History TableTopGame / DungeonsAndDragons

2nd Dec '16 3:05:01 AM WildCardCourier
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** As a show of good faith to the digital distribution market and the Open-Gaming License, [=WotC=] started their own storefront, the [[http://www.dmsguild.com/ Dungeon Masters Guild]], which allows the fans to self-publish their own material and [=WotC=] to publish both [=PDFs=] of all the past TSR/[=WotC=] releases from the "Original" Edition through 4th Edition and new Adventurers League content.

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** As a show of good faith to the digital distribution market and the Open-Gaming License, [=WotC=] started their own storefront, the [[http://www.dmsguild.com/ Dungeon Masters Guild]], which allows the fans to self-publish their own material and [=WotC=] to publish both [=PDFs=] of all the past TSR/[=WotC=] releases from the "Original" Edition through 4th Edition and new Adventurers League content.
content. As of November 2016, they've started a print-on-demand service so people can get physical copies of select TSR supplement releases.



** The [[http://www.lulu.com/us/en/shop/matthew-finch/swords-wizardry-whitebox-rulebook-pdf/ebook/product-14956259.html WhiteBox Rules]], which closely emulates the rules of the core box of [=OD&D=].

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** The [[http://www.lulu.com/us/en/shop/matthew-finch/swords-wizardry-whitebox-rulebook-pdf/ebook/product-14956259.html WhiteBox Rules]], which closely emulates the rules of the core box of [=OD&D=].OD&D.



** ''Swords & Wizardry: Light'', a version created by [[http://www.tenkarstavern.com/ Erik "Tenkar" Stiene of Tenkar's Tavern]], [[http://www.tenkarstavern.com/2016/08/its-official-frog-god-games-to-publish.html officially endorsed by Mythmere Games and to be published by Frog God Games]]. Essentially what Basic D&D was to AD&D: an easier to play version to help people learn the system. The idea is to strip the original 122 page [=WhiteBox=] Rules book down to a series of print-and-play 4 page pamphlets. Like BD&D, it's supposed to run from 1st level to 3rd level, with players converting to one of the three other versions at 4th level, although one of Tenkar's long-term ideas is to create an ''"Extra" Light'' rule set for advancing to 7th level.

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** ''Swords & Wizardry: Light'', a version created by [[http://www.tenkarstavern.com/ Erik "Tenkar" Stiene of Tenkar's Tavern]], [[http://www.tenkarstavern.com/2016/08/its-official-frog-god-games-to-publish.html officially endorsed by Mythmere Games and to be published by Frog God Games]]. Essentially what Basic D&D was to AD&D: an easier to play version to help people learn the system. The idea is to strip It heavily condenses the original 122 page [=WhiteBox=] Rules book down to a series of 4 print-and-play 4 page pamphlets. Like BD&D, it's supposed to run pages. While the "launch" version runs from 1st level to 3rd level, with players converting to one of the three other versions at 4th level, although one of Tenkar's the long-term ideas is to create an ''"Extra" Light'' rule set for advancing to 7th level.produce supplements that go beyond that.



** In 5th Edition, this continues with "fighting styles" for Fighters, granting bonuses with either ranged weapons, two-handed weapons, one-handed weapons with a free hand, shields or dual-wielding. Most fighters can only pick one of these styles, though Champions can pick another style to make it two.

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** In 5th Edition, this continues with "fighting styles" for Fighters, Paladins, and Rangers, granting bonuses with either ranged weapons, two-handed weapons, one-handed weapons with a free hand, shields or dual-wielding. Most fighters Paladins, Rangers, and Fighters can only pick one of these styles, though Champions the Fighter's Champion archetype can pick another style to make it two.



** Most Wizards and Sorcerors swear by Magic Missile. The damage is admittedly not so great, but it's an AlwaysAccurateAttack that ignores all damage and elemental resistances - though not spell resistance, but that's not exactly common until high level play. Plus it's a 1st level spell so you have plenty of slots for it.

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** Most Wizards and Sorcerors Sorcerers swear by Magic Missile. The damage is admittedly not so great, but it's an AlwaysAccurateAttack that ignores all damage and elemental resistances - though not spell resistance, but that's not exactly common until high level play. Plus it's a 1st level spell so you have plenty of slots for it.



** A hit by a firearm on a flamethrower's[[note:*]]Dragon magazine #67 article "Modern Monsters"[[/note]] fuel canister will cause an explosion doing 8d8 HitPoints of damage (with a saving throw for half damage) to all within 10 yards.

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** A hit by a firearm on a flamethrower's[[note:*]]Dragon flamethrower's[[note]]Dragon magazine #67 article "Modern Monsters"[[/note]] fuel canister will cause an explosion doing 8d8 HitPoints of damage (with a saving throw for half damage) to all within 10 yards.



** The silver Orb of Dragonkind[[note:*]]2nd Edition supplement ''Book of Artifacts''.[[/note]] can resurrect 20-200 bodies once per year.

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** The silver Orb of Dragonkind[[note:*]]2nd Dragonkind, from the 2nd Edition supplement ''Book of Artifacts''.[[/note]] Artifacts'', can resurrect 20-200 bodies once per year.



** On the note of Blackmoor, there's the legendary and infamous Comeback Inn, where the customers literally ''can't'' leave unless someone from the outside pulls them out. The 3.x Edition campaign book reveals that the building has been ''very'' heavily enchanted: the doors send you back into the building, attempting to jump out the windows or off the roof does the same, trying to use spells like 'dimension door' or 'teleport' will just move you about the Inn. The only people immune to the enchantments are the innkeeper himself and his direct employees.



* RocksFallEveryoneDies: A few modules are hilariously lethal. Also, Literature/{{Dragonlance}} and later ForgottenRealms settings were hammered apart so thoroughly that [[FanonDiscontinuity instead]] of dealing with the future [[ExecutiveMeddling additions]], fans switched to playing either classical versions or their own timelines.

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* RocksFallEveryoneDies: A few modules are hilariously lethal. Also, Literature/{{Dragonlance}} and later ForgottenRealms TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms settings were hammered apart so thoroughly that [[FanonDiscontinuity instead]] of dealing with the future [[ExecutiveMeddling additions]], fans switched to playing either classical versions or their own timelines.



* SpellLevels: Probably the TropeCodifier. In Original D&D, both arcane (wizard) and divine (cleric) spells are split into six and five tiers, respectively, with characters of certain level getting only so many spells of certain levels to [[VancianMagic memorize]]. The Greyhawk supplement increased them to nine tiers for arcane spells and seven tiers for divine spells.
** In 3rd Edition clerics, druids, sorcerers, and wizards have ten spell levels (0-9); bards have seven (0-6), and paladins and rangers have four (1-4).

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* SpellLevels: Probably the TropeCodifier. In Original D&D, both arcane (wizard) and divine (cleric) spells are split into six and five tiers, respectively, with characters of certain level getting only so many spells of certain levels to [[VancianMagic memorize]]. The Greyhawk supplement increased them to nine tiers for arcane spells and seven tiers for divine spells.
spells. It stayed this way from OD&D all the way through AD&D 2nd Edition.
** In 3rd Edition brought about spell level 0, increasing the number of levels to 10. Clerics and druids had their "max" for spell levels increased from 7 to 9, to put them on the same power plateau as arcane spellcasters. As such - clerics, druids, sorcerers, and wizards have ten spell levels (0-9); bards have seven (0-6), and paladins and rangers have four (1-4).



** 5th Edition brought back the concept. Wizards, sorcerers, clerics, and druids still have ten spell levels (cantrips and 1-9). Bards now have access to spell levels 7-9. The eldritch knight and arcane trickster archetypes have cantrips and spell levels 1-4. Paladins and rangers now have five spell levels (1-5). Warlocks have cantrips and spell levels 1-5, with four "Mystic Arcanum" spells - one spell each from spell levels 6-9 that can only cast once per long rest.

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** 5th Edition brought back the concept. Wizards, sorcerers, clerics, and druids still have ten spell levels (cantrips and 1-9). Bards now have access to all ten spell levels 7-9.levels. The eldritch knight and arcane trickster archetypes have cantrips and spell levels 1-4. Paladins and rangers now have five spell levels (1-5). Warlocks are kinda the strange one in this Edition: while they have cantrips and access to all 10 spell levels 1-5, with four levels, their 6-9 level "Mystic Arcanum" spells - are only limited to one spell for each from spell levels 6-9 that level and can only be cast once per long rest.



** Irons[[note:*]]Basic D&D supplement ''The Book of Marvelous Magic''[[/note]] are magical confinement devices combining manacles (wrists) and shackles (ankles). The Irons of Imprisonment can only be broken by a Wish spell or a blow from a plus 4 or better weapon.

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** Irons[[note:*]]Basic Irons, from the Basic D&D supplement ''The Book of Marvelous Magic''[[/note]] Magic'', are magical confinement devices combining manacles (wrists) and shackles (ankles). The Irons of Imprisonment can only be broken by a Wish spell or a blow from a plus 4 or better weapon.



** Gary Gygax had several, including mushrooms, various shades of the color purple, Creator/HPLovecraft, his extensive vocabulary and polearms. On the unfortunate side, problems with ranged weapons from slings to wheel-locks. Only in 3.x Edition was his fascination with polearms finally dropped... to be replaced with some new developer's spiked chain fetish. These things wormed their way '''everywhere''', even underground.

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** Gary Gygax had several, including mushrooms, various shades of the color purple, Creator/HPLovecraft, his extensive vocabulary vocabulary, polearms, and polearms.[[KillerGameMaster infamously difficult adventures/dungeons]]. On the unfortunate side, problems with ranged weapons from slings to wheel-locks. Only in 3.x Edition was his fascination with polearms finally dropped... to be replaced with some new developer's spiked chain fetish. These things wormed their way '''everywhere''', even underground.



** 5elists the good and neutral deities up front in the character creation section, while setting the evil gods firmly in the 'know your enemy' part of the book. This, of course, has no effect on some players and [=DMs=], who create all-evil campaigns frequently and with panache.

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** 5elists 5e lists the good and neutral deities up front in the character creation section, while setting the evil gods firmly in the 'know your enemy' part of the book. This, of course, has no effect on some players and [=DMs=], who create all-evil campaigns frequently and with panache.



