History TableTopGame / DungeonsAndDragons

27th Jul '16 6:23:01 PM WildCardCourier
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** The first version was the original home campaign, created after Gygax played a game of Blackmoor in 1972. While it ran from 1972 to 1979, games set there completely ceased in 1985 right after Gygax was ousted from TSR, while the setting itself was "destroyed" in 1988 in the last ''Gord the Rogue'' novel [[note]]a literary declaration that the old Oerth was dead, with Gygax himself furious over the direction TSR was taking the setting[[/note]]. Due to the number of games played each week, Gygax didn't have the time to make a world map completely from scratch and simply used a blank map of North America, filling it in as the campaign went on. Despite the name, the 1975 ''Supplement I: Greyhawk'' digest wasn't a Greyhawk setting book, but a rulebook which helped eliminate the game's dependence on ''Chainmail'', setting the groundwork for what would become Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. Not much is known about the home campaign version, apart from what is presented in the ''Gnome Cache'' novella from the first issues of ''Dragon'' magazine and the ''Gord the Rogue'' novel series. After years of talks about releasing the original Castle Greyhawk dungeon/campaign, the project was finally greenlit as ''Castle Zagyg'' in 2003, although it's immensely troubled production ended with just two of the proposed seven books and a small number of adventure modules being released.[[note]]The Castle Grewhawk dungeon as of 1985 had around 50 floors, meaning Gygax and Kuntz had to sift through years of notes and pick the 13 best parts for publication, while Gygax had to rewrite all the stuff that was still copyright of [=WotC=]. Gygax's health decline in 2004 led to the slow-moving project to grind to a near halt, while Kuntz had to withdraw due to working on other projects. Three months after Gary's death in 2008, his widow Gail pulled all the licensing from Troll Lord Games and transferred them to Gygax Games, but hasn't done anything with the project.[[/note]]

to:

** The first version was the original home campaign, created after Gygax played a game of Blackmoor in 1972. While it ran from 1972 to 1979, games set there completely ceased in 1985 right after Gygax was ousted from TSR, while the setting itself was "destroyed" in 1988 in the last ''Gord the Rogue'' novel [[note]]a literary declaration that the old Oerth was dead, with Gygax himself furious over the direction TSR was taking the setting[[/note]]. Due to the number of games played each week, Gygax didn't have the time to make a world map completely from scratch and simply used a blank map of North America, filling it in as the campaign went on. Despite the name, the 1975 ''Supplement I: Greyhawk'' digest wasn't a Greyhawk setting book, but a rulebook which helped eliminate the game's dependence on ''Chainmail'', setting the groundwork for what would become Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. Not much is known about the home campaign version, apart from what is presented in the ''Gnome Cache'' novella from the first issues of ''Dragon'' magazine and the ''Gord the Rogue'' novel series. After years of talks about releasing the original Castle Greyhawk dungeon/campaign, the project was finally greenlit as ''Castle Zagyg'' in 2003, although it's immensely troubled production ended with just two of the proposed seven books and a small number of adventure modules being released.[[note]]The Castle Grewhawk dungeon as of 1985 had around 50 floors, meaning Gygax and Robert Kuntz had to sift through years of notes and pick the 13 best parts for publication, while Gygax had to rewrite all the stuff that was still copyright of [=WotC=]. Gygax's health decline in 2004 led to the slow-moving project to grind to a near halt, while Kuntz had to withdraw due to working on other projects. Three months after Gary's death in 2008, his widow Gail pulled all the licensing from Troll Lord Games and transferred them to Gygax Games, but hasn't done anything with the project.project since.[[/note]]



* ''Kingdoms of Kalamar'': A third-party setting from Kenzer & Co. officially first released for 2nd Edition and endorsed by Wizards during the 3rd Edition era. A standard high-fantasy style setting that sells itself on its depth and verisimilitude. Though no longer an official setting, Kenzer has released an updated version for 4th Edition.

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* ''Kingdoms of Kalamar'': A third-party setting from Kenzer & Co. officially first released for 2nd Edition and endorsed by Wizards during the 3rd Edition era. A standard high-fantasy style setting that sells itself on its depth and verisimilitude. Though no longer an official setting, Kenzer has released an updated version for 4th Edition.



* ''Wilderlands of High Fantasy'': The first officially licensed and published third-party campaign setting for "Original" D&D, created by Judges Guild after the success of their ''City State of the Invincible Overlord'' city setting and released in a collection of 4 32-page booklets. In 2002, Judges Guild ended up working together with Necromancer Games to release a boxed version for 3.5 Edition. The earliest sandbox-style campaign setting, and it shows: 18 maps that altogether cover an area about 780 miles wide by 1080 miles long, roughly the size of the Mediterranean. Each individual map contained a number of pre-established points-of-interest, with the accompanying books containing entry upon entry for every bastion of civilization, set of ruins, and monster lair within the region. Touted as "First Edition feel", the Wilderlands sticks to the old-school SwordAndSorcery origins of D&D, a time when the lines between sci-fi and fantasy were very murky and SchizoTech was everywhere. Meaning you could have people who's greatest technological achievement is the wheel, potentially meet people who's greatest technological achievement is calculus, and ''then'' have them potentially happen upon a crashed alien spaceship from an age long before recorded history.

