History Spell / VideoGames

11th Jun '16 4:16:00 PM Prfnoff
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** "Rupee" is spelled "rupy" in the first game.
6th Jun '16 7:07:08 PM AnotherDuck
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* "Aeris vs. Aerith" from ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'' is a [[TropeCodifier canonical example]] [[note]]and one that could've served as the TropeNamer if not for Asimov[[/note]] that can spawn enough InternetBackdraft [[SeriousBusiness to melt the polar icecaps]]. It is always romanized as "Aerith" in Japan and used internationally in more current works, and some fans even use ''Earisu'' (the phonetic transliteration of the Japanese writing, エアリス). Aerith was subsequently chosen as a romanization because it sounds like "earth" when romanized, something that WordOfGod [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aerith_Gainsborough#cite_note-kaitai-8 confirmed]] at the time of the game's release in Japan. "Aeris" was chosen for the first English release because Sony handled the English release and their team felt it sounded better. Things got complicated by Square (later Creator/SquareEnix) once they took over localization of their own titles again - by the time of ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts'', Square had switched it back to "Aerith" outside of Japan. Some fans (including the ones editing Wikipedia and Final Fantasy Wiki) have struck a sort of compromise and use "Aeris" in regards to the game ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'' and "Aerith" when referring to all other games she appears in. It doesn't help that "Aeris" is a Latin word with many other connotations that could be reasonably applied to the character, though these were unintentional since even the Japanese developers intended to get the "earth" homophone (and early concept art shows other spellings such as "Erith").

to:

* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'':
**
"Aeris vs. Aerith" from ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'' is a [[TropeCodifier canonical example]] [[note]]and one that could've served as the TropeNamer if not for Asimov[[/note]] that can spawn enough InternetBackdraft [[SeriousBusiness to melt the polar icecaps]]. It is always romanized as "Aerith" in Japan and used internationally in more current works, and some fans even use ''Earisu'' (the phonetic transliteration of the Japanese writing, エアリス). Aerith was subsequently chosen as a romanization because it sounds like "earth" when romanized, something that WordOfGod [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aerith_Gainsborough#cite_note-kaitai-8 confirmed]] at the time of the game's release in Japan. "Aeris" was chosen for the first English release because Sony handled the English release and their team felt it sounded better. Things got complicated by Square (later Creator/SquareEnix) once they took over localization of their own titles again - by the time of ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts'', Square had switched it back to "Aerith" outside of Japan. Some fans (including the ones editing Wikipedia and Final Fantasy Wiki) have struck a sort of compromise and use "Aeris" in regards to the game ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'' and "Aerith" when referring to all other games she appears in. It doesn't help that "Aeris" is a Latin word with many other connotations that could be reasonably applied to the character, though these were unintentional since even the Japanese developers intended to get the "earth" homophone (and early concept art shows other spellings such as "Erith").
4th Jun '16 9:13:27 PM gewunomox
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The names of the bosses in the first two ''Metal Gear'' games for the [=MSX2=] were mostly [[WritingAroundTrademarks mangled]] pop-culture references: there's "Arnold" the cyborg (as in Schwarzenegger), "Coward Duck" (Comicbook/HowardTheDuck), "Black Color" (from Blackcollar, an obscure Timothy Zahn novel about space ninjas), "Ultra Box" ({{Ultravox}}) and the "Franchise/{{Predator}}". Not surprisingly, almost all of them (with the exception of [[Film/TheRunningMan Running Man]]) were changed in the remade versions.

to:

** The names of the bosses in the first two ''Metal Gear'' games for the [=MSX2=] were mostly [[WritingAroundTrademarks mangled]] pop-culture references: there's "Arnold" the cyborg (as in Schwarzenegger), "Coward Duck" (Comicbook/HowardTheDuck), "Black Color" (from Blackcollar, an obscure Timothy Zahn novel about space ninjas), "Ultra Box" ({{Ultravox}}) (Music/{{Ultravox}}) and the "Franchise/{{Predator}}". Not surprisingly, almost all of them (with the exception of [[Film/TheRunningMan Running Man]]) were changed in the remade versions.
4th Jun '16 5:53:29 AM MrLavisherMoot
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoII'': The Yakuza boss likes to address you as "kosai", when possibly the correct Japanese spelling is "Kohai".

to:

* ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoII'': ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto2'': The Yakuza boss likes to address you as "kosai", when possibly the correct Japanese spelling is "Kohai".
25th May '16 6:55:10 AM NoUsername
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The main characters of ''VideoGame/LegendOfTheValkyrie'', who have made several cameo appearances in other Creator/NamcoBandai, have varied in spelling between Valkyrie/Walküre and Sandra/Xandra.

to:

* The main characters of ''VideoGame/LegendOfTheValkyrie'', ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfValkyrie'', who have made several cameo appearances in other Creator/NamcoBandai, have varied in spelling between Valkyrie/Walküre and Sandra/Xandra.
21st May '16 10:58:59 PM bwburke94
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** ''VideoGame/StarFoxCommand'' retconned Panther Caroso to Panther Caruso for unknown reasons. And since there [[FranchiseKiller hasn't been a new Star Fox game after it]], most fans will probably still use Caroso.
** [[VideoGame/StarFox1 The original]] put all boss names in the manual and in game [[spoiler: except for the Slot Machine, who's never named at all.]] They contradict with three bosses: Atomic Core/Base, Professor Hangar/Hanger, and Galactic Riders/Rider. It's confusing as to which source is canon, most notable with the Galactic Rider(s), as it can refer to either the singular escape pod or the bikers piloting it. To make it even more confusing, the BossSubtitles in the manual support its plural spelling and the game's listing as the weapon is the bikers themselves. Hanger/Hangar... doesn't really help with the arguing. Those names are easily interchangeable.

to:

** ''VideoGame/StarFoxCommand'' retconned Panther Caroso to Panther Caruso for unknown reasons. And since there [[FranchiseKiller hasn't been a new Star Fox game after it]], most fans will probably still use Caroso.
reasons.
** [[VideoGame/StarFox1 The original]] put all boss names (save for the secret [[spoiler:Slot Machine]]) in the manual and in game [[spoiler: except for the Slot Machine, who's never named at all.]] game. They contradict with three bosses: Atomic Core/Base, Professor Hangar/Hanger, and Galactic Riders/Rider. It's confusing as to which source is canon, most notable with the Galactic Rider(s), as it can refer to either the singular escape pod or the bikers piloting it. To make it even more confusing, the BossSubtitles in the manual support its plural spelling and the game's listing as the weapon is the bikers themselves. Hanger/Hangar... doesn't really help with the arguing. Those names are easily interchangeable.
25th Apr '16 6:41:35 AM pinkdalek
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** It never appeared in the game itself, but Tetsuya Nomura punned on Cloud's absurd name when he jokingly named his mother "Claudia Strauss" (''Suturaauso'' rather than ''Suturaaifu'').
25th Apr '16 6:35:25 AM pinkdalek
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* "Aeris vs. Aerith" from ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'' is a [[TropeCodifier canonical example]] [[note]]and one that could've served as the TropeNamer if not for Asimov[[/note]] that can spawn enough InternetBackdraft [[SeriousBusiness to melt the polar icecaps]]. It is always romanized as "Aerith" in Japan and used internationally in more current works, and some fans even use ''Earisu'' (the phonetic transliteration of the Japanese writing, エアリス). Aerith was subsequently chosen as a romanization because it sounds like "earth" when romanized, something that WordOfGod [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aerith_Gainsborough#cite_note-kaitai-8 confirmed]] at the time of the game's release in Japan. "Aeris" was chosen for the first English release because Sony handled the English release and their team felt it sounded better. Things got complicated by Square (later Creator/SquareEnix) once they took over localization of their own titles again - by the time of ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts'', Square had switched it back to "Aerith" outside of Japan. Some fans (including the ones editing Wikipedia and Final Fantasy Wiki) have struck a sort of compromise and use "Aeris" in regards to the game ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'' and "Aerith" when referring to all other games she appears in. A remake was announced at E3 2015: one can only guess how Square Enix and their long-suffering fanbase will handle it.
** It doesn't help that "Aeris" is a Latin word with many other connotations that could be reasonably applied to the character, though these were unintentional since even the Japanese developers intended to get the "earth" homophone (and early concept art shows other spellings such as "Erith").

to:

* "Aeris vs. Aerith" from ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'' is a [[TropeCodifier canonical example]] [[note]]and one that could've served as the TropeNamer if not for Asimov[[/note]] that can spawn enough InternetBackdraft [[SeriousBusiness to melt the polar icecaps]]. It is always romanized as "Aerith" in Japan and used internationally in more current works, and some fans even use ''Earisu'' (the phonetic transliteration of the Japanese writing, エアリス). Aerith was subsequently chosen as a romanization because it sounds like "earth" when romanized, something that WordOfGod [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aerith_Gainsborough#cite_note-kaitai-8 confirmed]] at the time of the game's release in Japan. "Aeris" was chosen for the first English release because Sony handled the English release and their team felt it sounded better. Things got complicated by Square (later Creator/SquareEnix) once they took over localization of their own titles again - by the time of ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts'', Square had switched it back to "Aerith" outside of Japan. Some fans (including the ones editing Wikipedia and Final Fantasy Wiki) have struck a sort of compromise and use "Aeris" in regards to the game ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'' and "Aerith" when referring to all other games she appears in. A remake was announced at E3 2015: one can only guess how Square Enix and their long-suffering fanbase will handle it.
**
It doesn't help that "Aeris" is a Latin word with many other connotations that could be reasonably applied to the character, though these were unintentional since even the Japanese developers intended to get the "earth" homophone (and early concept art shows other spellings such as "Erith")."Erith").
** Also, "Safer Sephiroth" and "Bizarro Sephiroth" were supposed to be romanized as "Sefer Sephiroth" and "Rebirth Sephiroth" respectively, which were intended as further references to Sephiroth's name origin. Many still love using the original names mostly because of the [[{{Narm}} ironically funny naming]]. While Bizarro Sephiroth seems inexplicable at first, "rebirth" and "reverse" are homonyms in Japanese (both are spelled リバース). More than likely, Sony's translators mistook it for "Reverse Sephiroth" and attempted a {{woolseyism}}.



