History TabletopGame / DungeonsAndDragons

19th Jun '16 3:15:49 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* MassResurrection:
** 2nd Edition supplement ''Book of Artifacts''. The silver Orb of Dragonkind could resurrect 20-200 bodies once per year.
** Module T1-4 ''TabletopGame/TempleOfElementalEvil''. If the deity St. Cuthbert is summoned, he will Raise all slain {{PC}}s from the dead with a gesture.
** In early editions of the game, the Wish spell was able to resurrect a group of characters.
18th Jun '16 8:13:57 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''[[LegendOfTheFiveRings Rokugan]]'': JidaiGeki style fantasy. Licensed from the makers of the ''Legend of the Five Rings'' card game.

to:

* ''[[LegendOfTheFiveRings ''[[TabletopGame/LegendOfTheFiveRings Rokugan]]'': JidaiGeki style fantasy. Licensed from the makers of the ''Legend of the Five Rings'' card game.
18th May '16 12:34:06 PM supergod
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* HeroicAmbidexterity: In 3.0, Ambidexterity is a [[{{perk}} feat]] which allows you to DualWield weapons much more efficiently than otherwise, even if you're already trained for it.

to:

* HeroicAmbidexterity: In 2e and 3.0, 0e, Ambidexterity is a [[{{perk}} feat]] which that allows you to DualWield weapons much more efficiently than otherwise, even if you're already trained for it.
18th May '16 12:13:52 PM supergod
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* HeroicAmbidexterity: Ambidexterity is a {{perk}} which allows you to DualWield weapons much more efficiently than otherwise, even if you're already trained for it.


Added DiffLines:

* HeroicAmbidexterity: In 3.0, Ambidexterity is a [[{{perk}} feat]] which allows you to DualWield weapons much more efficiently than otherwise, even if you're already trained for it.
13th May '16 6:37:26 PM oknazevad
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''TabletopGame/MutantsAndMasterminds

to:

* ''TabletopGame/MutantsAndMasterminds''TabletopGame/MutantsAndMasterminds''
11th May '16 3:12:38 PM TheFantasyChronicler
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''TabletopGame/ThirteenthAge''


Added DiffLines:

* ''TabletopGame/MutantsAndMasterminds
10th May '16 6:46:30 PM YpsiFang
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

*IronicNurseryTune: The nursery rhymes about the oni in fifth edition certainly qualify.
30th Apr '16 2:47:21 PM oknazevad
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* '''"Original" Dungeons & Dragons (OD&D) - 1974-1976:''' The original set was written by Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson, and was published by TSR in 1974 as a boxed set consisting of three digest-sized books (the "little brown books" a.k.a. lbb): ''Men & Magic'', ''Monsters & Treasure'', ''The Underworld & Wilderness Adventures''. There were three original classes (Fighting-Man, Cleric and Magic User) and only three alignments (Law, Neutrality, Chaos). Humans could choose between all three classes and advance in their chosen class without limit, while non-human races were severely restricted. [[note]]Dwarves could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 6th level. Elves were multiclass by default and could freely switch between Fighting-Man and Magic-User on an adventure-by-adventure basis, with their level caps being 4th level for Fighting-Man and 8th level for Magic User. Halflings could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 4th level.[[/note]] Hit Points, damage, and initiative were rolled using a d6. Spell levels were limited to 6th level spells for Magic Users and 5th level spells for Clerics. Received numerous supplements, both officially released and from magazine articles.

to:

* '''"Original" Dungeons & Dragons (OD&D) - 1974-1976:''' The original set was written by Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson, and was published by TSR in 1974 as a boxed set consisting of three digest-sized books (the "little brown books" a.k.a. lbb): ''Men & Magic'', ''Monsters & Treasure'', ''The Underworld & Wilderness Adventures''. There were three original classes (Fighting-Man, Cleric and Magic User) and only three alignments (Law, Neutrality, Chaos). Humans could choose between all three classes and advance in their chosen class without limit, while non-human races were severely restricted. [[note]]Dwarves could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 6th level. Elves were multiclass by default and could freely switch between Fighting-Man and Magic-User on an adventure-by-adventure basis, with their level caps being 4th level for Fighting-Man and 8th level for Magic User. Halflings could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 4th level.[[/note]] Hit Points, damage, and initiative were all rolled using a d6. Spell levels were limited to 6th level spells for Magic Users and 5th level spells for Clerics. Received numerous supplements, both officially released and from magazine articles.