to:

* ''Wilderlands of High Fantasy'': The first officially licensed and published third-party campaign setting for "Original" D&D, created by Judges Guild after the success of their ''City State of the Invincible Overlord'' city setting and released in a collection of 4 32-page booklets. In 2002, Judges Guild ended up working together with Necromancer Games to release a boxed version for 3.5 Edition. The earliest sandbox-style campaign setting, and it shows: 18 maps that altogether cover an area about 780 miles wide by 1080 miles long, roughly the size of the Mediterranean. Each individual map contained a number of pre-established points-of-interest, with the accompanying books containing entry upon entry for every bastion of civilization, set of ruins, and monster lair within the region. Touted as "First Edition feel", the Wilderlands sticks to the old-school SwordAndSorcery origins of D&D, a time when the lines between sci-fi and fantasy were very murky and SchizoTech was everywhere. Meaning you could have people who's greatest technological achievement is the wheel, wheel potentially meet people who's greatest technological achievement is calculus, and ''then'' have them potentially happen upon a crashed alien spaceship from an age long before recorded history.



** In an effort to keep things "fresh", [=WotC=] is releasing two storyling-based adventure modules each year, commissioning third party publishers such as Kobold Press, Sasquatch Game Studio, and Green Ronin to help out.

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** In an effort to keep things "fresh", [=WotC=] is releasing two storyling-based storyline-based adventure modules each year, commissioning third party publishers such as Kobold Press, Sasquatch Game Studio, and Green Ronin to help out.



* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Swords+%26+Wizardry Swords and Wizardry:]]''' One of the more well-known retroclones, this game goes all the way back to the original D&D, with the Cleric, the Fighter and the Magic-User, taking inspiration from sword and sorcery. Notable for having only one saving throw as opposed to the five used in regular old-school D&D, although it includes the option to use the original five. You get to choose whether you want to play with original AC or ascending AC. There are three versions of this game, all of which are free to download:
** The [[http://www.swordsandwizardry.com/?page_id=6 WhiteBox]] Rules which closely emulates the rules of the core box of [=OD&D=].
** The [[http://www.swordsandwizardry.com/?page_id=4 Core]] Rules which also incorporate the Greyhawk supplement (most notably adding the Thief class).
** The Complete Rulebook which incorporates all the supplements, resulting in something of a middle-road between [=BD&D=] and [=AD&D=] that is quite easily compatible with much of the contents for both.

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* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Swords+%26+Wizardry Swords and Wizardry:]]''' Created by Myhtmere Games. One of the more well-known retroclones, this game goes all the way back to the original D&D, with the Cleric, the Fighter and the Magic-User, taking inspiration from sword and sorcery. Notable for having only one saving throw as opposed to the five used in regular old-school D&D, although it includes the option to use the original five. You get to choose whether you want to play with original AC or ascending AC. There are three versions of this game, all of which are free to download:
** The [[http://www.swordsandwizardry.com/?page_id=6 WhiteBox]] Rules WhiteBox Rules]], which closely emulates the rules of the core box of [=OD&D=].
** The [[http://www.swordsandwizardry.com/?page_id=4 Core]] Rules Core Rules]], which also incorporate the Greyhawk supplement (most notably adding the Thief class).
** The [[https://www.froggodgames.com/swords-wizardry-complete-rulebook Complete Rulebook Rulebook]], which incorporates all the five supplements, resulting in something of a middle-road between [=BD&D=] BD&D and [=AD&D=] AD&D that is quite easily compatible with much of the contents for both.
13th Jul '16 9:51:51 AM oknazevad
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** The original rules and setting were created for 2nd edition. AEG created a 3rd edition sourcebook, "Empire", that updated/reprinted a large amount of the rules (but not the setting).
12th Jul '16 11:16:17 PM Koveras
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** '''Dungeons & Dragons Essentials (4th) - 2010:''' A new line of products launched in 2010, compatible with 4th edition rules. ''Essentials'' had the stated intent of offering new players a means of introduction to the game. It is, for the most part, a simplified 4E. There are some differences (for example, fighters and thieves have scaling class features that modify their basic attacks, instead of special attack powers) but nevertheless uses all the same core mechanics from 4E. It's a set of ten products (the new Red Box, dice, three tile sets, and a few extra books). The reintroduction of certain game elements removed from the making of 4th edition, and the confirmation that these changes will become standard from the end of 2010 on, has already led many players to calling it "4.5" edition. Naturally, the already-fragmented base was broken further over this.

to:

** '''Dungeons & Dragons Essentials (4th) - 2010:''' A new line of products launched in 2010, compatible with 4th edition rules. ''Essentials'' had the stated intent of offering new players a means of introduction to the game. It is, for the most part, a simplified 4E. There are some differences (for example, fighters and thieves have scaling class features that modify their basic attacks, instead of special attack powers) but nevertheless uses all the same core mechanics from 4E. It's a set of ten products (the new Red Box, dice, UsefulNotes/{{dice}}, three tile sets, and a few extra books). The reintroduction of certain game elements removed from the making of 4th edition, and the confirmation that these changes will become standard from the end of 2010 on, has already led many players to calling it "4.5" edition. Naturally, the already-fragmented base was broken further over this.
12th Jul '16 8:12:08 PM WildCardCourier
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* ''Blackmoor'', a.k.a. ''The First Fantasy Campaign'': The '''very''' first campaign setting, originating from Dave Arneson's wargaming days. Arneson combined the ''Chainmail'' Fantasy Supplement with the dungeon exploration mechanic he created and eventually showed the end result off to Gary Gygax, leading to the creation of D&D. Your typical Good-vs-Evil setting, with the various duchies vying for power while the mysterious Egg of Coot hides in the shadows. Later tied to both Greyhawk (as an archbarony near the Land of Black Ice) and Mystara (as a kingdom from the world's distant past that [[AndManGrewProud rose to great heights]] [[CataclysmBackstory and quickly fell, changing the world in the process]]). While officially discontinued during the TSR days, Arneson was able to keep the rights for the setting and worked with Zeitgiest Games to release setting books for 3.5 and 4th Editions. Blackmoor proudly has the honor of being one of the longest continuously played fantasy role playing campaigns in existence, even spawning a renowned play-by-post game called ''The Last Fantasy Campaign'', which ran from 2005 to 2015.

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* ''Blackmoor'', a.k.a. ''The First Fantasy Campaign'': The '''very''' first campaign setting, originating from Dave Arneson's wargaming days. Arneson combined days, the ''Chainmail'' Fantasy Supplement with result of a slow weekend in October 1970 consisting of '50s monster movies, "fantasy hero" novels, a slump during his most recent wargame session, and the thought of "I can do better than this". So he drew one dungeon exploration mechanic he floor layout, then five more, then created a castle and eventually town from a Sicilian castle model he had lying around. The new setting was a huge hit amongst his fellow ''Braunstein'' players and when he showed the end result off game to Gary Gygax, leading to Gygax in 1972, the creation of D&D. rest, as they say, was history. Your typical Good-vs-Evil setting, with the various duchies vying for power while the mysterious Egg of Coot hides in pulls the strings from the shadows. Later tied to While the "canon" version was a released in 1977 as gazetteer by Judges Guild, alternate versions appeared in both Greyhawk (as an archbarony near the Land of Black Ice) and Mystara (as a kingdom from the world's distant past that [[AndManGrewProud rose to great heights]] [[CataclysmBackstory and quickly fell, changing the world in the process]]).process]]). The setting only had four adventure modules released for it during it's D&D days: ''Adventures in Blackmoor'', ''Temple of the Frog'', ''City of the Gods'', and ''The Duchy of Ten''. While officially discontinued during the TSR days, Arneson was able to keep the rights for the setting and worked with Zeitgiest Games to release setting books for 3.5 and 4th Editions. Blackmoor proudly has the honor of being one of the longest continuously played fantasy role playing campaigns in existence, even spawning a renowned play-by-post game called ''The Last Fantasy Campaign'', which ran from 2005 to 2015.



** The first version was the original home campaign. While it ran from 1972 to 1979, games set there completely ceased in 1985 right after Gygax was ousted from TSR, while the setting itself was "destroyed" in 1988 in the last ''Gord the Rogue'' novel [[note]]a literary declaration that the old Oerth was dead, with Gygax himself furious over the direction TSR was taking the setting[[/note]]. Due to the number of games played each week, Gygax didn't have the time to make a world map completely from scratch and simply used a blank map of North America, filling it in as the campaign went on. Despite the name, the 1975 ''Supplement I: Greyhawk'' digest wasn't a Greyhawk setting book, but a rulebook which helped eliminate the game's dependence on ''Chainmail'', setting the groundwork for what would become Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. Not much is known about the home campaign version, apart from what is presented in the ''Gnome Cache'' novella from the first issues of ''Dragon'' magazine and the ''Gord the Rogue'' novel series. After years of talks about releasing the original Castle Greyhawk dungeon/campaign, the project was finally greenlit as ''Castle Zagyg'' in 2003, although it's immensely troubled production ended with just two of the proposed seven books and a small number of adventure modules being released.[[note]]The Castle Grewhawk dungeon as of 1985 had around 50 floors, meaning Gygax and Kuntz had to sift through years of notes and pick the 13 best parts for publication, while Gygax had to rewrite all the stuff that was still copyright of [=WotC=]. Gygax's health decline in 2004 led to the slow-moving project to grind to a near halt, while Kuntz had to withdraw due to working on other projects. Three months after Gary's death in 2008, his widow Gail pulled all the licensing from Troll Lord Games and transferred them to Gygax Games, but hasn't done anything with the project.[[/note]]

to:

** The first version was the original home campaign.campaign, created after Gygax played a game of Blackmoor in 1972. While it ran from 1972 to 1979, games set there completely ceased in 1985 right after Gygax was ousted from TSR, while the setting itself was "destroyed" in 1988 in the last ''Gord the Rogue'' novel [[note]]a literary declaration that the old Oerth was dead, with Gygax himself furious over the direction TSR was taking the setting[[/note]]. Due to the number of games played each week, Gygax didn't have the time to make a world map completely from scratch and simply used a blank map of North America, filling it in as the campaign went on. Despite the name, the 1975 ''Supplement I: Greyhawk'' digest wasn't a Greyhawk setting book, but a rulebook which helped eliminate the game's dependence on ''Chainmail'', setting the groundwork for what would become Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. Not much is known about the home campaign version, apart from what is presented in the ''Gnome Cache'' novella from the first issues of ''Dragon'' magazine and the ''Gord the Rogue'' novel series. After years of talks about releasing the original Castle Greyhawk dungeon/campaign, the project was finally greenlit as ''Castle Zagyg'' in 2003, although it's immensely troubled production ended with just two of the proposed seven books and a small number of adventure modules being released.[[note]]The Castle Grewhawk dungeon as of 1985 had around 50 floors, meaning Gygax and Kuntz had to sift through years of notes and pick the 13 best parts for publication, while Gygax had to rewrite all the stuff that was still copyright of [=WotC=]. Gygax's health decline in 2004 led to the slow-moving project to grind to a near halt, while Kuntz had to withdraw due to working on other projects. Three months after Gary's death in 2008, his widow Gail pulled all the licensing from Troll Lord Games and transferred them to Gygax Games, but hasn't done anything with the project.[[/note]]



** ''Red Steel'': Personal magical powers, deforming curses. The [[http://index.rpg.net/display-entry.phtml?mainid=8311 campaign book]] has "[[PowerAtAPrice Power has a price!]]" printed [[Administrivia/YouHaveBeenWarned right on the cover]]. Additional rules for {{swashbuckler}}-style game, extra IntelligentGerbil races. Firearms. Cowboys and goblins.
* ''TabletopGame/NentirVale'': Default setting for 4th edition. [[CataclysmBackstory The great empires of mortals were destroyed]] [[AndManGrewProud in a magic war]], leaving behind scattered remnants of civilization in small pockets (described as "points of light") surrounded by dangerous monsters and abandoned and forgotten magic and technology.

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** ''Red Steel'': Personal magical powers, deforming curses.A sub-setting of Mystara released for 2nd Edition AD&D. The [[http://index.rpg.net/display-entry.phtml?mainid=8311 campaign book]] has "[[PowerAtAPrice Power has a price!]]" printed [[Administrivia/YouHaveBeenWarned right on the cover]]. Additional rules for {{swashbuckler}}-style game, extra IntelligentGerbil races. Firearms. Cowboys and goblins.
Set in the Savage Coast region of Mystara. The land is dyed red by the Red Curse: "vermeil", a dust that grants those who ingest it extraordinary power at the expense of crippling deformities. Those affected by the Red Curse must wear jewelry crafted from "cinnabryl" to stave off it's effects.
* ''TabletopGame/NentirVale'': Default setting pseudo-setting for 4th edition. [[CataclysmBackstory The great empires of mortals were destroyed]] [[AndManGrewProud in a magic war]], leaving behind scattered remnants of civilization in small pockets (described as "points of light") surrounded by dangerous monsters and abandoned and forgotten magic and technology.



* '''"Original" Dungeons & Dragons (OD&D) - 1974-1976:''' Also known as "The Original Game". Written by Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson and published by TSR in 1974 as a boxed set consisting of three digest-sized books (the "little brown books" a.k.a. lbb): ''Men & Magic'', ''Monsters & Treasure'', ''The Underworld & Wilderness Adventures''. There were three original classes (Fighting-Man, Cleric and Magic User) and only three alignments (Law, Neutrality, Chaos). Humans could choose between all three classes and advance in their chosen class without limit, while non-human races were severely restricted. [[note]]Dwarves could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 6th level. Elves were multiclass by default and could freely switch between Fighting-Man and Magic-User on an adventure-by-adventure basis, with their level caps being 4th level for Fighting-Man and 8th level for Magic User. Halflings could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 4th level.[[/note]] Hit Points, damage, and initiative were all rolled using a d6. Spell levels were limited to 6th level spells for Magic Users and 5th level spells for Clerics. Received numerous supplements, both officially released and from magazine articles.

to:

* '''"Original" Dungeons & Dragons (OD&D) - 1974-1976:''' Also known as "The Original Game". Written Co-written by Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson and published by TSR in 1974 as a boxed set consisting of three digest-sized books (the "little brown books" a.k.a. lbb): ''Men & Magic'', ''Monsters & Treasure'', ''The Underworld & Wilderness Adventures''. There were three original classes (Fighting-Man, Cleric and Magic User) and only three alignments (Law, Neutrality, Chaos). Humans could choose between all three classes and advance in their chosen class without limit, while non-human races were severely restricted. [[note]]Dwarves could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 6th level. Elves were multiclass by default and could freely switch between Fighting-Man and Magic-User on an adventure-by-adventure basis, with their level caps being 4th level for Fighting-Man and 8th level for Magic User. Halflings could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 4th level.[[/note]] Hit Points, damage, and initiative were all rolled using a d6. Spell levels were limited to 6th level spells for Magic Users and 5th level spells for Clerics. Received numerous supplements, both officially released and from magazine articles.



* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Swords+%26+Wizardry Swords and Wizardry:]]''' One of the more well-known retroclones, this game goes all the way back to the original D&D, with the Cleric, the Fighter and the Magic-User, taking inspiration from sword and sorcery. Notable for having only one saving throw as opposed to the five used in regular old-school D&D, although it includes the option to use the original five. You get to choose whether you want to play with original AC or ascending AC. There are three versions of this game:
** The [=WhiteBox=] Rules which closely emulates the rules of the core box of [=OD&D=].
** The Core Rules which also incorporate the Greyhawk supplement (most notably adding the Thief class).

to:

* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Swords+%26+Wizardry Swords and Wizardry:]]''' One of the more well-known retroclones, this game goes all the way back to the original D&D, with the Cleric, the Fighter and the Magic-User, taking inspiration from sword and sorcery. Notable for having only one saving throw as opposed to the five used in regular old-school D&D, although it includes the option to use the original five. You get to choose whether you want to play with original AC or ascending AC. There are three versions of this game:
game, all of which are free to download:
** The [=WhiteBox=] [[http://www.swordsandwizardry.com/?page_id=6 WhiteBox]] Rules which closely emulates the rules of the core box of [=OD&D=].
** The Core [[http://www.swordsandwizardry.com/?page_id=4 Core]] Rules which also incorporate the Greyhawk supplement (most notably adding the Thief class).
4th Jul '16 7:44:22 PM Discar
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** The [=CharOp=] boards on the Wizards website (and the official FAQ) can be infamous for these. [[TakenForGranite Transmute flesh to stone]], [[DishingOutDirt transmute stone to mud]], [[CoolClearWater purify water]]. Eschew Materials + Major Creation to summon [[EarthShatteringKaboom anti-matter.]] The [[FantasticNuke Locate City Bomb]]. Casting resurrection on the [[OutsideContextVillain armor of opponents]] wearing dragon scale or other exotic hides.

to:

** The [=CharOp=] boards on the Wizards website (and the official FAQ) can be infamous for these. [[TakenForGranite Transmute flesh to stone]], [[DishingOutDirt transmute stone to mud]], [[CoolClearWater purify water]]. Eschew Materials + Major Creation to summon [[EarthShatteringKaboom anti-matter.]] The [[FantasticNuke Locate City Bomb]]. Casting resurrection on the [[OutsideContextVillain [[RaisingTheSteaks armor of opponents]] wearing dragon scale or other exotic hides.
3rd Jul '16 9:56:09 AM WillKeaton
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* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Basic+Fantasy Basic Fantasy]]:''' A retro-clone of the B/X Basic D&D, this one takes the tack of having the player choose races and classes like in AD&D while keeping things as simple as in OD&D. It also uses ascending AC.
* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Castles+%26+Crusades Castles & Crusades]]''': Published by Troll Lord Games. Not strictly a retro-clone as it doesn't mimic a specific prior version, but goes for an old-school feel, as outright emulation wasn't considered legally possible at the time (it predates the other retro-clones). The general idea was to keep the updated mechanics from 3rd edition that players liked, while bringing back the more rules-light mechanics 1st edition classes (by leaving out the skill points and stacking bonuses of feats), and keeping paperwork to minimum skill checks and saving throws are simple d20 + Ability modifier checks, with only a bonus if it's a prime attribute. Also, Gary Gygax approved it, which in itself is a good resume for many old-time players. ''[=StarSiege=]'' is its sci-fi counterpart on the same SIEGE engine. Quickstart version is downloadable [[http://www.trolllord.com/cnc/index.html from Troll Lord Games site]].
* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Dark+Dungeons Dark Dungeons]]:''' Named after the infamous [[ComicBook/ChickTracts Jack Chick]] tract, this is a very faithful retroclone of the BECMI / Rules Cyclopedia version of basic D&D, that covers all five boxed sets (including the Immortals rules, although from RC's Wrath of the Immortals supplement rather than the BECMI box) in one book, merging in the optional rules from the later sets directly into the core rules and including a ''TabletopGame/{{Spelljammer}}'' inspired cosmology.
* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Labyrinth+Lord Labyrinth Lord]]:''' Another retroclone based on old-school D&D, this one uses the B/X version of Basic D&D as its base. There are also two supplements which recreate Original D&D (Original Edition Characters) and AD&D (Advanced Edition Companion). Goblinoid Games, the publisher, uses a modified version of the rules of this game for their post-apocalypse game called ''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Mutant+Future Mutant Future]]'', a close-as-you-can-get-it homage to ''TabletopGame/GammaWorld''.
* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=OSRIC OSRIC]]:''' One of the first "retro-clone" games, this game is a faithful recreation of the first edition of AD&D with a few (extremely minor) differences. It still got all the characteristic traits, from time segments to alignment languages, though the names of TabletopGame/{{Greyhawk}} [=NPC=]s are stripped from spells. Freely downloadable [[http://www.knights-n-knaves.com/osric/index.html from the developers' site.]]
* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Swords+%26+Wizardry Swords and Wizardry]]:''' One of the more well-known retroclones, this game goes all the way back to the original D&D, with the Cleric, the Fighter and the Magic-User, taking inspiration from sword and sorcery. Notable for having only one saving throw as opposed to the five used in regular old-school D&D, although it includes the option to use the original five. You get to choose whether you want to play with original AC or ascending AC. There are three versions of this game:

