History TableTopGame / DungeonsAndDragons

2nd Sep '17 3:52:23 PM nombretomado
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* AdaptationDistillation: {{Capcom}} managed to apply the rather complex ''D&D'' system into two very competent VideoGame/DungeonsAndDragons arcade {{BeatEm Up}} games that no company has ever been able to do right since.

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* AdaptationDistillation: {{Capcom}} Creator/{{Capcom}} managed to apply the rather complex ''D&D'' system into two very competent VideoGame/DungeonsAndDragons arcade {{BeatEm Up}} games that no company has ever been able to do right since.
30th Aug '17 6:11:36 PM WildCardCourier
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** '''Supplement IV: Gods, Demi-Gods & Heroes - 1976''': The last official supplement. Introduced deities, demi-gods, and legendary heroes from mythology and religions both real (Egyptian, Celtic, Norse) and fictional ([[Franchise/ConanTheBarbarian Hyborean]] and [[Literature/TheElricSaga Melnibonéan]]) for two purposes: 1) as a means of integrating pre-established mythologies into campaigns, and 2) a last ditch effort for reaching the "Monty Hall" style [=DMs=] who ran giveaway campaigns and to show the absurdity of 40+ level characters by giving them opponents that could wipe the floor with them. Unfortunately started the concept of "if you stat it, they will kill it".
** '''Swords & Spells - 1976''': The unnumbered fifth supplement, written by Gygax. Touted as the "grandson" of ''Chainmail'', this sourcebook introduced rules for upscaling the combat in order to portray large scale battles. The supplement was not that well received, and was not included in the 40th Anniversary White Box collection.

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** '''Supplement IV: Gods, Demi-Gods & Heroes - 1976''': The last official supplement. Introduced deities, demi-gods, and legendary heroes from mythology and religions both real (Egyptian, Celtic, Norse) and fictional ([[Franchise/ConanTheBarbarian Hyborean]] and [[Literature/TheElricSaga Melnibonéan]]) for two purposes: 1) as a means of integrating pre-established mythologies into campaigns, and 2) a last ditch effort for reaching the "Monty Hall" style [=DMs=] who ran giveaway campaigns and to show the absurdity of 40+ level characters by giving them opponents that could wipe the floor with them. Unfortunately started the concept of "if you stat it, they will kill it".
it". Modern reprints dropped the fictional pantheons due to licensing issues.
** '''Swords & Spells - 1976''': The unnumbered fifth supplement, written by Gygax. Touted as the "grandson" of ''Chainmail'', this sourcebook introduced rules for upscaling the combat in order to portray large scale battles. The supplement was not that well received, received when it was released, and was not included in the 40th Anniversary White Box collection.



** In an effort to keep things "fresh", [=WotC=] is releasing two storyline-based adventure modules each year, commissioning third party publishers such as Kobold Press, Sasquatch Game Studio, and Green Ronin to help out.

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** In an effort to keep things "fresh", [=WotC=] is releasing just two storyline-based adventure modules each year, commissioning third party publishers such as Kobold Press, Sasquatch Game Studio, and Green Ronin to help out.develop them.



** The [[https://www.froggodgames.com/swords-wizardry-complete-rulebook Complete Rulebook]], which incorporates Supplements 1-3 and ''Swords & Spells'', resulting in something of a middle-road between BD&D and AD&D that is quite easily compatible with much of the contents for both.

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** The [[https://www.froggodgames.com/swords-wizardry-complete-rulebook Complete Rulebook]], which incorporates Supplements 1-3 and 1-3, parts of ''Swords & Spells'', and content from ''Strategic Review'', resulting in something of a middle-road between BD&D Basic D&D and 1e AD&D that is quite easily compatible with much of the contents for both.
23rd Aug '17 9:47:56 AM thatmadork
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Added DiffLines:

* CombatPragmatist: Away from specific class examples, players are often encouraged to try to be this. ''Sandstorm'' adds rules and feats for bliding opponents with sand, while ''Stormwrack'' adds rules for grappling with opponents and ''holding them underwater until they drown''. The Dirty Trick feats allow characters to attack in all manner of unsporting ways, like {{Groin Attack}}s and eye gouging.
19th Aug '17 8:14:37 AM MorningStar1337
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** ''TabletopGame/DarkMatter''

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** ''TabletopGame/DarkMatter''''TabletopGame/DarkMatter1999''
19th Aug '17 2:36:56 AM JustaUsername
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** ''Sandbox/{{Starfinder}}''