** '''Swords & Spells - 1976:''' An unlisted fifth supplement written by Gygax. Essentially the "grandson" of ''Chainmail'', this sourcebook introduced rules for upscaling the combat in order to portray large scale battles. Was not included in the 40th Anniversary White Box.

to:

** '''Swords & Spells - 1976:''' An unlisted unnumbered fifth supplement written by Gygax. Essentially the "grandson" of ''Chainmail'', this sourcebook introduced rules for upscaling the combat in order to portray large scale battles. Was not included in the 40th Anniversary White Box.
25th Apr '16 1:51:05 PM JustTroper
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ProverbialWisdom: In module [=OA5=] ''Mad Monkey vs. Dragon Claw'', the martial arts trainer Hu Sen often makes statements the module calls "fortune cookie philosophy", sayings that may or may not make sense.
23rd Apr '16 3:55:22 AM WildCardCourier
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The first version was the original home campaign. While it ran from 1972 to 1979, games set there completely ceased in 1985 right after Gygax was ousted from TSR, while the setting itself was "destroyed" in 1988 in the last ''Gord the Rogue'' novel [[note]]a literary declaration that the old Oerth was dead, with Gygax himself furious over the direction TSR was taking the setting[[/note]]. Due to the number of games played each week, Gygax didn't have the time to make a world map completely from scratch and simply used a blank map of North America, filling it in as the campaign went on. Despite the name, the 1975 ''Supplement I: Greyhawk'' digest wasn't a Greyhawk setting book, but a rulebook which helped eliminate the game's dependence on ''Chainmail'', setting the groundwork for what would become Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. Not much is known about the home campaign version, apart from what is presented in the ''Gnome Cache'' novella from the first issues of ''Dragon'' magazine and the ''Gord the Rogue'' novel series. After years of talks about releasing the original Castle Greyhawk dungeon/campaign, the project was finally greenlit as ''Castle Zagyg'' in 2003, although it's immensely troubled production ended with just two of the proposed seven books and a small number of adventure modules being released.[[note]]The Castle Grewhawk dungeon as of 1985 had around 50 floors, meaning Gygax and Kuntz had to sift through years of notes and pick the 13 best parts for publication, while Gygax had to rewrite all the stuff that was still copyright of [=WotC=]. Gygax's health decline in 2004 led to the slow-moving project to grind to a near halt, while Kuntz had to withdraw due to working on other projects. Three months after Gary's death, his widow Gail pulled all the licensing from Troll Lord Games and transferred them to Gygax Games, but hasn't done anything with the project.[[/note]]

to:

** The first version was the original home campaign. While it ran from 1972 to 1979, games set there completely ceased in 1985 right after Gygax was ousted from TSR, while the setting itself was "destroyed" in 1988 in the last ''Gord the Rogue'' novel [[note]]a literary declaration that the old Oerth was dead, with Gygax himself furious over the direction TSR was taking the setting[[/note]]. Due to the number of games played each week, Gygax didn't have the time to make a world map completely from scratch and simply used a blank map of North America, filling it in as the campaign went on. Despite the name, the 1975 ''Supplement I: Greyhawk'' digest wasn't a Greyhawk setting book, but a rulebook which helped eliminate the game's dependence on ''Chainmail'', setting the groundwork for what would become Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. Not much is known about the home campaign version, apart from what is presented in the ''Gnome Cache'' novella from the first issues of ''Dragon'' magazine and the ''Gord the Rogue'' novel series. After years of talks about releasing the original Castle Greyhawk dungeon/campaign, the project was finally greenlit as ''Castle Zagyg'' in 2003, although it's immensely troubled production ended with just two of the proposed seven books and a small number of adventure modules being released.[[note]]The Castle Grewhawk dungeon as of 1985 had around 50 floors, meaning Gygax and Kuntz had to sift through years of notes and pick the 13 best parts for publication, while Gygax had to rewrite all the stuff that was still copyright of [=WotC=]. Gygax's health decline in 2004 led to the slow-moving project to grind to a near halt, while Kuntz had to withdraw due to working on other projects. Three months after Gary's death, death in 2008, his widow Gail pulled all the licensing from Troll Lord Games and transferred them to Gygax Games, but hasn't done anything with the project.[[/note]]