to:

* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Basic+Fantasy Basic Fantasy]]:''' Fantasy:]]''' A retro-clone of the B/X Basic D&D, this one takes the tack of having the player choose races and classes like in AD&D while keeping things as simple as in OD&D. It also uses ascending AC.
* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Castles+%26+Crusades Castles & Crusades]]''': Crusades:]]''' Published by Troll Lord Games. Not strictly a retro-clone as it doesn't mimic a specific prior version, but goes for an old-school feel, as outright emulation wasn't considered legally possible at the time (it predates the other retro-clones). The general idea was to keep the updated mechanics from 3rd edition that players liked, while bringing back the more rules-light mechanics 1st edition classes (by leaving out the skill points and stacking bonuses of feats), and keeping paperwork to minimum skill checks and saving throws are simple d20 + Ability modifier checks, with only a bonus if it's a prime attribute. Also, Gary Gygax approved it, which in itself is a good resume for many old-time players. ''[=StarSiege=]'' is its sci-fi counterpart on the same SIEGE engine. Quickstart version is downloadable [[http://www.trolllord.com/cnc/index.html from Troll Lord Games site]].
* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Dark+Dungeons Dark Dungeons]]:''' Dungeons:]]''' Named after the infamous [[ComicBook/ChickTracts Jack Chick]] tract, this is a very faithful retroclone of the BECMI / Rules Cyclopedia version of basic D&D, that covers all five boxed sets (including the Immortals rules, although from RC's Wrath of the Immortals supplement rather than the BECMI box) in one book, merging in the optional rules from the later sets directly into the core rules and including a ''TabletopGame/{{Spelljammer}}'' inspired cosmology.
* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Labyrinth+Lord Labyrinth Lord]]:''' Lord:]]''' Another retroclone based on old-school D&D, this one uses the B/X version of Basic D&D as its base. There are also two supplements which recreate Original D&D (Original Edition Characters) and AD&D (Advanced Edition Companion). Goblinoid Games, the publisher, uses a modified version of the rules of this game for their post-apocalypse game called ''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Mutant+Future Mutant Future]]'', a close-as-you-can-get-it homage to ''TabletopGame/GammaWorld''.
* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=OSRIC OSRIC]]:''' OSRIC:]]''' One of the first "retro-clone" games, this game is a faithful recreation of the first edition of AD&D with a few (extremely minor) differences. It still got all the characteristic traits, from time segments to alignment languages, though the names of TabletopGame/{{Greyhawk}} [=NPC=]s are stripped from spells. Freely downloadable [[http://www.knights-n-knaves.com/osric/index.html from the developers' site.]]
* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Swords+%26+Wizardry Swords and Wizardry]]:''' Wizardry:]]''' One of the more well-known retroclones, this game goes all the way back to the original D&D, with the Cleric, the Fighter and the Magic-User, taking inspiration from sword and sorcery. Notable for having only one saving throw as opposed to the five used in regular old-school D&D, although it includes the option to use the original five. You get to choose whether you want to play with original AC or ascending AC. There are three versions of this game:
1st Jul '16 2:59:01 PM WildCardCourier
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* ''Pelinore'': A little-known setting created by TSR's UK branch for AD&D 1st Edition and published in ''Imagine'' magazine, which ran from 1983-1985. Set in what is presumably a FlatWorld, at the supposed center lies the rumored Worldheart, the nexus of harmony and peace, with the lands extending beyond it becoming more chaotic until it reaches The Rim, the edge of the world where chaos reigns. However, most gameplay was set in a region of the Country of Cerwyn known as the [[MeaningfulName City League]], and it was left to the DM to expand the world as they say fit.

to:

* ''Pelinore'': A little-known setting created by TSR's UK branch for AD&D 1st Edition and published in ''Imagine'' magazine, which ran from 1983-1985. Set in what is presumably a FlatWorld, at the supposed center lies the rumored Worldheart, the nexus of harmony and peace, with the lands extending beyond it becoming more chaotic until it reaches The Rim, the edge of the world where chaos reigns. However, most gameplay was set in a region section of the Country of Cerwyn known as the [[MeaningfulName City League]], and it was left to the DM to expand the world outside of Cerwyn as they say saw fit.



