History TableTopGame / DungeonsAndDragons

26th Jan '16 5:15:17 PM WildCardCourier
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* ''Council of Wyrms'': Dragons plus politics. Set in an island chain called Io's Blood Isles, the dragon residents have a loose democratic government and must work together on issues affecting dragon welfare. They retain CharacterAlignment inclinations, but those are less important than matters of honor and politics. If the Council send a party with a Gold dragon as a substitute of paladin and a Black dragon as a substitute of thief on a mission, they'll fly. Dragon slayers (created by Io to punish his errant offspring) don't see much difference either.
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* ''Council of Wyrms'': Dragons plus politics. Set in an island chain called Io's Blood Isles, the dragon residents have a loose democratic government and must work together on issues affecting dragon welfare. They retain CharacterAlignment inclinations, but those are less important than matters of honor and politics. If the Council send a party with a Gold dragon as a substitute of paladin and a Black dragon as a substitute of thief on a mission, they'll fly. Dragon slayers (created by Io to punish his errant offspring) don't see much difference either.

*** The second version was released as the main setting for 1st Edition Advanced D&D. Surprised by the sheer popularity of the setting, Gygax spent a number of years recreating and fleshing out the setting, with a 32-page folio released in 1980 and the full boxed set released in 1983. While discontinued during 3.x Edition, 5th Edition includes several references to the setting. At least the setting got an epic send-off rather than being quietly dropped, with a GrandFinale spanning the entire 3.x Edition production called ''Living Greyhawk''.
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*** The second version was released as the main setting for 1st Edition Advanced D&D. Surprised by the sheer popularity of the setting, Gygax spent a number of years recreating and fleshing out the setting, with a 32-page folio released in 1980 and the full boxed set released in 1983. While discontinued during 3.x Edition, 5th Edition includes several references to the setting. At least setting, and the setting got an epic send-off rather than being quietly dropped, with received what was essentially a GrandFinale spanning the entire 3.x Edition production called production: the ''Living Greyhawk''.Greyhawk'' campaign.

* ''Wilderlands of High Fantasy'': The first officially licensed and published third-party campaign setting for "Original" D&D, created by Judges Guild after the success of their ''City State of the Invincible Overlord'' city setting. One of the first sandbox-style campaign settings, the boxed set contained 18 half-continent sized maps and two books filled with entry upon entry of information that the DM could draw from. A quintessential love-letter to the old school flare and SwordAndSorcery origins of D&D as a whole.
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* ''Wilderlands of High Fantasy'': The first officially licensed and published third-party campaign setting for "Original" D&D, created by Judges Guild after the success of their ''City State of the Invincible Overlord'' city setting. One setting and released in a collection of the first 4 32-page booklets. In 2002, Judges Guild ended up working together with Necromancer Games to release a boxed version for 3.5 Edition. The earliest sandbox-style campaign settings, the boxed set setting, and it shows: 18 maps that altogether cover an area about 780 miles wide by 1080 miles long. Each individual map contained 18 half-continent sized maps and two a number of pre-established points-of-interest, with the associated books filled with containing entry upon entry for every bastion of information that civilization, set of ruins, and monster lair within the DM could draw from. A quintessential love-letter region. Touted as "First Edition feel", the Wilderlands sticks to the old school flare and old-school SwordAndSorcery origins of D&D as a whole.D&D.
23rd Jan '16 12:03:28 PM WildCardCourier
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* BlowGun: The 1984 ''Dungeons & Dragons Companion Set''' introduced the blowgun as a 6"-4' tube. Darts don't do damage, but are instead poisonous. AD&D supplement ''Unearthed Arcana'' introduces the blowgun, where needle only does one HitPoint of damage, and is therefore only effective if poisoned.
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* BlowGun: The 1984 ''Dungeons & Dragons Companion Set''' Set'' introduced the blowgun as a 6"-4' tube. Darts don't do damage, but are instead poisonous. AD&D supplement ''Unearthed Arcana'' introduces the blowgun, where needle only does one HitPoint of damage, and is therefore only effective if poisoned.

* PlungerDetonator: Could be found in the '''TabletopGame/MasqueOfTheRedDeath'' campaign setting.
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* PlungerDetonator: Could be found in the '''TabletopGame/MasqueOfTheRedDeath'' ''TabletopGame/MasqueOfTheRedDeath'' campaign setting.