** Incantifers[[note:*]]''TabletopGame/{{Planescape}} Monstrous Compendium Appendix II''[[/note]] are creatures that used to be human beings. They were changed by magic so that they can absorb magic and don't need to eat, breathe or sleep (among other powers). They have evil tendencies and Dungeon Masters are warned not to allow {{PC}}s to undergo the incantifer-creation process.

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** Incantifers[[note:*]]''TabletopGame/{{Planescape}} Incantifers, from the ''TabletopGame/{{Planescape}} Monstrous Compendium Appendix II''[[/note]] II'', are creatures that used to be human beings. They were changed by magic so that they can absorb magic and don't need to eat, breathe or sleep (among other powers). They have evil tendencies and Dungeon Masters are warned not to allow {{PC}}s to undergo the incantifer-creation process.
30th Nov '16 10:29:34 AM WildCardCourier
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* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Swords+%26+Wizardry Swords and Wizardry]]''': Created by Mythmere Games. One of the more well-known retroclones, this game goes all the way back to the original D&D, with the Cleric, the Fighter and the Magic-User, taking inspiration from sword and sorcery. Notable for having only one saving throw as opposed to the five used in regular old-school D&D, although it includes the option to use the original five. You get to choose whether you want to play with original descending AC or ascending AC. Has a number of variants based on the system, such as ''[=WhiteHack=]'' and ''Crypts & Things''. There are four versions of this game, all of which are free to download:

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* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Swords+%26+Wizardry Swords and Wizardry]]''': Created by Mythmere Games. One of the more well-known retroclones, this game goes all the way back to the original D&D, with the Cleric, the Fighter and the Magic-User, taking inspiration from sword and sorcery.1974 edition of D&D. Notable for having only one saving throw as opposed to the five used in regular old-school D&D, although it includes the option to use the original five. You get to choose whether you want to play with original descending AC or ascending AC. Has a number of variants based on the system, such as ''[=WhiteHack=]'' and ''Crypts & Things''. There are four versions of this game, all of which are free to download:



** The [[http://www.rpgnow.com/product/62346/Swords-%26-Wizardry-Core-Rules&affiliate_id=1446 Core Rules]], which also incorporate the Greyhawk supplement (most notably adding the Thief class).

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** The [[http://www.rpgnow.com/product/62346/Swords-%26-Wizardry-Core-Rules&affiliate_id=1446 Core Rules]], which also incorporate incorporates the Greyhawk supplement (most notably adding the Thief class).



** ''Swords & Wizardry: Light'', an upcoming version created by [[http://www.tenkarstavern.com/ Erik "Tenkar" Stiene of Tenkar's Tavern]], [[http://www.tenkarstavern.com/2016/08/its-official-frog-god-games-to-publish.html officially endorsed by Mythmere Games and to be published by Frog God Games]]. Essentially what Basic D&D was to AD&D: an easier to play version to help people learn the system. The idea is to strip the original 122 page [=WhiteBox=] Rules book down to a series of print-and-play 4 page pamphlets. Like BD&D, it's supposed to run from 1st level to 3rd level, with players converting to one of the three official versions at 4th level, although one of Tenkar's long-term ideas is to create an ''"Extra" Light'' rule set for advancing to 7th level.
* '''Crypts & Things''': Created by D101 Games. A variant of the ''Swords & Wizardry'' Core system that more mirrors the classic SwordAndSorcery stories of Fritz Leiber, Robert E. Howard, and Clark Ashton Smith, instead of the more traditional Tolkienesque HighFantasy flare. Humans are the only playable race; so no elves, dwarves, or halflings. There are only four classes: barbarian, fighter, thief, and sorcerer. Barbarians function as a mix of battle-raging berserkers and rangers, being a rework of the barbarian from the fourth issue of ''White Dwarf'' magazine. Fighters get optional fighting styles to give them flavor. Thieves are more martial-based, similar to [[Literature/FafhrdAndTheGrayMouser the Gray Mouser]]. Sorcerers function as a combination of cleric and magic-user, as the cleric class doesn't exist. Magic is limited to 6th level spells, and is divided into WhiteMagic, Gray Magic, and BlackMagic. White Magic consists of healing, detection, and protective spells which can be cast without penalty. Gray Magic consists of illusions and mind-altering charms, costing the caster some HP. Black Magic consists of offensive spells, often requiring a sacrifice of some sort and a loss of sanity. Hit Points gauge the PC's mental faculties (such as shock, pain, loss of the will to fight) rather than their physical health; once their HP is gone, they take Constitution damage until death. As such, healing magic and potions only heal Constitution, not HP. Wisdom doubles as a character's sanity score, so once their Wisdom hits 0, the character is rendered insane. Magic items carry a hefty penalty more often than not and are very rare. Characters get a Life Path, which dictates their background and grants them specific bonuses.

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** ''Swords & Wizardry: Light'', an upcoming a version created by [[http://www.tenkarstavern.com/ Erik "Tenkar" Stiene of Tenkar's Tavern]], [[http://www.tenkarstavern.com/2016/08/its-official-frog-god-games-to-publish.html officially endorsed by Mythmere Games and to be published by Frog God Games]]. Essentially what Basic D&D was to AD&D: an easier to play version to help people learn the system. The idea is to strip the original 122 page [=WhiteBox=] Rules book down to a series of print-and-play 4 page pamphlets. Like BD&D, it's supposed to run from 1st level to 3rd level, with players converting to one of the three official other versions at 4th level, although one of Tenkar's long-term ideas is to create an ''"Extra" Light'' rule set for advancing to 7th level.
* '''Crypts & Things''': Created by D101 Games. A variant of the ''Swords & Wizardry'' Core system that more mirrors the classic SwordAndSorcery stories of Fritz Leiber, Robert E. Howard, and Clark Ashton Smith, instead of the more traditional Tolkienesque HighFantasy flare. Humans are the only playable race; so no elves, dwarves, or halflings. There are only four classes: barbarian, fighter, thief, and sorcerer. Barbarians function as a mix of battle-raging berserkers and rangers, being a rework of the barbarian from the fourth issue of ''White Dwarf'' magazine. rangers; Fighters get optional fighting styles to give them flavor. flavor; Thieves are more martial-based, similar to [[Literature/FafhrdAndTheGrayMouser the Gray Mouser]]. Mouser]]; Sorcerers function as a combination of cleric and magic-user, as the cleric class doesn't exist. Magic is limited to 6th level spells, and is divided into WhiteMagic, WhiteMagic (healing/protection), Gray Magic, Magic (illusions), and BlackMagic. BlackMagic (offensive). White Magic consists of healing, detection, and protective spells which can be cast without penalty. penalty, Gray Magic consists of illusions and mind-altering charms, costing costs the caster some HP. HP, and Black Magic consists of offensive spells, often requiring requires a sacrifice of some sort and a loss of sanity. Hit Points gauge the PC's mental faculties (such as shock, pain, loss of the will to fight) rather than their physical health; once their HP is gone, they take Constitution damage until death. As such, healing magic and potions only heal Constitution, not HP. Wisdom doubles as a character's sanity score, so once their Wisdom hits 0, the character is rendered insane. Magic items carry a hefty penalty more often than not and are very rare. Characters get a Life Path, which dictates their background and grants them specific bonuses.



* '''[=WhiteHack=]''': A variant of the ''Swords & Wizardry'' [=WhiteBox=] system. Classes are defined down to archetypes: [[FighterMageThief the Strong, the Deft, and the Wise]]. The "Deft" are rangers, monks, thieves, and the like, and can "attune" to something so that they use them for extraordinary feats. The "Strong" are soldiers, pit fighters, paladins, etc., and can choose between 8 special combat maneuvers and can "absorb" a single power from a defeated enemy, so long as they're the one to deal the finishing blow. The "Wise" are mages, healers, alchemists, scientists, etc., and can perform "Miracles" at the expense of HP and can't be healed through magical means, but heal naturally at twice the normal rate. Despite the "class", all characters can chose from joining at least two "groups" that they are a member from race/species, vocation/job, and affiliations. Has 4 AC tables: [=WhiteHack=] (Ascending, but the base AC is 0), two versions of Descending AC (one at base 9 and the other at base 10), and Ascending AC (base 10). The level cap is 10, and it's recommended that the players retire their characters at that point and make new ones, although there are a couple optional rules for playing beyond 10th level. Includes a campaign setting, ''The White Curse'', which takes place 300 years after the defeat of the Witch King, who cursed the land as he lay dying and the ground soaked up his blood.

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* '''[=WhiteHack=]''': A variant of the ''Swords & Wizardry'' [=WhiteBox=] system. Classes are defined down to archetypes: [[FighterMageThief the Strong, the Deft, and the Wise]]. The "Deft" are rangers, monks, thieves, and the like, and can "attune" to something so that they use them for extraordinary feats. The "Strong" are soldiers, pit fighters, paladins, etc., and can choose between 8 special combat maneuvers and can "absorb" a single power from a defeated enemy, so long as they're the one to deal the finishing blow. The "Wise" are mages, healers, alchemists, scientists, etc., and can perform "Miracles" at the expense of HP and can't be healed through magical means, but heal naturally at twice the normal rate. Despite the "class", all characters can chose from joining at least two "groups" that they are a member from race/species, vocation/job, lists of species, vocations, and affiliations. Has 4 AC tables: [=WhiteHack=] (Ascending, but the two versions of Ascending AC (one at base AC is 0), 10 and one at base 0) and two versions of Descending AC (one at base 9 and the other at base 10), and Ascending AC (base 10). The level cap is 10, and it's recommended that the players retire their characters at that point and make new ones, although there are a couple optional rules for playing beyond 10th level. Includes a campaign setting, ''The White Curse'', which takes place 300 years after the defeat of the Witch King, who cursed the land as he lay dying and the ground soaked up his blood.