* ''Wilderlands of High Fantasy'': The first officially licensed and published third-party campaign setting for "Original" D&D, created by Judges Guild after the success of their ''City State of the Invincible Overlord'' city setting and released in a collection of 4 32-page booklets. In 2002, Judges Guild ended up working together with Necromancer Games to release a boxed version for 3.5 Edition. The earliest sandbox-style campaign setting, and it shows: 18 maps that altogether cover an area about 780 miles wide by 1080 miles long, roughly the size of the Mediterranean. Each individual map contained a number of pre-established points-of-interest, with the accompanying books containing entry upon entry for every bastion of civilization, set of ruins, and monster lair within the region. Touted as "First Edition feel", the Wilderlands sticks to the old-school SwordAndSorcery origins of D&D, a time when the lines between sci-fi and fantasy were very murky. So you can have people who's greatest technological achievement is the wheel potentially meet people who's greatest technological achievement is calculus, and ''then'' have them potentially happen upon a crashed alien spaceship from long before recorded history.

to:

* ''Wilderlands of High Fantasy'': The first officially licensed and published third-party campaign setting for "Original" D&D, created by Judges Guild after the success of their ''City State of the Invincible Overlord'' city setting and released in a collection of 4 32-page booklets. In 2002, Judges Guild ended up working together with Necromancer Games to release a boxed version for 3.5 Edition. The earliest sandbox-style campaign setting, and it shows: 18 maps that altogether cover an area about 780 miles wide by 1080 miles long, roughly the size of the Mediterranean. Each individual map contained a number of pre-established points-of-interest, with the accompanying books containing entry upon entry for every bastion of civilization, set of ruins, and monster lair within the region. Touted as "First Edition feel", the Wilderlands sticks to the old-school SwordAndSorcery origins of D&D, a time when the lines between sci-fi and fantasy were very murky. So murky and SchizoTech was everywhere. Meaning you can could have people who's greatest technological achievement is the wheel wheel, potentially meet people who's greatest technological achievement is calculus, and ''then'' have them potentially happen upon a crashed alien spaceship from an age long before recorded history.
1st Jul '16 2:52:35 PM WildCardCourier
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* ''Blackmoor'', a.k.a. ''The First Fantasy Campaign'': The '''very''' first campaign setting, originating from Dave Arneson's wargaming days. Arneson combined the ''Chainmail'' Fantasy Supplement with the dungeon exploration mechanic he created and eventually showed the end result off to Gary Gygax, leading to the creation of D&D. Your typical Good-vs-Evil setting, with the various duchies vying for power while the mysterious Egg of Coot hides in the shadows. Later tied to both Greyhawk (as an archbarony near the Land of Black Ice) and Mystara (as a kingdom from the world's distant past that [[AndManGrewProud rose to great heights]] [[CataclysmBackstory and quickly fell, changing the world in the process]]). While officially discontinued during the TSR days, Arneson kept the rights for the setting and worked with Zeitgiest Games to release setting books for 3.5 and 4th Editions. Blackmoor proudly has the honor of being one of the longest continuously played fantasy role playing campaigns in existence, even spawning a renowned play-by-post game called ''The Last Fantasy Campaign''.
* ''Council of Wyrms'': Dragons plus politics. Set in an island chain called Io's Blood Isles, the dragon residents have a loose democratic government and must work together on issues affecting dragon welfare. They retain CharacterAlignment inclinations, but those are less important than matters of honor and politics. If the Council send a party with a Gold dragon as a substitute of paladin and a Black dragon as a substitute of thief on a mission, they'll fly. Dragon slayers don't see much difference either. [[invoked]]

to:

* ''Blackmoor'', a.k.a. ''The First Fantasy Campaign'': The '''very''' first campaign setting, originating from Dave Arneson's wargaming days. Arneson combined the ''Chainmail'' Fantasy Supplement with the dungeon exploration mechanic he created and eventually showed the end result off to Gary Gygax, leading to the creation of D&D. Your typical Good-vs-Evil setting, with the various duchies vying for power while the mysterious Egg of Coot hides in the shadows. Later tied to both Greyhawk (as an archbarony near the Land of Black Ice) and Mystara (as a kingdom from the world's distant past that [[AndManGrewProud rose to great heights]] [[CataclysmBackstory and quickly fell, changing the world in the process]]). While officially discontinued during the TSR days, Arneson kept was able to keep the rights for the setting and worked with Zeitgiest Games to release setting books for 3.5 and 4th Editions. Blackmoor proudly has the honor of being one of the longest continuously played fantasy role playing campaigns in existence, even spawning a renowned play-by-post game called ''The Last Fantasy Campaign''.
Campaign'', which ran from 2005 to 2015.
* ''Council of Wyrms'': Dragons plus politics. Set in an island chain called Io's Blood Isles, the dragon residents have a loose democratic government and must work together on issues affecting dragon welfare. They retain CharacterAlignment inclinations, but those are less important than matters of honor and politics. If the Council send a party with a Gold dragon as a substitute of paladin and a Black dragon as a substitute of thief on a mission, they'll fly. Dragon slayers don't see much difference either.There are no native humans in the setting; any humans that appear are dragon slaying adventurers. [[invoked]]



