History TableTopGame / DungeonsAndDragons

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* '''"Original" Dungeons & Dragons (OD&D) - 1974-1976:''' Also known as "The Original Game". Co-written by Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson and published by TSR in 1974 as a boxed set consisting of three digest-sized books (the "little brown books" a.k.a. lbb): ''Men & Magic'', ''Monsters & Treasure'', ''The Underworld & Wilderness Adventures''. There were three original classes (Fighting-Man, Cleric and Magic User) and only three alignments (Law, Neutrality, Chaos). Humans could choose between all three classes and advance in their chosen class without limit, while non-human races were severely restricted. [[note]]Dwarves could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 6th level. Elves were multiclass by default and could freely switch between Fighting-Man and Magic-User on an adventure-by-adventure basis, with their level caps being 4th level for Fighting-Man and 8th level for Magic User. Halflings could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 4th level.[[/note]] Hit Points, damage, and initiative were all rolled using a d6. Spell levels were limited to 6th level spells for Magic Users and 5th level spells for Clerics. Received numerous supplements, both officially released and from magazine articles.
** '''Supplement I: Greyhawk - 1975:''' Introduced the Thief class, the Paladin as a Fighing-Man subclass, Half-Elves as a playable race, and more monsters. Amended the level and class restrictions for Dwarves, Elves, and Halflings to account for the Thief class. [[note]]Dwarves, Elves, and Halflings could advance as a Thief with no level cap. Dwarves could advance to either 7th or 8th level Fighting-Man with an exceptional Strength score; they could also multiclass as either a Fighting-Man/Thief or a Fighting-Man/Cleric, although the Fighting-Man/Cleric option was NPC-only and their Cleric level capped at 7th level. Elves could advance up to 5th or 6th level Fighting-Man with an exceptional Strength score and 9th Magic-User with an exceptional Intelligence score; they could also multiclass as either a Fighting-Man/Magic-User/Cleric or a Fighting-Man/Magic-User/Thief, although FM/MU/Cleric had their Magic-User and Cleric classes capped at 6th level. Halflings could choose to be either a Fighting-Man or a Thief and had the best Thief skill bonuses of the non-human races. Half-Elves multiclass as a Fighting-Man/Magic-User by default, with both classes capped at 6th level, although exceptional Strength/Intelligence scores would raise them up to 7th or 8th level; they could also multiclass as a FM/MU/Cleric with a high enough Wisdom score, but their Cleric level capped at 4th level.[[/note]] Magic Users had access to 7th-9th level spells, but only if their Intelligence score was high enough, while Clerics had access to 6th and 7th level spells. Contained new and additional rules in order to distance itself from ''Chainmail''.
** '''Supplement II: Blackmoor - 1975:''' Introduced the Monk as a Cleric subclass, the Assassin as a Thief subclass, a system for diseases, a "hit location" system, rules for underwater adventures, and even more monsters. Also contains the very first published adventure module: ''The Temple of the Frog'' for Blackmoor.
** '''Supplement III: Eldritch Wizardry - 1976:''' Introduced the Druid as a Cleric subclass, the option for human psionics (restricted to Fighting-Men, Magic Users, Clerics, and Thieves). Marks the first appearances of the Demon Princes Orcus and Demogorgon, while introducing the lich-turned-deity Vecna.
** '''Supplement IV: Gods, Demi-Gods & Heroes - 1976:''' The last official supplement. Introduced deities, demi-gods, and legendary heroes from mythology and religions both real (Egyptian, Celtic, Norse) and fictional ([[Franchise/ConanTheBarbarian Hyborean]] and [[Literature/TheElricSaga Melnibonéan]]) for two purposes: 1) as a means of integrating pre-established mythologies into campaigns, and 2) a last ditch effort for reaching the "Monty Hall" style [=DMs=] who ran giveaway campaigns and to show the absurdity of 40+ level characters by giving them opponents that could wipe the floor with them. Unfortunately started the concept of "if you stat it, they will kill it".

to:

* '''"Original" Dungeons & Dragons (OD&D) - 1974-1976:''' 1974-1976''': Also known as "The Original Game". Co-written by Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson and published by TSR in 1974 as a boxed set consisting of three digest-sized books (the "little brown books" a.k.a. lbb): ''Men & Magic'', ''Monsters & Treasure'', ''The Underworld & Wilderness Adventures''. There were three original classes (Fighting-Man, Cleric and Magic User) and only three alignments (Law, Neutrality, Chaos). Humans could choose between all three classes and advance in their chosen class without limit, while non-human races were severely restricted. [[note]]Dwarves could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 6th level. Elves were multiclass by default and could freely switch between Fighting-Man and Magic-User on an adventure-by-adventure basis, with their level caps being 4th level for Fighting-Man and 8th level for Magic User. Halflings could only be Fighting-Men and capped at 4th level.[[/note]] Hit Points, damage, and initiative were all rolled using a d6. Spell levels were limited to 6th level spells for Magic Users and 5th level spells for Clerics. Received numerous supplements, both officially released and from magazine articles.
** '''Supplement I: Greyhawk - 1975:''' 1975''': Introduced the Thief class, the Paladin as a Fighing-Man subclass, Half-Elves as a playable race, and more monsters. Amended the level and class restrictions for Dwarves, Elves, and Halflings to account for the Thief class. [[note]]Dwarves, Elves, and Halflings could advance as a Thief with no level cap. Dwarves could advance to either 7th or 8th level Fighting-Man with an exceptional Strength score; they could also multiclass as either a Fighting-Man/Thief or a Fighting-Man/Cleric, although the Fighting-Man/Cleric option was NPC-only and their Cleric level capped at 7th level. Elves could advance up to 5th or 6th level Fighting-Man with an exceptional Strength score and 9th Magic-User with an exceptional Intelligence score; they could also multiclass as either a Fighting-Man/Magic-User/Cleric or a Fighting-Man/Magic-User/Thief, although FM/MU/Cleric had their Magic-User and Cleric classes capped at 6th level. Halflings could choose to be either a Fighting-Man or a Thief and had the best Thief skill bonuses of the non-human races. Half-Elves multiclass as a Fighting-Man/Magic-User by default, with both classes capped at 6th level, although exceptional Strength/Intelligence scores would raise them up to 7th or 8th level; they could also multiclass as a FM/MU/Cleric with a high enough Wisdom score, but their Cleric level capped at 4th level.[[/note]] Magic Users had access to 7th-9th level spells, but only if their Intelligence score was high enough, while Clerics had access to 6th and 7th level spells. Contained new and additional rules in order to distance itself from ''Chainmail''.
** '''Supplement II: Blackmoor - 1975:''' 1975''': Introduced the Monk as a Cleric subclass, the Assassin as a Thief subclass, a system for diseases, a "hit location" system, rules for underwater adventures, and even more monsters. Also contains the very first published adventure module: ''The Temple of the Frog'' for Blackmoor.
** '''Supplement III: Eldritch Wizardry - 1976:''' 1976''': Introduced the Druid as a Cleric subclass, the option for human psionics (restricted to Fighting-Men, Magic Users, Clerics, and Thieves). Marks the first appearances of the Demon Princes Orcus and Demogorgon, while introducing the lich-turned-deity Vecna.
** '''Supplement IV: Gods, Demi-Gods & Heroes - 1976:''' 1976''': The last official supplement. Introduced deities, demi-gods, and legendary heroes from mythology and religions both real (Egyptian, Celtic, Norse) and fictional ([[Franchise/ConanTheBarbarian Hyborean]] and [[Literature/TheElricSaga Melnibonéan]]) for two purposes: 1) as a means of integrating pre-established mythologies into campaigns, and 2) a last ditch effort for reaching the "Monty Hall" style [=DMs=] who ran giveaway campaigns and to show the absurdity of 40+ level characters by giving them opponents that could wipe the floor with them. Unfortunately started the concept of "if you stat it, they will kill it".



* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?key=system&value=D%2526D%2B%252F%2BBasic&sort=system,systemversion Basic Dungeons & Dragons]] - 1977-1991:''' Originally introduced in 1977, and edited by brain surgeon John Eric Holmes.[[note]]Not joking; Holmes was a polymath who, in addition to being a neurosurgeon and lecturer, wrote fantasy/sci-fi novels in his spare time and first came up with the idea for the Basic Set as a new players guide for his home campaign.[[/note]] Originally this was a starter set for new players to more easily learn the game (which was considered rather difficult to learn from the original set). The first release only covered levels 1-3, and players were intended to move on to ''Advanced Dungeons & Dragons'' after this. The revision published in 1981, edited by Tom Moldvay, simplified the game further, making it a distinct game system and product line. The most notable simplification is that Dwarf, Elf and Halfling are counted as ''classes'', not races that could choose a class separately the way humans did; so only humans could play anything but a standard version of their species i.e. classes are ''archetype''-based. An ''Expert Set'' expansion edited by David "Zeb" Cook accompanying the 1981 version (which combined are known as the "B/X" version) let players keep with these simpler rules. The next revision was the BECMI series of boxed sets by Frank Metzner (Basic, Expert, Companion, Master and Immortal, respectively), begun in 1983, which extended the game up to epic levels while turning the first set into a tutorial. The rules from the first four of the BECMI series were later compiled in 1991 into the ''Rules Cyclopedia'' written by Creator/AaronAllston, which is still considered a classic; this was accompanied by the last version of the Basic Set, now covering levels 1-5.
* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?key=system&value=AD%26D&sort=system,systemversion Advanced Dungeons & Dragons]] (1st edition) - 1977-1979:''' The more complete rules, including more character classes, and the enshrinement of the classic Dungeons & Dragons alignment system. More or less completely compatible with the simpler Dungeons & Dragons, and many gamers mixed and matched at will. As well, CharacterClassSystem was unified but some classes are human-only, others forbidden to certain races.[[note]]This is actually the rules from the original set, but the restrictions were a bit looser. Most people didn't understand the distinction early, which is why Moldvay just said "to heck with it" and made race-as-class the standard for the basic game; the B/X rules were actually mechanically identical, just presented differently.[[/note]]
** '''Unearthed Arcana - 1985:''' A codification of many of the new rules and options introduced in various magazines up to that point. Added 3 classes: Cavalier, Barbarian, and Thief-Acrobat -- which were also the same 3 classes that appeared in the WesternAnimation/DungeonsAndDragons cartoon show that didn't already exist in the Player's Handbook. While thief-acrobat was just a specialization of thief, and barbarian was another fighter subclass, cavalier was a whole new top-level class category in its own right; paladins were now subclasses of cavaliers instead of subclasses of fighters, which meant that some previously legitimate paladin characters no longer had high enough stats to be paladins any more. Also added a boatload of new spells and magic items. Clarified some rules, but also had several misprints and introduced as many new problems[[note]]Especially when it added to the haystack of non-uniform rules, like plate armor damage absorption![[/note]] as it solved.
** '''Oriental Adventures - 1985:''' A supplement designed to play Dungeons and Dragons campaigns set in the FarEast rather than MedievalEuropeanFantasy. While it came with a brief setting description (which eventually became Kara-Tur, mentioned above) the rules were very much designed to create a generic oriental setting. The ninja class allowed you to take levels in it without having to "switch away" from your main class, a notion that 3rd Edition would later codify as a PrestigeClass.
* '''Advanced Dungeons & Dragons (2nd edition) - 1989:''' The first full-scale revamp. Renamed all demons, devils and the like to avoid the Satanic Panic idiocy that hit the game in the 80s, tweaked the combat system, threw out material they thought parents might object to, like half-orcs and assassins (who returned with Satyrs and Bandits in [[http://index.rpg.net/display-entry.phtml?mainid=2624 Complete Humanoids]] and [[http://index.rpg.net/display-entry.phtml?mainid=2636 Complete Thief]] respectively), and other smallish changes.

to:

* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?key=system&value=D%2526D%2B%252F%2BBasic&sort=system,systemversion Basic Dungeons & Dragons]] - 1977-1991:''' 1977-1991''': Originally introduced in 1977, and edited by brain surgeon John Eric Holmes.[[note]]Not joking; Holmes was a polymath who, in addition to being a neurosurgeon and lecturer, wrote fantasy/sci-fi novels in his spare time and first came up with the idea for the Basic Set as a new players guide for his home campaign.[[/note]] Originally this was a starter set for new players to more easily learn the game (which was considered rather difficult to learn from the original set). The first release only covered levels 1-3, and players were intended to move on to ''Advanced Dungeons & Dragons'' after this. The revision published in 1981, edited by Tom Moldvay, simplified the game further, making it a distinct game system and product line. The most notable simplification is that Dwarf, Elf and Halfling are counted as ''classes'', not races that could choose a class separately the way humans did; so only humans could play anything but a standard version of their species i.e. classes are ''archetype''-based. An ''Expert Set'' expansion edited by David "Zeb" Cook accompanying the 1981 version (which combined are known as the "B/X" version) let players keep with these simpler rules. The next revision was the BECMI series of boxed sets by Frank Metzner (Basic, Expert, Companion, Master and Immortal, respectively), begun in 1983, which extended the game up to epic levels while turning the first set into a tutorial. The rules from the first four of the BECMI series were later compiled in 1991 into the ''Rules Cyclopedia'' written by Creator/AaronAllston, which is still considered a classic; this was accompanied by the last version of the Basic Set, now covering levels 1-5.
* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?key=system&value=AD%26D&sort=system,systemversion Advanced Dungeons & Dragons]] (1st edition) - 1977-1979:''' 1977-1979''': The more complete rules, including more character classes, and the enshrinement of the classic Dungeons & Dragons alignment system. More or less completely compatible with the simpler Dungeons & Dragons, and many gamers mixed and matched at will. As well, CharacterClassSystem was unified but some classes are human-only, others forbidden to certain races.[[note]]This is actually the rules from the original set, but the restrictions were a bit looser. Most people didn't understand the distinction early, which is why Moldvay just said "to heck with it" and made race-as-class the standard for the basic game; the B/X rules were actually mechanically identical, just presented differently.[[/note]]
** '''Unearthed Arcana - 1985:''' 1985''': A codification of many of the new rules and options introduced in various magazines up to that point. Added 3 classes: Cavalier, Barbarian, and Thief-Acrobat -- which were also the same 3 classes that appeared in the WesternAnimation/DungeonsAndDragons cartoon show that didn't already exist in the Player's Handbook. While thief-acrobat was just a specialization of thief, and barbarian was another fighter subclass, cavalier was a whole new top-level class category in its own right; paladins were now subclasses of cavaliers instead of subclasses of fighters, which meant that some previously legitimate paladin characters no longer had high enough stats to be paladins any more. Also added a boatload of new spells and magic items. Clarified some rules, but also had several misprints and introduced as many new problems[[note]]Especially when it added to the haystack of non-uniform rules, like plate armor damage absorption![[/note]] as it solved.
** '''Oriental Adventures - 1985:''' 1985''': A supplement designed to play Dungeons and Dragons campaigns set in the FarEast rather than MedievalEuropeanFantasy. While it came with a brief setting description (which eventually became Kara-Tur, mentioned above) the rules were very much designed to create a generic oriental setting. The ninja class allowed you to take levels in it without having to "switch away" from your main class, a notion that 3rd Edition would later codify as a PrestigeClass.
* '''Advanced Dungeons & Dragons (2nd edition) - 1989:''' 1989''': The first full-scale revamp. Renamed all demons, devils and the like to avoid the Satanic Panic idiocy that hit the game in the 80s, tweaked the combat system, threw out material they thought parents might object to, like half-orcs and assassins (who returned with Satyrs and Bandits in [[http://index.rpg.net/display-entry.phtml?mainid=2624 Complete Humanoids]] and [[http://index.rpg.net/display-entry.phtml?mainid=2636 Complete Thief]] respectively), and other smallish changes.