* RuleThirtyFour: The Book of Erotic Fantasy (third-party and unofficial as hell, but still) codifies this. Fairly tactfully, thankfully. Before this, it was "The Complete Guide To AD&D Unlawful Carnal Knowledge". As a netbook, it got stuff from "quite in-character in a normal game" (blow-a-kiss-with-effects spells may be a ''must-have'' for a love goddess' church, finding out how long it takes to blow your money on the hookers part of booze and hookers is also usable) to "where'd I put my BrainBleach again?".
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* RuleThirtyFour: The Book Both the "Book of Erotic Fantasy Fantasy" and "Encyclopaedia Arcane - Nymphology" (third-party and unofficial as hell, but still) codifies this. Fairly tactfully, thankfully. Before this, it was "The Complete Guide To AD&D Unlawful Carnal Knowledge". As a netbook, it got stuff from "quite in-character in a normal game" (blow-a-kiss-with-effects spells may be a ''must-have'' for a love goddess' church, finding out how long it takes to blow your money on the hookers part of booze and hookers is also usable) to "where'd I put my BrainBleach again?".

* SequelNumberSnarl: The various editions are titled ''Dungeons & Dragons'', ''Dungeons & Dragons Basic Set'', ''Advanced Dungeons & Dragons'', '''Advanced Dungeons and Dragons 2nd Edition'' (originally on the book cover, though later printings left it off), ''Dungeons & Dragons 3rd Edition'', ''Dungeons & Dragons v3.5'' (also referred to as "3rd Edition Revised"), ''Dungeons & Dragons 4th Edition'', and ''Dungeons & Dragons 5th Edition''.
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* SequelNumberSnarl: The various editions are titled ''Dungeons & Dragons'', ''Dungeons & Dragons Basic Set'', ''Advanced Dungeons & Dragons'', '''Advanced ''Advanced Dungeons and Dragons 2nd Edition'' (originally on the book cover, though later printings left it off), ''Dungeons & Dragons 3rd Edition'', ''Dungeons & Dragons v3.5'' (also referred to as "3rd Edition Revised"), ''Dungeons & Dragons 4th Edition'', and ''Dungeons & Dragons 5th Edition''.

