History Spell / VideoGames

17th Feb '17 1:51:43 AM Chabal2
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** Special notice must be given to foreigner Maribel/Mariber/Maeriberii Hearn/Haarn/Haan (mix and match as you will). As she only appears in the music [=CDs=], not the games, there is no official Romanization of her name. This is even [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] by her (most definitely Japanese) friend Renko Usami, who can't even pronounce her full name, and always calls her "Mary." Even ''that'' can be Romanized as "Merri," "Merii," or "Merry" instead. The poor girl just can't get a break. [[FutureMeScaresMe It is hinted, however]], [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lafcadio_Hearn that the correct one is Hearn]].

to:

** Special notice must be given to foreigner Maribel/Mariber/Maeriberii Hearn/Haarn/Haan (mix and match as you will). As she only appears in the music [=CDs=], not the games, there is no official Romanization of her name. This is even [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] by her (most definitely Japanese) friend Renko Usami, who can't even pronounce her full name, and always calls her "Mary." Even ''that'' can be Romanized as "Merri," "Merii," or "Merry" instead. The poor girl just can't get a break. [[FutureMeScaresMe [[FutureBadass It is hinted, however]], [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lafcadio_Hearn that the correct one is Hearn]].
17th Feb '17 1:51:07 AM Chabal2
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** Special notice must be given to foreigner Maribel/Mariber/Maeriberii Hearn/Haarn/Haan (mix and match as you will). As she only appears in the music [=CDs=], not the games, there is no official Romanization of her name. This is even [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] by her (most definitely Japanese) friend Renko Usami, who can't even pronounce her full name, and always calls her "Mary." Even ''that'' can be Romanized as "Merri," "Merii," or "Merry" instead. The poor girl just can't get a break.

to:

** Special notice must be given to foreigner Maribel/Mariber/Maeriberii Hearn/Haarn/Haan (mix and match as you will). As she only appears in the music [=CDs=], not the games, there is no official Romanization of her name. This is even [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] by her (most definitely Japanese) friend Renko Usami, who can't even pronounce her full name, and always calls her "Mary." Even ''that'' can be Romanized as "Merri," "Merii," or "Merry" instead. The poor girl just can't get a break. [[FutureMeScaresMe It is hinted, however]], [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lafcadio_Hearn that the correct one is Hearn]].


Added DiffLines:

** Mokou is a member of the Fujiwara clan, but apparently it can be romanized as Huziwara.
16th Feb '17 1:48:55 PM ILikeRobots
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** As mentioned, even official translations can be a bit dodgy. The seventh game,''Videogame/FireEmblemTheBlazingBlade,'' (known via fan translation as ''Blazing Sword'' for a good while), or just plain ''Fire Emblem'' outside Japan (as it was the first Fire Emblem game that got through Japanese shores, despite [=FE6=] originally being made for an international release), has a serious [[ChivalricRomance Matter of France]] theme to its names (Roland, Durandal, and so on) but for some reason Turpin and Almace became Durban and Armads. Then again, the original Turpin was an archbishop who followed his emperor to war and Durban is a bloodthirsty berserker.

to:

** As mentioned, even official translations can be a bit dodgy. The seventh game,''Videogame/FireEmblemTheBlazingBlade,'' game, ''Videogame/FireEmblemTheBlazingBlade,'' (known via fan translation as ''Blazing Sword'' for a good while), or just plain ''Fire Emblem'' outside Japan (as it was the first Fire Emblem game that got through Japanese shores, despite [=FE6=] originally being made for an international release), has a serious [[ChivalricRomance Matter of France]] theme to its names (Roland, Durandal, and so on) but for some reason Turpin and Almace became Durban and Armads. Then again, the original Turpin was an archbishop who followed his emperor to war and Durban is a bloodthirsty berserker.
16th Feb '17 12:57:43 PM ILikeRobots
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* The protagonist of [[VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia the original]] ''Franchise/FireEmblem'' appears to have been named for Mars (the Roman god of war), yet the ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' series localized his name as Marth. The Japanese aren't any help in this -- the debug menu for ''Melee'' has "Mars" in English, but [[http://serenesforest.net/media/complete/Marth.jpg the artbooks]] put out for ''Monshou no Nazo'', as well as the [[http://serenesforest.net/media/tcg/6/fe6-001.jpg official]] [[http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v139/VincentASM/TCG/P037_Marth.jpg trading card]] [[http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v139/VincentASM/TCG/5001_Marth_L.jpg game]] clearly have "Marth" written in English, yet the same card game also writes "Minerva" [[http://serenesforest.net/media/tcg/P/P042x.jpg as]] [[http://serenesforest.net/media/tcg/6/fe6-005.jpg "Minerba,"]] "Jeorge" as [[http://serenesforest.net/media/tcg/5/fe5-007.jpg "Jorjue"]] and "Scorpio" as [[http://serenesforest.net/media/tcg/3/fe3-050.jpg "Scopio."]]
** Nintendo also likes to completely change names for no apparent reason. This usually leads to mass confusion when new titles come out because there's always been enough delay for fans to have translated the names themselves. To be fair, Nintendo does have reasons for it occasionally, usually to eliminate names that sound strange in English (like Beeze) or to try and get them all to sound consistent in one universe. However, changing "Soanevalke" to "Stefan" came back to bite them when his Japanese name was actually a hint to the character's origins in ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Radiant Dawn]]''.
*** Nintendo also screwed up with the name of the Dragon King. It's spelled "Deghinsea" in ''Path of Radiance'', then spelled "Dheginsea" in ''Radiant Dawn'' (however, this was fixed in the PAL version, which uses ''Path of Radiance'''s spelling).
** Now that ''Fire Emblem: Shadow Dragon'' is out in the U.S. and Europe, it's even more obvious that one hand was not talking to the other. Since the original "Marth" games were not officially translated until late 2008/early 2009, fans had accepted certain spellings years ago out of necessity, so you can also add "changes" that may not have deliberately been changes at all. While you can find a much more extensive list of names [[http://serenesforest.net/fe11/name.html elsewhere,]] certain changes deserve special mention here.

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* ''Videogame/FireEmblem:''
**
The protagonist of [[VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia the original]] ''Franchise/FireEmblem'' original game, ''VideoGame/FireEmblemShadowDragonAndTheBladeOfLight,'' appears to have been named for Mars (the Roman god of war), yet the ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' series localized his name as Marth. The Japanese aren't any help in this -- the debug menu for ''Melee'' has "Mars" in English, but [[http://serenesforest.net/media/complete/Marth.jpg the artbooks]] put out for ''Monshou no Nazo'', ''Videogame/FireEmblemMysteryOfTheEmblem'', as well as the [[http://serenesforest.net/media/tcg/6/fe6-001.jpg official]] [[http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v139/VincentASM/TCG/P037_Marth.jpg trading card]] [[http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v139/VincentASM/TCG/5001_Marth_L.jpg game]] clearly have "Marth" written in English, yet the same card game also writes "Minerva" [[http://serenesforest.net/media/tcg/P/P042x.jpg as]] [[http://serenesforest.net/media/tcg/6/fe6-005.jpg "Minerba,"]] "Jeorge" as [[http://serenesforest.net/media/tcg/5/fe5-007.jpg "Jorjue"]] and "Scorpio" as [[http://serenesforest.net/media/tcg/3/fe3-050.jpg "Scopio."]]
** Nintendo also likes to [[DubNameChange completely change names for no apparent reason.reason]]. This usually leads to mass confusion when new titles come out because there's always been enough delay for fans to have translated the names themselves. To be fair, Nintendo does have reasons for it occasionally, usually to eliminate names that sound strange in English (like Beeze) or to try and get them all to sound consistent in one universe. However, changing "Soanevalke" to "Stefan" came back to bite them when his Japanese name was actually a hint to the character's origins in ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Radiant Dawn]]''.
*** ** Nintendo also screwed up with the name of the Dragon King. It's spelled "Deghinsea" in ''Path of Radiance'', then spelled "Dheginsea" in ''Radiant Dawn'' (however, this was fixed in the PAL version, which uses ''Path of Radiance'''s spelling).
spelling). Additionally, the name of the purple tiger laguz that debuted in ''Radiant Dawn'' after a brief mention in the previous game was at first given in ''Path of Radiance'' as "Kysha," where he was "Kyza" when he made his actual appearance.
** Now that ''Fire Emblem: Shadow Dragon'' is out in the U.S. and Europe, it's even more obvious that one hand was not talking to the other. Since the original "Marth" games were not officially translated until late 2008/early 2009, fans had accepted certain spellings years ago out of necessity, so you can also add "changes" that may not have deliberately been changes at all. While you can find a much more extensive list of names [[http://serenesforest.net/fe11/name.html elsewhere,]] certain changes deserve special mention here.here:



** [[VideoGame/FireEmblemJugdral The fourth game]], ''Seisen no Keifu'' (or ''Genealogy of the Holy War''), was never released outside Japan, which results in the usual fan translation weirdness. Like Yurius and Yuria versus Julius and Julia, and the Gayborg spear (should be Gáe Bolg).

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** [[VideoGame/FireEmblemJugdral ** The fourth game]], ''Seisen no Keifu'' (or ''Genealogy of the Holy War''), game, ''Videogame/FireEmblemGenealogyOfTheHolyWar'', was never released outside Japan, which results in the usual fan translation weirdness. Like Yurius and Yuria versus Julius and Julia, and the Gayborg spear (should be Gáe Bolg). The release of ''Videogame/FireEmblemAwakening'' gave official translations of several names from ''Genealogy,'' going with "Julius" and "Julia" and "Gáe Bolg" over the former names, among others.



** As mentioned, even official translations can be a bit dodgy. [[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe The seventh game]], ''Rekka no Ken'' ("Blazing Sword"), or just plain ''Fire Emblem'' outside Japan (as it was the first Fire Emblem game that got through Japanese shores, despite [=FE6=] originally made for an international release), has a serious [[ChivalricRomance Matter of France]] theme to its names (Roland, Durandal, and so on) but for some reason Turpin and Almace became Durban and Armads. Then again, the original Turpin was an archbishop who followed his emperor to war and Durban is a bloodthirsty berserker.
*** Fa's name from ''Fuuin no Tsurugi/The Binding Blade'' also got changed to Fae in ''Rekka no Ken'', and Dragon Riders were renamed Wyvern Riders for plot differentiation. Also, in [=FE6=], Alan could be called by the name [[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Aran]] or [[VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia Arran]] (which would interfere with OneSteveLimit), Astol could be called Astohl, Idoun could also be translated as Idenn, Brenya could also be called Brunya, and worst of all, the first Dark Magic-user you obtain could either be called Ray (direct translation) or Lleu (ThemeNaming with Lugh, his brother). ''Awakening'', once again, took a third option and named him Raigh.