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** ''Sandbox/{{Starfinder}}''''TabletopGame/{{Starfinder}}''
16th Aug '17 2:27:46 AM WildCardCourier
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* ''TabletopGame/{{Nentir Vale}}''

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* ''TabletopGame/{{Nentir Vale}}''''TabletopGame/NentirVale''



A fifth edition of D&D was released in 2014, as Wizards of the Coast seeks to revitalize the brand. In an effort to try and heal the divisions in the player community, they actively solicited players for ideas about the new edition, with an open playtest (which began in 2012 under the production alias of "D&D Next" and ran through the end of 2013). It combines elements from all previous editions extremely simplified classes and combat rules (making "theater of the mind" gameplay feasible once again) close to 1st and 2nd edition; the magic rules combine a lower-powered version of 3rd's slot system with 4th's ritual casting system; and while skills and feats are still present, they are much less prominent than before to the point of being technically optional.[[note]]Skills are simply areas of focus under the main six abilities that give a level-based bonus, but it's the ability scores that are used in the main. Feats are optional character advancement packages where a player may get certain improvements that are thematically linked instead of a flat ability score bonus, so either the character advances in everything related to an ability, or the character advances in a group of things related to a particular field. The other major advancement is automatic "class features", which any character of that class gets at that level. They more resemble the 4th edition powers system[[/note]]

The core rule books contain no "official" background setting material. Dungeon Masters are invited to either make up their own setting or use one of a number of published campaign settings. Of course, stuff from some settings leaked in anyway -- after all, one cannot roleplay in a vacuum. Advanced D&D has elements of Gygax's own TabletopGame/{{Greyhawk}} as the implied setting (the wizards whose names attached to spells of the core list are classical TabletopGame/{{Greyhawk}} characters), 3rd Edition even included the top of TabletopGame/{{Greyhawk}}'s pantheon and 4th Edition books' assumptions unofficially form a vaguely defined setting called the "TabletopGame/NentirVale". 5th Edition somewhat bucks this trend, through using the ''TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms'' as the main source of fluff material.

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A fifth edition of D&D was released in 2014, as Wizards of the Coast seeks sought to revitalize the brand. In an effort to try and heal the divisions in the player community, they actively solicited players for ideas about the new edition, with an open playtest (which began in 2012 under the production alias of "D&D Next" and ran through the end of 2013). It combines elements from all previous editions extremely simplified classes and combat rules (making "theater of the mind" gameplay feasible once again) close to 1st and 2nd edition; the magic rules combine a lower-powered version of 3rd's slot system with 4th's ritual casting system; and while skills and feats are still present, they are much less prominent than before to the point of being technically optional. [[note]]Skills are simply areas of focus under the main six abilities that give a level-based bonus, but it's the ability scores that are used in the main. Feats are optional character advancement packages where a player may get certain improvements that are thematically linked instead of a flat ability score bonus, so either the character advances in everything related to an ability, or the character advances in a group of things related to a particular field. The other major advancement is automatic "class features", which any character of that class gets at that level. They more resemble the 4th edition powers system[[/note]]

The core rule books contain no "official" background setting material. Dungeon Masters are invited to either make up their own setting or use one of a number of published campaign settings. Of course, stuff from some settings leaked in anyway -- after all, one cannot roleplay in a vacuum. Advanced D&D has elements of Gygax's own TabletopGame/{{Greyhawk}} as the implied setting (the wizards whose names attached to spells of the core list are classical TabletopGame/{{Greyhawk}} characters), 3rd Edition even included the top of TabletopGame/{{Greyhawk}}'s pantheon and 4th Edition books' assumptions unofficially form a vaguely defined setting called the "TabletopGame/NentirVale". 5th Edition somewhat bucks this trend, through using the ''TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms'' as the main source of fluff material.
material this time around.



* ''Blackmoor'', a.k.a. ''The First Fantasy Campaign'': The '''very''' first campaign setting, originating from Dave Arneson's wargaming days, the result of a slow weekend in October 1970 consisting of '50s monster movies, "fantasy hero" novels, a slump during his most recent wargame session, and the thought of "I can do better than this". So he drew a six floor dungeon layout, then created a castle and town from a Sicilian castle model he had lying around. The new setting was a huge hit amongst his fellow ''Braunstein'' players and when he showed the game to Gygax in 1972, the rest, as they say, was history. Your typical Good-vs-Evil setting, rather than Law-vs-Chaos, with the various duchies vying for power while the mysterious Egg of Coot pulls strings from the shadows. While the "official" version was a released in 1977 as gazetteer by Judges Guild, alternate versions appeared in both Greyhawk (as an archbarony near the Land of Black Ice) and Mystara (as a kingdom from the world's distant past that [[AndManGrewProud rose to great heights]] [[CataclysmBackstory and quickly fell, changing the world in the process]]). The setting only had four adventure modules released for it during its Creator/{{TSR}} days: ''Adventures in Blackmoor'', ''Temple of the Frog'', ''City of the Gods'', and ''The Duchy of Ten''. While officially discontinued during AD&D 2nd Edition, Arneson was able to keep the rights for the setting and eventually worked with Zeitgiest Games to release setting books for 3.5 and 4th Editions. Blackmoor proudly has the honor of being one of the longest continuously played fantasy role playing campaigns in existence, even spawning an epic play-by-post game called ''The Last Fantasy Campaign'', which ran from 2005 to 2015.

