setting the evil gods firmly in the 'know your enemy' part of the book. This, of course, has no effect on some players and [=DMs=], who create all-evil campaigns frequently and with panache.
** ''TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}} Society'' (a global organized play ''Pathfinder'' campaign) explicitly forbids playing characters of evil alignment. It's forbidden to create evil characters for ''PFS'', and if a player character's actions [[MoralEventHorizon cross the line]] later, their GameMaster can invoke an alignment shift to evil, which renders that character permanently unplayable for all future ''PFS'' events, just as their death would.
** The ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' based RTS game ''Dragonshard'', has a campaign for the humans and the lizardfolk, but not for the Umbragen.
** BECMI (Basic/Expert/Companion/Master/Immortal) D&D, Immortals boxed set (1986). Player controlled {{PC}} Immortals are forbidden to be from the Sphere of Entropy, because creatures from that Sphere are all evil. All Entropy Sphere Immortals are {{NPC}}s.
** The author of a ''Dragon'' article on the "Death Master", a necromancy-themed NonPlayerCharacter class for 1st Edition AD&D, introduced it by stressing, thusly, that it was designed for NPC villains only:
---> "If I ever run into a player character Death Master at a gaming convention, I may turn Evil myself."
** ''TabletopGame/{{Planescape}} Monstrous Compendium Appendix II''. Incantifers are creatures that used to be human beings. They were changed by magic so that they can absorb magic and don't need to eat, breathe or sleep (among other powers). They have evil tendencies and Dungeon Masters are warned not to allow {{PC}}s to undergo the incantifer-creation process.
11th Aug '16 4:40:17 PM Arivne
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* FollowTheLeader: Inspired many, many other [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dungeons_&_Dragons#Acclaim_and_influence tabletop games and video games]].



* GenrePopularizer: For pencil-and-paper roleplaying games.
2nd Aug '16 2:41:28 PM WildCardCourier
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* ''TabletopGame/GammaWorld'': While ''technically'' a different game line, uses identical mechanics and is often seen as a subset of vanilla D&D. (The AD&D 1st Edition ''Dungeon Master's Guide'' even has sections for converting AD&D characters to Gamma World characters and vice-versa.) ScavengerWorld AfterTheEnd inhabited by {{Mutants}} constantly trying to win the SuperPowerLottery and usually either CursedWithAwesome or BlessedWithSuck.

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* ''TabletopGame/GammaWorld'': While ''technically'' a different game line, uses identical mechanics and is often seen as a subset of vanilla D&D. (The D&D, to the point that the AD&D 1st Edition ''Dungeon Master's Guide'' even has had sections for converting AD&D characters to Gamma World characters and vice-versa.) vice-versa. ScavengerWorld AfterTheEnd inhabited by {{Mutants}} constantly trying to win the SuperPowerLottery and usually either CursedWithAwesome or BlessedWithSuck.



* ''TabletopGame/{{Ravenloft}}'': Gothic fantasy and Film/HammerHorror in a maybe-sentient demiplane called the "Domains of Dread" that seems to exist solely to inflict ThePunishment on its inhabitants. Initially a one-off module (the classic "weekend in hell"), it was popular enough to become its own campaign setting.

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* ''TabletopGame/{{Ravenloft}}'': Gothic fantasy and Film/HammerHorror in a maybe-sentient demiplane called the "Domains of Dread" that seems to exist solely to inflict ThePunishment on its inhabitants. Initially a one-off module (the classic "weekend in hell"), it was popular enough to become its own campaign setting. Fifth Edition brought it full circle by releasing an updated and expanded version of the original ''Ravenloft'' module, titled ''The Curse of Strahd''.



** '''Supplement IV: Gods, Demi-Gods & Heroes - 1976:''' The last official supplement. Introduced deities, demi-gods, and legendary heroes from mythology and religions both real (Egyptian, Celtic, Norse) and fictional ([[Franchise/ConanTheBarbarian Hyborean]] and [[Literature/TheElricSaga Melnibonéan]]) for two purposes: 1) as a means of integrating pre-established mythologies into campaigns, and 2) a last ditch effort for reaching the "Monty Hall" style [=DMs=] who ran giveaway campaigns and to show the absurdity of 40+ level characters.