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** As mentioned, even official translations can be a bit dodgy. [[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe The seventh game]], ''Rekka no Ken'' ("Blazing Sword"), game,''Videogame/FireEmblemTheBlazingBlade,'' (known via fan translation as ''Blazing Sword'' for a good while), or just plain ''Fire Emblem'' outside Japan (as it was the first Fire Emblem game that got through Japanese shores, despite [=FE6=] originally being made for an international release), has a serious [[ChivalricRomance Matter of France]] theme to its names (Roland, Durandal, and so on) but for some reason Turpin and Almace became Durban and Armads. Then again, the original Turpin was an archbishop who followed his emperor to war and Durban is a bloodthirsty berserker.
*** Fa's name from ''Fuuin no Tsurugi/The Binding Blade'' ''Videogame/FireEmblemTheBindingBlade'' also got changed to Fae in ''Rekka no Ken'', ''Blazing Blade'', and Dragon Riders were renamed Wyvern Riders for plot differentiation. Also, in [=FE6=], Alan could be called by the name [[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius [[VideoGame/FireEmblemRadiantDawn Aran]] or [[VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia [[VideoGame/FireEmblemShadowDragonAndTheBladeOfLight Arran]] (which would interfere with OneSteveLimit), Astol could be called Astohl, Idoun could also be translated as Idenn, Brenya could also be called Brunya, and worst of all, the first Dark Magic-user you obtain could either be called Ray (direct translation) or Lleu (ThemeNaming with Lugh, his brother). ''Awakening'', once again, took a third option and named him Raigh.



*** And then you have the conflicting translations of those titles. "Sword of Seals," "Sealed Sword," or "Binding Blade"? "Sword of Flames," "Blazing Sword," or "Blazing Blade"? "Dark Dragons and the Sword of Light" or "Shadow Dragons and the Bright Blade"? "Sword of Flames/Blazing Sword/Blazing Blade" was dropped from the title entirely for the American release, and the DS remake of the first game was simply called "Shadow Dragon." Jeebus.

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*** ** And then you have the conflicting translations of those titles. "Sword of Seals," "Sealed Sword," or "Binding Blade"? "Sword of Flames," "Blazing Sword," or "Blazing Blade"? "Dark Dragons and the Sword of Light" or "Shadow Dragons and the Bright Blade"? "Sword of Flames/Blazing Sword/Blazing Blade" was dropped from the title entirely for the American release, and the DS remake of the first game was simply called "Shadow Dragon." Jeebus.Dragon," and "The Binding Blade" and "The Blazing Blade" were finally confirmed as the correct localized titles. Jeebus.
5th Feb '17 9:17:46 AM Odacon_Spy
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* In the original Japanese [=MSX2=] version of ''VideoGame/{{Aleste}}'', the name of the supercomputer gone wrong was romanized as "DIA 51." The supercomputer was written out of the translated UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem version, ''Power Strike'', but the [[AllThereInTheManual out-of-game material]] for ''[[VideoGame/MUSHA M.U.S.H.A.]]'' refers to it as "Dire 51." (This was likely because the Japanese version of ''Musha Aleste'' wrote the name using ateji instead of romaji.)

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* In the original Japanese [=MSX2=] version of ''VideoGame/{{Aleste}}'', the name of the supercomputer gone wrong was romanized as "DIA 51." The supercomputer was written out of the translated UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem version, ''Power Strike'', but the [[AllThereInTheManual out-of-game material]] for ''[[VideoGame/MUSHA ''[[VideoGame/{{MUSHA}} M.U.S.H.A.]]'' refers to it as "Dire 51." (This was likely because the Japanese version of ''Musha Aleste'' wrote the name using ateji instead of romaji.)
26th Jan '17 11:40:21 AM X2X
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** For some odd reason, ''Guilty Gear XX'' inserted hyphens for characters with known surnames on their lifebars and during the VersusCharacterSplash (ex. Sol-Badguy, Ky-Kiske, Anji-Mito, etc.), which influenced the fandom for a time. ''GG''[='s=] SpiritualSuccessor, ''VideoGame/BlazBlue'' also did this for ''[[VideoGame/BlazBlueCalamityTrigger Calamity Trigger]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/BlazBlueContinuumShift Continuum Shift]]'', which led to people calling Hakumen "Haku-men."

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** For some odd reason, ''Guilty Gear XX'' inserted hyphens for characters with known surnames on their lifebars and during the VersusCharacterSplash (ex. Sol-Badguy, Ky-Kiske, Chipp-Zanuff, Anji-Mito, etc.), which influenced the fandom for a time. ''GG''[='s=] SpiritualSuccessor, ''VideoGame/BlazBlue'' also did this for ''[[VideoGame/BlazBlueCalamityTrigger Calamity Trigger]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/BlazBlueContinuumShift Continuum Shift]]'', which led to people calling Hakumen "Haku-men."



* When ''[[VideoGame/MushihimeSama Mushihime-sama Futari Black Label]]'' was released as [[DownloadableContent DLC[[ for the UsefulNotes/{{Xbox 360}} version, its title was bizarrely romanized as "Mushihimesama-hutari-Black-Lavel."

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* When ''[[VideoGame/MushihimeSama Mushihime-sama Futari Black Label]]'' was released as [[DownloadableContent DLC[[ DLC]] for the UsefulNotes/{{Xbox 360}} version, its title was bizarrely romanized as "Mushihimesama-hutari-Black-Lavel."



** A similar event happened with the WakeUpCallBoss of ''DMC4''. His name is clearly meant to be Belial since he's a flame demon from Hell, but a BlindIdiotTranslation somehow ended up with "Berial." (Strange considering [[VideoGame/{{Darkstalkers}} this isn't the first time a Capcom character has gone by that name]].) And if that wasn't bad enough, Berial's VA [[ItIsPronouncedTroPAY pronounces it as "burial."]]

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** A similar event happened with the WakeUpCallBoss of ''DMC4''.''[=DMC4=]''. His name is clearly meant to be Belial since he's a flame demon from Hell, but a BlindIdiotTranslation somehow ended up with "Berial." (Strange considering [[VideoGame/{{Darkstalkers}} this isn't the first time a Capcom character has gone by that name]].) And if that wasn't bad enough, Berial's VA [[ItIsPronouncedTroPAY pronounces it as "burial."]]
26th Jan '17 11:38:05 AM X2X
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** "Aeris vs. Aerith" is a [[TropeCodifier canonical example]] [[note]]and one that could've served as the TropeNamer if not for Asimov[[/note]] that can spawn enough InternetBackdraft [[SeriousBusiness to melt the polar icecaps]]. It is always romanized as "Aerith" in Japan and used internationally in more current works, and some fans even use ''Earisu'' (the phonetic transliteration of the Japanese writing, エアリス). Aerith was subsequently chosen as a romanization because it sounds like "earth" when romanized, something that WordOfGod [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aerith_Gainsborough#cite_note-kaitai-8 confirmed]] at the time of the game's release in Japan. "Aeris" was chosen for the first English release because Sony handled the English release and their team felt it sounded better. Things got complicated by Square (later Creator/SquareEnix) once they took over localization of their own titles again - by the time of ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts'', Square had switched it back to "Aerith" outside of Japan. Some fans (including the ones editing Wikipedia and Final Fantasy Wiki) have struck a sort of compromise and use "Aeris" in regards to the game ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'' and "Aerith" when referring to all other games she appears in. It doesn't help that "Aeris" is a Latin word with many other connotations that could be reasonably applied to the character, though these were unintentional since even the Japanese developers intended to get the "earth" homophone (and early concept art shows other spellings such as "Erith").
** Also, "Safer Sephiroth" and "Bizarro Sephiroth" were supposed to be romanized as "Sefer Sephiroth" and "Rebirth Sephiroth" respectively, which were intended as further references to Sephiroth's [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sephirot name origin]]. Many still love using the original names mostly because of the [[{{Narm}} ironically funny naming]]. While Bizarro Sephiroth seems inexplicable at first, "rebirth" and "reverse" are homonyms in Japanese (both are spelled リバース). More than likely, Sony's translators mistook it for "Reverse Sephiroth" and attempted a {{woolseyism}}.
** In Spain, Sephiroth was spelled "Sefirot", which is the Spanish name for the Kabbalah term the character is named after (Sephirot or Səphîrôṯ). However, just like with Aerith, Square Enix's localization team changed his name to the Japanese romanization in later games.
** There are multiple signs in Tifa's bar which give her name as 'Tyfer'. And is her last name Lockhart or Lockheart?
** Another two weird examples are Zack and Rufus - while their names sound like perfectly acceptable English names, they don't match with the Japanese romanizations - Zakkusu and Rūfausu, which would be pronounced Zacks and Rufaus (rhymes with "house") respectively.
** Barret (Baretto) is a [[LostInTranslation play on the Japanese pronunciation]] of "Bullet". His name is spelled 'Barrett' in some material, including the demo release (which itself has an obvious MeaningfulName connotation, as the spelling used by the gun manufacturer). It even appears as 'Bullet' in some early translations and '[[JapaneseRanguage Ballet]]' in the game's code and debug room.
** The truck stolen by Aeris when getting the team out of Midgar has 'Midgul Motor Vehicles' written on the side. "Midgul" appears several times around Midgar in various places in the backdrops.
** At one point, Bugenhagen will start telling the characters about "Life's dream". It sounds like gibberish, but it's a legitimate (if stupid) transliteration of "Lifestream".
* ''VideoGame/Freeciv'': Some historical characters have had their names mistransliterated in this[[FreewareGames free to download game]]
** [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seni_Pramoj Seni Pramoj]] = Seni Pramoya
**
* Several characters in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyII'', mostly due to CharacterNameLimits. Firion's original Japanese name was "Frionel", and Leon was originally "Leonhart". "Mingwu" eventually settled on "Minwu", and the ''Origins'' release changed Guy's name to "Gus" for some reason.
** Ricard Highwind has had his name bounced around constantly. He's "Richard" in Japanese versions (and the fan translation), the prototype NES version called him "Edward", he was given "Gareth" in ''Origins'', and finally they settled on "Ricard" for ''Dawn of Souls'' and onward. ''VideoGame/DissidiaFinalFantasy'' still refers to him as "Richard", and a MythologyGag in the DS remake of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIV'' gives the name of Kain's father as "Richard", alluding to a ''Dawn of Souls'' MythologyGag naming the child Ricard acts as an adoptive father to "Kain".
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIV'' has a character named "Rydia". Some fans have thought this was a mistranslation of Lydia. Square Enix has never used any other English spelling, though.