*** Also, "Safer Sephiroth" and "Bizarro Sephiroth" were supposed to be romanized as "Sefer Sephiroth" and "Rebirth Sephiroth" respectively, which were intended as further references to Sephiroth's name origin. Many still love using the original names mostly because of the [[{{Narm}} ironically funny naming]].
*** While Bizarro Sephiroth seems inexplicable at first, "rebirth" and "reverse" are homonyms in Japanese (both are spelled リバース). More than likely, Sony's translators mistook it for "Reverse Sephiroth" and attempted a {{woolseyism}}.
** It was sometimes believed that Aerith and Cloud were meant to be "Alice" and "Claude".
** Is Tifa's last name spelled Lockhart or Lockheart?
** Another two weird examples are Zack and Rufus - while their names sound like perfectly acceptable English names, they don't match with the Japanese romanizations - Zakkusu and Rūfausu, which would be pronounced Zacks and Rufaus (rhymes with "house") respectively. Also, Barret (Baretto) is a [[LostInTranslation play on the Japanese pronunciation]] of "Bullet".

to:

*** Also, "Safer Sephiroth" and "Bizarro Sephiroth" were supposed to be romanized as "Sefer Sephiroth" and "Rebirth Sephiroth" respectively, which were intended as further references to Sephiroth's name origin. Many still love using the original names mostly because of the [[{{Narm}} ironically funny naming]].
*** While Bizarro Sephiroth seems inexplicable at first, "rebirth" and "reverse"
**There are homonyms multiple signs in Japanese (both are spelled リバース). More than likely, Sony's translators mistook it for "Reverse Sephiroth" and attempted a {{woolseyism}}.
** It was sometimes believed that Aerith and Cloud were meant to be "Alice" and "Claude".
** Is
Tifa's bar which give her name as 'Tyfer'. And is her last name spelled Lockhart or Lockheart?
** Another two weird examples are Zack and Rufus - while their names sound like perfectly acceptable English names, they don't match with the Japanese romanizations - Zakkusu and Rūfausu, which would be pronounced Zacks and Rufaus (rhymes with "house") respectively. Also, Barret respectively.
**Barret
(Baretto) is a [[LostInTranslation play on the Japanese pronunciation]] of "Bullet"."Bullet". His name is spelled 'Barrett' in some material, including the demo release (which itself has an obvious MeaningfulName connotation, as the spelling used by the gun manufacturer). It even appears as 'Bullet' in some early translations and '[[JapaneseRanguage Ballet]]' in the game's code and debug room.
** The truck stolen by Aeris when getting the team out of Midgar has 'Midgul Motor Vehicles' written on the side. "Midgul" appears several times around Midgar in various places in the backdrops.
** At one point, Bugenhagen will start telling the characters about "Life's dream". It sounds like gibberish, but it's a legitimate (if stupid) transliteration of "Lifestream".
** It never appeared in the game itself, but Tetsuya Nomura punned on Cloud's absurd name when he jokingly named his mother "Claudia Strauss" (''Suturaauso'' rather than ''Suturaaifu'').
21st Apr '16 1:39:05 AM aye_amber
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''VideoGame/{{Klonoa}}'':
** Gantz/Guntz from ''VideoGame/Klonoa 2: Dream Champ Tournament'' and ''Klonoa: Beach Volleyball'' respectively. His name was romanized differently in each game.
** The character who is known as "Joka" in the [[VideoGame/KlonoaDoorToPhantomile original game]] is changed to "Joker" in the Wii remake.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Klonoa}}'':
''VideoGame/{{Klonoa}}:''
** Gantz/Guntz Gantz / Guntz from ''VideoGame/Klonoa ''VideoGame/{{Klonoa}} 2: Dream Champ Tournament'' and ''Klonoa: Beach Volleyball'' respectively. His name was romanized differently in each game.
** The character who is known as "Joka" in the [[VideoGame/KlonoaDoorToPhantomile [[VideoGame/{{Klonoa}}: Door to Phantomile original game]] is changed to "Joker" in the Wii remake.
12th Apr '16 8:51:32 PM Prfnoff
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The PCEngine version of ''Puzzle Boy'' has "© ATLAS" on the title screen. At least Creator/{{Atlus}} didn't develop or publish this version of their game (Creator/TelenetJapan did).

to:

* The PCEngine UsefulNotes/PCEngine version of ''Puzzle Boy'' has "© ATLAS" on the title screen. At least Creator/{{Atlus}} didn't develop or publish this version of their game (Creator/TelenetJapan did).game; Creator/TelenetJapan did. Similarly, the PC Engine port of ''Todd's Adventures in Slime World'', released in Japan under Telenet's Micro World label, identifies original developer Creator/{{Epyx}} as "EPIX" in the copyright notice on the title screen.
This list shows the last 10 events of 318. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Spell.VideoGames