* WritingAroundTrademarks: The earliest printings of the original boxed set call the race of little people hobbits, as one might expect from such a LordOfTheRimgs influenced game. Grumblings from the Tolkien estate led this to be changed to halflings (along with a couple of monster names, such as "Ents" becoming "Treants" and "Balrogs" becoming "Balors". This despite Tolkien himself taking the term "hobbit" from folklore, and "halfling" actually being a term he coined, apparently.
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* WritingAroundTrademarks: The earliest printings of the original boxed set call the race of little people hobbits, as one might expect from such a LordOfTheRimgs ''Lord of the Rings'' influenced game. Grumblings from the Tolkien estate led this to be changed to halflings (along with a couple of monster names, such as "Ents" becoming "Treants" and "Balrogs" becoming "Balors". This despite Tolkien himself taking the term "hobbit" from folklore, and "halfling" actually being a term he coined, apparently.
17th Jan '16 7:14:57 AM Underachiever
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Added DiffLines:
** Also, dungeons in which specific types of magic -- such as teleportation spells, say -- simply wouldn't work (or at least not work ''right'') rather obviously for the sole purpose of keeping the game challenging for the players weren't exactly unknown especially in the early days of the game.
28th Dec '15 4:02:47 AM morenohijazo
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* HostileWeather: Multiple examples
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* HostileWeather: Multiple examplesexamples. * InvisibleWriting: ** ''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-entry.phtml?mainid=4601 The Book of Marvelous Magic]]'' has Inkwell of Concealment, which is an Everfull Inkwell, but after a hour everything written with its ink vanishes and can be read only via effects allowing to see invisible objects. ** Tolkien's version above was thrown in when {{sourcebook}} ''Player's Options: Spells & Magic'' introduced 'Moon Rune' spell that displays letters when its triggering condition is met, including moonlight in the proper phase or presence of creatures (set by species). ** the spell Arcane Mark can functionally be an invisible ink. The campaign setting {{Eberron}} notices this, and [[{{Deconstruction}} uses it on documents to increase the difficulty of forging]].
13th Dec '15 9:25:25 PM Josef5678
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Misuse. Developers Foresight is when the game has a response for unlikely player actions.
** The [=CharOp=] boards on the Wizards website ([[TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything and the official FAQ]]) can be infamous for these. [[TakenForGranite Transmute flesh to stone]], [[DishingOutDirt transmute stone to mud]], [[CoolClearWater purify water]]. Eschew Materials + Major Creation to summon [[EarthShatteringKaboom anti-matter.]] The [[FantasticNuke Locate City Bomb]]. Casting resurrection on the [[OutsideContextVillain armor of opponents]] wearing dragon scale or other exotic hides.
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** The [=CharOp=] boards on the Wizards website ([[TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything and (and the official FAQ]]) FAQ) can be infamous for these. [[TakenForGranite Transmute flesh to stone]], [[DishingOutDirt transmute stone to mud]], [[CoolClearWater purify water]]. Eschew Materials + Major Creation to summon [[EarthShatteringKaboom anti-matter.]] The [[FantasticNuke Locate City Bomb]]. Casting resurrection on the [[OutsideContextVillain armor of opponents]] wearing dragon scale or other exotic hides.
6th Dec '15 6:48:02 AM TheNerfGuy
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Page quotes cannot have potholes in them.
->''[[MemeticMutation Roll for initiative]].''
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->''[[MemeticMutation Roll ->''Roll for initiative]].initiative.''
4th Dec '15 8:53:08 PM FF32
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* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Dark+Dungeons Dark Dungeons]]:''' Named after the infamous Creator/JackChick tract, this is a very faithful retroclone of the BECMI / Rules Cyclopedia version of basic D&D, that covers all five boxed sets (including the Immortals rules, although from RC's Wrath of the Immortals supplement rather than the BECMI box) in one book, merging in the optional rules from the later sets directly into the core rules and including a ''TabletopGame/{{Spelljammer}}'' inspired cosmology.
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* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?firstsearch=1&key=title&match=loose&value=Dark+Dungeons Dark Dungeons]]:''' Named after the infamous Creator/JackChick [[ComicBook/ChickTracts Jack Chick]] tract, this is a very faithful retroclone of the BECMI / Rules Cyclopedia version of basic D&D, that covers all five boxed sets (including the Immortals rules, although from RC's Wrath of the Immortals supplement rather than the BECMI box) in one book, merging in the optional rules from the later sets directly into the core rules and including a ''TabletopGame/{{Spelljammer}}'' inspired cosmology.
28th Nov '15 2:54:42 PM WildCardCourier
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* ''Blackmoor'', a.k.a. ''The First Fantasy Campaign'': The '''very''' first campaign setting, originating from Dave Arneson's wargaming days. Arneson combined the ''Chainmail'' Fantasy Supplement with the dungeon exploration mechanic he created and eventually showed the end result off to Gary Gygax, leading to the creation of D&D. Later tied to both Greyhawk (as an archbarony near the Land of Black Ice) and Mystara (as a kingdom from the world's distant past that [[AndManGrewProud rose to great heights]] [[CataclysmBackstory and quickly fell, changing the world in the process]]). While officially discontinued during the TSR days, Arneson kept the rights for the setting and worked with Zeitgiest Games to release setting books for 3.5 and 4th Editions. Blackmoor proudly has the honor of being one of the longest continuously played fantasy role playing campaigns in existence. * ''Council of Wyrms'': Dragons are feudals ruling everyone else. They retain CharacterAlignment inclinations, but those are less important than matters of honor and politics. If the Council send a party with a Gold dragon as a substitute of paladin and a Black dragon as a substitute of thief on a mission, they'll fly. Dragon slayers (created by Io to punish his errant offspring) don't see much difference either.
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* ''Blackmoor'', a.k.a. ''The First Fantasy Campaign'': The '''very''' first campaign setting, originating from Dave Arneson's wargaming days. Arneson combined the ''Chainmail'' Fantasy Supplement with the dungeon exploration mechanic he created and eventually showed the end result off to Gary Gygax, leading to the creation of D&D. Your typical Good-vs-Evil setting, with the various duchies vying for power while the mysterious Egg of Coot hides in the shadows. Later tied to both Greyhawk (as an archbarony near the Land of Black Ice) and Mystara (as a kingdom from the world's distant past that [[AndManGrewProud rose to great heights]] [[CataclysmBackstory and quickly fell, changing the world in the process]]). While officially discontinued during the TSR days, Arneson kept the rights for the setting and worked with Zeitgiest Games to release setting books for 3.5 and 4th Editions. Blackmoor proudly has the honor of being one of the longest continuously played fantasy role playing campaigns in existence. existence, even spawning a renowned play-by-post game called ''The Last Fantasy Campaign''. * ''Council of Wyrms'': Dragons are feudals ruling everyone else.plus politics. Set in an island chain called Io's Blood Isles, the dragon residents have a loose democratic government and must work together on issues affecting dragon welfare. They retain CharacterAlignment inclinations, but those are less important than matters of honor and politics. If the Council send a party with a Gold dragon as a substitute of paladin and a Black dragon as a substitute of thief on a mission, they'll fly. Dragon slayers (created by Io to punish his errant offspring) don't see much difference either.