to:

** "Aeris vs. Aerith" is a [[TropeCodifier canonical example]] [[note]]and one that could've served as the TropeNamer {{Trope Namer|s}} if not for Asimov[[/note]] that can spawn enough InternetBackdraft [[SeriousBusiness to melt the polar icecaps]]. It is always romanized as "Aerith" in Japan and used internationally in more current works, and some fans even use ''Earisu'' (the phonetic transliteration of the Japanese writing, エアリス). Aerith was subsequently chosen as a romanization because it sounds like "earth" when romanized, something that WordOfGod [[http://en.[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aerith_Gainsborough#cite_note-kaitai-8 confirmed]] at the time of the game's release in Japan. "Aeris" was chosen for the first English release because Sony handled the English release and their team felt it sounded better. Things got complicated by Square (later Creator/SquareEnix) once they took over localization of their own titles again - -- by the time of ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts'', Square had switched it back to "Aerith" outside of Japan. Some fans (including the ones editing Wikipedia and Final Fantasy Wiki) have struck a sort of compromise and use "Aeris" in regards to the game ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'' and "Aerith" when referring to all other games she appears in. It doesn't help that "Aeris" is a Latin word with many other connotations that could be reasonably applied to the character, though these were unintentional since even the Japanese developers intended to get the "earth" homophone (and early concept art shows other spellings such as "Erith").
** Also, "Safer Sephiroth" and "Bizarro Sephiroth" were supposed to be romanized as "Sefer Sephiroth" and "Rebirth Sephiroth" respectively, which were intended as further references to Sephiroth's [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sephirot name origin]]. origin.]] Many still love using the original names mostly because of the [[{{Narm}} ironically funny naming]]. While Bizarro Sephiroth seems inexplicable at first, "rebirth" and "reverse" are homonyms in Japanese (both are spelled リバース). More than likely, Sony's translators mistook it for "Reverse Sephiroth" and attempted a {{woolseyism}}.
{{Woolseyism}}.
** In Spain, Sephiroth was spelled "Sefirot", "Sefirot," which is the Spanish name for the Kabbalah term the character is named after (Sephirot or Səphîrôṯ). However, just like with Aerith, Square Enix's localization team changed his name to the Japanese romanization in later games.
** There are multiple signs in Tifa's bar which give her name as 'Tyfer'. "Tyfer." And is her last name Lockhart or Lockheart?
** Another two weird examples are Zack and Rufus - -- while their names sound like perfectly acceptable English names, they don't match with the Japanese romanizations - -- Zakkusu and Rūfausu, which would be pronounced Zacks and Rufaus (rhymes with "house") respectively.
** Barret (Baretto) is a [[LostInTranslation play on the Japanese pronunciation]] of "Bullet". "Bullet." His name is spelled 'Barrett' "Barrett" in some material, including the demo release (which itself has an obvious MeaningfulName connotation, as the spelling used by the gun manufacturer). It even appears as 'Bullet' "Bullet" in some early translations and '[[JapaneseRanguage Ballet]]' "[[JapaneseRanguage Ballet]]" in the game's code and debug room.
** The truck stolen by Aeris when getting the team out of Midgar has 'Midgul "Midgul Motor Vehicles' Vehicles" written on the side. "Midgul" appears several times around Midgar in various places in the backdrops.
** At one point, Bugenhagen will start telling the characters about "Life's dream". dream." It sounds like gibberish, but it's a legitimate (if stupid) transliteration of "Lifestream".
"Lifestream."
* ''VideoGame/Freeciv'': ''VideoGame/{{Freeciv}}'': Some historical characters have had their names mistransliterated in this[[FreewareGames this [[FreewareGames free to download game]]
**
game]], such as [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seni_Pramoj Seni Pramoj]] = Seni Pramoya
**
Pramoj,]] whose name is given as "Seni Pramoya."
* Several characters in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyII'', mostly due to CharacterNameLimits. Firion's original Japanese name was "Frionel", "Frionel," and Leon was originally "Leonhart". "Leonhart." "Mingwu" eventually settled on "Minwu", "Minwu," and the ''Origins'' release changed Guy's name to "Gus" for some reason.
** Ricard Highwind has had his name bounced around constantly. He's "Richard" in Japanese versions (and the fan translation), the prototype NES version called him "Edward", "Edward," he was given "Gareth" in ''Origins'', and finally they settled on "Ricard" for ''Dawn of Souls'' and onward. ''VideoGame/DissidiaFinalFantasy'' still refers to him as "Richard", "Richard," and a MythologyGag in the DS remake of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIV'' gives the name of Kain's father as "Richard", "Richard," alluding to a ''Dawn of Souls'' MythologyGag naming the child Ricard acts as an adoptive father to "Kain".
"Kain."
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIV'' has a character named "Rydia". "Rydia." Some fans have thought this was a mistranslation of Lydia. Square Enix has never used any other English spelling, though.



* Because ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyV'' went a long time without an official translation, the {{fan translation}}s tended to disagree on what the English equivalent of "Kururu" was, the most popular alternative being "Cara". Square (later Square Enix) eventually translated it as "Krile".
** And then, of course, there's Butz/Bartz. It is ''still'' romanized as "Butz" in Japan, though most English speakers and the official western translations call him "Bartz" considering the alternative (that and his name has always been translated as such officially).
** The villain's name being Exdeath or Exodus ''seems'' to be an issue, but it should be noted that everything that's "Exdeath" in English is ''Ekusudesu'' (エクスデス) in Japanese; meanwhile, everything that's "Exodus" is ''Ekusodasu'' (エクソダス). However, he has been referred to as "Ex-Death" or "X-Death" before settling on "Exdeath".

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* Because ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyV'' went a long time without an official translation, the {{fan translation}}s tended to disagree on what the English equivalent of "Kururu" was, the most popular alternative being "Cara". "Cara." Square (later Square Enix) eventually translated it as "Krile".
"Krile."
** And then, of course, there's Butz/Bartz. It is ''still'' romanized as "Butz" in Japan, though most English speakers and the official western translations call him "Bartz" [[UnfortunateNames considering the alternative alternative]] (that and his name has always been translated as such officially).
** The villain's name being Exdeath or Exodus ''seems'' to be an issue, but it should be noted that everything that's "Exdeath" in English is ''Ekusudesu'' (エクスデス) in Japanese; meanwhile, everything that's "Exodus" is ''Ekusodasu'' (エクソダス). However, he has been referred to as "Ex-Death" or "Ex-Death," "[=ExDeath=]," and "X-Death" before settling on "Exdeath"."Exdeath."



** While Galuf has always been Galuf, the other three Warriors of Dawn have been very inconsistent; Bartz's father was originally dubbed "Dorgan" in the fan translation and "Drogan" in the [=PS1=] release, before becoming "Dorgann" in the GBA translation. The werewolf has been called "Kelgar", "Kelga", and "Kelgore" before becoming "Kelger". Finally, the king of Surgate has been "Zezae" or "Zeza" before becoming "Xezat". One name translation that everyone agrees on, however, is that Faris's real name is "Sarisa" and NOT "Salsa".
** Its sequel, the OVA ''Legend of the Crystals'' naturally follows in its footsteps. "Bartz" is referred to as "Batz," while Exdeath is "Exodese," and "Cid" is rendered as "Shido." The English dub is even internally inconsistent, as the main male character's name is rendered as first "Prettz" and later "Pritz" by the opening text in different episodes.
** There has long been debate over Gilgamesh's "bad" sword equivalent of "Excalibur". The first game it appeared in was ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyV'', and the most common translation for a long time was "Exca'''il'''bur", taken from a fan translation done before the game was finally localized in the U.S. Square's first translation of this was in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII'', in which they chose "Excalipoor", a name that made sense considering the horrible quality of the weapon. They later flipped back and forth on using "Excalipoor" and "Excalipur", though they appear to have finally settled on the former.
* One of the examples of Ted Woolsey's videogame translations is the [[GoldfishPoopGang comic recurring enemy]] Ultros from ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI'', who was originally named Orthros. Square Enix seems to go back and forth on whether to keep it or not. A reference to him as a mark in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXII'' and his appearance as a BonusBoss in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyTacticsA2'' and the GBA and PSP versions of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyI'' use "Orthros", but when the GBA version of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI'' came out in America with a fresh script, they went back to "Ultros."
** The character known as "Sabin" in the English version is called "Mash"[[note]]マッシュ, ''Masshu''[[/note]] in the Japanese version. Some fans have insisted that Mash is a mistranslation of "Matthew", but this is incorrect since transliterating "Matthew" to Japanese ends up as ''Mashū''[[note]]マシュウ[[/note]]. The point is moot, since "Mash" is actually his ''nickname'' in Japan, his real name being Macias[[note]]マシアス, ''Mashiasu''[[/note]].
** Another name issue in FFVI is the Atma / Ultima weapon. While Ultima makes sense for all the future games and is therefore now the standard, Atma actually still works because it refers to the soul in Hindi. Therefore, a boss that has its lifeforce entirely in magic would make sense being a soul weapon. However, Atma Weapon was obviously only chosen for space considerations, and only appeared in the SNES version of FFVI where "Ultima Weapon" wouldn't fit. "Atma" doesn't even match the katakana for "Ultima". It's even lampooned in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX2'', where the bestiary entry for Ultima Weapon chides the player, "Whatever you do, don't call it Atma."