* ''Wilderlands of High Fantasy'': The first officially licensed and published third-party campaign setting for "Original" D&D, created by Judges Guild after the success of their ''City State of the Invincible Overlord'' city setting and released in a collection of 4 32-page booklets. In 2002, Judges Guild ended up working together with Necromancer Games to release a boxed version for 3.5 Edition. The earliest sandbox-style campaign setting, and it shows: 18 maps that altogether cover an area about 780 miles wide by 1080 miles long, roughly the size of the Mediterranean. Each individual map contained a number of pre-established points-of-interest, with the associated books containing entry upon entry for every bastion of civilization, set of ruins, and monster lair within the region. Touted as "First Edition feel", the Wilderlands sticks to the old-school SwordAndSorcery origins of D&D, a time when the lines between sci-fi and fantasy were very murky. So you can have people who's greatest technological achievement is the wheel potentially meet people who's greatest technological achievement is calculus, and ''then'' have them potentially happen upon a crashed alien spaceship from long before recorded history.

to:

* ''Wilderlands of High Fantasy'': The first officially licensed and published third-party campaign setting for "Original" D&D, created by Judges Guild after the success of their ''City State of the Invincible Overlord'' city setting and released in a collection of 4 32-page booklets. In 2002, Judges Guild ended up working together with Necromancer Games to release a boxed version for 3.5 Edition. The earliest sandbox-style campaign setting, and it shows: 18 maps that altogether cover an area about 780 miles wide by 1080 miles long, roughly the size of the Mediterranean. Each individual map contained a number of pre-established points-of-interest, with the associated accompanying books containing entry upon entry for every bastion of civilization, set of ruins, and monster lair within the region. Touted as "First Edition feel", the Wilderlands sticks to the old-school SwordAndSorcery origins of D&D, a time when the lines between sci-fi and fantasy were very murky. So you can have people who's greatest technological achievement is the wheel potentially meet people who's greatest technological achievement is calculus, and ''then'' have them potentially happen upon a crashed alien spaceship from long before recorded history.



* '''"Original" Dungeons & Dragons (OD&D) - 1974-1976:''' The original set was written by Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson, and was published by TSR in 1974 as a boxed set consisting of three digest-sized books (the "little brown books" a.k.a. lbb): ''Men & Magic'', ''Monsters & Treasure'', ''The Underworld & Wilderness Adventures''. There were three original classes (Fighting-Man, Cleric and Magic User) and only three alignments (Law, Neutrality, Chaos). Humans could advance in their chosen class without limit, while non-human races were severely restricted. [[note]]Only humans could be clerics. Dwarves could only be Fighting-Man and capped at 6th level. Elves were dual-class by default and could freely switch between Fighting-Man and Magic-User on an adventure-by-adventure basis, with their level caps being 4th level Fighting-Man and 8th level Magic User. Halflings were restricted to Fighting-Men and capped at 4th level.[[/note]] Hit Points, damage, and initiative were rolled using a d6. Spell levels were limited to 6th level spells for Magic Users and 5th level spells for Clerics. Received numerous supplements, both officially released and from magazine articles.
** '''Supplement I: Greyhawk - 1975:''' Introduced the Thief class, the Paladin as a Fighing-Man subclass, Half-Elves as a playable race, and more monsters. Amended the level and class restrictions for Dwarves, Elves, and Halflings to account for the Thief class. [[note]]Dwarves, Elves, and Halflings could advance as a Thief with no level cap. Dwarves could advance to 7th and 8th level Fighting-Man if their Strength score was high enough; they could also dual-class as Fighting-Men/Thief and Fighting-Men/Cleric, although Fighting-Men/Cleric was NPC-only and their Cleric level capped at 7th level. Elves with high enough Strength/Intelligence could advance to 5th and 6th level Fighting-Man and 9th level Magic-Users; they could also triple-class into either Fighting-Man/Magic-User/Cleric or Fighting-Man/Magic-User/Thief, although FM/MU/Cleric Elves have both their Magic-User and Cleric classes capped at 6th level. Halflings could be either a Fighting-Man or a Thief and had the best Thief skill bonuses. Half-Elves start as Fighting-Man/Magic-User and were capped at 6th level for both, although high Strength/Intelligence scores would raise them to 8th level for both; they could also triple-class into FM/MU/Cleric with a high enough Wisdom score, but their Cleric level is capped at 4th level.[[/note]] Magic Users were given 7th-9th level spells, while Clerics were given 6th and 7th level spells. Contained new and additional rules in order to distance itself from ''Chainmail''.
** '''Supplement II: Blackmoor - 1975:''' Introduced the Monk as a Cleric subclass, the Assassin as a Thief subclass, a system for diseases, a "hit location" system, and even more monsters. Also contains the very first published adventure module: ''The Temple of the Frog'' for Blackmoor.