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* ''Blackmoor'', a.k.a. ''The First Fantasy Campaign'': The '''very''' first campaign setting, originating from Dave Arneson's wargaming days, the result of a slow weekend in October 1970 consisting of '50s monster movies, "fantasy hero" novels, a slump during his most recent wargame session, and the thought of "I can do better than this". So he drew a six floor dungeon layout, then created a castle and town from a Sicilian castle model he had lying around. The new setting was a huge hit amongst his fellow ''Braunstein'' players and when he showed the game to Gygax in 1972, the rest, as they say, was history. Your typical Good-vs-Evil setting, rather than Law-vs-Chaos, with the various duchies vying for power while the mysterious Egg of Coot pulls strings from the shadows. While the "official" version was a released in 1977 as a combination battle report and gazetteer by Judges Guild, alternate versions appeared in both Greyhawk (as an archbarony near the Land of Black Ice) and Mystara (as a kingdom from the world's distant past that [[AndManGrewProud rose to great heights]] [[CataclysmBackstory and quickly fell, changing the world in the process]]). The setting only had four adventure modules released for it during its Creator/{{TSR}} days: ''Adventures in Blackmoor'', ''Temple of the Frog'', ''City of the Gods'', and ''The Duchy of Ten''. While officially discontinued during AD&D 2nd Edition, Arneson was able to keep the rights for the setting and eventually worked with Zeitgiest Games to release setting books for 3.5 and 4th Editions. Blackmoor proudly has the honor of being one of the longest continuously played fantasy role playing campaigns in existence, even spawning an epic play-by-post game called ''The Last Fantasy Campaign'', which ran from 2005 to 2015.



* ''TabletopGame/DarkSun'': DesertPunk, PsychicPowers, and BlackMagic AfterTheEnd by way of ''Franchise/{{Dune}}''. A world ravaged by [[EnemyToAllLivingThings misuse of magic]], Athas is now a vast desert wasteland. Psionics are extremely common, while wizardry is outlawed. The world is ruled by a cabal of evil god-kings, each of whom controls their own city-state with an iron fist.

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* ''TabletopGame/DarkSun'': DesertPunk, PsychicPowers, and BlackMagic AfterTheEnd by way of ''Franchise/{{Dune}}''. A world ravaged by [[EnemyToAllLivingThings misuse of magic]], Athas is now a vast desert wasteland. Psionics are extremely common, while wizardry is outlawed. The world is ruled by a cabal of evil god-kings, sorcerer-kings, each of whom controls their own city-state with an iron fist.



* ''Ghostwalk'': The first campaign setting created for 3rd Edition, and ironically the one which almost nobody remembers. It is a setting where the underworld is a real, physical place, and the ghosts of the dead walk the earth on the way to their final journey. The main villain race is the Yuan-Ti - an ancient race snake-people bent on awakening their patron deity so it can destroy the world and remake it in their image, with the Yuan-Ti as the ruling race. It mostly focuses on the city of Manifest, which resides near the entrance to the underworld.

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* ''Ghostwalk'': The first campaign setting created for 3rd Edition, and ironically the one which almost nobody remembers. It is a setting where the underworld is a real, physical place, and the ghosts of the dead walk the earth on the way to their final journey. The main villain race is the Yuan-Ti - an ancient race of snake-people bent on awakening their patron deity so it can destroy the world and remake it in their image, with the Yuan-Ti as the ruling race. It mostly focuses on the city of Manifest, which resides near the entrance to the underworld.