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** While Galuf has always been Galuf, the other three Warriors of Dawn have been very inconsistent; Bartz's father was originally dubbed "Dorgan" in the fan translation and "Drogan" in the [=PS1=] release, before becoming "Dorgann" in the GBA translation. The werewolf has been called "Kelgar", "Kelga", "Kelgar," "Kelga," and "Kelgore" before becoming "Kelger". "Kelger." Finally, the king of Surgate has been "Zezae" or "Zeza" before becoming "Xezat". "Xezat." One name translation that everyone agrees on, however, is that Faris's real name is "Sarisa" and NOT "Salsa".
"Salsa."
** Its sequel, the OVA ''Legend ''[[Anime/FinalFantasyLegendOfTheCrystals Legend of the Crystals'' Crystals]]'' naturally follows in its footsteps. "Bartz" is referred to as "Batz," while Exdeath is "Exodese," and "Cid" is rendered as "Shido." The English dub is even internally inconsistent, as the main male character's name is rendered as first "Prettz" and later "Pritz" by the opening text in different episodes.
** There has long been debate over Gilgamesh's "bad" sword equivalent of "Excalibur". Excalibur. The first game it appeared in was ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyV'', and the most common translation for a long time was "Exca'''il'''bur", "Exca'''il'''bur," taken from a fan translation done before the game was finally localized in the U.S. Square's first translation of this was in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII'', in which they chose "Excalipoor", "Excalipoor," a name that made sense considering the horrible quality of the weapon. They later flipped back and forth on using "Excalipoor" and "Excalipur", "Excalipur," though they appear to have finally settled on the former.
* One of the examples of Ted Woolsey's videogame video game translations is the [[GoldfishPoopGang comic recurring enemy]] Ultros from ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI'', who was originally named Orthros. Square Enix seems to go back and forth on whether to keep it or not. A reference to him as a mark in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXII'' and his appearance as a BonusBoss in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyTacticsA2'' and the GBA and PSP versions of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyI'' use "Orthros", "Orthros," but when the GBA version of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI'' came out in America with a fresh script, they went back to "Ultros."
** The character known as "Sabin" in the English version is called "Mash"[[note]]マッシュ, ''Masshu''[[/note]] "Mash" [[note]]マッシュ, ''Masshu'' [[/note]] in the Japanese version. Some fans have insisted that Mash is a mistranslation of "Matthew", "Matthew," but this is incorrect since transliterating "Matthew" to Japanese ends up as ''Mashū''[[note]]マシュウ[[/note]].''Mashū'' [[note]]マシュウ[[/note]]. The point is moot, since "Mash" is actually his ''nickname'' in Japan, his real name being Macias[[note]]マシアス, ''Mashiasu''[[/note]].
** Another name issue in FFVI ''FFVI'' is the Atma / Ultima Atma/Ultima weapon. While Ultima makes sense for all the future games and is therefore now the standard, Atma actually still works because it refers to the soul in Hindi. Therefore, a boss that has its lifeforce entirely in magic would make sense being a soul weapon. However, Atma Weapon was obviously only chosen for space considerations, and only appeared in the SNES version of FFVI ''FFVI'' where "Ultima Weapon" wouldn't fit. "Atma" doesn't even match the katakana for "Ultima". "Ultima." It's even lampooned in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX2'', where the bestiary entry for Ultima Weapon chides the player, "Whatever you do, don't call it Atma."



** The official name of the music that plays in Zozo is スラム·シャッフル (Suramu Shaffuru). The most popular way to romanize this is as Slam Shuffle, but スラム can also be translated as "slum", so perhaps Slum Shuffle would make more sense [[note]]the music has a shuffle rhythm and plays in a slum[[/note]].
** Note that Square Enix officially romanizes "Kefka" as "Cefca" (Japanese materials to this day maintain the spelling), but the name is always changed to "Kefka" overseas. It's a very strange case because in Japanese, the hard C needed for this sound would be "ke" and the kana ''supports'' "Kefka". Unlike the Aerith/Aeris example, they've continued to leave his name alone in non-Japanese localizations.

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** The official name of the music that plays in Zozo is スラム·シャッフル (Suramu Shaffuru). The most popular way to romanize this is as Slam Shuffle, "Slam Shuffle," but スラム can also be translated as "slum", "slum," so perhaps Slum Shuffle "Slum Shuffle" would make more sense [[note]]the music has a shuffle rhythm and plays in a slum[[/note]].
** Note that Square Enix officially romanizes "Kefka" as "Cefca" (Japanese materials to this day maintain the spelling), but the name is always changed to "Kefka" overseas. It's a very strange case because in Japanese, the hard C needed for this sound would be "ke" and the kana ''supports'' "Kefka". "Kefka." Unlike the Aerith/Aeris example, they've continued to leave his name alone in non-Japanese localizations.



** Some fans have argued that Rinoa's name should be Lenore. A few fan-run websites initially translated her name as "Lenore" before an official romanization was released. Again, [[http://www.rpgamer.com/games/ff/ff8/art/ff8chars.jpg Square Enix]] artwork from before the US release contradicts this. Worth noting: Lenor is a fabric conditioner in the UK and parts of Europe. The equivalent US product is Downy. Whether this was considered by Square Enix's translation team is unknown, but probably not. Still, releasing the game in the UK with the character named "Lenore" could have resulted in mockery. Although Rinoa DOES '''soften''' Squall's heart, so...
*** It ''could'' have been [[Creator/EdgarAllanPoe a Shout Out]]. While she isn't an example of [[TheLostLenore the associated trope]], she does have an angel motif, so it sort of fits.

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** Some fans have argued that Rinoa's name should be Lenore. A few fan-run websites initially translated her name as "Lenore" before an official romanization was released. Again, [[http://www.rpgamer.com/games/ff/ff8/art/ff8chars.jpg Square Enix]] artwork Enix artwork]] from before the US release contradicts this. Worth noting: Lenor is a fabric conditioner in the UK and parts of Europe. The equivalent US product is Downy. Whether this was considered by Square Enix's translation team is unknown, but probably not. Still, releasing the game in the UK with the character named "Lenore" could have resulted in mockery. Although Rinoa DOES '''soften''' Squall's heart, so...
*** It ''could'' have been [[Creator/EdgarAllanPoe a Shout Out]].Shout-Out]]. While she isn't an example of [[TheLostLenore the associated trope]], she does have an angel motif, so it sort of fits.



** It doesn't stop there for ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIX'' - many [[MythologyGag Mythology Gags]] were ruined thanks to inconsistent translations.
*** The location "Mount Gulug", romanized as "Gurugu" in Japanese, is obviously a reference to Gurgu Volcano from ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyI'' (which itself has been alternately translated; as of the [=PS1=] remake it is now called "Mt. Gulg").

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** It doesn't stop there for ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIX'' - -- many [[MythologyGag Mythology Gags]] {{Mythology Gag}}s were ruined thanks to inconsistent translations.
*** The location "Mount Gulug", Gulug," romanized as "Gurugu" in Japanese, is obviously a reference to Gurgu Volcano from ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyI'' (which itself has been alternately translated; as of the [=PS1=] remake it is now called "Mt. Gulg").



*** The boss "Hilgigars" is clearly supposed to be "Hill Gigas", which is a recurring enemy in the series.
* In early ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXII'' translations, Balthier's name originally appeared as 'Balflear', because that was actually his name in the Japanese original (romanised "Barufurea").

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*** The boss "Hilgigars" is clearly supposed to be "Hill Gigas", Gigas," which is a recurring enemy in the series.
* In early ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXII'' translations, Balthier's name originally appeared as 'Balflear', "Balflear," because that was actually his name in the Japanese original (romanised "Barufurea").



** In Japanese, the almighty god of the series appears to have the word "universe" with a B in front of it as a name. Romanized it's Bhunivelze.
* The ''Final Fantasy'' games [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyTactics set in]] [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyXII Ivalice]] started out with a ''lot'' of this, sometimes in the same game. As of the re-translations it's mostly cleared up, generally for the better.
** The most famous example being the original release of ''Final Fantasy Tactics''. The queen is most frequently referred to as Ruvelia, but occasionally the pronunciation is inverted to Luveria. The latter is chosen for the rerelease, but spelt Louveria. And don't get the fanbase started on Tietra/Teta, Orran/Olan, Zalbaag/Zalbag, Isilud/Izlude...
** Bonus points for Omdoria/Omdolia, where it's possible to see both names [[http://img844.imageshack.us/img844/7158/omdoliaomdoria.png ON THE SAME SCREEN]].

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** In Japanese, the almighty god of [[Franchise/FabulaNovaCrystallisFinalFantasy the series series]] appears to have the word "universe" with a B in front of it as a name. Romanized Romanized, it's Bhunivelze.
* The ''Final Fantasy'' games [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyTactics set in]] set]] [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyXII Ivalice]] in]] Franchise/{{Ivalice|Alliance}} started out with a ''lot'' of this, sometimes in the same game. As of the re-translations it's mostly cleared up, generally for the better.
** The most famous example being the original release of ''Final Fantasy Tactics''. The queen is most frequently referred to as Ruvelia, but occasionally the pronunciation is inverted to Luveria. The latter is chosen for the rerelease, but spelt Louveria. spelled as "Louveria." And don't get the fanbase started on Tietra/Teta, Orran/Olan, Zalbaag/Zalbag, Isilud/Izlude...
** Bonus points for Omdoria/Omdolia, where it's possible to see both names [[http://img844.imageshack.us/img844/7158/omdoliaomdoria.png ON THE SAME SCREEN]]. SCREEN.]]



