History StarTrekDeepSpaceNine / TropesAToD

29th Jun '16 2:58:44 PM Wyldchyld
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* AndIMustScream: While the audience never gets to see evidence of it, WordOfGod states that [[spoiler: Dukat's ultimate fate is to be sealed in the Fire Caves with the Pah-Wraiths - ''forever.'']]
** [[spoiler: And in this case, WordOfGod is ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin, since it was the Prophet who wears the form of Sisko's biological mother who told him that.]]

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* AndIMustScream: While the audience never gets to see evidence of it, WordOfGod states that [[spoiler: Dukat's ultimate fate is to be sealed in the Fire Caves with the Pah-Wraiths - ''forever.'']]
** [[spoiler: And in this case, WordOfGod is ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin, since it was the
'' The Prophet who wears the form of Sisko's biological mother who told him that.]]
12th Jun '16 3:26:50 PM GoblinCipher
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** At one point relatively early in the series, before the Dominion War Arc, when the Feds were trying to maintain peace with Cardassia, Gul Dukat makes a point of discretely boarding the station and entering Sisko's quarters, since as he points out, they used to be his. During his conversation with Sisko he makes an offhand reference to Jake. The rage on Sisko's face is seriously impressive, and immediately he comms Ops and has Odo track down Jake to make sure that he is alright. Dukat makes a big deal of being offended by Sisko's suspicion and demonstrates again that Cardassian military leaders are a little too prone to MySpeciesDothProtestTooMuch. Sisko is most definitely ''not'' reassured that Dukat "would never do anything to harm (his) son."

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** At one point relatively early in the series, before the Dominion War Arc, when the Feds were trying to maintain peace with Cardassia, Gul Dukat makes a point of discretely discreetly boarding the station and entering Sisko's quarters, since as he points out, they used to be his. During his conversation with Sisko he makes an offhand reference to Jake. The rage on Sisko's face is seriously impressive, and immediately he comms Ops and has Odo track down Jake to make sure that he is alright. Dukat makes a big deal of being offended by Sisko's suspicion and demonstrates again that Cardassian military leaders are a little too prone to MySpeciesDothProtestTooMuch. Sisko is most definitely ''not'' reassured that Dukat "would never do anything to harm (his) son."
3rd Jun '16 9:47:14 PM ImpudentInfidel
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* AlienArtsAreAppreciated: Averted in the case of Cardassian literature, which is hideously boring and repetitive by any human standard.

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* AlienArtsAreAppreciated: Averted in the case of Cardassian literature, which is hideously boring and repetitive by any human standard. Garak felt the same way about ''Theatre/JuliusCaesar''; the betrayal is obvious from the beginning, so what's the point?



** A recurring element is Garak and Bashier talking about these. In one example they trade some of the best literature from their own cultures (Shakesphere's tragedy ''Julius Caesar'' and the repetitive epic ''The Never-ending Sacrifice) only to both completely fail to get the point of the genre.
3rd Jun '16 9:46:25 PM ImpudentInfidel
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Added DiffLines:

** A recurring element is Garak and Bashier talking about these. In one example they trade some of the best literature from their own cultures (Shakesphere's tragedy ''Julius Caesar'' and the repetitive epic ''The Never-ending Sacrifice) only to both completely fail to get the point of the genre.
3rd Jun '16 6:32:16 AM DrRomoray
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** Even the Captain is darker, ba-boom. (But seriously folks...) Apparently the on-set dynamic on the [=DS9=] cast were much more serious than TNG, which makes sense given Brooks' acting style. This could also explain the general absence of TNG alums.

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** Even the Captain is darker, ba-boom. (But seriously folks...) Apparently the on-set dynamic on the [=DS9=] cast were much set was ''much'' more serious than TNG, which makes sense given Brooks' acting style. This could also That might explain the general absence of why so few TNG alums. alums wanted to guest-star.



** On a philosophical note, the series in general. Gene Roddenberry had envisioned the Federation as a perfect utopian paradise, free from greed, infighting, and discomfort, so much so that during StarTrekTheNextGeneration, he routinely shot down the writers' suggestions as not conforming to that idea of paradise. DS9 was produced after Gene's passing, and portrays the Federation in a far more realistic light, with a top secret intelligence division that is willing to stop at nothing to ensure the security of the Federation, government corruption, and officers willing to violate human rights if it served the greater good. One of the show's antagonists, Eddington, even lampshades this when he states that the Federation's biggest beef with him (and all Federation members that defected to the Maquis) is that they don't understand why anyone would willingly defect from their so-called paradise.