** The first version was the original home campaign, created after Gygax played a game of Blackmoor in 1972. Games in this version ran constantly from 1972 to 1979, slowed down from 1980 to 1985, and completely ceased on December 31, 1985, right after Gygax was ousted from Creator/{{TSR}}, with the setting itself being "destroyed" in 1988 in the last ''Gord the Rogue'' novel. Due to the number of games played each week, Gygax didn't have the time to make a world map completely from scratch and simply used a blank map of North America, filling it in as the campaign went on. Despite the name, the 1975 ''Supplement I: Greyhawk'' digest wasn't a Greyhawk setting book, but a rulebook which helped eliminate the game's dependence on ''Chainmail'', setting the groundwork for what would become Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. Not much is known about the home campaign version, apart from what is presented in the ''Gnome Cache'' novella from the first issues of ''Dragon'' magazine and the ''Gord the Rogue'' novel series. Despite washing his hands of the setting, fans wanted the original home campaign version of the Castle Greyhawk megadungeon to be published, so Gygax finally greenlit the project as ''Castle Zagyg'' in 2003. Although its immensely troubled production ended with just two or three of the proposed seven books and a small number of adventure modules and supplements being released.[[note]]The Castle Grewhawk dungeon as of 1985 had around 50 floors, meaning Gygax and Robert Kuntz had to sift through years of notes and pick the 13 best parts for publication, while Gygax had to rewrite everything that was still copyright of [=WotC=]. Gygax's health decline in 2004 led to the already slow-moving project to grind to a near halt, while Kuntz had to withdraw due to working on other projects. A few months after Gary's death in 2008, his widow Gail pulled all the licensing from Troll Lord Games and transferred them to her own company, Gygax Games, but hasn't done anything with the project since.[[/note]]

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** The first version was the original home campaign, created after Gygax played a game of Blackmoor in 1972. Games in this version ran constantly from 1972 to 1979, slowed down from 1980 to 1985, and completely ceased on December 31, 1985, right after Gygax was ousted from Creator/{{TSR}}, with the setting itself being "destroyed" in 1988 in the last ''Gord the Rogue'' novel. Due to the number of games played each week, Gygax didn't have the time to make a world map completely from scratch and simply used a blank map of North America, filling it in as the campaign went on. Despite the name, the 1975 ''Supplement I: Greyhawk'' digest wasn't a Greyhawk setting book, but a rulebook which helped eliminate the game's dependence on ''Chainmail'', setting the groundwork for what would become Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. Not much is known about the home campaign version, apart from what is presented in the ''Gnome Cache'' novella from the first issues of ''Dragon'' magazine and the ''Gord the Rogue'' novel series. Despite washing his hands of the setting, fans wanted the original home campaign version of the Castle Greyhawk megadungeon to be published, so Gygax finally greenlit the project as ''Castle Zagyg'' in 2003. Although its immensely troubled production ended with just two or three of the proposed seven books and a small number of adventure modules and supplements being released. [[note]]The Castle Grewhawk dungeon as of 1985 had around 50 floors, meaning Gygax and Robert Kuntz had to sift through years of notes and pick the 13 best parts for publication, while Gygax had to rewrite everything that was still copyright of [=WotC=]. Gygax's health decline in 2004 led to the already slow-moving project to grind to a near halt, while Kuntz had to withdraw due to working on other projects. A few months after Gary's death in 2008, his widow Gail pulled all the licensing from Troll Lord Games and transferred them to her own company, Gygax Games, but hasn't done anything with the project since.[[/note]]



** ''Red Steel'': A sub-setting of Mystara released for 2nd Edition AD&D. The [[http://index.rpg.net/display-entry.phtml?mainid=8311 campaign book]] has "[[PowerAtAPrice Power has a price!]]" printed [[Administrivia/YouHaveBeenWarned right on the cover]]. Set in the Savage Coast region of Mystara. The land is dyed red by the Red Curse: "vermeil", a dust that grants those who ingest it extraordinary power at the expense of crippling deformities. Those affected by the Red Curse must wear jewelry crafted from "cinnabryl" to stave off its effects.

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** ''Red Steel'': A sub-setting of Mystara released for 2nd Edition AD&D. The [[http://index.rpg.net/display-entry.phtml?mainid=8311 campaign book]] has "[[PowerAtAPrice Power has a price!]]" printed [[Administrivia/YouHaveBeenWarned right on the cover]]. Set in the Savage Coast region of Mystara. The land is dyed red plagued by the Red Curse: "vermeil", a dust that grants those who ingest it extraordinary power at the expense of crippling deformities. Those affected by the Red Curse must wear jewelry crafted from "cinnabryl" to stave off its effects.