** Tidus vs. Tida. All official English media uses Tidus, with varying pronunciations (Tee-dus in the first KingdomHearts game, Tie-dus in the second), though James Arnold Taylor, his English voice actor, decreed that "Tee-dus" was the official English pronunciation. The Japanese, however, spell and pronounce the name "Tīda" (Tee-da), from the Okinawan dialect word for "sun" (Yuna, by contrast, means "moon" in Okinawan). Regardless, "Tidus" is the official English spelling, even though "Tida" would be closer to the original pronunciation. "Tida" was originally going to be used, however, and one can see his name written (in the fictional Spiran script) as "Tidu" on the lockers at Luca Stadium.
* From ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyAdventure'', a combination of JapaneseRanguage and the translator not really doing the proper research managed to corrupt the name of one of the bosses, Ifrit, into "Iflyte".
* [[TalesSeries Tales Series]] examples:

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** Tidus vs. Tida. All official English media uses Tidus, with varying pronunciations (Tee-dus in [[VideoGame/KingdomHeartsI the first KingdomHearts first]] ''Franchise/KingdomHearts'' game, Tie-dus in [[VideoGame/KingdomHeartsII the second), second]]), though James Arnold Taylor, Creator/JamesArnoldTaylor, his English voice actor, decreed that "Tee-dus" was the official English pronunciation. The Japanese, however, spell and pronounce the name "Tīda" (Tee-da), from the Okinawan dialect word for "sun" (Yuna, by contrast, means "moon" in Okinawan). Regardless, "Tidus" is the official English spelling, even though "Tida" would be closer to the original pronunciation. "Tida" was originally going to be used, however, and one can see his name written (in the fictional Spiran script) as "Tidu" on the lockers at Luca Stadium.
** ''FFX'' was the game that cemented the recurring HP- and MP-stealing ability of Dragoons (or Dragoon-like characters) as "Lancet." Previously, the ability was known as "Lancer" in ''IX'' and "Lance" in ''V''. ''VideoGame/TheatrhythmFinalFantasy'' would strangely revert to "Lance," though it is an outlier among the Square Enix-era ''FF'' titles in this regard.
* From ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyAdventure'', a combination of JapaneseRanguage and the translator not really doing the proper research managed to corrupt the name of one of the bosses, Ifrit, into "Iflyte".
"Iflyte."
* [[TalesSeries Tales Series]] ''VideoGame/{{Tales|Series}}'' series examples:



** Some names of ''VideoGame/TalesOfSymphonia'' characters were changed or spelled differently for the western release. Examples: Collet Brunel (became Colette in the translation) and Shihna Fujibayashi (who became Sheena). Genius Sage and Refill Sage got their names changed to Genis and Raine respectively. Also, the place names Asgard, Palmacosta, Luin and Hima were Ascard, Parumacosta, Ruin and Haima in the original (though Asgard makes more sense, as it most likely refers to Ásgarðr, a place in Norse mythology).
** The still-untranslated ''VideoGame/TalesOfHearts'' has generated confusion among its small English fanbase with the character カルセドニー.[[note]]literal is karusedonii[[/note]] This clearly looks like Chalcedony, which also makes sense when you figure most character names are English names for gemstones. The manual has no answers, but the romanizations on [[http://toh-r.tales-ch.jp/sp/images/chara/btn_calcedny.jpg Namco's website]] use Calcedny.
** This is a recurring thing in the ''TalesSeries'', really. Namco usually changes names in the American version of a game; sometimes they do it for no reason (as any [[VideoGame/TalesOfDestiny Destiny]] fan could tell you), but mostly they do it because the original names were just "Western-sounding", not genuinely western. For example (but definitely not limited to), [[VideoGame/TalesOfDestiny Leon Magnus]], whose Japanese name was ''Lion'' Magnus; while Lion sounds silly when read in English, in Japanese it is read the exact same way "Leon" is read here. The same applied to many, many games. It has been toned down in recent installments (for example, ''VideoGame/TalesOfVesperia''), probably because the writers started doing some research.

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** Some names of ''VideoGame/TalesOfSymphonia'' characters were changed or spelled differently for the western release. Examples: Collet Brunel (became Colette in the translation) and Shihna Fujibayashi (who became Sheena). Genius Sage and Refill Sage got their names changed to Genis and Raine respectively. Also, the place names Asgard, Palmacosta, Luin and Hima were Ascard, Parumacosta, Ruin and Haima in the original (though Asgard makes more sense, as it most likely refers to Ásgarðr, a place in Norse mythology).
Myth/{{Norse mythology}}).
** The still-untranslated ''VideoGame/TalesOfHearts'' has generated confusion among its small English fanbase with the character カルセドニー.[[note]]literal [[note]]The literal translation is karusedonii[[/note]] "Karusedonii."[[/note]] This clearly looks like Chalcedony, which also makes sense when you figure most character names are English names for gemstones. The manual has no answers, but the romanizations on [[http://toh-r.tales-ch.jp/sp/images/chara/btn_calcedny.jpg Namco's website]] use Calcedny.
** This is a recurring thing in the ''TalesSeries'', ''Tales'' games, really. Namco usually changes names in the American version of a game; sometimes they do it for no reason (as any [[VideoGame/TalesOfDestiny Destiny]] ''[[VideoGame/TalesOfDestiny Destiny]]'' fan could tell you), but mostly they do it because the original names were just "Western-sounding", "Western-sounding," not genuinely western. For example (but definitely not limited to), [[VideoGame/TalesOfDestiny Leon Magnus]], whose Japanese name was ''Lion'' Magnus; while Lion sounds silly when read in English, in Japanese it is read the exact same way "Leon" is read here. The same applied to many, many games. It has been toned down in recent installments (for example, ''VideoGame/TalesOfVesperia''), probably because the writers started doing some research.



** In the first ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaI'' game, there was an armored knight enemy called a "Darknut" by the instruction book. It was intended to be ''Taatonakku'', which translates as "Tart Knuck". Compare this with ''VideoGame/ZeldaIITheAdventureOfLink'''s ''aiannakku'' which became "Iron Knuckle". There's also a boss enemy named ''rebonakku'' that rides a horse. This has simply been translated as "Rebonack" in the ''Zelda: Collectors Edition'' Player's Guide.

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** In the first ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaI'' ''VideoGame/{{The Legend Of Zelda|I}}'' game, there was an armored knight enemy called a "Darknut" by the instruction book. It was intended to be ''Taatonakku'', which translates as "Tart Knuck". Knuck." Compare this with ''VideoGame/ZeldaIITheAdventureOfLink'''s ''aiannakku'' which became "Iron Knuckle". Knuckle." There's also a boss enemy named ''rebonakku'' that rides a horse. This has simply been translated as "Rebonack" in the ''Zelda: Collectors Edition'' Player's Guide.



** The number of people who call Sheik "Shiek" is saddening. However, it ''is'' "Shiek" in Germany, because "Sheik" would be pronounced "shike", not "sheek" like it should be.
** And then we have Zoras vs. Zolas. This worked, though, because they look and behave like two separate species (Zora = tail-headed/nice; Zola = scaly and crested/AlwaysChaoticEvil [though the Zola King in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkToThePast'' isn't so bad]). In ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOracleGames Oracle of Ages]],'' both types are referred to as Zoras; according to an NPC in the Zora village, they're the same species, with "Ocean Zoras" being the friendly variety, and "River Zoras" being the enemy type.

to:

** The number of people who call Sheik "Shiek" is saddening. However, it ''is'' "Shiek" in Germany, because "Sheik" would be pronounced "shike", "shike," not "sheek" like it should be.
** And then we have [[JapaneseRanguage Zoras vs. Zolas.Zolas]]. This worked, though, because they look and behave like two separate species (Zora = tail-headed/nice; Zola = scaly and crested/AlwaysChaoticEvil [though the Zola King in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkToThePast'' isn't so bad]). In ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOracleGames Oracle of Ages]],'' Ages]]'', both types are referred to as Zoras; according to an NPC in the Zora village, they're the same species, with "Ocean Zoras" being the friendly variety, and "River Zoras" being the enemy type.



** Before ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaPhantomHourglass'' came out, some websites were translating Link's fairy companion Ciela's name as "Sierra", another L/R issue. "Ciela" is correct due to ThemeNaming between the fairies; her name refers to air, and the others refer to earth and water.
** The ''Zelda'' series makes a point of giving normal Anglo names strange Romanizations--for example, Renado from ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTwilightPrincess'' could've easily been "Leonard". What makes this even worse is that the Japanese website for the game used such "normal" Romanizations until the English release neared and everything was switched to the "weird" Romanizations.

to:

** Before ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaPhantomHourglass'' came out, some websites were translating Link's fairy companion Ciela's name as "Sierra", "Sierra," another L/R issue. "Ciela" is correct due to ThemeNaming between the fairies; her name refers to air, and the others refer to earth and water.
** The ''Zelda'' series makes a point of giving normal Anglo names strange Romanizations--for example, Renado from ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTwilightPrincess'' could've easily been "Leonard". "Leonard." What makes this even worse is that the Japanese website for the game used such "normal" Romanizations until the English release neared and everything was switched to the "weird" Romanizations.



** The dragon bosses appearing in ''Zelda II'' and ''Ocarina of Time'' were actually intended to be one and the same, both being known as ''Barubajia'' in Japan. The former got translated as "Barba" in the initial English release, while the latter became "Volvagia".

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** The dragon bosses appearing in ''Zelda II'' and ''Ocarina ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime Ocarina of Time'' Time]]'' were actually intended to be one and the same, both being known as ''Barubajia'' in Japan. The former got translated as "Barba" in the initial English release, while the latter became "Volvagia"."Volvagia."



* Dr. Light (ライト) from the ''VideoGame/MegaMan'' series had his name variously rendered as Light, Right, or Wright in the early games; it wasn't until ''4'' that it was standardized as Dr. Light in the English games. Similarly, Dr. Wily (ワイリー) was sometimes referred to as Dr. Wiley (or even Dr. Willy) in the early games.
** In Japan, Dr. Light is officially spelled Dr. Right, with the logo of his lab being a capital "R" in the Famicom game ''Rockboard''. When the Light's Lab logo first appeared in English, it became a capital "L".

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* Dr. Light (ライト) from the ''VideoGame/MegaMan'' ''Franchise/MegaMan'' series had his name variously rendered as Light, Right, or Wright in the early games; it wasn't until ''4'' that it was standardized as Dr. Light in the English games. Similarly, Dr. Wily (ワイリー) was sometimes referred to as Dr. Wiley (or even Dr. Willy) in the early games.
** In Japan, Dr. Light is officially spelled Dr. Right, with the logo of his lab being a capital "R" in the Famicom game ''Rockboard''. When the Light's Lab logo first appeared in English, it became a capital "L"."L."