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* ColdIron: One of the many materials that equipment can be made out of, which also includes silver and adamantine. All editions dabbled in including a list of materials, although 3.x Edition went hog-wild with it. Certain enemies could only be damaged with weapons made from certain materials. There was even materials that armor could be made out of so that druids could use them.
29th Nov '16 4:15:57 AM Yukianesa
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Added DiffLines:

** In 5th Edition, this continues with "fighting styles" for Fighters, granting bonuses with either ranged weapons, two-handed weapons, one-handed weapons with a free hand, shields or dual-wielding. Most fighters can only pick one of these styles, though Champions can pick another style to make it two.
29th Nov '16 3:02:59 AM Yukianesa
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* BoringYetPractical:

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* BoringYetPractical:BoringButPractical:


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** Most Wizards and Sorcerors swear by Magic Missile. The damage is admittedly not so great, but it's an AlwaysAccurateAttack that ignores all damage and elemental resistances - though not spell resistance, but that's not exactly common until high level play. Plus it's a 1st level spell so you have plenty of slots for it.
** Many "utility" spells, like Water Breathing and Stone to Mud, have no use against enemies in battles but are absolutely useful in solving problems the party faces outside combat. Very basic spells like Light and Detect Magic are pretty much vital even at high level play.
24th Nov '16 7:46:56 AM WildCardCourier
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* ''Blackmoor'', a.k.a. ''The First Fantasy Campaign'': The '''very''' first campaign setting, originating from Dave Arneson's wargaming days, the result of a slow weekend in October 1970 consisting of '50s monster movies, "fantasy hero" novels, a slump during his most recent wargame session, and the thought of "I can do better than this". So he drew a six floor dungeon layout, then created a castle and town from a Sicilian castle model he had lying around. The new setting was a huge hit amongst his fellow ''Braunstein'' players and when he showed the game to Gygax in 1972, the rest, as they say, was history. Your typical Good-vs-Evil setting, with the various duchies vying for power while the mysterious Egg of Coot pulls the strings from the shadows. While the "official" version was a released in 1977 as gazetteer by Judges Guild, alternate versions appeared in both Greyhawk (as an archbarony near the Land of Black Ice) and Mystara (as a kingdom from the world's distant past that [[AndManGrewProud rose to great heights]] [[CataclysmBackstory and quickly fell, changing the world in the process]]). The setting only had four adventure modules released for it during it's TSR days: ''Adventures in Blackmoor'', ''Temple of the Frog'', ''City of the Gods'', and ''The Duchy of Ten''. While officially discontinued, Arneson was able to keep the rights for the setting and eventually worked with Zeitgiest Games to release setting books for 3.5 and 4th Editions. Blackmoor proudly has the honor of being one of the longest continuously played fantasy role playing campaigns in existence, even spawning a renowned play-by-post game called ''The Last Fantasy Campaign'', which ran from 2005 to 2015.

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* ''Blackmoor'', a.k.a. ''The First Fantasy Campaign'': The '''very''' first campaign setting, originating from Dave Arneson's wargaming days, the result of a slow weekend in October 1970 consisting of '50s monster movies, "fantasy hero" novels, a slump during his most recent wargame session, and the thought of "I can do better than this". So he drew a six floor dungeon layout, then created a castle and town from a Sicilian castle model he had lying around. The new setting was a huge hit amongst his fellow ''Braunstein'' players and when he showed the game to Gygax in 1972, the rest, as they say, was history. Your typical Good-vs-Evil setting, rather than Law-vs-Chaos, with the various duchies vying for power while the mysterious Egg of Coot pulls the strings from the shadows. While the "official" version was a released in 1977 as gazetteer by Judges Guild, alternate versions appeared in both Greyhawk (as an archbarony near the Land of Black Ice) and Mystara (as a kingdom from the world's distant past that [[AndManGrewProud rose to great heights]] [[CataclysmBackstory and quickly fell, changing the world in the process]]). The setting only had four adventure modules released for it during it's TSR days: ''Adventures in Blackmoor'', ''Temple of the Frog'', ''City of the Gods'', and ''The Duchy of Ten''. While officially discontinued, Arneson was able to keep the rights for the setting and eventually worked with Zeitgiest Games to release setting books for 3.5 and 4th Editions. Blackmoor proudly has the honor of being one of the longest continuously played fantasy role playing campaigns in existence, even spawning a renowned play-by-post game called ''The Last Fantasy Campaign'', which ran from 2005 to 2015.



** The Eberron setting puts a unique spin on the concept of alignment as well. There are no AlwaysChaoticEvil races; any intelligent creature (including sentient undead) can be of any alignment, and even clerics don't necessarily have to be of the same alignment as the god(s) they worship... or don't, since divine magic in Eberron isn't actually tied to any specific deity. There are "angels" in the setting, and that's what a cleric gets if he casts a spell like ''Commune''. However, if pressed, the angels will admit that even ''they'' haven't ever actually seen any deities.
*** About the closest the world comes to AlwaysChaoticEvil is the aberrations. Changelings aren't, but are treated as such by most other humanoid races.

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** The Eberron setting puts a unique spin on the concept of alignment as well. There are no AlwaysChaoticEvil races; any intelligent creature (including sentient undead) can be of any alignment, and even clerics don't necessarily have to be of the same alignment as the god(s) they worship... or don't, since divine magic in Eberron isn't actually tied to any specific deity. There are "angels" in the setting, and that's what a cleric gets if he casts a spell like ''Commune''. However, if pressed, the angels will admit that even ''they'' haven't ever actually seen any deities.
***
deities. About the closest the world comes to AlwaysChaoticEvil is the aberrations. Changelings aren't, but are treated as such by most other humanoid races.



* ''Ghostwalk'': The first campaign setting created for 3rd Edition, and ironically the one which almost nobody remembers. It is a setting where the underworld is a real, physical place, and the ghosts of the dead walk the earth on the way to their final journey, and the main villain race is the Yuan-Ti. It mostly focuses on the city of Manifest, which resides near the entrance to the underworld.

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* ''Ghostwalk'': The first campaign setting created for 3rd Edition, and ironically the one which almost nobody remembers. It is a setting where the underworld is a real, physical place, and the ghosts of the dead walk the earth on the way to their final journey, and the journey. The main villain race is the Yuan-Ti.Yuan-Ti - an ancient race snake-people bent on awakening their patron deity so it can destroy the world and remake it in their image, with the Yuan-Ti as the ruling race. It mostly focuses on the city of Manifest, which resides near the entrance to the underworld.



* ''World of Kalibruhn'': The third created campaign setting for OD&D, created by D&D alumni Robert Kuntz in 1973. Originally planned to be the fifth supplement for OD&D, a number of problems within TSR led to Kuntz leaving them in 1977 and the supplement was never published. Despite this, Kuntz has worked on the setting constantly since 1974, with the history of the setting included in the [[http://www.tlbgames.com/collections/archive El Raja Key Archive]] DVD, alongside information on the original Greyhawk and Blackmoor campaigns.

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* ''World of Kalibruhn'': The third created campaign setting for OD&D, created by D&D alumni Robert Kuntz in 1973. 1973 as "Castle El Raja Key". This was the main setting where Gygax himself played as a player and the "home" setting of his legendary archmage, Mordenkainen. Originally planned to be the focus of a fifth supplement for OD&D, a number of problems within TSR led to Kuntz leaving them in 1977 and the supplement was never published. Despite this, Due to never signing the rights away, Kuntz has worked on the setting constantly since 1974, it's creation, with the history of the setting included in the [[http://www.tlbgames.com/collections/archive El Raja Key Archive]] DVD, alongside information on the original Greyhawk and Blackmoor campaigns.



* '''Dungeons & Dragons (5th Edition) - 2014''': Developed under the title ''D&D Next'' and officially launched in 2014, 5th edition was an attempt by Wizards to recapture and unite some of the fractured fanbase. The basic mechanics resemble a mixture of 2nd and 3rd editions with some influences by 4th edition. The overall power levels have been reduced: the max level cap is 20 ''period'', magic items are much more rare and do not scale in levels, and the bonuses/penalties to an action seldom break double digits. Stacking modifiers have been replaced with a simple advantage/disadvantage system where the character with the advantage/disadvantage rolls two dice for the action and picks the higher/lower die. Magic spells with durations are now 'concentration' type, meaning a magic user can ever only have one such spell active at any time. Most major, world-altering magics are rituals that take minutes if not hours and days to cast. Each class is now firmly wedded to a single character concept, with class archetypes and character backgrounds (representing social class and upbringing) chosen at creation being used to hybridize characters. Most post-creation exclusives are gone, but multiclassing has been returned to 3rd edition standards and feats are completely optional, although they are much more powerful and robust. Roleplaying and flavor have been increased in importance, with the old 2nd edition alignment system restored and canonical D&D characters from related media being used as examples of their respective classes, alignments and backgrounds. Pinning down the primary world for Fifth Edition is a bit dodgy: while the core books are written in a multiverse view and are near-completely adaptable to any setting, all of the official Adventurer's League material for organized play is primarily set in the ''Forgotten Realms''.[[note]]The ''Princes of the Apocalypse'' adventure, which is "what if the Cult of Elemental Evil arrived in Faerûn", but includes info for adapting the content for Dark Sun, Dragonlance, Greyhawk, Eberron, and home campaigns; while ''The Curse of Strahd'' is a combination enhanced remake of the original Ravenloft adventure and a return to Ravenloft as a campaign setting.[[/note]] Fan response has been mostly positive, with some praising the return to a more roleplaying-based system based on in-universe-justified abilities, while others bemoan a lack of character options on release and argue that the game has returned to LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards.

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* '''Dungeons & Dragons (5th Edition) - 2014''': Developed under the title ''D&D Next'' and officially launched in 2014, 5th edition was an attempt by Wizards to recapture and unite some of the fractured fanbase. The basic mechanics resemble a mixture of 2nd and 3rd editions with some influences by 4th edition. The overall power levels have been reduced: the max level cap is 20 ''period'', magic items are much more rare and do not scale in levels, and the bonuses/penalties to an action seldom break double digits. Stacking modifiers have been replaced with a simple advantage/disadvantage system where the character with the advantage/disadvantage rolls two dice for the action and picks the higher/lower die. Magic spells with durations are now 'concentration' type, meaning a magic user can ever only have one such spell active at any time. Most major, world-altering magics are rituals that take minutes if not hours and days to cast. Each class is now firmly wedded to a single character concept, with class archetypes and character backgrounds (representing social class and upbringing) chosen at creation being used to hybridize characters. Most post-creation exclusives are gone, but multiclassing has been returned to 3rd edition standards and feats are completely optional, although they are much more powerful and robust. Roleplaying and flavor have been increased in importance, with the old 2nd edition alignment system restored and canonical D&D characters from related media being used as examples of their respective classes, alignments and backgrounds. Pinning down the primary world for Fifth Edition is a bit dodgy: while the core books are mostly written in a multiverse view and are near-completely adaptable to any setting, all of the official Adventurer's League material for organized play is primarily set in the ''Forgotten Realms''.[[note]]The ''Princes of the Apocalypse'' adventure, which is "what if the Cult of Elemental Evil arrived in Faerûn", but includes info for adapting the content for Dark Sun, Dragonlance, Greyhawk, Eberron, and home campaigns; while ''The Curse of Strahd'' is a combination enhanced remake of the original Ravenloft adventure and a return to Ravenloft as a campaign setting.[[/note]] Fan response has been mostly positive, with some praising the return to a more roleplaying-based system based on in-universe-justified abilities, while others bemoan a lack of character options on release and argue that the game has returned to LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards.