* ''Wilderlands of High Fantasy'': The first officially licensed and published third-party campaign setting for OD&D, created by Judges Guild after the success of their ''City State of the Invincible Overlord'' city setting and released in a collection of 4 32-page booklets. In 2002, Judges Guild ended up working together with Necromancer Games to release a boxed version for 3.5 Edition. Rather than go for the "megadungeon" style of early Blackmoor and Greyhawk, the Wilderlands went the sandbox route: 18 maps that altogether cover an area about 780 miles wide by 1080 miles long, roughly the size of the Mediterranean. Each individual map contains a number of pre-established points-of-interest, with the accompanying books containing entry upon entry for every bastion of civilization, set of ruins, and monster lair within each region. The Wilderlands sticks to the origins of D&D, a time when the lines between sci-fi and fantasy were very murky and SchizoTech was everywhere. Meaning you could have people who just invented the wheel potentially meet people who use calculus, ''then'' have them potentially happen upon a crashed alien spaceship from an age long before recorded history.

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* ''Wilderlands of High Fantasy'': The first officially licensed and published third-party campaign setting for OD&D, created by Judges Guild after the success of their ''City State of the Invincible Overlord'' city setting and released in a collection of 4 32-page booklets. In 2002, Judges Guild ended up working together with Necromancer Games to release a boxed version for 3.5 Edition. Rather than go for the "megadungeon" style of early Blackmoor and Greyhawk, the Wilderlands went the sandbox route: 18 maps that altogether cover an area about 780 miles wide by 1080 miles long, roughly the size of the Mediterranean. Each individual map contains a number of pre-established points-of-interest, with the accompanying books containing entry upon entry for every bastion of civilization, set of ruins, and monster lair within each region. The Wilderlands sticks to the gonzo origins of D&D, a time when the lines between sci-fi and fantasy were very murky and SchizoTech was everywhere. Meaning everywhere, meaning you could have people who just invented the wheel potentially meet people who use calculus, calculus and ''then'' have them potentially happen upon a crashed alien spaceship from an age long before recorded history.



* '''"Original" Dungeons & Dragons (OD&D) - 1974-1976''': Also known as "The Original Game". Co-written by Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson and published by Creator/{{TSR}} in 1974 as a boxed set consisting of three digest-sized books (the "little brown books" a.k.a. lbb): ''Men & Magic'', ''Monsters & Treasure'', ''The Underworld & Wilderness Adventures''. There were three original classes (Fighting-Man, Cleric and Magic User) and only three alignments (Law, Neutrality, Chaos). Humans could choose between all three classes and advance in their chosen class without limit, while non-human races were severely restricted. [[note]]Dwarves could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 6th level. Elves were multiclass by default and could freely switch between Fighting-Man and Magic-User on an adventure-by-adventure basis, with their level caps being 4th level for Fighting-Man and 8th level for Magic User. Halflings could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 4th level.[[/note]] Hit Points, damage, and initiative were all rolled using a d6. Spell levels were limited to 6th level spells for Magic Users and 5th level spells for Clerics. Received numerous supplements, both officially released and from magazine articles.
** '''Supplement I: Greyhawk - 1975''': Introduced the Thief class, the Paladin as a Fighing-Man subclass, Half-Elves as a playable race, and more monsters. Amended the level and class restrictions for Dwarves, Elves, and Halflings to account for the Thief class. [[note]]Dwarves, Elves, and Halflings could advance as a Thief with no level cap. Dwarves could advance to either 7th or 8th level Fighting-Man with an exceptional Strength score; they could also multiclass as either a Fighting-Man/Thief or a Fighting-Man/Cleric, although the Fighting-Man/Cleric option was NPC-only and their Cleric level capped at 7th level. Elves could advance up to 5th or 6th level Fighting-Man with an exceptional Strength score and 9th Magic-User with an exceptional Intelligence score; they could also multiclass as either a Fighting-Man/Magic-User/Cleric or a Fighting-Man/Magic-User/Thief, although FM/MU/Cleric had their Magic-User and Cleric classes capped at 6th level. Halflings could choose to be either a Fighting-Man or a Thief and had the best Thief skill bonuses of the non-human races. Half-Elves multiclass as a Fighting-Man/Magic-User by default, with both classes capped at 6th level, although exceptional Strength/Intelligence scores would raise them up to 7th or 8th level; they could also multiclass as a FM/MU/Cleric with a high enough Wisdom score, but their Cleric level capped at 4th level.[[/note]] Magic Users had access to 7th-9th level spells, but only if their Intelligence score was high enough, while Clerics had access to 6th and 7th level spells. Contained new and additional rules in order to distance itself from ''Chainmail''.