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** '''Supplement IV: Gods, Demi-Gods & Heroes - 1976:''' The last official supplement. Introduced deities, demi-gods, and legendary heroes from mythology and religions both real (Egyptian, Celtic, Norse) and fictional ([[Franchise/ConanTheBarbarian Hyborean]] and [[Literature/TheElricSaga Melnibonéan]]) for two purposes: 1) as a means of integrating pre-established mythologies into campaigns, and 2) a last ditch effort for reaching the "Monty Hall" style [=DMs=] who ran giveaway campaigns and to show the absurdity of 40+ level characters.characters by giving them opponents that could wipe the floor with them. Unfortunately started the concept of "if you stat it, they will kill it".



* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Swords+%26+Wizardry Swords and Wizardry:]]''' Created by Myhtmere Games. One of the more well-known retroclones, this game goes all the way back to the original D&D, with the Cleric, the Fighter and the Magic-User, taking inspiration from sword and sorcery. Notable for having only one saving throw as opposed to the five used in regular old-school D&D, although it includes the option to use the original five. You get to choose whether you want to play with original AC or ascending AC. There are three versions of this game, all of which are free to download:
** The [[http://www.swordsandwizardry.com/?page_id=6 WhiteBox Rules]], which closely emulates the rules of the core box of [=OD&D=].

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* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Swords+%26+Wizardry Swords and Wizardry:]]''' Created by Myhtmere Mythmere Games. One of the more well-known retroclones, this game goes all the way back to the original D&D, with the Cleric, the Fighter and the Magic-User, taking inspiration from sword and sorcery. Notable for having only one saving throw as opposed to the five used in regular old-school D&D, although it includes the option to use the original five. You get to choose whether you want to play with original AC or ascending AC. There are three versions of this game, all of which are free to download:
** The [[http://www.swordsandwizardry.com/?page_id=6 WhiteBox Rules]], which closely emulates the rules of the core box of [=OD&D=]. [=OD&D=].
*** Has a work-in-progress fan version called ''Swords & Wizardry: Light'', created by [[http://www.tenkarstavern.com/ Erik Tenkar of Tenkar's Tavern]]. Essentially what Basic D&D was to AD&D: an easier to play version to help people learn the system. The idea is to strip the original 122 page [=WhiteBox=] Rules book down to a series of print-and-play 4 page pamphlets. Like BD&D, it's supposed to run from 1st level to 3rd level, with players converting to one of the three official versions at 4th level, although one of Tenkar's long-term ideas is to create an ''"Extra" Light'' rule set for advancing to 7th level.
31st Jul '16 10:18:05 AM nombretomado
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Whole libraries of novels have been published with D&D tie-ins, most of them linked to specific game settings such as the ''TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms''. While writing quality is inconsistent at best, sheer quantity testifies to these novel lines' profitability. The best known novels are R.A. Salvatore's ''Legend of Drizz't'' series. In addition, IDW Publishing, famous for their ''{{Transformers}}'' and ''GIJoe'' comics, have obtained the license to [[ComicBook/DungeonsAndDragons an ongoing series]] based on D&D - which have been [[http://www.comicsalliance.com/2011/04/20/dungeons-dragons-comic-idw/ well-received,]] mainly due to being written by the writer for DCComics' ''ComicBook/BlueBeetle''.