*** The first version was the original home campaign, which stretched from 1972 to 1979. Due to the number of games played each week, Gygax simply used a blank map of North America and filled it in as the campaign went on. Despite the name, the 1975 ''Supplement I: Greyhawk'' digest wasn't a Greyhawk setting book. Rather, it was a supplemental rulebook which helped eliminate the game's dependence on ''Chainmail'', setting the groundwork for what would become Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. Not much is known about the home campaign version, apart from what is presented in the ''Gnome Cache'' novella from the first issues of ''Dragon'' magazine and possibly the ''Gord the Rogue'' novel series. *** The second version was released as the main setting for 1st Edition Advanced D&D. Surprised by the sheer popularity of the setting, Gygax spent a number of years recreating and fleshing out the setting, with a 32-page folio released in 1980 and the full boxed set released in 1983. While "discontinued" during 3.x Edition, 5th Edition includes several references to the setting.
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*** The first version was the original home campaign, which stretched from 1972 to 1979. Due to the number of games played each week, Gygax didn't have the time to make a world map completely from scratch and simply used a blank map of North America and filled America, filling it in as the campaign went on. Despite the name, the 1975 ''Supplement I: Greyhawk'' digest wasn't a Greyhawk setting book. Rather, it was a supplemental rulebook which helped eliminate the game's dependence on ''Chainmail'', setting the groundwork for what would become Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. Not much is known about the home campaign version, apart from what is presented in the ''Gnome Cache'' novella from the first issues of ''Dragon'' magazine and possibly the ''Gord the Rogue'' novel series. *** The second version was released as the main setting for 1st Edition Advanced D&D. Surprised by the sheer popularity of the setting, Gygax spent a number of years recreating and fleshing out the setting, with a 32-page folio released in 1980 and the full boxed set released in 1983. While "discontinued" discontinued during 3.x Edition, 5th Edition includes several references to the setting. At least the setting got an epic send-off rather than being quietly dropped, with a GrandFinale spanning the entire 3.x Edition production called ''Living Greyhawk''.

* ''TabletopGame/{{Mystara}}'', originally ''The Known World'': The third campaign setting and the first officially released under the D&D brand as the setting for Basic D&D. WoodenShipsAndIronMen on the surface of a HollowWorld full of [[LostWorld lost worlds inside of it]]. Notable for the Immortals, incredibly powerful beings which stand in for gods in this setting, and which player characters could [[AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence become]] if they got to the highest levels. The default setting of BECMI/Rules Cyclopedia-era D&D (and the setting of the Creator/{{Capcom}} BeatEmUp [[VideoGame/DungeonsAndDragons games]]). Lots of {{cool airship}}s -- from a floating city [[AirborneAircraftCarrier carrying a fleet]] of WWI style planes powered by gnomish {{Magitek}} to big wooden birds of prey kept in the air by sacred relics and armed with long-range {{Disintegrator Ray}}s to a flying icosahedron (i.e. d20) plated with one-side mirrors.
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* ''TabletopGame/{{Mystara}}'', originally ''The Known World'': The third internal campaign setting and the first officially released under the D&D brand as the setting for Basic D&D. WoodenShipsAndIronMen on the surface of a HollowWorld full of [[LostWorld lost worlds inside of it]]. Notable for the Immortals, incredibly powerful beings which stand in for gods in this setting, and which player characters could [[AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence become]] if they got to the highest levels. The default setting of BECMI/Rules Cyclopedia-era D&D (and the setting of the Creator/{{Capcom}} BeatEmUp [[VideoGame/DungeonsAndDragons games]]). Lots of {{cool airship}}s -- from a floating city [[AirborneAircraftCarrier carrying a fleet]] of WWI style planes powered by gnomish {{Magitek}} to big wooden birds of prey kept in the air by sacred relics and armed with long-range {{Disintegrator Ray}}s to a flying icosahedron (i.e. d20) plated with one-side mirrors.