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* '''[=WhiteHack=]''': A variant of the ''Swords & Wizardry'' [=WhiteBox=] system. Classes are defined down to archetypes: [[FighterMageThief the Strong, the Deft, and the Wise]]. The "Deft" are rangers, monks, thieves, and the like, and can "attune" to something so that they use them for extraordinary feats. The "Strong" are soldiers, pit fighters, paladins, etc., and can choose between 8 special combat maneuvers and can "absorb" a single power from a defeated enemy, so long as they're the one to deal the finishing blow. The "Wise" are mages, healers, alchemists, scientists, etc., and can perform "Miracles" at the expense of HP and can't be healed through magical means, but heal naturally at twice the normal rate. Despite the "class", all characters can chose from joining at least two "groups" that they are a member from race/species, vocation/job, and affiliations. Has 4 AC tables: [=WhiteHack=] (Ascending, but the base AC is 0), two versions of Descending AC (one at base 9 and the other at base 10), and Ascending AC (base 10). The level cap is 10, and it's recommended that the players retire their characters at that point and make new ones, although there are a couple optional rules for playing beyond 10th level. Includes a campaign setting, ''The White Curse'', which takes place 300 years after the defeat of the Witch King, who cursed the land as he lay dying and the ground soaked up his blood.
20th Nov '16 11:22:15 PM Midna
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** This was the ultimate goal in the last version of BECMI/Rules Cyclopedia-era D&D, complete with a ruleset for those that ascended. To ascend further, an ascended entity needs to max out his ascended level at 36, reincarnate himself as a level 1 character, ascend once again, max out the ascended level again, and proceed to ascend past some great barrier. The result is a character that cannot be contained by a D&D rulebook.
** In 4th edition, when your characters reach max level (30) the rulebooks encourage them to do this so you can start new characters.
** Can be an InvokedTrope if you like in 3/3.5 edition. Standard class progression stops at level 20, but the TabletopGame/EpicLevelHandbook contains rules for advancing beyond that, with no actual cap. The easy multiclassing in that edition also meant that you could simply add new classes and prestige classes pretty much forever. However, by this point game balance is pretty much non-existent so few games ever hit epic levels, and even those that do rarely go very far into them. Deities and Demigods allows your character to engage in this trope rather than just advance forever.

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** This was is the ultimate goal in the last version of BECMI/Rules Cyclopedia-era D&D, complete with a ruleset for those that ascended.ascend. To ascend further, an ascended entity needs to max out his ascended level at 36, reincarnate himself as a level 1 character, ascend once again, max out the ascended level again, and proceed to ascend past some great barrier. The result is a character that cannot be contained by a D&D rulebook.
** In 4th edition, when your characters reach max level (30) (30), the rulebooks encourage them to do this so you can start new characters.
** Can be an InvokedTrope if you like in 3/3.5 edition. Standard class progression stops at level 20, but the TabletopGame/EpicLevelHandbook contains rules for advancing beyond that, with no actual cap. The easy multiclassing in that edition also meant means that you could can simply add new classes and prestige classes pretty much forever. However, by this point game balance is pretty much non-existent so few games ever hit epic levels, and even those that do rarely go very far into them. Deities and Demigods allows your character to engage in this trope rather than just advance forever.



* AwesomeButImpractical: The 3.X monk. On paper, you've got a monster ninja who can move faster than anything, run up walls, teleport, [[InASingleBound jump so far]] [[NotQuiteFlight he can effectively fly]], become completely immune to poison and disease, block and catch enemies, grapple and trip forever, stun or kill enemies with a single blow, punch through ''castles'', and [[FlightStrengthHeart talk to animals]]. In practice, he can't hit anything, and is ''squishier'' than [[SquishyWizard the wizard]] (Who gets lots of good buffs to avert that).
** 3.X metamagic feats raised the power of spells but treated them as higher level, essentially making them more expensive to use. With very few exceptions, the result was actually slightly less powerful than just using a higher level spell. Several feats and classes reduce the cost of metamagic (Arcane Thesis, notably), making it capable of dealing several thousand damage per round with ease.

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* AwesomeButImpractical: AwesomeButImpractical:
**
The 3.X monk. On paper, you've got a monster ninja who can move faster than anything, run up walls, teleport, [[InASingleBound jump so far]] [[NotQuiteFlight he can effectively fly]], become completely immune to poison and disease, block and catch enemies, grapple and trip forever, stun or kill enemies with a single blow, punch through ''castles'', and [[FlightStrengthHeart talk to animals]]. In practice, he can't hit anything, and is ''squishier'' than [[SquishyWizard the wizard]] (Who (who gets lots of good buffs to avert that).
** 3.X metamagic feats raised raise the power of spells but treated treat them as higher level, essentially making them more expensive to use. With very few exceptions, the result was is actually slightly less powerful than just using a higher level spell. Several feats and classes reduce the cost of metamagic (Arcane Thesis, notably), making it capable of dealing several thousand damage per round with ease.



* BoringYetPractical: Several, especially in ''Complete Arcane'', which (among other things) details how to counter casters. For example, the best defense against an invisible intruder? A dog.
** Of all the crazy stuff Gestalt can allow you to do, just adding Warblade or Factotum on the other half a typical Wizard build allows you to run almost anything off your intelligence.
** Of all the new tricks you can learn with a feat, Improved Initiative is still a great choice for anything, because moving first lets you use those tricks before you die in rocket tag.

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* BoringYetPractical: BoringYetPractical:
**
Several, especially in ''Complete Arcane'', which (among other things) details how to counter casters. For example, the best defense against an invisible intruder? A dog.
** Of all the crazy stuff Gestalt can allow you to do, just adding Warblade or Factotum on the other half of a typical Wizard build allows you to run almost anything off your intelligence.
** Of all the new tricks you can learn with a feat, Improved Initiative is still a great choice for anything, because moving first lets you use those tricks before you die in playing rocket tag.



* CaveBehindTheFalls: Module [=UK1=] ''Beyond the Crystal Cave''. In the title cave one wall has a waterfall that magically falls in slow motion. Behind the waterfall is a hidden observation room carved out of the rock.
* CharlesAtlasSuperpower: Every character with a few levels under his belt who does not use magic or obviously supernatural abilities. Having a 10 in all stats is defined as the human average in an ability score, and 18 as the strongest on earth. Since you can get an 18 in a stat at character creation if you're lucky, characters can go far and above the maximum human potential through leveling up.

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* CaveBehindTheFalls: Module [=UK1=] In the eponymous cave in ''Beyond the Crystal Cave''. In the title cave Cave'', one wall has a waterfall that magically falls in slow motion. Behind the waterfall is a hidden observation room carved out of the rock.
* CharlesAtlasSuperpower: CharlesAtlasSuperpower:
**
Every character with a few levels under his belt who does not doesn't use magic or obviously supernatural abilities. Having a 10 in all stats is defined as the human average in an ability score, and 18 as the strongest on earth. Since you can get an 18 in a stat at character creation if you're lucky, characters can go far and above the maximum human potential through leveling up.



* CombatMedic: Certain cleric or fighter/cleric builds could be like this; most Leader classes in 4th Edition function as Combat Medics by default.
* TheComputerIsACheatingBastard: The Beholder Mage and Illithid Savant {{Prestige Class}}es in 3.5 were intended to be used only by the DM to make monsters able to stand a chance against 4 [=PC=]s with their 4 times as many actions. Naturally Munchkins have figured out ways to get into them without taking the large amount of racial hit dice that Beholders and Mind Flayers have.
* ConcealingCanvas: Multiple examples

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* CombatMedic: Certain cleric or fighter/cleric builds could can be like this; most Leader classes in 4th Edition function as Combat Medics by default.
* TheComputerIsACheatingBastard: The Beholder Mage and Illithid Savant {{Prestige Class}}es in 3.5 were are intended to be used only by the DM to make monsters able to stand a chance against 4 [=PC=]s with their 4 times as many actions. Naturally Naturally, Munchkins have figured out ways to get into them without taking the large amount of racial hit dice that Beholders and Mind Flayers have.
* ConcealingCanvas: Multiple examplesexamples.



** In 3.5E, there were two major instances of this trope:
*** The wizard had effectively unlimited access to spells, provided it was willing to pay for the scrolls and wands. Lower-level spells and scrolls were cheaper than higher-level ones, meaning any given wizard would probably have the majority of his collection of spells known, wands, and scrolls, in the lower level region. Now, when your budget is measured in values like 18,000 gold, is it really a problem to spend 12.5 gold to have odd, corner-case spells available like Tenser's Floating Disk? The practical upshot of it is that a wizard will typically be walking around with a veritable library of spells that have ''no practical purpose'' except to make him look like Batman. This means the Wizard can spend the rest of his time and money on having those really hugely powerful spells that turn the rest of the party into his personal audience.
*** The funny part was that the balance was supposed to be that you could only prepare a certain amount of spells per day, and you had to do it in advance. Unfortunately, they kind of broke this by allowing a single spell to be prepared in an empty slot in 15 minutes. Sure, you need your combat spells in advance, but leaving a slot open at strategic levels for "something without a time constraint" could give you access to something like 3/4 of it all at once.
*** Also, in rules supplements like the '''Arms And Equipment Guide''' you'd find a variety of little bits-and-pieces items, like a stick of chalk, a hacksaw blade, extremely long pieces of string, a piece of ebony wood, and a bag of marbles. Each of them individual items that had shown up in a variety of different other modules by one lone, clever writer, and since they were mundane items they were remarkably cheap (some not even breaking a single gold piece). It only takes a player willing to comb through the book and dedicate maybe a hundred gold of his budget (which, again, represents thousands and thousands of gold) to always have the right tool for an obscure job.