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Whole libraries of novels have been published with D&D tie-ins, most of them linked to specific game settings such as the ''TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms''. While writing quality is inconsistent at best, sheer quantity testifies to these novel lines' profitability. The best known novels are R.A. Salvatore's ''Legend of Drizz't'' series. In addition, IDW Publishing, famous for their ''{{Transformers}}'' and ''GIJoe'' comics, have obtained the license to [[ComicBook/DungeonsAndDragons an ongoing series]] based on D&D - which have been [[http://www.comicsalliance.com/2011/04/20/dungeons-dragons-comic-idw/ well-received,]] mainly due to being written by the writer for DCComics' Creator/DCComics' ''ComicBook/BlueBeetle''.
27th Jul '16 6:23:01 PM WildCardCourier
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** The first version was the original home campaign, created after Gygax played a game of Blackmoor in 1972. While it ran from 1972 to 1979, games set there completely ceased in 1985 right after Gygax was ousted from TSR, while the setting itself was "destroyed" in 1988 in the last ''Gord the Rogue'' novel [[note]]a literary declaration that the old Oerth was dead, with Gygax himself furious over the direction TSR was taking the setting[[/note]]. Due to the number of games played each week, Gygax didn't have the time to make a world map completely from scratch and simply used a blank map of North America, filling it in as the campaign went on. Despite the name, the 1975 ''Supplement I: Greyhawk'' digest wasn't a Greyhawk setting book, but a rulebook which helped eliminate the game's dependence on ''Chainmail'', setting the groundwork for what would become Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. Not much is known about the home campaign version, apart from what is presented in the ''Gnome Cache'' novella from the first issues of ''Dragon'' magazine and the ''Gord the Rogue'' novel series. After years of talks about releasing the original Castle Greyhawk dungeon/campaign, the project was finally greenlit as ''Castle Zagyg'' in 2003, although it's immensely troubled production ended with just two of the proposed seven books and a small number of adventure modules being released.[[note]]The Castle Grewhawk dungeon as of 1985 had around 50 floors, meaning Gygax and Kuntz had to sift through years of notes and pick the 13 best parts for publication, while Gygax had to rewrite all the stuff that was still copyright of [=WotC=]. Gygax's health decline in 2004 led to the slow-moving project to grind to a near halt, while Kuntz had to withdraw due to working on other projects. Three months after Gary's death in 2008, his widow Gail pulled all the licensing from Troll Lord Games and transferred them to Gygax Games, but hasn't done anything with the project.[[/note]]

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** The first version was the original home campaign, created after Gygax played a game of Blackmoor in 1972. While it ran from 1972 to 1979, games set there completely ceased in 1985 right after Gygax was ousted from TSR, while the setting itself was "destroyed" in 1988 in the last ''Gord the Rogue'' novel [[note]]a literary declaration that the old Oerth was dead, with Gygax himself furious over the direction TSR was taking the setting[[/note]]. Due to the number of games played each week, Gygax didn't have the time to make a world map completely from scratch and simply used a blank map of North America, filling it in as the campaign went on. Despite the name, the 1975 ''Supplement I: Greyhawk'' digest wasn't a Greyhawk setting book, but a rulebook which helped eliminate the game's dependence on ''Chainmail'', setting the groundwork for what would become Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. Not much is known about the home campaign version, apart from what is presented in the ''Gnome Cache'' novella from the first issues of ''Dragon'' magazine and the ''Gord the Rogue'' novel series. After years of talks about releasing the original Castle Greyhawk dungeon/campaign, the project was finally greenlit as ''Castle Zagyg'' in 2003, although it's immensely troubled production ended with just two of the proposed seven books and a small number of adventure modules being released.[[note]]The Castle Grewhawk dungeon as of 1985 had around 50 floors, meaning Gygax and Robert Kuntz had to sift through years of notes and pick the 13 best parts for publication, while Gygax had to rewrite all the stuff that was still copyright of [=WotC=]. Gygax's health decline in 2004 led to the slow-moving project to grind to a near halt, while Kuntz had to withdraw due to working on other projects. Three months after Gary's death in 2008, his widow Gail pulled all the licensing from Troll Lord Games and transferred them to Gygax Games, but hasn't done anything with the project.project since.[[/note]]



* ''Kingdoms of Kalamar'': A third-party setting from Kenzer & Co. officially first released for 2nd Edition and endorsed by Wizards during the 3rd Edition era. A standard high-fantasy style setting that sells itself on its depth and verisimilitude. Though no longer an official setting, Kenzer has released an updated version for 4th Edition.

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* ''Kingdoms of Kalamar'': A third-party setting from Kenzer & Co. officially first released for 2nd Edition and endorsed by Wizards during the 3rd Edition era. A standard high-fantasy style setting that sells itself on its depth and verisimilitude. Though no longer an official setting, Kenzer has released an updated version for 4th Edition.