* ''TabletopGame/{{Mystara}}'', originally ''The Known World'': ''Wilderlands of High Fantasy'': The third first officially licensed and published third-party campaign setting and for "Original" D&D, created by Judges Guild after the success of their ''City State of the Invincible Overlord'' city setting. One of the first officially released under sandbox-style campaign settings, the D&D brand as boxed set contained 18 half-continent sized maps and two books filled with entry upon entry of information that the setting for Basic D&D. WoodenShipsAndIronMen on the surface of a HollowWorld full of [[LostWorld lost worlds inside of it]]. Notable for the Immortals, incredibly powerful beings which stand in for gods in this setting, and which player characters DM could [[AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence become]] if they got draw from. A quintessential love-letter to the highest levels. The default setting old school flare and SwordAndSorcery origins of BECMI/Rules Cyclopedia-era D&D (and the setting of the Creator/{{Capcom}} BeatEmUp [[VideoGame/DungeonsAndDragons games]]). Lots of {{cool airship}}s -- from as a floating city [[AirborneAircraftCarrier carrying a fleet]] of WWI style planes powered by gnomish {{Magitek}} to big wooden birds of prey kept in the air by sacred relics and armed with long-range {{Disintegrator Ray}}s to a flying icosahedron (i.e. d20) plated with one-side mirrors.whole.

* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?key=system&value=D%2526D%2B%252F%2BBasic&sort=system,systemversion Basic Dungeons & Dragons]] - 1977-1991:''' Originally introduced in 1977, and edited by brain surgeon John Eric Holmes,Not joking; Holmes was a polymath who, in addition to being a neurosurgeon and lecturer, wrote fantasy/sci-fi novels in his spare time and first came up with the idea for the Basic Set as a new players guide for his home campaign. Originally this was a starter set for new players to more easily learn the game (which was considered rather difficult to learn from the original set). The first release only covered levels 1-3, and players were intended to move on to ''Advanced Dungeons & Dragons'' after this. The revision published in 1981, edited by Tom Moldvay, simplified the game further, making it a distinct game system and product line. The most notable simplification is that Dwarf, Elf and Halfling are counted as ''classes'', not races that could choose a class separately the way humans did; so only humans could play anything but a standard version of their species i.e. classes are ''archetype''-based. An ''Expert Set'' expansion edited by David "Zeb" Cook accompanying the 1981 version (which combined are known as the "B/X" version) let players keep with these simpler rules. The next revision was the BECMI series of boxed sets by Frank Metzner (Basic, Expert, Companion, Master and Immortal, respectively), begun in 1983, which extended the game up to epic levels while turning the first set into a tutorial. The rules from the first four of the BECMI series were later compiled in 1991 into the ''Rules Cyclopedia'' written by Creator/AaronAllston, which is still considered a classic; this was accompanied by the last version of the Basic Set, now covering levels 1-5. * '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?key=system&value=AD%26D&sort=system,systemversion Advanced Dungeons & Dragons]] (1st edition) - 1977-1979:''' The more complete rules, including more character classes, and the enshrinement of the classic Dungeons & Dragons alignment system. More or less completely compatible with the simpler Dungeons & Dragons, and many gamers mixed and matched at will. As well, CharacterClassSystem was unified but some classes are human-only, others forbidden to certain races.This is actually the rules from the original set, but the restrictions were a bit looser. Most people didn't understand the distinction early, which is why Moldvay just said "to heck with it" and made race-as-class the standard for the basic game; the B/X rules were actually mechanically identical, just presented differently.
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* '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?key=system&value=D%2526D%2B%252F%2BBasic&sort=system,systemversion Basic Dungeons & Dragons]] - 1977-1991:''' Originally introduced in 1977, and edited by brain surgeon John Eric Holmes,Not Holmes [[note]]Not joking; Holmes was a polymath who, in addition to being a neurosurgeon and lecturer, wrote fantasy/sci-fi novels in his spare time and first came up with the idea for the Basic Set as a new players guide for his home campaign. [[/note]]. Originally this was a starter set for new players to more easily learn the game (which was considered rather difficult to learn from the original set). The first release only covered levels 1-3, and players were intended to move on to ''Advanced Dungeons & Dragons'' after this. The revision published in 1981, edited by Tom Moldvay, simplified the game further, making it a distinct game system and product line. The most notable simplification is that Dwarf, Elf and Halfling are counted as ''classes'', not races that could choose a class separately the way humans did; so only humans could play anything but a standard version of their species i.e. classes are ''archetype''-based. An ''Expert Set'' expansion edited by David "Zeb" Cook accompanying the 1981 version (which combined are known as the "B/X" version) let players keep with these simpler rules. The next revision was the BECMI series of boxed sets by Frank Metzner (Basic, Expert, Companion, Master and Immortal, respectively), begun in 1983, which extended the game up to epic levels while turning the first set into a tutorial. The rules from the first four of the BECMI series were later compiled in 1991 into the ''Rules Cyclopedia'' written by Creator/AaronAllston, which is still considered a classic; this was accompanied by the last version of the Basic Set, now covering levels 1-5. * '''[[http://index.rpg.net/display-search.phtml?key=system&value=AD%26D&sort=system,systemversion Advanced Dungeons & Dragons]] (1st edition) - 1977-1979:''' The more complete rules, including more character classes, and the enshrinement of the classic Dungeons & Dragons alignment system. More or less completely compatible with the simpler Dungeons & Dragons, and many gamers mixed and matched at will. As well, CharacterClassSystem was unified but some classes are human-only, others forbidden to certain races.This [[note]]This is actually the rules from the original set, but the restrictions were a bit looser. Most people didn't understand the distinction early, which is why Moldvay just said "to heck with it" and made race-as-class the standard for the basic game; the B/X rules were actually mechanically identical, just presented differently.[[/note]]