to:

* '''"Original" Dungeons & Dragons (OD&D) - 1974-1976:''' The original set was written by Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson, and was published by TSR in 1974 as a boxed set consisting of three digest-sized books (the "little brown books" a.k.a. lbb): ''Men & Magic'', ''Monsters & Treasure'', ''The Underworld & Wilderness Adventures''. There were three original classes (Fighting-Man, Cleric and Magic User) and only three alignments (Law, Neutrality, Chaos). Humans could choose between all three classes and advance in their chosen class without limit, while non-human races were severely restricted. [[note]]Only humans could be clerics. Dwarves [[note]]Dwarves could only be Fighting-Man Fighting-Men and capped at 6th level. Elves were dual-class multiclass by default and could freely switch between Fighting-Man and Magic-User on an adventure-by-adventure basis, with their level caps being 4th level for Fighting-Man and 8th level for Magic User. Halflings were restricted to could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 4th level.[[/note]] Hit Points, damage, and initiative were rolled using a d6. Spell levels were limited to 6th level spells for Magic Users and 5th level spells for Clerics. Received numerous supplements, both officially released and from magazine articles.
** '''Supplement I: Greyhawk - 1975:''' Introduced the Thief class, the Paladin as a Fighing-Man subclass, Half-Elves as a playable race, and more monsters. Amended the level and class restrictions for Dwarves, Elves, and Halflings to account for the Thief class. [[note]]Dwarves, Elves, and Halflings could advance as a Thief with no level cap. Dwarves could advance to either 7th and or 8th level Fighting-Man if their with an exceptional Strength score was high enough; score; they could also dual-class multiclass as Fighting-Men/Thief and Fighting-Men/Cleric, either a Fighting-Man/Thief or a Fighting-Man/Cleric, although Fighting-Men/Cleric the Fighting-Man/Cleric option was NPC-only and their Cleric level capped at 7th level. Elves with high enough Strength/Intelligence could advance up to 5th and or 6th level Fighting-Man with an exceptional Strength score and 9th level Magic-Users; Magic-User with an exceptional Intelligence score; they could also triple-class into multiclass as either a Fighting-Man/Magic-User/Cleric or a Fighting-Man/Magic-User/Thief, although FM/MU/Cleric Elves have both had their Magic-User and Cleric classes capped at 6th level. Halflings could choose to be either a Fighting-Man or a Thief and had the best Thief skill bonuses. bonuses of the non-human races. Half-Elves start multiclass as a Fighting-Man/Magic-User and were by default, with both classes capped at 6th level for both, level, although high exceptional Strength/Intelligence scores would raise them up to 7th or 8th level for both; level; they could also triple-class into multiclass as a FM/MU/Cleric with a high enough Wisdom score, but their Cleric level is capped at 4th level.[[/note]] Magic Users were given had access to 7th-9th level spells, but only if their Intelligence score was high enough, while Clerics were given had access to 6th and 7th level spells. Contained new and additional rules in order to distance itself from ''Chainmail''.
** '''Supplement II: Blackmoor - 1975:''' Introduced the Monk as a Cleric subclass, the Assassin as a Thief subclass, a system for diseases, a "hit location" system, rules for underwater adventures, and even more monsters. Also contains the very first published adventure module: ''The Temple of the Frog'' for Blackmoor.



** '''Swords & Spells - 1976:''' An unlisted supplement written by Gygax. Essentially the "grandson" of ''Chainmail'', this sourcebook introduced rules for upscaling the combat in order to portray large scale battles. Was not included in the 40th Anniversary White Box.

to:

** '''Swords & Spells - 1976:''' An unlisted fifth supplement written by Gygax. Essentially the "grandson" of ''Chainmail'', this sourcebook introduced rules for upscaling the combat in order to portray large scale battles. Was not included in the 40th Anniversary White Box.