* ''Wilderlands of High Fantasy'': The first officially licensed and published third-party campaign setting for "Original" D&D, created by Judges Guild after the success of their ''City State of the Invincible Overlord'' city setting and released in a collection of 4 32-page booklets. In 2002, Judges Guild ended up working together with Necromancer Games to release a boxed version for 3.5 Edition. The earliest sandbox-style campaign setting, and it shows: 18 maps that altogether cover an area about 780 miles wide by 1080 miles long, roughly the size of the Mediterranean. Each individual map contained a number of pre-established points-of-interest, with the accompanying books containing entry upon entry for every bastion of civilization, set of ruins, and monster lair within the region. Touted as "First Edition feel", the Wilderlands sticks to the old-school SwordAndSorcery origins of D&D, a time when the lines between sci-fi and fantasy were very murky and SchizoTech was everywhere. Meaning you could have people who's greatest technological achievement is the wheel, potentially meet people who's greatest technological achievement is calculus, and ''then'' have them potentially happen upon a crashed alien spaceship from an age long before recorded history.

to:

* ''Wilderlands of High Fantasy'': The first officially licensed and published third-party campaign setting for "Original" D&D, created by Judges Guild after the success of their ''City State of the Invincible Overlord'' city setting and released in a collection of 4 32-page booklets. In 2002, Judges Guild ended up working together with Necromancer Games to release a boxed version for 3.5 Edition. The earliest sandbox-style campaign setting, and it shows: 18 maps that altogether cover an area about 780 miles wide by 1080 miles long, roughly the size of the Mediterranean. Each individual map contained a number of pre-established points-of-interest, with the accompanying books containing entry upon entry for every bastion of civilization, set of ruins, and monster lair within the region. Touted as "First Edition feel", the Wilderlands sticks to the old-school SwordAndSorcery origins of D&D, a time when the lines between sci-fi and fantasy were very murky and SchizoTech was everywhere. Meaning you could have people who's greatest technological achievement is the wheel, wheel potentially meet people who's greatest technological achievement is calculus, and ''then'' have them potentially happen upon a crashed alien spaceship from an age long before recorded history.



** In an effort to keep things "fresh", [=WotC=] is releasing two storyling-based adventure modules each year, commissioning third party publishers such as Kobold Press, Sasquatch Game Studio, and Green Ronin to help out.

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** In an effort to keep things "fresh", [=WotC=] is releasing two storyling-based storyline-based adventure modules each year, commissioning third party publishers such as Kobold Press, Sasquatch Game Studio, and Green Ronin to help out.



* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Swords+%26+Wizardry Swords and Wizardry:]]''' One of the more well-known retroclones, this game goes all the way back to the original D&D, with the Cleric, the Fighter and the Magic-User, taking inspiration from sword and sorcery. Notable for having only one saving throw as opposed to the five used in regular old-school D&D, although it includes the option to use the original five. You get to choose whether you want to play with original AC or ascending AC. There are three versions of this game, all of which are free to download:
** The [[http://www.swordsandwizardry.com/?page_id=6 WhiteBox]] Rules which closely emulates the rules of the core box of [=OD&D=].
** The [[http://www.swordsandwizardry.com/?page_id=4 Core]] Rules which also incorporate the Greyhawk supplement (most notably adding the Thief class).
** The Complete Rulebook which incorporates all the supplements, resulting in something of a middle-road between [=BD&D=] and [=AD&D=] that is quite easily compatible with much of the contents for both.

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* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Swords+%26+Wizardry Swords and Wizardry:]]''' Created by Myhtmere Games. One of the more well-known retroclones, this game goes all the way back to the original D&D, with the Cleric, the Fighter and the Magic-User, taking inspiration from sword and sorcery. Notable for having only one saving throw as opposed to the five used in regular old-school D&D, although it includes the option to use the original five. You get to choose whether you want to play with original AC or ascending AC. There are three versions of this game, all of which are free to download:
** The [[http://www.swordsandwizardry.com/?page_id=6 WhiteBox]] Rules WhiteBox Rules]], which closely emulates the rules of the core box of [=OD&D=].
** The [[http://www.swordsandwizardry.com/?page_id=4 Core]] Rules Core Rules]], which also incorporate the Greyhawk supplement (most notably adding the Thief class).
** The [[https://www.froggodgames.com/swords-wizardry-complete-rulebook Complete Rulebook Rulebook]], which incorporates all the five supplements, resulting in something of a middle-road between [=BD&D=] BD&D and [=AD&D=] AD&D that is quite easily compatible with much of the contents for both.
13th Jul '16 9:51:51 AM oknazevad
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** The original rules and setting were created for 2nd edition. AEG created a 3rd edition sourcebook, "Empire", that updated/reprinted a large amount of the rules (but not the setting).
12th Jul '16 11:16:17 PM Koveras
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** '''Dungeons & Dragons Essentials (4th) - 2010:''' A new line of products launched in 2010, compatible with 4th edition rules. ''Essentials'' had the stated intent of offering new players a means of introduction to the game. It is, for the most part, a simplified 4E. There are some differences (for example, fighters and thieves have scaling class features that modify their basic attacks, instead of special attack powers) but nevertheless uses all the same core mechanics from 4E. It's a set of ten products (the new Red Box, dice, three tile sets, and a few extra books). The reintroduction of certain game elements removed from the making of 4th edition, and the confirmation that these changes will become standard from the end of 2010 on, has already led many players to calling it "4.5" edition. Naturally, the already-fragmented base was broken further over this.