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** On a philosophical note, the series in general. Gene Roddenberry had envisioned the Federation as a perfect utopian paradise, free from greed, infighting, and discomfort, so much so that during StarTrekTheNextGeneration, he routinely shot down the writers' suggestions as not conforming to that idea of paradise. DS9 [=DS9=] was produced after Gene's passing, and portrays the Federation in a far more realistic light, with a top secret intelligence division that is willing to stop at nothing to ensure the security of the Federation, government corruption, and officers willing to violate human rights if it served the greater good. One of the show's antagonists, Eddington, even lampshades this when he states that the Federation's biggest beef with him (and all Federation members that defected to the Maquis) is that they don't understand why anyone would willingly defect from their so-called paradise.
3rd Jun '16 6:30:33 AM DrRomoray
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** Even the Captain is darker, ba-boom. (But seriously folks...) Apparently the on-set dynamics on the [=DS9=] cast were much more serious than TNG, which makes sense given Brooks' acting style. This could also explain the general absence of TNG alums.
** WordOfGod said the sets were intentionally [[TheFutureIsNoir lit differently]] to make them look less pristine.

to:

** Even the Captain is darker, ba-boom. (But seriously folks...) Apparently the on-set dynamics dynamic on the [=DS9=] cast were much more serious than TNG, which makes sense given Brooks' acting style. This could also explain the general absence of TNG alums.
** WordOfGod Word of God said the sets were intentionally [[TheFutureIsNoir lit differently]] to make them look less pristine.
3rd Jun '16 6:30:09 AM DrRomoray
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* DarkerAndEdgier: WordOfGod says the sets were intentionally [[TheFutureIsNoir lit differently]] from TNG to make them look less pristine.
** On a more metaphorical note, the series in general. Gene Roddenberry had envisioned the Federation as a perfect utopian paradise, free from greed, infighting, and discomfort, so much so that during StarTrekTheNextGeneration, he routinely shot down the writers' suggestions as not conforming to that idea of paradise. DS9 was produced after Gene's passing, and portrays the Federation in a far more realistic light, with a top secret intelligence division that is willing to stop at nothing to ensure the security of the Federation, government corruption, and officers willing to violate human rights if it served the greater good. One of the show's antagonists, Eddington, even lampshades this when he states that the Federation's biggest beef with him (and all Federation members that defected to the Maquis) is that they don't understand why anyone would willingly defect from their so-called paradise.

to:

* DarkerAndEdgier: DarkerAndEdgier:
** Even the Captain is darker, ba-boom. (But seriously folks...) Apparently the on-set dynamics on the [=DS9=] cast were much more serious than TNG, which makes sense given Brooks' acting style. This could also explain the general absence of TNG alums.
**
WordOfGod says said the sets were intentionally [[TheFutureIsNoir lit differently]] from TNG to make them look less pristine.
pristine.
** On a more metaphorical philosophical note, the series in general. Gene Roddenberry had envisioned the Federation as a perfect utopian paradise, free from greed, infighting, and discomfort, so much so that during StarTrekTheNextGeneration, he routinely shot down the writers' suggestions as not conforming to that idea of paradise. DS9 was produced after Gene's passing, and portrays the Federation in a far more realistic light, with a top secret intelligence division that is willing to stop at nothing to ensure the security of the Federation, government corruption, and officers willing to violate human rights if it served the greater good. One of the show's antagonists, Eddington, even lampshades this when he states that the Federation's biggest beef with him (and all Federation members that defected to the Maquis) is that they don't understand why anyone would willingly defect from their so-called paradise.
13th May '16 5:39:34 AM Morgenthaler
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* DeusExMachina: Sisko takes the Defiant into the wormhole to head off a fleet of several thousand enemy ships. Luckily, the Prophets intervene and somehow remove the entire enemy fleet from existence. It's nice to have a race of virtually omnipotent noncorporeal alien beings nearby, isn't it?
** However it's only a partial example, as the Prophets' help doesn't come out of nowhere. Their powers, presence and attitude were already long established.
** [[spoiler: And then, [[VideoGame/StarTrekOnline later on]], the Prophets put them back.]]