* ''Pelinore'': A little-known setting created by TSR's UK branch for AD&D 1st Edition and published in ''Imagine'' magazine, which ran from 1983-1985. Set in what is presumably a FlatWorld, at the supposed center lies the rumored Worldheart, the nexus of harmony and peace, with the lands extending beyond it becoming more chaotic until it reaches The Rim, the edge of the world where chaos reigns. However, most gameplay was set in a region of the Country of Cerwyn known as the [[MeaningfulName City League]], and it was left to the DM to expand the world as they say fit.



* '''"Original" Dungeons & Dragons (OD&D) - 1974-1976:''' The original set was written by Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson, and was published by TSR in 1974 as a boxed set consisting of three digest-sized books (the "little brown books" a.k.a. lbb): ''Men & Magic'', ''Monsters & Treasure'', ''The Underworld & Wilderness Adventures''. There were three original classes (Fighting-Man, Cleric and Magic User) and only three alignments (Law, Neutrality, Chaos). Humans could choose between all three classes and advance in their chosen class without limit, while non-human races were severely restricted. [[note]]Dwarves could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 6th level. Elves were multiclass by default and could freely switch between Fighting-Man and Magic-User on an adventure-by-adventure basis, with their level caps being 4th level for Fighting-Man and 8th level for Magic User. Halflings could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 4th level.[[/note]] Hit Points, damage, and initiative were all rolled using a d6. Spell levels were limited to 6th level spells for Magic Users and 5th level spells for Clerics. Received numerous supplements, both officially released and from magazine articles.

to:

* '''"Original" Dungeons & Dragons (OD&D) - 1974-1976:''' The original set was written Also known as "The Original Game". Written by Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson, Arneson and was published by TSR in 1974 as a boxed set consisting of three digest-sized books (the "little brown books" a.k.a. lbb): ''Men & Magic'', ''Monsters & Treasure'', ''The Underworld & Wilderness Adventures''. There were three original classes (Fighting-Man, Cleric and Magic User) and only three alignments (Law, Neutrality, Chaos). Humans could choose between all three classes and advance in their chosen class without limit, while non-human races were severely restricted. [[note]]Dwarves could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 6th level. Elves were multiclass by default and could freely switch between Fighting-Man and Magic-User on an adventure-by-adventure basis, with their level caps being 4th level for Fighting-Man and 8th level for Magic User. Halflings could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 4th level.[[/note]] Hit Points, damage, and initiative were all rolled using a d6. Spell levels were limited to 6th level spells for Magic Users and 5th level spells for Clerics. Received numerous supplements, both officially released and from magazine articles.



** The first setting-based sourcebook was released in November 2015. Titled ''The Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide'', the sourcebook covers the Sword Coast region of the ''Forgotten Realms'' and includes a number of options for both player and Dungeon Masters.

to:

** The first setting-based sourcebook was released in November 2015. Titled ''The Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide'', In an effort to keep things "fresh", [=WotC=] is releasing two storyling-based adventure modules each year, commissioning third party publishers such as Kobold Press, Sasquatch Game Studio, and Green Ronin to help out.
** As a show of good faith to
the sourcebook covers digital distribution market and the Sword Coast region of Open-Gaming License, [=WotC=] started their own storefront, the ''Forgotten Realms'' and includes a number of options for both player and [[http://www.dmsguild.com/ Dungeon Masters.
Masters Guild]], which allows the fans to self-publish their own material and [=WotC=] to publish both [=PDFs=] of all the past TSR/[=WotC=] releases from the "Original" Edition through Fourth Edition and new Adventurers League content.
19th Jun '16 3:15:49 AM Morgenthaler
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Added DiffLines:

* MassResurrection:
** 2nd Edition supplement ''Book of Artifacts''. The silver Orb of Dragonkind could resurrect 20-200 bodies once per year.
** Module T1-4 ''TabletopGame/TempleOfElementalEvil''. If the deity St. Cuthbert is summoned, he will Raise all slain {{PC}}s from the dead with a gesture.
** In early editions of the game, the Wish spell was able to resurrect a group of characters.
18th Jun '16 8:13:57 PM nombretomado
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* ''[[LegendOfTheFiveRings Rokugan]]'': JidaiGeki style fantasy. Licensed from the makers of the ''Legend of the Five Rings'' card game.

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* ''[[LegendOfTheFiveRings ''[[TabletopGame/LegendOfTheFiveRings Rokugan]]'': JidaiGeki style fantasy. Licensed from the makers of the ''Legend of the Five Rings'' card game.
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