* '''Dungeons & Dragons (3rd edition) - 2000:''' 3rd edition made major simplifications to the rules by using the TabletopGame/D20System (which was originally created specifically for D&D 3.0) based on roll-over used in TabletopGame/GammaWorld long ago. The simplification was comprehensive enough to mean that nearly all character actions will fall into one of three areas - combat, skills and magic. This means that 3rd edition is also more flexible than 2nd; skills and abilities are more universal, with every class being able to attempt actions like "bluff" or "hide", where as only specific classes had access to them before. This time the CharacterClassSystem dominates the weaker race system and for powerful and unusual creatures what was racial HD is treated as "class". The standard level limit was set at 20 (higher levels were covered in the ''TabletopGame/EpicLevelHandbook''), again without racial restrictions of any kind, although each race had a "favored class" that factored into multiclassing. The previous, crufty system of "weapon proficiency slots" was revamped into a somewhat-less-crufty system of Feats. Overall, the game became a lot simpler to use without losing very much of its depth. In addition, much of the material thrown out in 2nd edition - half-orcs, monks, battles with demons, and so on, were added back in (some in the core rulebooks, others in supplements). The most obvious flaws: indecisive unification [[note]]Such as class feature "skill works differently" -- e.g. out-of-table Rogue abilities to deal with difficult and magic traps. Or prestige classes awkwardly referring to the base class -- like with "+1 to existing spellcasting class" or "we don't say Druid, we say requires Wild Shape... which has nothing to do with the class".[[/note]], skill rank inflation, feats handled separately without any common meaning to them[[note]]''Complete Scoundrel'' later tried to abate two latter problems at once with "[[http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=dnd/ex/20070105a&page=5 skill tricks]]" mechanics.[[/note]] and LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards on steroids.
** '''Dungeons & Dragons (3.5 edition) - 2003:''' Rebalancing and fixing up of 3rd edition. ''Lots'' of little fixes. However, the gradual shift from attempts to model the game world to an abstract "chess rules balance" approach becomes rather obvious. Individual settings are routinely treated much more invasively at this point, starting with "how to shoehorn this into X" advice on everything.
* '''Dungeons & Dragons (4th edition) - 2008:''' A major overhaul that changed a lot of the mechanics, making it easier for new players to get used to the basic D&D concepts. Its setting and rules are a lot less varied than 3.5 - there's no more crafting system, most magic and attacks are made into "powers" that vary by each class, and magic items have been slimmed down - and there's more pluses in the game rather than minuses (i.e. most races get two + 2 to abilities, rather than the usual 3.5 one of +2 to one, -2 to one). To this end, the game is more fitting (and clearly designed) for a heroic campaign that is combat-heavy and very fantasy-oriented, with very few guidelines on the role-playing portion. Combat itself has been highly revised so that each class is equally capable, but in different roles: Wizards have area-attack spells and debuffs, fighters draw attention and punish enemies who don't attack them, rangers do heavy damage with an assortment of multi-attack powers, etc., and all of these are presented in a standardized format to keep classes more or less balanced. The main problems that scared fans away included concerns that it plays too much like a {{MMORPG}}, and/or a tabletop miniatures war game. Indeed, the assumption that players use miniatures on a map is even expressed throughout the core rules, such as movement being described in squares, not feet. Fans were also unhappy with changes to published settings from the time period as well.
** '''Dungeons & Dragons Essentials (4th) - 2010:''' A new line of products launched in 2010, compatible with 4th edition rules. ''Essentials'' had the stated intent of offering new players a means of introduction to the game. It is, for the most part, a simplified 4E. There are some differences (for example, fighters and thieves have scaling class features that modify their basic attacks, instead of special attack powers) but nevertheless uses all the same core mechanics from 4E. It's a set of ten products (the new Red Box, UsefulNotes/{{dice}}, three tile sets, and a few extra books). The reintroduction of certain game elements removed from the making of 4th edition, and the confirmation that these changes will become standard from the end of 2010 on, has already led many players to calling it "4.5" edition. Naturally, the already-fragmented base was broken further over this.
* '''Dungeons & Dragons (5th Edition) - 2014:''' Developed under the title ''D&D Next'' and officially launched in 2014, 5th edition was an attempt by Wizards to recapture and unite some of the fractured fanbase. The basic mechanics resemble a mixture of 2nd and 3rd editions with some influences by 4th edition. The overall power levels have been reduced: the max level cap is 20 ''period'', magic items are much more rare and do not scale in levels, and the bonuses/penalties to an action seldom break double digits. Stacking modifiers have been replaced with a simple advantage/disadvantage system where the character with the advantage/disadvantage rolls two dice for the action and picks the higher/lower die. Magic spells with durations are now 'concentration' type, meaning a magic user can ever only have one such spell active at any time. Most major, world-altering magics are rituals that take minutes if not hours and days to cast. Each class is now firmly wedded to a single character concept, with class archetypes and character backgrounds (representing social class and upbringing) chosen at creation being used to hybridize characters. Most post-creation exclusives are gone, but multiclassing has been returned to 3rd edition standards. Roleplaying and flavor have been increased in importance, with the old 2nd edition alignment system restored and canonical D&D characters from related media being used as examples of their respective classes, alignments and backgrounds. Pinning down the primary world for Fifth Edition is a bit dodgy: while the core books are written in a multiverse view and are near-completely adaptable to any setting, all of the official Adventurer's League material for organized play is primarily set in the ''Forgotten Realms''.[[note]]The ''Princes of the Apocalypse'' adventure, which is blatantly stated as "The Temple of Elemental Evil in Faerûn", includes info for adapting the content for Dark Sun, Dragonlance, Greyhawk, Eberron, and home campaigns; while ''Curse of Strahd'' is a combination enhanced remake of the original Ravenloft adventure and a return to Ravenloft as a campaign setting.[[/note]] Fan response has been mostly positive, with some praising the return to a more roleplaying-based system based on in-universe-justified abilities, while others bemoan a lack of character options on release and argue that the game has returned to LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards.

to:

* '''Dungeons & Dragons (3rd edition) - 2000:''' 2000''': 3rd edition made major simplifications to the rules by using the TabletopGame/D20System (which was originally created specifically for D&D 3.0) based on roll-over used in TabletopGame/GammaWorld long ago. The simplification was comprehensive enough to mean that nearly all character actions will fall into one of three areas - combat, skills and magic. This means that 3rd edition is also more flexible than 2nd; skills and abilities are more universal, with every class being able to attempt actions like "bluff" or "hide", where as only specific classes had access to them before. This time the CharacterClassSystem dominates the weaker race system and for powerful and unusual creatures what was racial HD is treated as "class". The standard level limit was set at 20 (higher levels were covered in the ''TabletopGame/EpicLevelHandbook''), again without racial restrictions of any kind, although each race had a "favored class" that factored into multiclassing. The previous, crufty system of "weapon proficiency slots" was revamped into a somewhat-less-crufty system of Feats. Overall, the game became a lot simpler to use without losing very much of its depth. In addition, much of the material thrown out in 2nd edition - half-orcs, monks, battles with demons, and so on, were added back in (some in the core rulebooks, others in supplements). The most obvious flaws: indecisive unification [[note]]Such as class feature "skill works differently" -- e.g. out-of-table Rogue abilities to deal with difficult and magic traps. Or prestige classes awkwardly referring to the base class -- like with "+1 to existing spellcasting class" or "we don't say Druid, we say requires Wild Shape... which has nothing to do with the class".[[/note]], skill rank inflation, feats handled separately without any common meaning to them[[note]]''Complete Scoundrel'' later tried to abate two latter problems at once with "[[http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=dnd/ex/20070105a&page=5 skill tricks]]" mechanics.[[/note]] and LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards on steroids.
** '''Dungeons & Dragons (3.5 edition) - 2003:''' 2003''': Rebalancing and fixing up of 3rd edition. ''Lots'' of little fixes. However, the gradual shift from attempts to model the game world to an abstract "chess rules balance" approach becomes rather obvious. Individual settings are routinely treated much more invasively at this point, starting with "how to shoehorn this into X" advice on everything.
* '''Dungeons & Dragons (4th edition) - 2008:''' 2008''': A major overhaul that changed a lot of the mechanics, making it easier for new players to get used to the basic D&D concepts. Its setting and rules are a lot less varied than 3.5 - there's no more crafting system, most magic and attacks are made into "powers" that vary by each class, and magic items have been slimmed down - and there's more pluses in the game rather than minuses (i.e. most races get two + 2 to abilities, rather than the usual 3.5 one of +2 to one, -2 to one). To this end, the game is more fitting (and clearly designed) for a heroic campaign that is combat-heavy and very fantasy-oriented, with very few guidelines on the role-playing portion. Combat itself has been highly revised so that each class is equally capable, but in different roles: Wizards have area-attack spells and debuffs, fighters draw attention and punish enemies who don't attack them, rangers do heavy damage with an assortment of multi-attack powers, etc., and all of these are presented in a standardized format to keep classes more or less balanced. The main problems that scared fans away included concerns that it plays too much like a {{MMORPG}}, and/or a tabletop miniatures war game. Indeed, the assumption that players use miniatures on a map is even expressed throughout the core rules, such as movement being described in squares, not feet. Fans were also unhappy with changes to published settings from the time period as well.
** '''Dungeons & Dragons Essentials (4th) - 2010:''' 2010''': A new line of products launched in 2010, compatible with 4th edition rules. ''Essentials'' had the stated intent of offering new players a means of introduction to the game. It is, for the most part, a simplified 4E. There are some differences (for example, fighters and thieves have scaling class features that modify their basic attacks, instead of special attack powers) but nevertheless uses all the same core mechanics from 4E. It's a set of ten products (the new Red Box, UsefulNotes/{{dice}}, three tile sets, and a few extra books). The reintroduction of certain game elements removed from the making of 4th edition, and the confirmation that these changes will become standard from the end of 2010 on, has already led many players to calling it "4.5" edition. Naturally, the already-fragmented base was broken further over this.
* '''Dungeons & Dragons (5th Edition) - 2014:''' 2014''': Developed under the title ''D&D Next'' and officially launched in 2014, 5th edition was an attempt by Wizards to recapture and unite some of the fractured fanbase. The basic mechanics resemble a mixture of 2nd and 3rd editions with some influences by 4th edition. The overall power levels have been reduced: the max level cap is 20 ''period'', magic items are much more rare and do not scale in levels, and the bonuses/penalties to an action seldom break double digits. Stacking modifiers have been replaced with a simple advantage/disadvantage system where the character with the advantage/disadvantage rolls two dice for the action and picks the higher/lower die. Magic spells with durations are now 'concentration' type, meaning a magic user can ever only have one such spell active at any time. Most major, world-altering magics are rituals that take minutes if not hours and days to cast. Each class is now firmly wedded to a single character concept, with class archetypes and character backgrounds (representing social class and upbringing) chosen at creation being used to hybridize characters. Most post-creation exclusives are gone, but multiclassing has been returned to 3rd edition standards. Roleplaying and flavor have been increased in importance, with the old 2nd edition alignment system restored and canonical D&D characters from related media being used as examples of their respective classes, alignments and backgrounds. Pinning down the primary world for Fifth Edition is a bit dodgy: while the core books are written in a multiverse view and are near-completely adaptable to any setting, all of the official Adventurer's League material for organized play is primarily set in the ''Forgotten Realms''.[[note]]The ''Princes of the Apocalypse'' adventure, which is blatantly stated as "The Temple of Elemental Evil in Faerûn", includes info for adapting the content for Dark Sun, Dragonlance, Greyhawk, Eberron, and home campaigns; while ''Curse of Strahd'' is a combination enhanced remake of the original Ravenloft adventure and a return to Ravenloft as a campaign setting.[[/note]] Fan response has been mostly positive, with some praising the return to a more roleplaying-based system based on in-universe-justified abilities, while others bemoan a lack of character options on release and argue that the game has returned to LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards.



* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Basic+Fantasy Basic Fantasy:]]''' A retro-clone of the B/X Basic D&D, this one takes the tack of having the player choose races and classes like in AD&D while keeping things as simple as in OD&D. It also uses ascending AC.

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* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Basic+Fantasy Basic Fantasy:]]''' Fantasy]]''': A retro-clone of the B/X Basic D&D, this one takes the tack of having the player choose races and classes like in AD&D while keeping things as simple as in OD&D. It also uses ascending AC.



* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Dark+Dungeons Dark Dungeons:]]''' Named after the infamous [[ComicBook/ChickTracts Jack Chick]] tract, this is a very faithful retroclone of the BECMI / Rules Cyclopedia version of basic D&D, that covers all five boxed sets (including the Immortals rules, although from RC's Wrath of the Immortals supplement rather than the BECMI box) in one book, merging in the optional rules from the later sets directly into the core rules and including a ''TabletopGame/{{Spelljammer}}'' inspired cosmology.
* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Labyrinth+Lord Labyrinth Lord:]]''' Another retroclone based on old-school D&D, this one uses the B/X version of Basic D&D as its base. There are also two supplements which recreate Original D&D (Original Edition Characters) and AD&D (Advanced Edition Companion). Goblinoid Games, the publisher, uses a modified version of the rules of this game for their post-apocalypse game called ''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Mutant+Future Mutant Future]]'', a close-as-you-can-get-it homage to ''TabletopGame/GammaWorld''.
* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=OSRIC OSRIC:]]''' One of the first "retro-clone" games, this game is a faithful recreation of the first edition of AD&D with a few (extremely minor) differences. It still got all the characteristic traits, from time segments to alignment languages, though the names of TabletopGame/{{Greyhawk}} [=NPC=]s are stripped from spells. Freely downloadable [[http://www.knights-n-knaves.com/osric/index.html from the developers' site.]]
* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Swords+%26+Wizardry Swords and Wizardry:]]''' Created by Mythmere Games. One of the more well-known retroclones, this game goes all the way back to the original D&D, with the Cleric, the Fighter and the Magic-User, taking inspiration from sword and sorcery. Notable for having only one saving throw as opposed to the five used in regular old-school D&D, although it includes the option to use the original five. You get to choose whether you want to play with original AC or ascending AC. There are four versions of this game, all of which are free to download:

to:

* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Dark+Dungeons Dark Dungeons:]]''' Dungeons]]''': Named after the infamous [[ComicBook/ChickTracts Jack Chick]] tract, this is a very faithful retroclone of the BECMI / Rules Cyclopedia version of basic D&D, that covers all five boxed sets (including the Immortals rules, although from RC's Wrath of the Immortals supplement rather than the BECMI box) in one book, merging in the optional rules from the later sets directly into the core rules and including a ''TabletopGame/{{Spelljammer}}'' inspired cosmology.
* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Labyrinth+Lord Labyrinth Lord:]]''' Lord]]''': Another retroclone based on old-school D&D, this one uses the B/X version of Basic D&D as its base. There are also two supplements which recreate Original D&D (Original Edition Characters) and AD&D (Advanced Edition Companion). Goblinoid Games, the publisher, uses a modified version of the rules of this game for their post-apocalypse game called ''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Mutant+Future Mutant Future]]'', a close-as-you-can-get-it homage to ''TabletopGame/GammaWorld''.
* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=OSRIC OSRIC:]]''' OSRIC]]''': One of the first "retro-clone" games, this game is a faithful recreation of the first edition of AD&D with a few (extremely minor) differences. It still got all the characteristic traits, from time segments to alignment languages, though the names of TabletopGame/{{Greyhawk}} [=NPC=]s are stripped from spells. Freely downloadable [[http://www.knights-n-knaves.com/osric/index.html from the developers' site.]]
* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Swords+%26+Wizardry Swords and Wizardry:]]''' Wizardry]]''': Created by Mythmere Games. One of the more well-known retroclones, this game goes all the way back to the original D&D, with the Cleric, the Fighter and the Magic-User, taking inspiration from sword and sorcery. Notable for having only one saving throw as opposed to the five used in regular old-school D&D, although it includes the option to use the original five. You get to choose whether you want to play with original AC or ascending AC. There are four versions of this game, all of which are free to download:


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* '''Crypts & Things''': Created by D101 Games. A variant based on ''Swords & Wizardry'' that goes deeper into SwordAndSorcery than any other system. Humans are the only playable race, while elves, dwarves, and halflings only appear as [=NPCs=], if at all. There are only four classes: barbarian, fighter, thief, and magician. Clerics don't exist in the system, meaning that turning undead isn't a thing. Barbarians function as a mix of battle-raging berserkers and rangers. Fighters get optional fighting styles to give them flavor. Thieves are more martial-based, similar to [[Literature/FafhrdAndTheGrayMouser the Gray Mouser]]. Magicians function as a combination of cleric and magic-user. Magic is limited to 6th level spells, and is divided into WhiteMagic, Gray Magic, and BlackMagic. White Magic consists of healing, detection, and protective spells and can be cast without penalty. Gray Magic consists of illusions and mind-altering charms, costing the caster some HP. Black Magic consists of offensive spells, often requiring a sacrifice of some sort and a loss of sanity. Hit Points gauge the PC's mental faculties (such as shock, pain, loss of the will to fight) rather than their physical health; once their HP is gone, they take Constitution damage until death. As such, healing magic and potions only heal Constitution, not HP. Magic items carry a hefty penalty more often than not and are very rare. Characters get a Life Path, which dictates their background and grants them specific bonuses.
4th Sep '16 8:55:15 PM oknazevad
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** ''TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}} Society'' (a global organized play ''Pathfinder'' campaign) explicitly forbids playing characters of evil alignment. It's forbidden to create evil characters for ''PFS'', and if a player character's actions [[MoralEventHorizon cross the line]] later, their GameMaster can invoke an alignment shift to evil, which renders that character permanently unplayable for all future ''PFS'' events, just as their death would.
** The ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' based RTS game ''Dragonshard'', has a campaign for the humans and the lizardfolk, but not for the Umbragen.

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** ''TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}} Society'' (a global organized play ''Pathfinder'' campaign) explicitly forbids playing characters of evil alignment. It's forbidden to create evil characters for ''PFS'', and if a player character's actions [[MoralEventHorizon cross the line]] later, their GameMaster can invoke an alignment shift to evil, which renders that character permanently unplayable for all future ''PFS'' events, just as their death would.
** The ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' ''D&D'' based RTS game ''Dragonshard'', has a campaign for the humans and the lizardfolk, but not for the Umbragen.
4th Sep '16 8:47:47 PM oknazevad
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** As a show of good faith to the digital distribution market and the Open-Gaming License, [=WotC=] started their own storefront, the [[http://www.dmsguild.com/ Dungeon Masters Guild]], which allows the fans to self-publish their own material and [=WotC=] to publish both [=PDFs=] of all the past TSR/[=WotC=] releases from the "Original" Edition through Fourth Edition and new Adventurers League content.

''TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}}'' is a continuation of 3.5 mechanics updated and rebalanced a little more (it basically does to 3.5 what 3.5 did to 3.0 and is sometimes dubbed 3.75) with its own campaign setting, produced by Paizo - the former publishers of Dragon and Dungeon magazines before those properties were reassumed by Wizards of the Coast. Pathfinder started out as just a campaign setting in the late days of 3.5, but was published as a separate game to keep the system going after the publication of D&D 4th edition. It surpassed 4th edition in sales, and retains a strong following, though the launch of D&D 5th edition has begun to swing fans back to the D&D brand. See the article for more details.

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** As a show of good faith to the digital distribution market and the Open-Gaming License, [=WotC=] started their own storefront, the [[http://www.dmsguild.com/ Dungeon Masters Guild]], which allows the fans to self-publish their own material and [=WotC=] to publish both [=PDFs=] of all the past TSR/[=WotC=] releases from the "Original" Edition through Fourth 4th Edition and new Adventurers League content.

''TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}}'' is a continuation of 3.5 mechanics updated and rebalanced a little more (it basically does to 3.5 what 3.5 did to 3.0 and is sometimes dubbed 3.75) with its own campaign setting, produced by Paizo - the former publishers of Dragon and Dungeon magazines before those properties were reassumed by Wizards of the Coast. Pathfinder started out as just a campaign setting in the late days of 3.5, but was published as a separate game to keep the system going after the publication of D&D 4th edition. It surpassed 4th edition in sales, and retains a strong following, though the launch of D&D 5th edition has begun to swing swung fans back to the D&D brand. See the article for more details.



** The 1st Edition Advanced D&D supplement ''Deities and Demigods Cyclopedia'' mentions that objects covered in dung are reputedly unable to be touched by the undead.