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** In 3.5E, there were are two major instances of this trope:
*** The wizard had has effectively unlimited access to spells, provided it was he's willing to pay for the scrolls and wands. Lower-level spells and scrolls were are cheaper than higher-level ones, meaning any given wizard would will probably have the majority of his collection of spells known, wands, and scrolls, in the lower level region. Now, when your budget is measured in values like 18,000 gold, is it really a problem to spend 12.5 gold to have odd, corner-case spells available like Tenser's Floating Disk? The practical upshot of it is that a wizard will typically be walking around with a veritable library of spells that have ''no practical purpose'' except to make him look like Batman. This means the Wizard can spend the rest of his time and money on having those really hugely powerful spells that turn the rest of the party into his personal audience.
***
audience. The funny part was is that the balance was is supposed to be that you could can only prepare a certain amount of spells per day, and you had have to do it in advance. Unfortunately, they kind of broke this by allowing a single spell to be prepared in an empty slot in 15 minutes. Sure, you need your combat spells in advance, but leaving a slot open at strategic levels for "something without a time constraint" could can give you access to something like 3/4 of it all at once.
*** Also, in rules supplements like the '''Arms And Equipment Guide''' you'd you'll find a variety of little bits-and-pieces items, like a stick of chalk, a hacksaw blade, extremely long pieces of string, a piece of ebony wood, and a bag of marbles. Each of them these were individual items that had shown up in a variety of different other modules by one lone, clever writer, and since they were they're mundane items they were are remarkably cheap (some not even breaking a single gold piece). It only takes a player willing to comb through the book and dedicate maybe a hundred gold of his budget (which, again, represents thousands and thousands of gold) to always have the right tool for an obscure job.



** Module T1-4 ''The Temple of Elemental Evil''. A {{PC}} in one of the four Nodes of Elemental Evil took 1-4 HitPoints of environmental damage per turn.
** According to the ''Manual of the Planes'' (1987), the same thing happened on some of the Inner Planes.
** Characters in the Elemental Plane of Earth took 1-2 HitPoints of damage per turn (from the pressure of the surrounding rock).
** {{PC}}s on the Paraelemental Plane of Ice took 1-6 HitPoints of cold damage per round.

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** Module T1-4 In ''The Temple of Elemental Evil''. A Evil'', a {{PC}} in one of the four Nodes of Elemental Evil took takes 1-4 HitPoints of environmental damage per turn.
** According to the ''Manual of the Planes'' (1987), the same thing happened happens on some of the Inner Planes.
** Characters in the Elemental Plane of Earth took take 1-2 HitPoints of damage per turn (from the pressure of the surrounding rock).
** {{PC}}s on the Paraelemental Plane of Ice took take 1-6 HitPoints of cold damage per round.



* DeathIsCheap: Potentially, as of 4e it's considerably harder to die but relatively cheap to come back from the dead. That is until you hit epic levels, when it become free to most characters via "Once per day, when you die..." powers.
* DidYouJustPunchOutCthulhu: Deicide is a common practice in epic-level games. In 1st, 3rd and 4th Edition, gods even have combat stats just like any other monster, and are fully punchable. At least in 3rd and 4th, they can't be killed except by extraordinary circumstances, not to mention 3rd edition deities typically had 20 levels in three different class with another 20 outsider hit dice (and each of these gets the max amount, rather than the 1/2 or random most get). For those not in the know, that means they can take a ''lot'' of punishment and resist a lot of effects even without their divine immunities and powers. A Call of Cthulhu d20 book not only gave Cthulhu stats, but had a sidebar addressing why Cthulhu might have a suit of +3 chainmail lying around.
* DifficultButAwesome: [[SquishyWizard Controllers]] in 4E. Poorly played, they're a [[TheLoad liability]] due to their squishiness and lack of damage output. Played by a good tactician, their ability to [[AnAdventurerIsYou debuff and mez]] everything to the point of complete ineffectiveness will make the DM cry.
** It turns out the horribly overpowered full casters in 3rd edition [[http://www.montecook.com/cgi-bin/page.cgi?mc_los_142 were at least partially intentional]], in order to reward players who realize how it works.
* EmptyLevels: The earlier editions had this problem. While spellcasters got new spells every few levels, fighters and thieves were mainly limited to the advancement in Hit Dice and to-hit that all characters got upon leveling up, in addition to skill percentages if you were a thief and being able to cut down another 1 HD or less mook per round if you were a fighter. Combine this with the increasingly horrifying supernatural enemies that players encountered at higher levels, against which sharp-sword-swinging was a decreasingly recommendable tactic, and it was no wonder that LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards set in.

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* DeathIsCheap: Potentially, as Potentially. As of 4e it's considerably harder to die die, but relatively cheap to come back from the dead. That is is, until you hit epic levels, when it become free to most characters via "Once per day, when you die..." powers.
* DidYouJustPunchOutCthulhu: Deicide is a common practice in epic-level games. In 1st, 3rd and 4th Edition, gods even have combat stats just like any other monster, and are fully punchable. At least in 3rd and 4th, they can't be killed except by extraordinary circumstances, not to mention 3rd edition deities typically had have 20 levels in three different class with another 20 outsider hit dice (and each of these gets the max amount, rather than the 1/2 or random most get). For those not in the know, that means they can take a ''lot'' of punishment and resist a lot of effects even without their divine immunities and powers. A Call of Cthulhu d20 book not only gave gives Cthulhu stats, but had has a sidebar addressing why Cthulhu might have a suit of +3 chainmail lying around.
* DifficultButAwesome: DifficultButAwesome:
**
[[SquishyWizard Controllers]] in 4E. Poorly played, they're a [[TheLoad liability]] due to their squishiness and lack of damage output. Played by a good tactician, their ability to [[AnAdventurerIsYou debuff and mez]] everything to the point of complete ineffectiveness will make the DM cry.
** It turns out the The horribly overpowered full casters in 3rd edition [[http://www.montecook.com/cgi-bin/page.cgi?mc_los_142 were at least partially intentional]], in order to reward players who realize how it works.
* EmptyLevels: The earlier editions had have this problem. While spellcasters got get new spells every few levels, fighters and thieves were are mainly limited to the advancement in Hit Dice and to-hit that all characters got get upon leveling up, in addition to skill percentages if you were you're a thief and being able to cut down another 1 HD or less mook per round if you were you're a fighter. Combine this with the increasingly horrifying supernatural enemies that players encountered encounter at higher levels, against which sharp-sword-swinging was is a decreasingly recommendable tactic, and it was it's no wonder that LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards set in.



** The Deck of Many Things. One of the cards was Fates, which allowed you to avoid any situation, once.
** There were also items like Teleport rings or the Helm of Teleportation that could send you to another location.

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** The Deck of Many Things. One of the cards was in a Deck of Many Things is Fates, which allowed allows you to avoid any situation, once.
** There were are also items like Teleport rings or the Helm of Teleportation that could can send you to another location.



** Dragon magazine #67 article "Modern Monsters". A hit by a firearm on a flamethrower's fuel canister will cause an explosion doing 8d8 HitPoints of damage (with a saving throw for half damage) to all within 10 yards.

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** Dragon A hit by a firearm on a flamethrower's[[note:*]]Dragon magazine #67 article "Modern Monsters". A hit by a firearm on a flamethrower's Monsters"[[/note]] fuel canister will cause an explosion doing 8d8 HitPoints of damage (with a saving throw for half damage) to all within 10 yards.



* FreshClue: Module [=CM1=] ''Test of the Warlords'', adventure "The Ruins of Alinor". The {{PC}}s find a cave filled with the bodies of dead giants and wolves and a fire with venison cooking over it. From the condition of the bodies and the roasting meat, the {{PC}}s can deduce that the attack occurred within the last half hour and that the perpetrators are probably nearby.

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* FreshClue: Module [=CM1=] FreshClue:In the ''Test of the Warlords'', Warlords'' adventure "The Ruins of Alinor". The Alinor", the {{PC}}s find a cave filled with the bodies of dead giants and wolves and a fire with venison cooking over it. From the condition of the bodies and the roasting meat, the {{PC}}s can deduce that the attack occurred within the last half hour and that the perpetrators are probably nearby.



* HeroicAmbidexterity: In 2e and 3.0e, Ambidexterity is a [[{{perk}} feat]] that allows you to DualWield weapons much more efficiently than otherwise, even if you're already trained for it.

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* HeroicAmbidexterity: In 2e and 3.0e, 3e, Ambidexterity is a [[{{perk}} feat]] that allows you to DualWield weapons much more efficiently than otherwise, even if you're already trained for it.



** ''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-entry.phtml?mainid=4601 The Book of Marvelous Magic]]'' has Inkwell of Concealment, which is an Everfull Inkwell, but after a hour everything written with its ink vanishes and can be read only via effects allowing to see invisible objects.

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** ''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-entry.phtml?mainid=4601 The Book of Marvelous Magic]]'' has the Inkwell of Concealment, which is an Everfull Inkwell, but after a hour everything written with its ink vanishes and can be read only via effects allowing to see invisible objects.



** the spell Arcane Mark can functionally be an invisible ink. The campaign setting {{Eberron}} notices this, and [[{{Deconstruction}} uses it on documents to increase the difficulty of forging]].

to:

** the The spell Arcane Mark can functionally be an invisible ink. The campaign setting {{Eberron}} notices this, and [[{{Deconstruction}} uses it on documents to increase the difficulty of forging]].



* KnockoutAmbush: Module [=A3=] ''Assault on the Aerie of the Slave Lords''. If the [=PC=]s will be playing in module [=A4=], at the end of [=A3=] the entire {{PC}} party will rendered unconscious by a green gas and captured by the Slave Lords.

to:

* KnockoutAmbush: Module [=A3=] If the [=PC=]s in ''Assault on the Aerie of the Slave Lords''. If the [=PC=]s Lords'' will be playing in module [=A4=], the follow-up, at the end of [=A3=] the adventure the entire {{PC}} party will rendered unconscious by a green gas and captured by the Slave Lords.