Added DiffLines:

* DivineIntervention: Sisko takes the Defiant into the wormhole to head off a fleet of several thousand enemy ships. Luckily, the Prophets intervene and somehow remove the entire enemy fleet from existence. It's nice to have a race of virtually omnipotent noncorporeal alien beings nearby, isn't it?
7th May '16 9:29:14 PM ImpudentInfidel
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* AesopAmnesia: In ''[[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration TNG]]'', Worf and Alexander eventually came to the understanding that Alexander should not be forced to be a warrior and Worf could be proud of him anyway. During the Dominion War, Alexander shows up again, and he and his father show the same resentful, misunderstood attitudes towards each other as though they'd never learned that lesson. (With the added bonus of SoapOperaRapidAgingSyndrome [[note]]It's never clearly stated that Klingons ''don't'' age more rapidly than humans, but if they did you'd think it would be explicitly stated at some point given how prominent they are.[[/note]])

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* AesopAmnesia: In ''[[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration TNG]]'', Worf and Alexander eventually came to the understanding that Alexander should not be forced to be a warrior and Worf could be proud of him anyway. During the Dominion War, Alexander shows up again, and he and his father show the same resentful, misunderstood attitudes towards each other as though they'd never learned that lesson. (With the added bonus of SoapOperaRapidAgingSyndrome [[note]]It's never clearly stated that Klingons ''don't'' age more rapidly than humans, but if they did you'd think it would be explicitly stated at some point given how prominent they are.[[/note]])[[/note]]) The variant this time is that this time the positions are reversed; with a war on, Alexander has decided he wants to serve in the military after all. He's still terrible at it though, and Worf can't understand why he bothers instead of pursuing something he's actually good at.
27th Apr '16 5:05:23 PM LentilSandEater
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* ArtisticLicenseEngineering: Well, it *is* Star Trek, but even so, the fact that the airlocks on the station are designed to have both doors open at once is just ridiculous.
** Of course, the station ''was'' built by the Cardassians, and it is established throughout the show that they have lower engineering standards than the Federation. And given how many times the warp cores nearly blow up for what seems like no reason on the various ships of Starfleet, that's saying something.

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* ArtisticLicenseEngineering: ArtisticLicenseEngineering:
**
Well, it *is* Star Trek, but even so, the fact that the airlocks on the station are designed to have both doors open at once is just ridiculous.
** Of course, the station ''was'' built by the Cardassians, and it is established throughout the show that they have lower engineering standards than the Federation. And given how many times the warp cores nearly blow up for what seems like no reason on the various ships of Starfleet, that's saying something.
ridiculous.



** Damar - from Dukat's unremarkable [[TheDragon Dragon]] to one of the most crucial components of the later seasons.
*** WordOfGod says that the writers always had "big plans" for Damar, which is how the producers managed to convince Casey Biggs to play such an apparently unremarkable character. In "Return to Grace" (his first appearance) the director shot Damar as if he were a major character.

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** Damar - from Dukat's unremarkable [[TheDragon Dragon]] to one of the most crucial components of the later seasons.
***
seasons. WordOfGod says that the writers always had "big plans" for Damar, which is how the producers managed to convince Casey Biggs to play such an apparently unremarkable character. In "Return to Grace" (his first appearance) the director shot Damar as if he were a major character.



*** If you thought Rom rose a long way, his son Nog was an even bigger example. By the last few episodes, Rom was a regularly recurring supporting character, but Nog (who'd risen from a petty young thief to the first Ferengi in Starfleet and a respected young officer) was effectively ''one of the main cast,'' and even had an episode devoted ''entirely'' to him ('It's Only a Paper Moon', which didn't even have a B-plot, focusing entirely on Nog [[spoiler:dealing with his PTSD after he lost his leg at AR-558]]).

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*** ** If you thought Rom rose a long way, his son Nog was an even bigger example. By the last few episodes, Rom was a regularly recurring supporting character, but Nog (who'd risen from a petty young thief to the first Ferengi in Starfleet and a respected young officer) was effectively ''one of the main cast,'' and even had an episode devoted ''entirely'' to him ('It's Only a Paper Moon', which didn't even have a B-plot, focusing entirely on Nog [[spoiler:dealing with his PTSD after he lost his leg at AR-558]]).
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