** The ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork'' games [[LampshadeHanging address]] the Light/Right mixup: the main protagonist's grandfather is called Tadashi Hikari, which pretty much translates to "Right Light" in English. Apparently Capcom thinks either version is fine for them at this point.
*** The names of the main characters in the Japanese version are officially "Netto" and "Meiru", which are the Japanese pronunciations of the English words "net" (as in internet) and "mail" (as in e-mail). The English translation dealt with this by renaming Netto to Lan (as in LAN, Local Area Network) and calling Meiru "Mayl", which keeps the pun as well as looking like a girl's name. (The English dub of TheAnimeOfTheGame ruined it a bit, as they had to call her "Maylu" in order to match the mouth flaps).
** Averted with ''VideoGame/MegaManZero's'' BigBad, Dr. Weil (Vile in Japan). Before he was unveiled in part 3, fans thought this was Capcom USA's worst translation botch ever, that they somehow got Dr. Wily's name wrong. Further more, his Japanese pronunciation is actually ''Bairu'' (バイル), which sounds like While/Bile/Vile so there was plenty of naming issues to FanWank over before [=MMZ3=] was released and revealed...Dr. Weil as a completely separate person. "Weil" is presumably with a Germanic V-sounding W, thus keeping the pronunciation more or less identical.

to:

** The ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork'' games [[LampshadeHanging address]] the Light/Right mixup: mix-up: the main protagonist's grandfather is called Tadashi Hikari, which pretty much translates to "Right Light" in English. Apparently Capcom thinks either version is fine for them at this point.
*** The names of the main characters in the Japanese version are officially "Netto" and "Meiru", "Meiru," which are the Japanese pronunciations of the English words "net" (as in internet) and "mail" (as in e-mail). The English translation dealt with this by renaming Netto to Lan (as in LAN, Local Area Network) and calling Meiru "Mayl", "Mayl," which keeps the pun as well as looking like a girl's name. (The English dub of ''[[Anime/MegaManNTWarrior NT Warrior]]'', TheAnimeOfTheGame ruined it a bit, as they had to call her "Maylu" in order to match the mouth flaps).
** Averted with ''VideoGame/MegaManZero's'' ''VideoGame/MegaManZero''[='s=] BigBad, Dr. Weil (Vile in Japan). Before he was unveiled in part Part 3, fans thought this was Capcom USA's worst translation botch ever, that they somehow got Dr. Wily's name wrong. Further more, his Japanese pronunciation is actually ''Bairu'' (バイル), which sounds like While/Bile/Vile so there was plenty of naming issues to FanWank over before [=MMZ3=] ''[=MMZ3=]'' was released and revealed...revealed... Dr. Weil as a completely separate person. "Weil" is presumably with a Germanic V-sounding W, thus keeping the pronunciation more or less identical.



** The hard hat mooks seen in almost every incarnation of the game have been called Mettools, Metalls, and Mettaurs. The last one is now the official name.
* The protagonist of the original ''Franchise/FireEmblem'' appears to have been named for Mars (The god of war), however the ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros.''' series localized his name as Marth. The Japanese aren't any help in this -- the debug menu for ''Melee'' has "Mars" in English, but [[http://serenesforest.net/media/complete/Marth.jpg the artbooks]] put out for ''Monshou no Nazo'', as well as the [[http://serenesforest.net/media/tcg/6/fe6-001.jpg official]] [[http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v139/VincentASM/TCG/P037_Marth.jpg trading card]] [[http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v139/VincentASM/TCG/5001_Marth_L.jpg game]] clearly have "Marth" written in English, yet the same card game also writes "Minerva" [[http://serenesforest.net/media/tcg/P/P042x.jpg as]] [[http://serenesforest.net/media/tcg/6/fe6-005.jpg Minerba"]], "Jeorge" as "[[http://serenesforest.net/media/tcg/5/fe5-007.jpg Jorjue]]" and "Scorpio" as "[[http://serenesforest.net/media/tcg/3/fe3-050.jpg Scopio]]".
** Nintendo also likes to completely change names for no apparent reason. This usually leads to mass confusion when new titles come out because there's always been enough delay for fans to have translated the names themselves. To be fair, Nintendo does have reasons for it occasionally, usually to eliminate names that sound strange in English (like Beeze) or to try and get them all to sound consistent in one universe. However, changing "Soanevalke" to "Stefan" came back to bite them when his Japanese name was actually a hint to the character's origins in ''Radiant Dawn''.
*** Nintendo also screwed up with the name of the Dragon King. It's spelled "Deghinsea" in ''Path Of Radiance'', then spelled "Dheginsea" in ''Radiant Dawn'' (however, this was fixed in the PAL version, which uses ''Path of Radiance'''s spelling).
** Now that ''Fire Emblem: Shadow Dragon'' is out in the U.S. and Europe, it's even more obvious that one hand was not talking to the other. Since the original "Marth" games were not officially translated until late 2008/early 2009, fans had accepted certain spellings years ago out of necessity, so you can also add "changes" that may not have deliberately been changes at all. While you can find a much more extensive list of names [[http://serenesforest.net/fe11/name.html elsewhere]], certain changes deserve special mention here.

to:

** The hard hat mooks seen in almost every incarnation of the game have been called Mettools, Metalls, and Mettaurs. The last one is now the official name.
name. Most fans tend to call them Mets for short, which was first used in the instruction manual for the original ''VideoGame/{{Mega Man|1}}''.
** Thanks to the title font used in several of the [[VideoGame/MegaManClassic Classic]] games, as well as the in-game text in certain installments, it is still very common to see names of Mega Man, the other Robot Masters, and the overall series itself spelled as one word (i.e "Megaman"), similar to Franchise/SpiderMan and [[Franchise/TheSlenderManMythos Slender Man]]. Not helping matters is the fact that the Classic characters' [[VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork NetNavi counterparts]] ''do'' have their names spelled this way, albeit with two capitalizations (i.e. [=MegaMan=]), a convention that also applies to [[VideoGame/MegaManLegends MegaMan Volnutt/Trigger and MegaMan Juno]].
* The protagonist of [[VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia the original original]] ''Franchise/FireEmblem'' appears to have been named for Mars (The (the Roman god of war), however yet the ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros.''' ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' series localized his name as Marth. The Japanese aren't any help in this -- the debug menu for ''Melee'' has "Mars" in English, but [[http://serenesforest.net/media/complete/Marth.jpg the artbooks]] put out for ''Monshou no Nazo'', as well as the [[http://serenesforest.net/media/tcg/6/fe6-001.jpg official]] [[http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v139/VincentASM/TCG/P037_Marth.jpg trading card]] [[http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v139/VincentASM/TCG/5001_Marth_L.jpg game]] clearly have "Marth" written in English, yet the same card game also writes "Minerva" [[http://serenesforest.net/media/tcg/P/P042x.jpg as]] [[http://serenesforest.net/media/tcg/6/fe6-005.jpg Minerba"]], "Minerba,"]] "Jeorge" as "[[http://serenesforest.[[http://serenesforest.net/media/tcg/5/fe5-007.jpg Jorjue]]" "Jorjue"]] and "Scorpio" as "[[http://serenesforest.[[http://serenesforest.net/media/tcg/3/fe3-050.jpg Scopio]]".
"Scopio."]]
** Nintendo also likes to completely change names for no apparent reason. This usually leads to mass confusion when new titles come out because there's always been enough delay for fans to have translated the names themselves. To be fair, Nintendo does have reasons for it occasionally, usually to eliminate names that sound strange in English (like Beeze) or to try and get them all to sound consistent in one universe. However, changing "Soanevalke" to "Stefan" came back to bite them when his Japanese name was actually a hint to the character's origins in ''Radiant Dawn''.
''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Radiant Dawn]]''.
*** Nintendo also screwed up with the name of the Dragon King. It's spelled "Deghinsea" in ''Path Of of Radiance'', then spelled "Dheginsea" in ''Radiant Dawn'' (however, this was fixed in the PAL version, which uses ''Path of Radiance'''s spelling).
** Now that ''Fire Emblem: Shadow Dragon'' is out in the U.S. and Europe, it's even more obvious that one hand was not talking to the other. Since the original "Marth" games were not officially translated until late 2008/early 2009, fans had accepted certain spellings years ago out of necessity, so you can also add "changes" that may not have deliberately been changes at all. While you can find a much more extensive list of names [[http://serenesforest.net/fe11/name.html elsewhere]], elsewhere,]] certain changes deserve special mention here.



*** Marth's Pegasus Knight friend/lover is "Sheeda" in Japan, "Shiida" in Europe, and "Caeda" in North America (though pronounced the same - the name is Gaelic).
*** Navarre has the most variations thanks to fans, companies, and Nintendo refusing to pick one name and stay with it. So officially, in English, he's both "Navarre" (US) ''and'' "Nabarl (Europe)". Other official spellings in the past were ADV's translation of "Navahl" for the anime, and ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Brawl'' translation of "Nabaaru" (a straight transliteration of the name's katakana), as well as some alternative fan names used for fan translations. Meaningful names don't help here either, Nabal is a character in the bible, Navarre is a region in Spain.

to:

*** Marth's Pegasus Knight friend/lover is "Sheeda" in Japan, "Shiida" in Europe, and "Caeda" in North America (though pronounced the same - -- the name is Gaelic).
*** Navarre has the most variations thanks to fans, companies, and Nintendo refusing to pick one name and stay with it. So officially, in English, he's both "Navarre" (US) ''and'' "Nabarl (Europe)"."Nabarl" (Europe). Other official spellings in the past were ADV's translation of "Navahl" for the anime, and ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Brawl'' translation of "Nabaaru" (a straight transliteration of the name's katakana), as well as some alternative fan names used for fan translations. Meaningful names don't help here either, Nabal is a character in the bible, Navarre is a region in Spain.



*** Marth's homeland is "Akaneia" and ''Super Smash Bros Melee'' translated it as that (a debug menu also showed "Akaneia" as a stage). The American release uses "Archanea".

to:

*** Marth's homeland is "Akaneia" and ''Super Smash Bros Bros. Melee'' translated it as that (a debug menu also showed "Akaneia" as a stage). The American release uses "Archanea"."Archanea."