* '''Dungeons & Dragons (5th Edition) - 2014:''' Developed under the title ''D&D Next'' and officially launched in 2014, 5th edition was an attempt by Wizards to recapture and unite some of the fractured fanbase. The basic mechanics resemble a mixture of 2nd and 3rd editions with some influences by 4th edition. The overall power levels have been reduced: the max level cap is 20 ''period'', magic items are much more rare and do not scale in levels, and the bonuses/penalties to an action seldom break double digits. Stacking modifiers have been replaced with a simple advantage/disadvantage system where the character with the advantage/disadvantage rolls two dice for the action and picks the higher/lower die. Magic spells with durations are now 'concentration' type, meaning a magic user can ever only have one such spell active at any time. Most major, world-altering magics are rituals that take minutes if not hours and days to cast. Each class is now firmly wedded to a single character concept, with class archetypes and character backgrounds (representing social class and upbringing) chosen at creation being used to hybridize characters. Most post-creation exclusives are gone, but multiclassing has been returned to 3rd edition standards. Roleplaying and flavor have been increased in importance, with the old 2nd edition alignment system restored and canonical D&D characters from related media being used as examples of their respective classes, alignments and backgrounds. Pinning down the primary world for Fifth Edition is a bit dodgy: while the core books are written in a multiverse view and are near-completely adaptable to any setting, all of the official Adventurer's League material for organized play is primarily set in the ''Forgotten Realms'' .[[note]]The ''Princes of the Apocalypse'' adventure, which is blatantly stated as "The Temple of Elemental Evil in Faerûn", includes info for adapting the content to Dark Sun, Dragonlance, Greyhawk, Eberron, and home campaigns; while ''Curse of Strahd'' is a combination enhanced remake of the original Ravenloft adventure and a return to Ravenloft as a campaign setting.[[/note]] Fan response has been mostly positive, with some praising the return to a more roleplaying-based system based on in-universe-justified abilities, while others bemoan a lack of character options on release and argue that the game has returned to LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards.

to:

* '''Dungeons & Dragons (5th Edition) - 2014:''' Developed under the title ''D&D Next'' and officially launched in 2014, 5th edition was an attempt by Wizards to recapture and unite some of the fractured fanbase. The basic mechanics resemble a mixture of 2nd and 3rd editions with some influences by 4th edition. The overall power levels have been reduced: the max level cap is 20 ''period'', magic items are much more rare and do not scale in levels, and the bonuses/penalties to an action seldom break double digits. Stacking modifiers have been replaced with a simple advantage/disadvantage system where the character with the advantage/disadvantage rolls two dice for the action and picks the higher/lower die. Magic spells with durations are now 'concentration' type, meaning a magic user can ever only have one such spell active at any time. Most major, world-altering magics are rituals that take minutes if not hours and days to cast. Each class is now firmly wedded to a single character concept, with class archetypes and character backgrounds (representing social class and upbringing) chosen at creation being used to hybridize characters. Most post-creation exclusives are gone, but multiclassing has been returned to 3rd edition standards. Roleplaying and flavor have been increased in importance, with the old 2nd edition alignment system restored and canonical D&D characters from related media being used as examples of their respective classes, alignments and backgrounds. Pinning down the primary world for Fifth Edition is a bit dodgy: while the core books are written in a multiverse view and are near-completely adaptable to any setting, all of the official Adventurer's League material for organized play is primarily set in the ''Forgotten Realms'' .Realms''.[[note]]The ''Princes of the Apocalypse'' adventure, which is blatantly stated as "The Temple of Elemental Evil in Faerûn", includes info for adapting the content to for Dark Sun, Dragonlance, Greyhawk, Eberron, and home campaigns; while ''Curse of Strahd'' is a combination enhanced remake of the original Ravenloft adventure and a return to Ravenloft as a campaign setting.[[/note]] Fan response has been mostly positive, with some praising the return to a more roleplaying-based system based on in-universe-justified abilities, while others bemoan a lack of character options on release and argue that the game has returned to LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards.



In addition to all this, some die-hard gamers have elected to go back to the roots of D&D, launching an "Old School Renaissance" that consists of playing and writing new adventures for the older editions and using the OGL to provide "retro-clone" games that do their best to recreate the feel of the out -of-print older editions for the gaming audience of today.

to:

In addition to all this, some die-hard gamers have elected to go back to the roots of D&D, launching an "Old School Renaissance" that consists of playing and writing new adventures for the older editions and using the OGL to provide "retro-clone" games that do their best to recreate the feel of the out -of-print out-of-print older editions for the gaming audience of today.
This list shows the last 10 events of 751. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=TabletopGame.DungeonsAndDragons