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* '''"Original" Dungeons & Dragons (OD&D) - 1974-1976''': Also known as "The Original Game". Co-written by Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson and published by Creator/{{TSR}} in 1974 as a boxed set consisting of three digest-sized books (the "little brown books" a.k.a. lbb): ''Men & Magic'', ''Monsters & Treasure'', ''The Underworld & Wilderness Adventures''. There were three original classes (Fighting-Man, Cleric and Magic User) and only three alignments (Law, Neutrality, Chaos). Humans could choose between all three classes and advance in their chosen class without limit, while non-human races were severely restricted. [[note]]Dwarves could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 6th level. Elves were multiclass by default and could freely switch between Fighting-Man and Magic-User on an adventure-by-adventure basis, with their level caps being 4th level for Fighting-Man and 8th level for Magic User. Halflings could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 4th level.[[/note]] Hit Points, damage, and initiative were all rolled using a d6. Spell levels were limited to 6th level spells for Magic Users and 5th level spells for Clerics. Received numerous supplements, both officially released and from magazine articles.
articles. Unfortunately, it required the ''Chainmail'' rulebook to properly play.
** '''Supplement I: Greyhawk - 1975''': Introduced the Thief class, the Paladin as a Fighing-Man Fighting-Man subclass, Half-Elves as a playable race, and more monsters. Amended the level and class restrictions for Dwarves, Elves, and Halflings to account for the Thief class. [[note]]Dwarves, Elves, and Halflings could advance as a Thief with no level cap. Dwarves could advance to either 7th or 8th level Fighting-Man with an exceptional Strength score; they could also multiclass as either a Fighting-Man/Thief or a Fighting-Man/Cleric, although the Fighting-Man/Cleric option was NPC-only and their Cleric level capped at 7th level. Elves could advance up to 5th or 6th level Fighting-Man with an exceptional Strength score and 9th Magic-User with an exceptional Intelligence score; they could also multiclass as either a Fighting-Man/Magic-User/Cleric or a Fighting-Man/Magic-User/Thief, although FM/MU/Cleric had their Magic-User and Cleric classes capped at 6th level. Halflings could choose to be either a Fighting-Man or a Thief and had the best Thief skill bonuses of the non-human races. Half-Elves multiclass as a Fighting-Man/Magic-User by default, with both classes capped at 6th level, although exceptional Strength/Intelligence scores would raise them up to 7th or 8th level; they could also multiclass as a FM/MU/Cleric with a high enough Wisdom score, but their Cleric level capped at 4th level.[[/note]] Magic Users had access to gained 7th-9th level spells, but only if their Intelligence score was high enough, while Clerics had access to gained 6th and 7th level spells. Contained new and additional rules in order to distance itself from ''Chainmail''.



** '''Supplement III: Eldritch Wizardry - 1976''': Introduced the Druid as a Cleric subclass, the option for human psionics (restricted to Fighting-Men, Magic Users, Clerics, and Thieves). Marks the first appearances of the Demon Princes Orcus and Demogorgon, while introducing the lich-turned-deity Vecna.

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** '''Supplement III: Eldritch Wizardry - 1976''': Introduced the Druid as a Cleric subclass, the option for human psionics (restricted to Fighting-Men, Magic Users, Clerics, and Thieves). Marks the first appearances of the Demon Princes Orcus and Orcus, Demogorgon, while introducing the lich-turned-deity and Vecna.



** '''Swords & Spells - 1976''': An unnumbered fifth supplement written by Gygax. Essentially the "grandson" of ''Chainmail'', this sourcebook introduced rules for upscaling the combat in order to portray large scale battles. Was not included in the 40th Anniversary White Box.

to:

** '''Swords & Spells - 1976''': An The unnumbered fifth supplement supplement, written by Gygax. Essentially Touted as the "grandson" of ''Chainmail'', this sourcebook introduced rules for upscaling the combat in order to portray large scale battles. Was The supplement was not that well received, and was not included in the 40th Anniversary White Box.Box collection.



* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Swords+%26+Wizardry Swords and Wizardry]]''': Created by Mythmere Games. One of the more well-known retroclones, this game goes all the way back to the original 1974 edition of D&D. Notable for having only one saving throw, although it includes the option to use the original five. You get to choose whether you want to play with original descending AC or ascending AC. Has a number of variants based on the system, such as ''[=WhiteHack=]'' and ''Crypts & Things''. There are four versions of this game, all of which are free to download:
** The [[http://www.lulu.com/us/en/shop/matthew-finch/swords-wizardry-whitebox-rulebook-pdf/ebook/product-14956259.html WhiteBox Rules]], which closely emulates the rules of the core box of OD&D.
** The [[http://www.rpgnow.com/product/62346/Swords-%26-Wizardry-Core-Rules&affiliate_id=1446 Core Rules]], which incorporates the Greyhawk supplement (most notably adding the Thief class).
** The [[https://www.froggodgames.com/swords-wizardry-complete-rulebook Complete Rulebook]], which incorporates all five supplements, resulting in something of a middle-road between BD&D and AD&D that is quite easily compatible with much of the contents for both.
** ''Swords & Wizardry: Light'', a version created by [[http://www.tenkarstavern.com/ Erik "Tenkar" Stiene of Tenkar's Tavern]], [[http://www.tenkarstavern.com/2016/08/its-official-frog-god-games-to-publish.html officially endorsed by Mythmere Games and to be published by Frog God Games]]. Essentially what Basic D&D was to AD&D: an easier to play version to help people learn the system. It heavily condenses the [=WhiteBox=] Rules book down to 4 print-and-play pages. While the "launch" version runs from 1st level to 3rd level, with players converting to one of the three other versions at 4th level, one of the long-term ideas is to produce supplements that go beyond that.

to:

* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Swords+%26+Wizardry Swords and Wizardry]]''': Created by Mythmere Games. One of the more well-known retroclones, this game goes all the way back to the original 1974 edition of D&D. Notable for having only one saving throw, throw instead of five, although it includes the option to use the original five.system. You get to choose whether you want to play with original descending AC or ascending AC. Has a number of variants based on the system, such as ''[=WhiteHack=]'' and ''Crypts & Things''. There are four versions of this game, all of which are free to download:
** The [[http://www.lulu.com/us/en/shop/matthew-finch/swords-wizardry-whitebox-rulebook-pdf/ebook/product-14956259.html WhiteBox White Box Rules]], which closely emulates the rules of the core box of OD&D.
** The [[http://www.rpgnow.com/product/62346/Swords-%26-Wizardry-Core-Rules&affiliate_id=1446 Core Rules]], which incorporates the Greyhawk supplement Supplement (most notably adding the Thief class).
** The [[https://www.froggodgames.com/swords-wizardry-complete-rulebook Complete Rulebook]], which incorporates all five supplements, Supplements 1-3 and ''Swords & Spells'', resulting in something of a middle-road between BD&D and AD&D that is quite easily compatible with much of the contents for both.
** ''Swords & Wizardry: Light'', a version created by [[http://www.tenkarstavern.com/ Erik "Tenkar" Stiene of Tenkar's Tavern]], [[http://www.tenkarstavern.com/2016/08/its-official-frog-god-games-to-publish.html officially endorsed by Mythmere Games and to be published by Frog God Games]]. Essentially what Basic D&D was to AD&D: an easier to play version designed to help people learn the system. It heavily condenses the [=WhiteBox=] White Box Rules book down to 4 print-and-play pages. While the "launch" launch version runs from 1st level to 3rd level, with players converting to one of the three other versions at 4th level, one of the long-term ideas is to produce supplements that go beyond that.



* '''[=WhiteHack=]''': A variant of the ''Swords & Wizardry'' [=WhiteBox=] system. Classes are defined down to archetypes: [[FighterMageThief the Strong, the Deft, and the Wise]]. The "Deft" are rangers, monks, thieves, etc., and can "attune" to something so that they use them for extraordinary feats. The "Strong" are soldiers, pit fighters, paladins, etc., and can choose between 8 special combat maneuvers and can "absorb" a single power from a defeated enemy, so long as they're the one to deal the finishing blow. The "Wise" are mages, healers, alchemists, scientists, etc., and can perform "Miracles" at the expense of HP and can't be healed through magical means, but heal naturally at twice the normal rate. The Miracles that the Wise use don't have to outright be actual magic, they could be alchemical or scientific experiments. Despite the "class", all characters can chose from joining at least two "groups" that they are a member from lists of species, vocations, and affiliations, leading to hybrid skill sets. Has 4 AC tables: two versions of Ascending AC (one at base 10 and one at base 0) and two versions of Descending AC (one at base 9 and the other at base 10). The level cap is 10, and it's recommended that the players retire their characters at that point and make new ones, although there are a couple optional rules for playing beyond 10th level.