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** '''Dungeons & Dragons Essentials (4th) - 2010:''' A new line of products launched in 2010, compatible with 4th edition rules. ''Essentials'' had the stated intent of offering new players a means of introduction to the game. It is, for the most part, a simplified 4E. There are some differences (for example, fighters and thieves have scaling class features that modify their basic attacks, instead of special attack powers) but nevertheless uses all the same core mechanics from 4E. It's a set of ten products (the new Red Box, dice, UsefulNotes/{{dice}}, three tile sets, and a few extra books). The reintroduction of certain game elements removed from the making of 4th edition, and the confirmation that these changes will become standard from the end of 2010 on, has already led many players to calling it "4.5" edition. Naturally, the already-fragmented base was broken further over this.
12th Jul '16 8:12:08 PM WildCardCourier
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* ''Blackmoor'', a.k.a. ''The First Fantasy Campaign'': The '''very''' first campaign setting, originating from Dave Arneson's wargaming days. Arneson combined the ''Chainmail'' Fantasy Supplement with the dungeon exploration mechanic he created and eventually showed the end result off to Gary Gygax, leading to the creation of D&D. Your typical Good-vs-Evil setting, with the various duchies vying for power while the mysterious Egg of Coot hides in the shadows. Later tied to both Greyhawk (as an archbarony near the Land of Black Ice) and Mystara (as a kingdom from the world's distant past that [[AndManGrewProud rose to great heights]] [[CataclysmBackstory and quickly fell, changing the world in the process]]). While officially discontinued during the TSR days, Arneson was able to keep the rights for the setting and worked with Zeitgiest Games to release setting books for 3.5 and 4th Editions. Blackmoor proudly has the honor of being one of the longest continuously played fantasy role playing campaigns in existence, even spawning a renowned play-by-post game called ''The Last Fantasy Campaign'', which ran from 2005 to 2015.

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* ''Blackmoor'', a.k.a. ''The First Fantasy Campaign'': The '''very''' first campaign setting, originating from Dave Arneson's wargaming days. Arneson combined days, the ''Chainmail'' Fantasy Supplement with result of a slow weekend in October 1970 consisting of '50s monster movies, "fantasy hero" novels, a slump during his most recent wargame session, and the thought of "I can do better than this". So he drew one dungeon exploration mechanic he floor layout, then five more, then created a castle and eventually town from a Sicilian castle model he had lying around. The new setting was a huge hit amongst his fellow ''Braunstein'' players and when he showed the end result off game to Gary Gygax, leading to Gygax in 1972, the creation of D&D. rest, as they say, was history. Your typical Good-vs-Evil setting, with the various duchies vying for power while the mysterious Egg of Coot hides in pulls the strings from the shadows. Later tied to While the "canon" version was a released in 1977 as gazetteer by Judges Guild, alternate versions appeared in both Greyhawk (as an archbarony near the Land of Black Ice) and Mystara (as a kingdom from the world's distant past that [[AndManGrewProud rose to great heights]] [[CataclysmBackstory and quickly fell, changing the world in the process]]).process]]). The setting only had four adventure modules released for it during it's D&D days: ''Adventures in Blackmoor'', ''Temple of the Frog'', ''City of the Gods'', and ''The Duchy of Ten''. While officially discontinued during the TSR days, Arneson was able to keep the rights for the setting and worked with Zeitgiest Games to release setting books for 3.5 and 4th Editions. Blackmoor proudly has the honor of being one of the longest continuously played fantasy role playing campaigns in existence, even spawning a renowned play-by-post game called ''The Last Fantasy Campaign'', which ran from 2005 to 2015.