* LetsSplitUpGang: Module [=I10=] ''Ravenloft II: The House on Gryphon Hill''. If any of the [=NPC=]s at the Weathermay estate have been trans-possessed by an undead they will suggest splitting up the PC party and [=NPC=]s to search the grounds more quickly.

to:

* LetsSplitUpGang: Module [=I10=] ''Ravenloft II: The House on Gryphon Hill''. If any of the [=NPC=]s at the Weathermay estate in ''Ravenloft II: The House on Gryphon Hill'' have been trans-possessed by an undead undead, they will suggest splitting up the PC party and [=NPC=]s to search the grounds more quickly.



** If a Violet Fungi monster hit a living creature with one of its branches, the creature had to make a saving throw vs. poison or have its flesh rot and its body decompose.

to:

** If a Violet Fungi monster hit hits a living creature with one of its branches, the creature had has to make a saving throw vs. poison or have its flesh rot and its body decompose.



** 2nd Edition supplement ''Book of Artifacts''. The silver Orb of Dragonkind could resurrect 20-200 bodies once per year.
** Module T1-4 ''TabletopGame/TempleOfElementalEvil''. If the deity St. Cuthbert is summoned, he will Raise all slain {{PC}}s from the dead with a gesture.

to:

** 2nd The silver Orb of Dragonkind[[note:*]]2nd Edition supplement ''Book of Artifacts''. The silver Orb of Dragonkind could Artifacts''.[[/note]] can resurrect 20-200 bodies once per year.
** Module T1-4 ''TabletopGame/TempleOfElementalEvil''. If the deity St. Cuthbert is summoned, summoned in ''TabletopGame/TempleOfElementalEvil'', he will Raise all slain {{PC}}s from the dead with a gesture.



** Leprechauns from 1st Edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons had "polymorph non-living" as one of their most annoying talents.

to:

** Leprechauns from 1st Edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons had have "polymorph non-living" as one of their most annoying talents.



* OutsideTheBoxTactic: Casting ''Remove Blindness/Deafness'' on an Eye of Gruumsh (a one-eyed, mad orc fighter) restores its other eye and negates its magical abilities as well. As well as countless other DM-annoying examples.

to:

* OutsideTheBoxTactic: OutsideTheBoxTactic:
**
Casting ''Remove Blindness/Deafness'' on an Eye of Gruumsh (a one-eyed, mad orc fighter) restores its other eye and negates its magical abilities as well. As well as countless other DM-annoying examples.



* RandomTransportation: Basic D&D module [=DA1=] ''Adventures in Blackmoor''. When characters trapped in the Inn Between the Worlds passed through the Gate in the cellar they ended up back in the Inn but at a random different time, either before or after they entered (possibly ''long'' before or after).
* {{Retirony}}: ''TabletopGame/MasqueOfTheRedDeath'', adventure "Red Tide". A sailor about to propose marriage to his girlfriend is killed by a vampire.

to:

* RandomTransportation: Basic D&D module [=DA1=] In ''Adventures in Blackmoor''. When Blackmoor'', when characters trapped in the Inn Between the Worlds passed pass through the Gate in the cellar cellar, they ended end up back in the Inn but at a random different time, either before or after they entered (possibly ''long'' before or after).
* {{Retirony}}: ''TabletopGame/MasqueOfTheRedDeath'', In the ''TabletopGame/MasqueOfTheRedDeath'' adventure "Red Tide". A Tide", a sailor about to propose marriage to his girlfriend is killed by a vampire.



* ShieldsAreUseless: A commonly held opinion about shields in 3E due to what they give you (a linear increase to AC compared to extra attacks or double Power Attack damage), the fact that most magic attacks ignore your shield bonus, and the existence of animated shields.

to:

* ShieldsAreUseless: ShieldsAreUseless:
**
A commonly held opinion about shields in 3E due to what they give you (a linear increase to AC compared to extra attacks or double Power Attack damage), the fact that most magic attacks ignore your shield bonus, and the existence of animated shields.



** Played straight in 1st and 2nd Edition AD&D. A nonmagical shield improved your armor class by only one (1) step, and then only if the attack comes from the front or front-flank and the shield-user isn't stunned or knocked prone. A fighter, paladin, or ranger was always far more effective with a weapon in his off-hand than he was with a shield in it. Since clerics and assassins could use shields, but couldn't wield two weapons at the same time and didn't have many two-handed weapons to choose from, they wouldn't have anything to ''lose'' by equipping a shield, but the gain was still minimal.
* ShootTheMageFirst: 1st Edition TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms Campaign Setting boxed set booklet ''Cyclopedia of the Realms'', section "Pirate Isles of the Inner Sea". On pirate ships it was a standard procedure for archers to make anyone who was appearing to cast a spell their first target.

to:

** Played straight in 1st and 2nd Edition AD&D. A nonmagical shield improved improves your armor class by only one (1) step, and then only if the attack comes from the front or front-flank and the shield-user isn't stunned or knocked prone. A fighter, paladin, or ranger was is always far more effective with a weapon in his off-hand than he was is with a shield in it. Since clerics and assassins could can use shields, but couldn't can't wield two weapons at the same time and didn't don't have many two-handed weapons to choose from, they wouldn't won't have anything to ''lose'' by equipping a shield, but the gain was is still minimal.
* ShootTheMageFirst: 1st Edition TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms Campaign Setting boxed set booklet According to ''Cyclopedia of the Realms'', section "Pirate Isles of the Inner Sea". On on pirate ships it was it's a standard procedure for archers to make anyone who was appearing appears to cast be casting a spell their first target.



* SpellLevels: Probably the TropeCodifier. In Original D&D, both arcane (wizard) and divine (cleric) spells were split into six and five tiers, respectively, with characters of certain level getting only so many spells of certain levels to [[VancianMagic memorize]]. The Greyhawk supplement increased them to nine tiers for arcane spells and seven tiers for divine spells.
** In 3rd Edition clerics, druids, sorcerers, and wizards had ten spell levels (0-9); bards had seven (0-6), and paladins and rangers had four (1-4).

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* SpellLevels: Probably the TropeCodifier. In Original D&D, both arcane (wizard) and divine (cleric) spells were are split into six and five tiers, respectively, with characters of certain level getting only so many spells of certain levels to [[VancianMagic memorize]]. The Greyhawk supplement increased them to nine tiers for arcane spells and seven tiers for divine spells.
** In 3rd Edition clerics, druids, sorcerers, and wizards had have ten spell levels (0-9); bards had have seven (0-6), and paladins and rangers had have four (1-4).



** Basic D&D adventure [=IM2=] ''The Wrath of Olympus''. A group of Immortals (minor deities) illegally interferes on the Prime Plane. The forces of Entropy capture them and secure them with chains that not only render them helpless but drain their internal power (LifeEnergy) as well.
** Basic D&D supplement ''The Book of Marvelous Magic''. Irons are magical confinement devices combining manacles (wrists) and shackles (ankles). The Irons of Imprisonment can only be broken by a Wish spell or a blow from a plus 4 or better weapon.

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** Basic D&D adventure [=IM2=] In ''The Wrath of Olympus''. A Olympus'', a group of Immortals (minor deities) illegally interferes on the Prime Plane. The forces of Entropy capture them and secure them with chains that not only render them helpless but drain their internal power (LifeEnergy) as well.
** Basic Irons[[note:*]]Basic D&D supplement ''The Book of Marvelous Magic''. Irons Magic''[[/note]] are magical confinement devices combining manacles (wrists) and shackles (ankles). The Irons of Imprisonment can only be broken by a Wish spell or a blow from a plus 4 or better weapon.



* WhenTheClockStrikesTwelve: Multiple examples

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* WhenTheClockStrikesTwelve: Multiple examplesexamples.



* WizardingSchool: Multiple examples

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* WizardingSchool: Multiple examplesexamples.



* CharacterTiers: A unique variant, the classes are tiered not on their power, but on their versatility (and thus ability to solve traps, social encounters, and other non-combat stuff given by the DM), then broken up into how well they can do that. Thus a fighter is low tier not because he is bad in combat (though he may be), but because he is complete dead weight outside of combat (He may rarely get usage out of intimidate), while Rogue is higher because he may work at social encounters, traps and combat, but he isn't fantastic at them. [[invoked]]
* CreatorThumbprint: Gary Gygax had several, including mushrooms, various shades of the color purple, Creator/HPLovecraft, his extensive vocabulary and polearms. On the unfortunate side, problems with ranged weapons from slings to wheel-locks.
** ...and only in 3.x Edition his fascination with polearms was finally dropped... to be replaced with some new developer's spiked chain fetish. These things wormed their way '''everywhere''', even underground.

to:

* CharacterTiers: A unique variant, the variant. The classes are tiered not on their power, but on their versatility (and thus ability to solve traps, social encounters, and other non-combat stuff given by the DM), then broken up into how well they can do that. Thus a fighter is low tier not because he is bad in combat (though he may be), but because he is complete dead weight outside of combat (He may rarely get usage out of intimidate), while Rogue is higher because he may work at social encounters, traps and combat, but he isn't fantastic at them. [[invoked]]
* CreatorThumbprint: CreatorThumbprint:
**
Gary Gygax had several, including mushrooms, various shades of the color purple, Creator/HPLovecraft, his extensive vocabulary and polearms. On the unfortunate side, problems with ranged weapons from slings to wheel-locks.
** ...and only
wheel-locks. Only in 3.x Edition was his fascination with polearms was finally dropped... to be replaced with some new developer's spiked chain fetish. These things wormed their way '''everywhere''', even underground.



** [[Series/TheBigBangTheory "Really? So we're playing Dungeons & Dragons and we walk into a dungeon and see a dragon? Isn't that a little on the nose?"]]

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** [[Series/TheBigBangTheory -->[[Series/TheBigBangTheory "Really? So we're playing Dungeons & Dragons and we walk into a dungeon and see a dragon? Isn't that a little on the nose?"]]



** The new edition lists the good and neutral deities up front in the character creation section, while setting the evil gods firmly in the 'know your enemy' part of the book. This, of course, has no effect on some players and [=DMs=], who create all-evil campaigns frequently and with panache.
** The ''D&D'' based RTS game ''Dragonshard'', has a campaign for the humans and the lizardfolk, but not for the Umbragen.
** BECMI (Basic/Expert/Companion/Master/Immortal) D&D, Immortals boxed set (1986). Player controlled {{PC}} Immortals are forbidden to be from the Sphere of Entropy, because creatures from that Sphere are all evil. All Entropy Sphere Immortals are {{NPC}}s.