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* '''[=WhiteHack=]''': A variant of the ''Swords & Wizardry'' [=WhiteBox=] White Box system. Classes are defined down to archetypes: [[FighterMageThief the Strong, the Deft, and the Wise]]. The "Deft" are rangers, monks, thieves, etc., and can "attune" to something so that they use them for extraordinary feats. The "Strong" are soldiers, pit fighters, paladins, etc., and can choose between 8 special combat maneuvers and can "absorb" a single power from a defeated enemy, so long as they're the one to deal the finishing blow. The "Wise" are mages, healers, alchemists, scientists, etc., and can perform "Miracles" at the expense of HP and can't be healed through magical means, but heal naturally at twice the normal rate. The Miracles that the Wise use don't have to outright be actual magic, they could be alchemical or scientific experiments. Despite the "class", all characters can chose from joining at least two "groups" that they are a member from lists of species, vocations, and affiliations, leading to hybrid skill sets. Has 4 AC tables: two versions of Ascending AC (one at base 10 and one at base 0) and two versions of Descending AC (one at base 9 and the other at base 10). The level cap is 10, and it's recommended that the players retire their characters at that point and make new ones, although there are a couple optional rules for playing beyond 10th level.



** On the note of Blackmoor, there's the legendary and infamous Comeback Inn, where the customers literally ''can't'' leave unless someone from the outside pulls them out. The 3.x Edition campaign book reveals that the building has been ''very'' heavily enchanted: the doors send you back into the building, attempting to jump out the windows or off the roof does the same, trying to use spells like 'dimension door' or 'teleport' will just move you about the Inn. The only people immune to the enchantments are the innkeeper himself and his direct employees.

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** On the note of Blackmoor, there's the legendary and infamous Comeback Inn, where the customers literally ''can't'' leave unless someone from the outside pulls them out. The 3.x Edition campaign book reveals that the building has been ''very'' heavily enchanted: exiting the doors send will teleport you back into the building, attempting to jump out the windows or off the roof does plops you back in the same, main hall, and trying to use spells like 'dimension door' or 'teleport' will just move moves you about the Inn. The only people immune to the enchantments are the innkeeper himself and his direct employees. And the usual way you can leave is if you pay your bill and the innkeeper was happy with your behavior as a guest.
6th Aug '17 3:01:21 AM SwordsageRagnar
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** Averted greatly in 5th Edition. There's only one shield option, and it only provides a few points of AC. However, because of 5E's slower power scaling and having fewer bonuses overall that managing to reach a total AC of 20+ is considered to be very good, any such armor improvement is significant. Holy symbols for providing a spell casting focus can be added to the shield for clerics and paladins. The shield also pairs with several "Fighting Styles" class traits available to a number of classes, notably ''Defense'' style (more AC), and the ''Duelist'' style.[[note]]The character deals increased damage with their weapon attacks if the weapon is a single one-handed weapon and no other weapons are held. Shields do not count as weapons in this regard[[/note]] Finally, the ''Shield Master'' feat gives bonuses that aid with shoving creatures away and defending against some spells while using a shield.

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** Averted greatly in 5th Edition. There's only one shield option, and it only provides a few points of AC. However, because of 5E's slower power scaling and having fewer bonuses overall that managing to reach a total AC of 20+ is considered to be very good, any such armor improvement is significant. Holy symbols for providing a spell casting focus can be added to the shield for clerics and paladins. The shield also pairs with several "Fighting Styles" class traits available to a number of classes, notably ''Defense'' style (more AC), and the ''Duelist'' style.[[note]]The character deals increased damage with their weapon attacks if the weapon is a single one-handed weapon and no other weapons are held. Shields do not count as weapons in this regard[[/note]] Finally, the ''Shield Master'' feat gives bonuses that aid with shoving creatures away and defending against some spells while using a shield.
5th Aug '17 6:15:06 PM SwordsageRagnar
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** Averted greatly in 5th Edition. There's only one shield option, and it only provides a few points of AC. However, because of 5E's slower power scaling and having fewer bonuses overall that managing to reach a total AC of 20+ is considered to be very good, any such armor improvement is significant. Holy symbols for providing a spell casting focus can be added to the shield for clerics and paladins. The shield also pairs with several "Fighting Styles" class traits available to a number of classes, notably ''Defense'' style (more AC), and the ''Duelist'' style.[[note]]The character deals increased damage with their weapon attacks if the weapon is a single one-handed weapon and no other weapons are held. Shields do not count as weapons in this regard[[/note]] Finally, the ''Shield Master'' feat gives bonuses that aid with shoving creatures away and defending against some spells while using a shield.
2nd Aug '17 1:54:12 PM TheFantasyChronicler
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** ''TabletopGame/StarDrive''
** ''TabletopGame/DarkMatter''
2nd Aug '17 1:50:37 PM TheFantasyChronicler
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** ''Franchise/PathfinderTales''
** ''ComicBook/PathfinderWorldscape''
** ''Sandbox/{{Starfinder}}''
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