** The first version was the original home campaign. While it ran from 1972 to 1979, games set there completely ceased in 1985 right after Gygax was ousted from TSR, while the setting itself was "destroyed" in 1988 in the last ''Gord the Rogue'' novel [[note]]a literary declaration that the old Oerth was dead, with Gygax himself furious over the direction TSR was taking the setting[[/note]]. Due to the number of games played each week, Gygax didn't have the time to make a world map completely from scratch and simply used a blank map of North America, filling it in as the campaign went on. Despite the name, the 1975 ''Supplement I: Greyhawk'' digest wasn't a Greyhawk setting book, but a rulebook which helped eliminate the game's dependence on ''Chainmail'', setting the groundwork for what would become Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. Not much is known about the home campaign version, apart from what is presented in the ''Gnome Cache'' novella from the first issues of ''Dragon'' magazine and the ''Gord the Rogue'' novel series. After years of talks about releasing the original Castle Greyhawk dungeon/campaign, the project was finally greenlit as ''Castle Zagyg'' in 2003, although it's immensely troubled production ended with just two of the proposed seven books and a small number of adventure modules being released.[[note]]The Castle Grewhawk dungeon as of 1985 had around 50 floors, meaning Gygax and Kuntz had to sift through years of notes and pick the 13 best parts for publication, while Gygax had to rewrite all the stuff that was still copyright of [=WotC=]. Gygax's health decline in 2004 led to the slow-moving project to grind to a near halt, while Kuntz had to withdraw due to working on other projects. Three months after Gary's death in 2008, his widow Gail pulled all the licensing from Troll Lord Games and transferred them to Gygax Games, but hasn't done anything with the project.[[/note]]

to:

** The first version was the original home campaign.campaign, created after Gygax played a game of Blackmoor in 1972. While it ran from 1972 to 1979, games set there completely ceased in 1985 right after Gygax was ousted from TSR, while the setting itself was "destroyed" in 1988 in the last ''Gord the Rogue'' novel [[note]]a literary declaration that the old Oerth was dead, with Gygax himself furious over the direction TSR was taking the setting[[/note]]. Due to the number of games played each week, Gygax didn't have the time to make a world map completely from scratch and simply used a blank map of North America, filling it in as the campaign went on. Despite the name, the 1975 ''Supplement I: Greyhawk'' digest wasn't a Greyhawk setting book, but a rulebook which helped eliminate the game's dependence on ''Chainmail'', setting the groundwork for what would become Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. Not much is known about the home campaign version, apart from what is presented in the ''Gnome Cache'' novella from the first issues of ''Dragon'' magazine and the ''Gord the Rogue'' novel series. After years of talks about releasing the original Castle Greyhawk dungeon/campaign, the project was finally greenlit as ''Castle Zagyg'' in 2003, although it's immensely troubled production ended with just two of the proposed seven books and a small number of adventure modules being released.[[note]]The Castle Grewhawk dungeon as of 1985 had around 50 floors, meaning Gygax and Kuntz had to sift through years of notes and pick the 13 best parts for publication, while Gygax had to rewrite all the stuff that was still copyright of [=WotC=]. Gygax's health decline in 2004 led to the slow-moving project to grind to a near halt, while Kuntz had to withdraw due to working on other projects. Three months after Gary's death in 2008, his widow Gail pulled all the licensing from Troll Lord Games and transferred them to Gygax Games, but hasn't done anything with the project.[[/note]]



** ''Red Steel'': Personal magical powers, deforming curses. The [[http://index.rpg.net/display-entry.phtml?mainid=8311 campaign book]] has "[[PowerAtAPrice Power has a price!]]" printed [[Administrivia/YouHaveBeenWarned right on the cover]]. Additional rules for {{swashbuckler}}-style game, extra IntelligentGerbil races. Firearms. Cowboys and goblins.
* ''TabletopGame/NentirVale'': Default setting for 4th edition. [[CataclysmBackstory The great empires of mortals were destroyed]] [[AndManGrewProud in a magic war]], leaving behind scattered remnants of civilization in small pockets (described as "points of light") surrounded by dangerous monsters and abandoned and forgotten magic and technology.