** The fourth game, ''Seisen no Keifu'' (or ''Genealogy of the Holy War''), was never released outside Japan, which results in the usual fan translation weirdness. Like Yurius and Yuria versus Julius and Julia, and the Gayborg spear (should be Gáe Bolg).

to:

** [[VideoGame/FireEmblemJugdral The fourth game, game]], ''Seisen no Keifu'' (or ''Genealogy of the Holy War''), was never released outside Japan, which results in the usual fan translation weirdness. Like Yurius and Yuria versus Julius and Julia, and the Gayborg spear (should be Gáe Bolg).



** As mentioned, even official translations can be a bit dodgy. The seventh game, ''Rekka no Ken'' ("Blazing Sword"), or just plain ''Fire Emblem'' outside Japan (as it was the first Fire Emblem game that got through Japanese shores, despite FE6 originally made for an international release), has a serious [[ChivalricRomance Matter of France]] theme to its names (Roland, Durandal, and so on) but for some reason Turpin and Almace became Durban and Armads. Then again, the original Turpin was an archbishop who followed his emperor to war and Durban is a bloodthirsty berserker.
*** Fa's name from Fuuin no Tsurugi also got changed to Fae in Rekka no Ken, and Dragon Riders were renamed Wyvern Riders for plot differentiation. Also, in FE6, Alan could be called by the name [[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Aran]] or [[VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia Arran]] (which would interfere with OneSteveLimit), Astol could be called Astohl, Idoun could also be translated as Idenn, Brenya could also be called Brunya, and worst of all, the first Dark Magic-user you obtain could either be called Ray (direct translation), or Lleu (ThemeNaming with Lugh, his brother). ''Awakening'', once again, took a third option and named him Raigh.
** Even the official Japanese subtitle of the original Famicom game has been subject to variation due to the different readings for the kanji for "sword". Some official sources use ''Ankoku Ryuu to Hikari no '''Ken''','' while other sources uses ''Ankoku Ryuu to Hikari no '''Tsurugi'''.''
*** And then you have the conflicting translations of those titles. "Sword of Seals", "Sealed Sword", or "Binding Blade"? "Sword of Flames", "Blazing Sword", or "Blazing Blade"? "Dark Dragons and the Sword of Light" or "Shadow Dragons and the Bright Blade"? "Sword of Flames/Blazing Sword/Blazing Blade" was dropped from the title entirely for the American release, and the DS remake of the first game was simply called "Shadow Dragon". Jeebus.

to:

** As mentioned, even official translations can be a bit dodgy. [[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe The seventh game, game]], ''Rekka no Ken'' ("Blazing Sword"), or just plain ''Fire Emblem'' outside Japan (as it was the first Fire Emblem game that got through Japanese shores, despite FE6 [=FE6=] originally made for an international release), has a serious [[ChivalricRomance Matter of France]] theme to its names (Roland, Durandal, and so on) but for some reason Turpin and Almace became Durban and Armads. Then again, the original Turpin was an archbishop who followed his emperor to war and Durban is a bloodthirsty berserker.
*** Fa's name from Fuuin ''Fuuin no Tsurugi Tsurugi/The Binding Blade'' also got changed to Fae in Rekka ''Rekka no Ken, Ken'', and Dragon Riders were renamed Wyvern Riders for plot differentiation. Also, in FE6, [=FE6=], Alan could be called by the name [[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Aran]] or [[VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia Arran]] (which would interfere with OneSteveLimit), Astol could be called Astohl, Idoun could also be translated as Idenn, Brenya could also be called Brunya, and worst of all, the first Dark Magic-user you obtain could either be called Ray (direct translation), translation) or Lleu (ThemeNaming with Lugh, his brother). ''Awakening'', once again, took a third option and named him Raigh.
** Even the official Japanese subtitle of the original Famicom game has been subject to variation due to the different readings for the kanji for "sword". "sword." Some official sources use ''Ankoku Ryuu to Hikari no '''Ken''','' while other sources uses use ''Ankoku Ryuu to Hikari no '''Tsurugi'''.''
'''Tsurugi'''''.
*** And then you have the conflicting translations of those titles. "Sword of Seals", Seals," "Sealed Sword", Sword," or "Binding Blade"? "Sword of Flames", Flames," "Blazing Sword", Sword," or "Blazing Blade"? "Dark Dragons and the Sword of Light" or "Shadow Dragons and the Bright Blade"? "Sword of Flames/Blazing Sword/Blazing Blade" was dropped from the title entirely for the American release, and the DS remake of the first game was simply called "Shadow Dragon". Dragon." Jeebus.



* The ''PhantasyStar'' series has several examples, the most {{egregious}} of which involve the complete name change of a character present in the first two games, [[spoiler:Noah in the first game, Lutz in the second]]. While the name used in the second game is the correct one, it was so long before the change was identified that many fans of the series are convinced the character is actually two separate people who look alike. A large body of {{Fanon}} was created to support the idea. Note also: Dark Force/Darkfalz/Dark Phallus.
** In [=PSO=], there is a weapon named Rika's Claw. [=PSU=] has a weapon named Falclaw. Both weapons look identical...because they reference the same character, a Newman named Rika in English versions of Phantasy Star IV, and Fal in Japanese versions. Similar, but less severe, violations include the weapon named Sato in [=PSO=] which is named Shato in [=PSU=], and the enemy named Gigobooma in [=PSO=] and Jigo Booma in [=PSU=].
*** In Phantasy Star Zero the spelling has been changed once more, this time to "Chato". Maybe it's an inside joke on the part of the localization team.
** Related, ''Phantasy Star Online'' quests would have a trader character as "Garon" or "Gallon", while both are literally "Garon" in Japanese. As such, many would not relate the person dealt with in "Gallon's Shop" to the man who appears in the offline / single player quests. So, as above, some players remain convinced that there are two large men dressed in purple who want more money and hate you when you don't do perfect work.
** ''PhantasyStarUniverse'' has a particularly odd example, renaming "Techniques" to "[=TECHNICs=]".
** ''Phantasy Star Portable 2 Infinity'' introduces a new race, but unfortunately, the game never got released outside Japan. This inevitably left the translation of the race's name up in the air. A translation spelled it as "Dewman", although "Duman" is an acceptable spelling too. The players ran with it until ''VideoGame/PhantasyStarOnline2'' gave us the correct spelling in a cutscene: "Deuman".
* Amazingly the American ''Command & Conquer'' series suffers from this. Character names are often not consistently spelled in the manuals, credits and ingame tooltips. Shephard/Sheppard, Slavik/Slavic and even the incorrect spelling of CABAL as KABAL in the credits of Tiberian Sun, even though it's an acronym.

to:

* The ''PhantasyStar'' ''VideoGame/PhantasyStar'' series has several examples, the most {{egregious}} JustForPun/{{egregious}} of which involve the complete name change of a character present in the first two games, [[spoiler:Noah in the first game, Lutz in the second]]. While the name used in the second game is the correct one, it was so long before the change was identified that many fans of the series are convinced the character is actually two separate people who look alike. A large body of {{Fanon}} was created to support the idea. Note also: Dark Force/Darkfalz/Dark Phallus.
** In [=PSO=], ''VideoGame/PhantasyStarOnline'', there is a weapon named Rika's Claw. [=PSU=] ''VideoGame/PhantasyStarUniverse'' has a weapon named Falclaw. Both weapons look identical... because they reference the same character, a Newman named Rika in English versions of Phantasy Star IV, ''VideoGame/PhantasyStarIV'' and Fal in Japanese versions. Similar, but less severe, violations include the weapon named Sato in [=PSO=] ''PSO'' which is named Shato in [=PSU=], ''PSU'', and the enemy named Gigobooma in [=PSO=] ''PSO' and Jigo Booma in [=PSU=].
''PSU''.
*** In Phantasy Star Zero ''VideoGame/PhantasyStarZero'' the spelling has been changed once more, this time to "Chato". "Chato." Maybe it's an inside joke on the part of the localization team.
** Related, ''Phantasy Star Online'' quests would have a trader character as "Garon" or "Gallon", "Gallon," while both are literally "Garon" in Japanese. As such, many would not relate the person dealt with in "Gallon's Shop" to the man who appears in the offline / single offline/single player quests. So, as above, some players remain convinced that there are two large men dressed in purple who want more money and hate you when you don't do perfect work.
** ''PhantasyStarUniverse'' ''Phantasy Star Universe'' has a particularly odd example, renaming "Techniques" to "[=TECHNICs=]".
"[=TECHNICs=]."
** ''Phantasy ''[[VideoGame/PhantasyStarUniverse Phantasy Star Portable 2 Infinity'' Infinity]]'' introduces a new race, but unfortunately, the game never got was released outside Japan. This inevitably left the translation of the race's name up in the air. A translation spelled it as "Dewman", "Dewman," although "Duman" is an acceptable spelling too. The players ran with it until ''VideoGame/PhantasyStarOnline2'' gave us the correct spelling in a cutscene: "Deuman".
"Deuman."
* Amazingly the American ''Command & Conquer'' ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquer'' series suffers from this. Character names are often not consistently spelled in the manuals, credits and ingame in-game tooltips. Shephard/Sheppard, Slavik/Slavic and even the incorrect spelling of CABAL as KABAL in the credits of Tiberian Sun, even though it's an acronym.



** The Belnades clan have their name spelled in several ways thorough the ''Castlevania'' series. Belnades, the most common spelling in the English games, was originally used only in the manual for ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaIIIDraculasCurse''; the game itself actually spelled it as Velnumdes, and for some reason it was castilianised to Fernandez in ''VideoGame/{{Castlevania 64}}''. The literal romanization is ''Verunandesu'' (ヴェルナンデス), since the Japanese tend to use the "V" sound only when they mean it to spell that way too. Best to just split the difference and say Velnandes, thus making no one happy.
** A new timeline has identified Sypha as "Cipher", and ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaHarmonyOfDissonance'' translated Sypha's Charm as "Cipher's Charm". Only to fix her name back to 'Sypha' in ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaJudgment''.
*** For Sypha, her name is a PunnyName, for "cipher", as in a secret, which Sypha's gender was at first.
*** The same timeline also gave Maria Renard's surname as "Larnett", though the recent PSP remake/port of the games she appeared in went back to Renard, casting doubt on the accuracy of the rest of the timeline's (numerous) spelling changes.

to:

** The Belnades clan have their name spelled in several ways thorough the ''Castlevania'' series. Belnades, the most common spelling in the English games, was originally used only in the manual for ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaIIIDraculasCurse''; the game itself actually spelled it as Velnumdes, and for some reason it was castilianised to Fernandez in ''VideoGame/{{Castlevania 64}}''. The literal romanization is ''Verunandesu'' (ヴェルナンデス), since the Japanese tend to use the "V" sound only when they mean it to spell that way too. Best to just split the difference and say Velnandes, Velnandes (or Vernandes... or Vernades...), thus making no one happy.
** A new timeline has identified Sypha as "Cipher", "Cipher," and ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaHarmonyOfDissonance'' translated Sypha's Charm as "Cipher's Charm". Charm." Only to fix her name back to 'Sypha' "Sypha" in ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaJudgment''.
*** For Sypha, her name is a PunnyName, for "cipher", "cipher," as in a secret, which [[SweetPollyOliver Sypha's gender was at first.
first]].
*** As a corollary to the above, "Syfa" is sometimes thrown out as an alternative to Sypha due to her name being "Saifa" (サイファ) in Japanese.
*** The same timeline also gave Maria Renard's surname as "Larnett", "Larnett," though the recent PSP remake/port of the games she appeared in went back to Renard, casting doubt on the accuracy of the rest of the timeline's (numerous) spelling changes.