*** The October 2015 ''Unearthed Arcana'' article revealed the return of prestige classes. Prestige classes now offer class-unique game mechanics and require not only the typical prerequisites (certain level, certain proficiencies, certain ability scores), but require you to accomplish a certain task before you can start training in the class. ** The first of many setting-based sourcebooks is set to be released in November 2015. Titled ''The Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide'', the sourcebook is set to cover the Sword Coast region of the ''Forgotten Realms'' and includes a number of options for both player and Dungeon Masters.
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*** The October 2015 ''Unearthed Arcana'' article revealed the potential return of prestige classes. Prestige Rather than the varying "unique mechanics" to "pseudo-elite reskin", prestige classes now are being reworked to wholly offer class-unique game mechanics and require not only the typical prerequisites (certain level, certain proficiencies, certain ability scores), but require you to accomplish a certain task before you can start training in the class. ** The first of many setting-based sourcebooks is set to be was released in November 2015. Titled ''The Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide'', the sourcebook is set to cover covers the Sword Coast region of the ''Forgotten Realms'' and includes a number of options for both player and Dungeon Masters.
9th Nov '15 8:41:21 PM oknazevad
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After TSR was bought by WizardsOfTheCoast (makers of ''MagicTheGathering'', and now a subsidiary of Hasbro), they published ''Dungeons and Dragons 3rd Edition'' using the TabletopGame/D20System. A major overhaul of the entire rules set, 3rd edition cleared off the crust that had accumulated around 2nd and unified a scattered assortment of rules and procedures into something more coherent. It was a huge hit and revitalized the game, leading to new players aplenty. Then came an incremental edition known as "v3.5", which was largely concerned with fixing a few very obvious {{Game Breaker}}s and {{Spoony Bard}}s in 3rd Edition.
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After TSR was bought by WizardsOfTheCoast (makers of ''MagicTheGathering'', and now a subsidiary of Hasbro), they published ''Dungeons and & Dragons 3rd Edition'' using the TabletopGame/D20System. A major overhaul of the entire rules set, 3rd edition cleared off the crust that had accumulated around 2nd and unified a scattered assortment of rules and procedures into something more coherent. It was a huge hit and revitalized the game, leading to new players aplenty. Then came an incremental edition known as "v3.5", which was largely concerned with fixing a few very obvious {{Game Breaker}}s and {{Spoony Bard}}s in 3rd Edition.
9th Nov '15 8:36:01 PM oknazevad
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In the early 1980's a corporate power struggle inside TSR caused Gary Gygax to be ousted from the company. In 1989, the group left behind codified the official rules tweaks and unofficial suggestions that had accumulated in the mean time into ''Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 2nd Edition.'' It continued in popularity for a time, but by the late 90s, mismanagement of the company led TSR into bankruptcy.
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In the early 1980's mid-1980's a corporate power struggle inside TSR caused Gary Gygax to be ousted from the company. In 1989, the group left behind codified the official rules tweaks and unofficial suggestions that had accumulated in the mean time into ''Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 2nd Edition.'' It continued in popularity for a time, but by the late 90s, mismanagement of the company led TSR into bankruptcy.
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