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** ''Red Steel'': Personal magical powers, deforming curses.A sub-setting of Mystara released for 2nd Edition AD&D. The [[http://index.rpg.net/display-entry.phtml?mainid=8311 campaign book]] has "[[PowerAtAPrice Power has a price!]]" printed [[Administrivia/YouHaveBeenWarned right on the cover]]. Additional rules for {{swashbuckler}}-style game, extra IntelligentGerbil races. Firearms. Cowboys and goblins.
Set in the Savage Coast region of Mystara. The land is dyed red by the Red Curse: "vermeil", a dust that grants those who ingest it extraordinary power at the expense of crippling deformities. Those affected by the Red Curse must wear jewelry crafted from "cinnabryl" to stave off it's effects.
* ''TabletopGame/NentirVale'': Default setting pseudo-setting for 4th edition. [[CataclysmBackstory The great empires of mortals were destroyed]] [[AndManGrewProud in a magic war]], leaving behind scattered remnants of civilization in small pockets (described as "points of light") surrounded by dangerous monsters and abandoned and forgotten magic and technology.



* '''"Original" Dungeons & Dragons (OD&D) - 1974-1976:''' Also known as "The Original Game". Written by Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson and published by TSR in 1974 as a boxed set consisting of three digest-sized books (the "little brown books" a.k.a. lbb): ''Men & Magic'', ''Monsters & Treasure'', ''The Underworld & Wilderness Adventures''. There were three original classes (Fighting-Man, Cleric and Magic User) and only three alignments (Law, Neutrality, Chaos). Humans could choose between all three classes and advance in their chosen class without limit, while non-human races were severely restricted. [[note]]Dwarves could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 6th level. Elves were multiclass by default and could freely switch between Fighting-Man and Magic-User on an adventure-by-adventure basis, with their level caps being 4th level for Fighting-Man and 8th level for Magic User. Halflings could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 4th level.[[/note]] Hit Points, damage, and initiative were all rolled using a d6. Spell levels were limited to 6th level spells for Magic Users and 5th level spells for Clerics. Received numerous supplements, both officially released and from magazine articles.

to:

* '''"Original" Dungeons & Dragons (OD&D) - 1974-1976:''' Also known as "The Original Game". Written Co-written by Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson and published by TSR in 1974 as a boxed set consisting of three digest-sized books (the "little brown books" a.k.a. lbb): ''Men & Magic'', ''Monsters & Treasure'', ''The Underworld & Wilderness Adventures''. There were three original classes (Fighting-Man, Cleric and Magic User) and only three alignments (Law, Neutrality, Chaos). Humans could choose between all three classes and advance in their chosen class without limit, while non-human races were severely restricted. [[note]]Dwarves could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 6th level. Elves were multiclass by default and could freely switch between Fighting-Man and Magic-User on an adventure-by-adventure basis, with their level caps being 4th level for Fighting-Man and 8th level for Magic User. Halflings could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 4th level.[[/note]] Hit Points, damage, and initiative were all rolled using a d6. Spell levels were limited to 6th level spells for Magic Users and 5th level spells for Clerics. Received numerous supplements, both officially released and from magazine articles.



* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Swords+%26+Wizardry Swords and Wizardry:]]''' One of the more well-known retroclones, this game goes all the way back to the original D&D, with the Cleric, the Fighter and the Magic-User, taking inspiration from sword and sorcery. Notable for having only one saving throw as opposed to the five used in regular old-school D&D, although it includes the option to use the original five. You get to choose whether you want to play with original AC or ascending AC. There are three versions of this game:
** The [=WhiteBox=] Rules which closely emulates the rules of the core box of [=OD&D=].
** The Core Rules which also incorporate the Greyhawk supplement (most notably adding the Thief class).

to:

* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Swords+%26+Wizardry Swords and Wizardry:]]''' One of the more well-known retroclones, this game goes all the way back to the original D&D, with the Cleric, the Fighter and the Magic-User, taking inspiration from sword and sorcery. Notable for having only one saving throw as opposed to the five used in regular old-school D&D, although it includes the option to use the original five. You get to choose whether you want to play with original AC or ascending AC. There are three versions of this game:
game, all of which are free to download:
** The [=WhiteBox=] [[http://www.swordsandwizardry.com/?page_id=6 WhiteBox]] Rules which closely emulates the rules of the core box of [=OD&D=].
** The Core [[http://www.swordsandwizardry.com/?page_id=4 Core]] Rules which also incorporate the Greyhawk supplement (most notably adding the Thief class).
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