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** The 1st Edition Advanced D&D supplement ''Deities and Demigods Cyclopedia'' Demigods'' mentions that objects covered in dung are reputedly unable to be touched by the undead.
4th Sep '16 6:22:14 AM Morgenthaler
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* SupernaturalRepellent:
** Mirrors, garlic and holy symbols (and other holy relics) repel vampires.
** Clerics can turn the undead, which causes them to retreat from the cleric.
** The 1st Edition Advanced D&D supplement ''Deities and Demigods Cyclopedia'' mentions that objects covered in dung are reputedly unable to be touched by the undead.
** 1st Edition Advanced D&D supplement ''Oriental Adventures''. Magic items called "Noisome Spirit Chasers" are firecrackers that, when detonated, cause nearby spirits to leave the area.
25th Aug '16 3:16:24 AM WildCardCourier
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* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Swords+%26+Wizardry Swords and Wizardry:]]''' Created by Mythmere Games. One of the more well-known retroclones, this game goes all the way back to the original D&D, with the Cleric, the Fighter and the Magic-User, taking inspiration from sword and sorcery. Notable for having only one saving throw as opposed to the five used in regular old-school D&D, although it includes the option to use the original five. You get to choose whether you want to play with original AC or ascending AC. There are three versions of this game, all of which are free to download:

to:

* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Swords+%26+Wizardry Swords and Wizardry:]]''' Created by Mythmere Games. One of the more well-known retroclones, this game goes all the way back to the original D&D, with the Cleric, the Fighter and the Magic-User, taking inspiration from sword and sorcery. Notable for having only one saving throw as opposed to the five used in regular old-school D&D, although it includes the option to use the original five. You get to choose whether you want to play with original AC or ascending AC. There are three four versions of this game, all of which are free to download:



*** Has a work-in-progress fan version called ''Swords & Wizardry: Light'', created by [[http://www.tenkarstavern.com/ Erik Tenkar of Tenkar's Tavern]]. Essentially what Basic D&D was to AD&D: an easier to play version to help people learn the system. The idea is to strip the original 122 page [=WhiteBox=] Rules book down to a series of print-and-play 4 page pamphlets. Like BD&D, it's supposed to run from 1st level to 3rd level, with players converting to one of the three official versions at 4th level, although one of Tenkar's long-term ideas is to create an ''"Extra" Light'' rule set for advancing to 7th level.


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** ''Swords & Wizardry: Light'', an upcoming version created by [[http://www.tenkarstavern.com/ Erik "Tenkar" Stiene of Tenkar's Tavern]], [[http://www.tenkarstavern.com/2016/08/its-official-frog-god-games-to-publish.html officially endorsed by Mythmere Games and to be published by Frog God Games]]. Essentially what Basic D&D was to AD&D: an easier to play version to help people learn the system. The idea is to strip the original 122 page [=WhiteBox=] Rules book down to a series of print-and-play 4 page pamphlets. Like BD&D, it's supposed to run from 1st level to 3rd level, with players converting to one of the three official versions at 4th level, although one of Tenkar's long-term ideas is to create an ''"Extra" Light'' rule set for advancing to 7th level.
20th Aug '16 9:56:58 AM nombretomado
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* RocksFallEveryoneDies: A few modules are hilariously lethal. Also, {{Dragonlance}} and later ForgottenRealms settings were hammered apart so thoroughly that [[FanonDiscontinuity instead]] of dealing with the future [[ExecutiveMeddling additions]], fans switched to playing either classical versions or their own timelines.

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* RocksFallEveryoneDies: A few modules are hilariously lethal. Also, {{Dragonlance}} Literature/{{Dragonlance}} and later ForgottenRealms settings were hammered apart so thoroughly that [[FanonDiscontinuity instead]] of dealing with the future [[ExecutiveMeddling additions]], fans switched to playing either classical versions or their own timelines.
18th Aug '16 5:04:16 PM Tre
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For the animated series based on the game, see ''WesternAnimation/DungeonsAndDragons''. For the Creator/{{Bally}} {{pinball}} game, see ''Pinball/DungeonsAndDragons''. There are also three movies. The first (''Film/DungeonsAndDragons'') is InNameOnly. The second (''[[Film/DungeonsAndDragonsWrathOfTheDragonGod Wrath of the Dragon God]]'') [[SurprisinglyImprovedSequel is a lot better]], despite being made on a low budget. The third, ''Film/DungeonsAndDragonsTheBookOfVileDarkness'', was a made-for-cable-TV affair that premiered on the SyFy channel in November 2012. A reboot of the ''Dungeons and Dragons'' film franchise is currently planned by Warner Brothers.

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For the animated series based on the game, see ''WesternAnimation/DungeonsAndDragons''. For the Creator/{{Bally}} {{pinball}} game, see ''Pinball/DungeonsAndDragons''. There are also three movies. The first (''Film/DungeonsAndDragons'') is InNameOnly. The second (''[[Film/DungeonsAndDragonsWrathOfTheDragonGod Wrath of the Dragon God]]'') [[SurprisinglyImprovedSequel is a lot better]], despite being made on a low budget. The third, ''Film/DungeonsAndDragonsTheBookOfVileDarkness'', was a made-for-cable-TV affair that premiered on the SyFy channel Creator/{{Syfy}} in November 2012. A reboot of the ''Dungeons and Dragons'' film franchise is currently planned by Warner Brothers.
11th Aug '16 4:52:00 PM Arivne
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* NoCampaignForTheWicked
** The new edition lists the good and neutral deities up front in the character creation section, while setting the evil gods firmly in the 'know your enemy' part of the book. This, of course, has no effect on some players and [=DMs=], who create all-evil campaigns frequently and with panache.
** ''TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}} Society'' (a global organized play ''Pathfinder'' campaign) explicitly forbids playing characters of evil alignment. It's forbidden to create evil characters for ''PFS'', and if a player character's actions [[MoralEventHorizon cross the line]] later, their GameMaster can invoke an alignment shift to evil, which renders that character permanently unplayable for all future ''PFS'' events, just as their death would.
** The ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' based RTS game ''Dragonshard'', has a campaign for the humans and the lizardfolk, but not for the Umbragen.
** BECMI (Basic/Expert/Companion/Master/Immortal) D&D, Immortals boxed set (1986). Player controlled {{PC}} Immortals are forbidden to be from the Sphere of Entropy, because creatures from that Sphere are all evil. All Entropy Sphere Immortals are {{NPC}}s.
** The author of a ''Dragon'' article on the "Death Master", a necromancy-themed NonPlayerCharacter class for 1st Edition AD&D, introduced it by stressing, thusly, that it was designed for NPC villains only:
---> "If I ever run into a player character Death Master at a gaming convention, I may turn Evil myself."
** ''TabletopGame/{{Planescape}} Monstrous Compendium Appendix II''. Incantifers are creatures that used to be human beings. They were changed by magic so that they can absorb magic and don't need to eat, breathe or sleep (among other powers). They have evil tendencies and Dungeon Masters are warned not to allow {{PC}}s to undergo the incantifer-creation process.
11th Aug '16 4:40:17 PM Arivne
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* FollowTheLeader: Inspired many, many other [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dungeons_&_Dragons#Acclaim_and_influence tabletop games and video games]].