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** The new edition lists 5elists the good and neutral deities up front in the character creation section, while setting the evil gods firmly in the 'know your enemy' part of the book. This, of course, has no effect on some players and [=DMs=], who create all-evil campaigns frequently and with panache.
** The ''D&D'' based RTS game ''Dragonshard'', ''Dragonshard'' has a campaign for the humans and the lizardfolk, but not for the Umbragen.
** BECMI (Basic/Expert/Companion/Master/Immortal) D&D, Immortals From the ''Immortals'' boxed set (1986). Player set, player controlled {{PC}} Immortals are forbidden to be from the Sphere of Entropy, because creatures from that Sphere are all evil. All Entropy Sphere Immortals are {{NPC}}s.



** ''TabletopGame/{{Planescape}} Monstrous Compendium Appendix II''. Incantifers are creatures that used to be human beings. They were changed by magic so that they can absorb magic and don't need to eat, breathe or sleep (among other powers). They have evil tendencies and Dungeon Masters are warned not to allow {{PC}}s to undergo the incantifer-creation process.
* PaintingTheMedium: AD&D 1st edition, Monster Manual. The Leprechauns on page 60 play around with the page headings. They also ride the giant leech to their left as well.

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** ''TabletopGame/{{Planescape}} Incantifers[[note:*]]''TabletopGame/{{Planescape}} Monstrous Compendium Appendix II''. Incantifers II''[[/note]] are creatures that used to be human beings. They were changed by magic so that they can absorb magic and don't need to eat, breathe or sleep (among other powers). They have evil tendencies and Dungeon Masters are warned not to allow {{PC}}s to undergo the incantifer-creation process.
* PaintingTheMedium: AD&D 1st edition, Monster Manual. The Leprechauns on page 60 of the 1e Monster Manual play around with the page headings. They also ride the giant leech to their left as well.left.



* {{Retraux}}: An "old school renaissance" has sprung up recently, with a number of retro-clones (OSRIC, Swords & Wizardry, Labyrinth Lord, Basic Fantasy, and others) based on Basic, Original and First Edition D&D.
* RuleThirtyFour: Both the "Book of Erotic Fantasy" and "Encyclopaedia Arcane - Nymphology" (third-party and unofficial as hell, but still) codifies this. Fairly tactfully, thankfully. Before this, it was "The Complete Guide To AD&D Unlawful Carnal Knowledge". As a netbook, it got stuff from "quite in-character in a normal game" (blow-a-kiss-with-effects spells may be a ''must-have'' for a love goddess' church, finding out how long it takes to blow your money on the hookers part of booze and hookers is also usable) to "where'd I put my BrainBleach again?".

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* {{Retraux}}: An "old school renaissance" has sprung up recently, up, with a number of retro-clones (OSRIC, Swords & Wizardry, Labyrinth Lord, Basic Fantasy, and others) based on Basic, Original and First Edition D&D.
* RuleThirtyFour: Both the "Book of Erotic Fantasy" and "Encyclopaedia Arcane - Nymphology" (third-party (both third-party and unofficial as hell, but still) codifies this.still). Fairly tactfully, thankfully. Before this, it was "The Complete Guide To AD&D Unlawful Carnal Knowledge". As a netbook, it got stuff from "quite in-character in a normal game" (blow-a-kiss-with-effects spells may be a ''must-have'' for a love goddess' church, finding out how long it takes to blow your money on the hookers part of booze and hookers is also usable) to "where'd I put my BrainBleach again?".



** One notable instance is an article with explanations of some of the harder rules, the page states everyone is proficient with splash weapons, then describes an example with a character taking a non-proficiency penalty when using a splash weapon.

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** One notable instance is an article with explanations of some of the harder rules, the rules. The page states everyone is proficient with splash weapons, then describes an example with a character taking a non-proficiency penalty when using a splash weapon.



*** 'Armor' has this bug back from AD&D1 even though other school assignments were fixed by AD&D2. Most [=DMs=], if asked will allow the spell as either an Abjuration as a "protective barriers" and/or Evocation (Force subschool) as one more force field; either one fits better than "create/call stuff".

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*** 'Armor' has this bug back from AD&D1 even though other school assignments were fixed by AD&D2. Most [=DMs=], if asked asked, will allow the spell as either an Abjuration as a "protective barriers" barrier" and/or Evocation (Force subschool) as one more force field; either one fits better than "create/call stuff".
20th Nov '16 10:07:30 AM Orbiting
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* GlassWeapon: Glass weapons can be considerably more practical in D&D. The 8th level Glassteel spell can permanently make a glass weapon as tough and strong as steel.
15th Nov '16 7:37:05 AM Spark9
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** ''TabletopGame/PathfinderSociety''
4th Nov '16 11:25:09 AM WildCardCourier
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* ''Blackmoor'', a.k.a. ''The First Fantasy Campaign'': The '''very''' first campaign setting, originating from Dave Arneson's wargaming days, the result of a slow weekend in October 1970 consisting of '50s monster movies, "fantasy hero" novels, a slump during his most recent wargame session, and the thought of "I can do better than this". So he drew a six floor dungeon layout, then created a castle and town from a Sicilian castle model he had lying around. The new setting was a huge hit amongst his fellow ''Braunstein'' players and when he showed the game to Gygax in 1972, the rest, as they say, was history. Your typical Good-vs-Evil setting, with the various duchies vying for power while the mysterious Egg of Coot pulls the strings from the shadows. While the "canon" version was a released in 1977 as gazetteer by Judges Guild, alternate versions appeared in both Greyhawk (as an archbarony near the Land of Black Ice) and Mystara (as a kingdom from the world's distant past that [[AndManGrewProud rose to great heights]] [[CataclysmBackstory and quickly fell, changing the world in the process]]). The setting only had four adventure modules released for it during it's TSR days: ''Adventures in Blackmoor'', ''Temple of the Frog'', ''City of the Gods'', and ''The Duchy of Ten''. While officially discontinued during the TSR days, Arneson was able to keep the rights for the setting and worked with Zeitgiest Games to release setting books for 3.5 and 4th Editions. Blackmoor proudly has the honor of being one of the longest continuously played fantasy role playing campaigns in existence, even spawning a renowned play-by-post game called ''The Last Fantasy Campaign'', which ran from 2005 to 2015.

to:

* ''Blackmoor'', a.k.a. ''The First Fantasy Campaign'': The '''very''' first campaign setting, originating from Dave Arneson's wargaming days, the result of a slow weekend in October 1970 consisting of '50s monster movies, "fantasy hero" novels, a slump during his most recent wargame session, and the thought of "I can do better than this". So he drew a six floor dungeon layout, then created a castle and town from a Sicilian castle model he had lying around. The new setting was a huge hit amongst his fellow ''Braunstein'' players and when he showed the game to Gygax in 1972, the rest, as they say, was history. Your typical Good-vs-Evil setting, with the various duchies vying for power while the mysterious Egg of Coot pulls the strings from the shadows. While the "canon" "official" version was a released in 1977 as gazetteer by Judges Guild, alternate versions appeared in both Greyhawk (as an archbarony near the Land of Black Ice) and Mystara (as a kingdom from the world's distant past that [[AndManGrewProud rose to great heights]] [[CataclysmBackstory and quickly fell, changing the world in the process]]). The setting only had four adventure modules released for it during it's TSR days: ''Adventures in Blackmoor'', ''Temple of the Frog'', ''City of the Gods'', and ''The Duchy of Ten''. While officially discontinued during the TSR days, discontinued, Arneson was able to keep the rights for the setting and eventually worked with Zeitgiest Games to release setting books for 3.5 and 4th Editions. Blackmoor proudly has the honor of being one of the longest continuously played fantasy role playing campaigns in existence, even spawning a renowned play-by-post game called ''The Last Fantasy Campaign'', which ran from 2005 to 2015.



** The first version was the original home campaign, created after Gygax played a game of Blackmoor in 1972. While it ran from 1972 to 1979, games set there completely ceased in 1985 right after Gygax was ousted from TSR, while the setting itself was "destroyed" in 1988 in the last ''Gord the Rogue'' novel [[note]]a literary declaration that the old Oerth was dead, with Gygax himself furious over the direction TSR was taking the setting[[/note]]. Due to the number of games played each week, Gygax didn't have the time to make a world map completely from scratch and simply used a blank map of North America, filling it in as the campaign went on. Despite the name, the 1975 ''Supplement I: Greyhawk'' digest wasn't a Greyhawk setting book, but a rulebook which helped eliminate the game's dependence on ''Chainmail'', setting the groundwork for what would become Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. Not much is known about the home campaign version, apart from what is presented in the ''Gnome Cache'' novella from the first issues of ''Dragon'' magazine and the ''Gord the Rogue'' novel series. After years of talks about releasing the original Castle Greyhawk dungeon/campaign, the project was finally greenlit as ''Castle Zagyg'' in 2003, although it's immensely troubled production ended with just two or three of the proposed seven books and a small number of adventure modules being released.[[note]]The Castle Grewhawk dungeon as of 1985 had around 50 floors, meaning Gygax and Robert Kuntz had to sift through years of notes and pick the 13 best parts for publication, while Gygax had to rewrite everything that was still copyright of [=WotC=]. Gygax's health decline in 2004 led to the already slow-moving project to grind to a near halt, while Kuntz had to withdraw due to working on other projects. Three months after Gary's death in 2008, his widow Gail pulled all the licensing from Troll Lord Games and transferred them to Gygax Games, but hasn't done anything with the project since.[[/note]]

to:

** The first version was the original home campaign, created after Gygax played a game of Blackmoor in 1972. While it ran from 1972 to 1979, games set there completely ceased in 1985 right after Gygax was ousted from TSR, while the setting itself was "destroyed" in 1988 in the last ''Gord the Rogue'' novel [[note]]a literary declaration that the old Oerth was dead, with Gygax himself furious over the direction TSR was taking the setting[[/note]].novel. Due to the number of games played each week, Gygax didn't have the time to make a world map completely from scratch and simply used a blank map of North America, filling it in as the campaign went on. Despite the name, the 1975 ''Supplement I: Greyhawk'' digest wasn't a Greyhawk setting book, but a rulebook which helped eliminate the game's dependence on ''Chainmail'', setting the groundwork for what would become Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. Not much is known about the home campaign version, apart from what is presented in the ''Gnome Cache'' novella from the first issues of ''Dragon'' magazine and the ''Gord the Rogue'' novel series. After years of talks about releasing the original Castle Greyhawk dungeon/campaign, megadungeon, the project was finally greenlit as ''Castle Zagyg'' in 2003, although it's immensely troubled production ended with just two or three of the proposed seven books and a small number of adventure modules being released.[[note]]The Castle Grewhawk dungeon as of 1985 had around 50 floors, meaning Gygax and Robert Kuntz had to sift through years of notes and pick the 13 best parts for publication, while Gygax had to rewrite everything that was still copyright of [=WotC=]. Gygax's health decline in 2004 led to the already slow-moving project to grind to a near halt, while Kuntz had to withdraw due to working on other projects. Three months after Gary's death in 2008, his widow Gail pulled all the licensing from Troll Lord Games and transferred them to Gygax Games, but hasn't done anything with the project since.[[/note]]



* ''Wilderlands of High Fantasy'': The first officially licensed and published third-party campaign setting for "Original" D&D, created by Judges Guild after the success of their ''City State of the Invincible Overlord'' city setting and released in a collection of 4 32-page booklets. In 2002, Judges Guild ended up working together with Necromancer Games to release a boxed version for 3.5 Edition. Rather than go for the "megadungeon" style of Blackmoor and Greyhawk, the Wilderlands went the sandbox route: 18 maps that altogether cover an area about 780 miles wide by 1080 miles long, roughly the size of the Mediterranean. Each individual map contained a number of pre-established points-of-interest, with the accompanying books containing entry upon entry for every bastion of civilization, set of ruins, and monster lair within the region. Touted as "First Edition feel", the Wilderlands sticks to the origins of D&D, a time when the lines between sci-fi and fantasy were very murky and SchizoTech was everywhere. Meaning you could have people who's greatest technological achievement is the wheel potentially meet people who's greatest technological achievement is calculus, ''then'' have them potentially happen upon a crashed alien spaceship from an age long before recorded history.

to:

* ''Wilderlands of High Fantasy'': The first officially licensed and published third-party campaign setting for "Original" D&D, OD&D, created by Judges Guild after the success of their ''City State of the Invincible Overlord'' city setting and released in a collection of 4 32-page booklets. In 2002, Judges Guild ended up working together with Necromancer Games to release a boxed version for 3.5 Edition. Rather than go for the "megadungeon" style of early Blackmoor and Greyhawk, the Wilderlands went the sandbox route: 18 maps that altogether cover an area about 780 miles wide by 1080 miles long, roughly the size of the Mediterranean. Each individual map contained a number of pre-established points-of-interest, with the accompanying books containing entry upon entry for every bastion of civilization, set of ruins, and monster lair within the region. Touted as "First Edition feel", the The Wilderlands sticks to the origins of D&D, a time when the lines between sci-fi and fantasy were very murky and SchizoTech was everywhere. Meaning you could have people who's greatest technological achievement is the wheel potentially meet people who's greatest technological achievement is calculus, ''then'' have them potentially happen upon a crashed alien spaceship from an age long before recorded history.history.
* ''World of Kalibruhn'': The third created campaign setting for OD&D, created by D&D alumni Robert Kuntz in 1973. Originally planned to be the fifth supplement for OD&D, a number of problems within TSR led to Kuntz leaving them in 1977 and the supplement was never published. Despite this, Kuntz has worked on the setting constantly since 1974, with the history of the setting included in the [[http://www.tlbgames.com/collections/archive El Raja Key Archive]] DVD, alongside information on the original Greyhawk and Blackmoor campaigns.



* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Swords+%26+Wizardry Swords and Wizardry]]''': Created by Mythmere Games. One of the more well-known retroclones, this game goes all the way back to the original D&D, with the Cleric, the Fighter and the Magic-User, taking inspiration from sword and sorcery. Notable for having only one saving throw as opposed to the five used in regular old-school D&D, although it includes the option to use the original five. You get to choose whether you want to play with original AC or ascending AC. There are four versions of this game, all of which are free to download:
** The [[http://www.swordsandwizardry.com/?page_id=6 WhiteBox Rules]], which closely emulates the rules of the core box of [=OD&D=].
** The [[http://www.swordsandwizardry.com/?page_id=4 Core Rules]], which also incorporate the Greyhawk supplement (most notably adding the Thief class).

to:

* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Swords+%26+Wizardry Swords and Wizardry]]''': Created by Mythmere Games. One of the more well-known retroclones, this game goes all the way back to the original D&D, with the Cleric, the Fighter and the Magic-User, taking inspiration from sword and sorcery. Notable for having only one saving throw as opposed to the five used in regular old-school D&D, although it includes the option to use the original five. You get to choose whether you want to play with original descending AC or ascending AC.AC. Has a number of variants based on the system, such as ''[=WhiteHack=]'' and ''Crypts & Things''. There are four versions of this game, all of which are free to download:
** The [[http://www.swordsandwizardry.com/?page_id=6 lulu.com/us/en/shop/matthew-finch/swords-wizardry-whitebox-rulebook-pdf/ebook/product-14956259.html WhiteBox Rules]], which closely emulates the rules of the core box of [=OD&D=].
** The [[http://www.swordsandwizardry.com/?page_id=4 rpgnow.com/product/62346/Swords-%26-Wizardry-Core-Rules&affiliate_id=1446 Core Rules]], which also incorporate the Greyhawk supplement (most notably adding the Thief class).



* '''Crypts & Things''': Created by D101 Games. A variant of the ''Swords & Wizardry'' system that more mirrors the classic SwordAndSorcery stories of Fritz Leiber, Robert E. Howard, and Clark Ashton Smith, instead of the more traditional Tolkienesque HighFantasy flare. Humans are the only playable race; so no elves, dwarves, or halflings. There are only four classes: barbarian, fighter, thief, and sorcerer. Clerics don't exist in the system, meaning that turning undead isn't a thing. Resurrection magic is also nonexistent. Barbarians function as a mix of battle-raging berserkers and rangers, being a rework of the barbarian from the fourth issue of ''White Dwarf'' magazine. Fighters get optional fighting styles to give them flavor. Thieves are more martial-based, similar to [[Literature/FafhrdAndTheGrayMouser the Gray Mouser]]. Sorcerers function as a combination of cleric and magic-user. Magic is limited to 6th level spells, and is divided into WhiteMagic, Gray Magic, and BlackMagic. White Magic consists of healing, detection, and protective spells which can be cast without penalty. Gray Magic consists of illusions and mind-altering charms, costing the caster some HP. Black Magic consists of offensive spells, often requiring a sacrifice of some sort and a loss of sanity. Hit Points gauge the PC's mental faculties (such as shock, pain, loss of the will to fight) rather than their physical health; once their HP is gone, they take Constitution damage until death. As such, healing magic and potions only heal Constitution, not HP. Wisdom doubles as a character's sanity score, so once their Wisdom hits 0, the character is rendered insane. Magic items carry a hefty penalty more often than not and are very rare. Characters get a Life Path, which dictates their background and grants them specific bonuses.

to:

* '''Crypts & Things''': Created by D101 Games. A variant of the ''Swords & Wizardry'' Core system that more mirrors the classic SwordAndSorcery stories of Fritz Leiber, Robert E. Howard, and Clark Ashton Smith, instead of the more traditional Tolkienesque HighFantasy flare. Humans are the only playable race; so no elves, dwarves, or halflings. There are only four classes: barbarian, fighter, thief, and sorcerer. Clerics don't exist in the system, meaning that turning undead isn't a thing. Resurrection magic is also nonexistent. Barbarians function as a mix of battle-raging berserkers and rangers, being a rework of the barbarian from the fourth issue of ''White Dwarf'' magazine. Fighters get optional fighting styles to give them flavor. Thieves are more martial-based, similar to [[Literature/FafhrdAndTheGrayMouser the Gray Mouser]]. Sorcerers function as a combination of cleric and magic-user.magic-user, as the cleric class doesn't exist. Magic is limited to 6th level spells, and is divided into WhiteMagic, Gray Magic, and BlackMagic. White Magic consists of healing, detection, and protective spells which can be cast without penalty. Gray Magic consists of illusions and mind-altering charms, costing the caster some HP. Black Magic consists of offensive spells, often requiring a sacrifice of some sort and a loss of sanity. Hit Points gauge the PC's mental faculties (such as shock, pain, loss of the will to fight) rather than their physical health; once their HP is gone, they take Constitution damage until death. As such, healing magic and potions only heal Constitution, not HP. Wisdom doubles as a character's sanity score, so once their Wisdom hits 0, the character is rendered insane. Magic items carry a hefty penalty more often than not and are very rare. Characters get a Life Path, which dictates their background and grants them specific bonuses.



* ShieldsAreUseless: A commonly held opinion about shields in 3e due to what they give you (a linear increase to AC compared to extra attacks or double Power Attack damage), the fact that most magic attacks ignore your shield bonus, and the existence of animated shields.

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* ShieldsAreUseless: A commonly held opinion about shields in 3e 3E due to what they give you (a linear increase to AC compared to extra attacks or double Power Attack damage), the fact that most magic attacks ignore your shield bonus, and the existence of animated shields.



* IdealizedSex: According to the ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' 3.5 module "Book Of Vile Darkness", only evil people can have a sadomasochistic sexuality. Also, all sadomasochists have evil superpowers sexual masochism and sadism ''are'' evil superpowers in this setting, and sexual masochism is defined as being the same thing as the trope CombatSadomasochist.

to:

* IdealizedSex: According to the ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' 3.5 module "Book Of of Vile Darkness", only evil people can have a sadomasochistic sexuality. Also, all sadomasochists have evil superpowers sexual masochism and sadism ''are'' evil superpowers in this setting, and sexual masochism is defined as being the same thing as the trope CombatSadomasochist.



* {{Retcon}}: Fourth Edition recently had a relatively minor one concerning the war between the Gods and Primordials.

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* {{Retcon}}: Fourth Edition recently had a relatively minor one concerning the war between the Gods and Primordials.
28th Oct '16 2:17:43 AM justanid
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* ''TabletopGame/{{Alternity}}''
This list shows the last 10 events of 789. Show all.
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