* GenrePopularizer: For pencil-and-paper roleplaying games.
2nd Aug '16 2:41:28 PM WildCardCourier
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* ''TabletopGame/GammaWorld'': While ''technically'' a different game line, uses identical mechanics and is often seen as a subset of vanilla D&D. (The AD&D 1st Edition ''Dungeon Master's Guide'' even has sections for converting AD&D characters to Gamma World characters and vice-versa.) ScavengerWorld AfterTheEnd inhabited by {{Mutants}} constantly trying to win the SuperPowerLottery and usually either CursedWithAwesome or BlessedWithSuck.

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* ''TabletopGame/GammaWorld'': While ''technically'' a different game line, uses identical mechanics and is often seen as a subset of vanilla D&D. (The D&D, to the point that the AD&D 1st Edition ''Dungeon Master's Guide'' even has had sections for converting AD&D characters to Gamma World characters and vice-versa.) vice-versa. ScavengerWorld AfterTheEnd inhabited by {{Mutants}} constantly trying to win the SuperPowerLottery and usually either CursedWithAwesome or BlessedWithSuck.



* ''TabletopGame/{{Ravenloft}}'': Gothic fantasy and Film/HammerHorror in a maybe-sentient demiplane called the "Domains of Dread" that seems to exist solely to inflict ThePunishment on its inhabitants. Initially a one-off module (the classic "weekend in hell"), it was popular enough to become its own campaign setting.

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* ''TabletopGame/{{Ravenloft}}'': Gothic fantasy and Film/HammerHorror in a maybe-sentient demiplane called the "Domains of Dread" that seems to exist solely to inflict ThePunishment on its inhabitants. Initially a one-off module (the classic "weekend in hell"), it was popular enough to become its own campaign setting. Fifth Edition brought it full circle by releasing an updated and expanded version of the original ''Ravenloft'' module, titled ''The Curse of Strahd''.



** '''Supplement IV: Gods, Demi-Gods & Heroes - 1976:''' The last official supplement. Introduced deities, demi-gods, and legendary heroes from mythology and religions both real (Egyptian, Celtic, Norse) and fictional ([[Franchise/ConanTheBarbarian Hyborean]] and [[Literature/TheElricSaga Melnibonéan]]) for two purposes: 1) as a means of integrating pre-established mythologies into campaigns, and 2) a last ditch effort for reaching the "Monty Hall" style [=DMs=] who ran giveaway campaigns and to show the absurdity of 40+ level characters.

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** '''Supplement IV: Gods, Demi-Gods & Heroes - 1976:''' The last official supplement. Introduced deities, demi-gods, and legendary heroes from mythology and religions both real (Egyptian, Celtic, Norse) and fictional ([[Franchise/ConanTheBarbarian Hyborean]] and [[Literature/TheElricSaga Melnibonéan]]) for two purposes: 1) as a means of integrating pre-established mythologies into campaigns, and 2) a last ditch effort for reaching the "Monty Hall" style [=DMs=] who ran giveaway campaigns and to show the absurdity of 40+ level characters.characters by giving them opponents that could wipe the floor with them. Unfortunately started the concept of "if you stat it, they will kill it".



* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Swords+%26+Wizardry Swords and Wizardry:]]''' Created by Myhtmere Games. One of the more well-known retroclones, this game goes all the way back to the original D&D, with the Cleric, the Fighter and the Magic-User, taking inspiration from sword and sorcery. Notable for having only one saving throw as opposed to the five used in regular old-school D&D, although it includes the option to use the original five. You get to choose whether you want to play with original AC or ascending AC. There are three versions of this game, all of which are free to download:
** The [[http://www.swordsandwizardry.com/?page_id=6 WhiteBox Rules]], which closely emulates the rules of the core box of [=OD&D=].

to:

* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Swords+%26+Wizardry Swords and Wizardry:]]''' Created by Myhtmere Mythmere Games. One of the more well-known retroclones, this game goes all the way back to the original D&D, with the Cleric, the Fighter and the Magic-User, taking inspiration from sword and sorcery. Notable for having only one saving throw as opposed to the five used in regular old-school D&D, although it includes the option to use the original five. You get to choose whether you want to play with original AC or ascending AC. There are three versions of this game, all of which are free to download:
** The [[http://www.swordsandwizardry.com/?page_id=6 WhiteBox Rules]], which closely emulates the rules of the core box of [=OD&D=]. [=OD&D=].
*** Has a work-in-progress fan version called ''Swords & Wizardry: Light'', created by [[http://www.tenkarstavern.com/ Erik Tenkar of Tenkar's Tavern]]. Essentially what Basic D&D was to AD&D: an easier to play version to help people learn the system. The idea is to strip the original 122 page [=WhiteBox=] Rules book down to a series of print-and-play 4 page pamphlets. Like BD&D, it's supposed to run from 1st level to 3rd level, with players converting to one of the three official versions at 4th level, although one of Tenkar's long-term ideas is to create an ''"Extra" Light'' rule set for advancing to 7th level.
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