*** Dynasty and Beaumont were single-instance print media typos. And Grant's last name would be "Danesti" were that not a case of research failure, if he is meant to be a descendant of Dan II.

to:

*** Dynasty and Beaumont were single-instance print media typos. And Grant's last name would be "Danesti" were that not a case of research failure, if he is meant to be a descendant of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dan_II_of_Wallachia Dan II.]]
** Previews for ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaPortraitOfRuin'' following its unveiling at [[UsefulNotes/ElectronicEntertainmentExpo E3 2006]] spelled Charlotte's surname as "Orlean," [[http://castlevania.neo-romance.net/translations.php?other which appears to be a direct translation of her Japanese name]] (シャーロット·オーリン, ''Shārotto Ōrin''). Officially, it's Charlotte Aulin.



** In the games with explicitly named enemies, a certain type of agile, dual-dagger-wielding enemy was given the name "Skeleton Blaze", starting with ''Symphony of the Night''. Although it is fairly obvious to all involved (except the translators) that this should be "Skeleton '''Blades'''", the localization teams have kept this the same throughout the entire series, presumably for continuity.

to:

** In the games with explicitly named enemies, a certain type of agile, dual-dagger-wielding enemy was given the name "Skeleton Blaze", Blaze," starting with ''Symphony ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaSymphonyOfTheNight Symphony of the Night''. Night]]''. Although it is fairly obvious to all involved (except the translators) that this should be "Skeleton '''Blades'''", '''Blades'''," the localization teams have kept this the same throughout the entire series, presumably for continuity.



* Angol Moa/Angolmois from ''WildArms''.
** There are debates over whether "Zeikfried" in the first game is supposed to be "Siegfried." The fact that [[spoiler:his appearance in the third game spells it Siegfried]] appears to be nullified by [[TheRemake Alter Code F's]] BlindIdiotTranslation that reverts it back to Zeikfried.

to:

* Angol Moa/Angolmois from ''WildArms''.
''VideoGame/WildArms''.
** There are debates over whether "Zeikfried" in the first game is supposed to be "Siegfried." The fact that [[spoiler:his appearance in the third game spells it Siegfried]] appears to be nullified by [[TheRemake ''[[TheRemake Alter Code F's]] F]]''[='s=] BlindIdiotTranslation that reverts it back to Zeikfried.



* Prier/Priere from the ''Franchise/{{Disgaea}}'' and ''LaPucelle'' games. Her name is only spelled with the last "e" in the former, where she appears as a BonusBoss. Not helping the situation at all is that ''both'' versions work within the ThemeNaming of the series {Prier = "To Pray", Priere = "Prayer").

to:

* Prier/Priere from the ''Franchise/{{Disgaea}}'' and ''LaPucelle'' ''VideoGame/LaPucelle'' games. Her name is only spelled with the last "e" in the former, where she appears as a BonusBoss. Not helping the situation at all is that ''both'' versions work within the ThemeNaming of the series {Prier = "To Pray", Pray," Priere = "Prayer").



* Not a character name, but ''VideoGame/FatalFury'' (and ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters'' after it) has Geese Howard's first Desperation Move. Because of how he [[CallingYourAttacks yells the name]], translators have spent ages trying to work out if it's "Raging Storm" or "Raising Storm". ''Fatal Fury Battle Archives'' says "Raging"; ''Capcom vs. SNK'' says "Raising". Most move lists go with "Raising Storm". Fans, on the other hand, universally go with "Raging Storm". Or a [[ClusterFBomb long string of profanities]], but that's almost certainly not the official name.

to:

* Not a character name, but ''VideoGame/FatalFury'' (and ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters'' after it) has Geese Howard's first Desperation Move. Because of how he [[CallingYourAttacks yells the name]], translators have spent ages trying to work out if it's "Raging Storm" or "Raising Storm". ''Fatal ''[[CompilationRerelease Fatal Fury Battle Archives'' Archives]]'' says "Raging"; ''Capcom ''[[VideoGame/SNKVsCapcom Capcom vs. SNK'' SNK]]'' says "Raising". "Raising." Most move lists go with "Raising Storm". Storm." Fans, on the other hand, universally go with "Raging Storm". Storm." Or a [[ClusterFBomb long string of profanities]], but that's almost certainly not the official name.



** Kevin R'''i'''an from ''Garou: Mark of the Wolves'', is supposedly a distant relative of Blue Mary of ''VideoGame/FatalFury'' and ''[[VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters KOF]]'' fame, even though Mary's surname is romanized differently in the ''KOF'' series (R'''y'''an).



** Bianca's male counterpart is named Cheren (チェレン), which corresponds to Russian чёрен (''choren'', again short masculine form, letter ё (''yo'') is often replaced by е (''e'')), "black". His name is also correct transcription of Bulgarian черен.
** You'd think that while romanising the Japanese names can be a difficult task, there wouldn't be any issue with the English names, right? Wrong. The Pokédex entry for Mawile in Ruby version spells its name as "Mawhile" (except in the European version).

to:

** Bianca's male counterpart is named Cheren (チェレン), which corresponds to Russian чёрен (''choren'', again short masculine form, letter ё (''yo'') is often replaced by е (''e'')), "black". "black." His name is also correct transcription of Bulgarian черен.
** You'd think that while romanising the Japanese names can be a difficult task, there wouldn't be any issue with the English names, right? Wrong. The Pokédex entry for Mawile in Ruby version ''[[VideoGame/PokemonRubyAndSapphire Ruby]]'' spells its name as "Mawhile" (except in the European version).



*** Or the prehistoric bug robot that his criminal team revived from a fossil: is it Gen'''e'''sect or Gen'''o'''sect? Either works as a pun on the DNA theme (Gene or Genome), with the second spelling giving rise to rumors that it was for "[[OmnicidalManiac Genocide]]", and the declaration that "[[MemeticBadass Genosect]] [[PhlebotinumKilledTheDinosaurs killed off the dinosaurs]]". The English translation settled on the former.

to:

*** Or the prehistoric bug robot that his criminal team revived from a fossil: is it Gen'''e'''sect or Gen'''o'''sect? Either works as a pun on the DNA theme (Gene or Genome), with the second spelling giving rise to rumors that it was for "[[OmnicidalManiac Genocide]]", Genocide]]," and the declaration that "[[MemeticBadass Genosect]] [[PhlebotinumKilledTheDinosaurs killed off the dinosaurs]]". dinosaurs]]." The English translation settled on the former.



** Many fans write Cilan's Japanese name as "Dento" instead of "Dent".
* Fanon of ''VideoGame/SuperRobotWars'' is big on this, with Ibis Douglas often being spelled "Ivis" even though, the first time you see her in-game, it's outright written in English as Ibis. Examples of names that are supposed to be real foreign-language words getting fan-romanized into {{Engrish}} abound, including "Geshpenst," (Gespenst, German for "ghost"), "Sladegelmir" (Thrudgelmir, a Norse giant), and one from the official translation, "Alfimi" ("Alchemie," German for "alchemy").

to:

** Many fans write Cilan's Japanese name as "Dento" instead of "Dent".
"Dent."
* Fanon of ''VideoGame/SuperRobotWars'' is big on this, with Ibis Douglas often being spelled "Ivis" even though, the first time you see her in-game, it's outright written in English as Ibis. Examples of names that are supposed to be real foreign-language words getting fan-romanized into {{Engrish}} Engrish abound, including "Geshpenst," (Gespenst, German for "ghost"), "Sladegelmir" (Thrudgelmir, a Norse giant), and one from the official translation, "Alfimi" ("Alchemie," German for "alchemy").



*** Unfortunately the Japanese don't help and this gets even more confusing with [[strike:Zengar's]]''Sanger's'' mech, as the joke is that he shortens "Dynamic General Guardian" in Japanese to "Dai-Zen-Gar"... Big Zengar. However, in English the joke doesn't work at all (you can't squeeze "Sanger" out of "Gen-Guard" unless you read "Sanger" with a German accent and "Gen-Guard" with a Japanese one - and even then it's a stretch) and fell flat in Atlus' translation of [=OGs=].
*** The FanTranslation of ''Alpha Gaiden'' choose "Sombold", because that was the closest thing that was an actual German name.

to:

*** Unfortunately the Japanese don't help and this gets even more confusing with [[strike:Zengar's]]''Sanger's'' mech, as the joke is that he shortens "Dynamic General Guardian" in Japanese to "Dai-Zen-Gar"... Big Zengar. However, in English the joke doesn't work at all (you can't squeeze "Sanger" out of "Gen-Guard" unless you read "Sanger" with a German accent and "Gen-Guard" with a Japanese one - -- and even then it's a stretch) and fell flat in Atlus' translation of [=OGs=].
*** The FanTranslation of ''Alpha Gaiden'' choose "Sombold", "Sombold," because that was the closest thing that was an actual German name.



** ''Original Generation Gaiden'' makes fun of Banpresto's own mistake by having the boss of ''R'', Duminuss finds out that her name is actually Dynamis (greek for power), Banpresto has simply mispelled it while making ''R''.

to:

** ''Original Generation Gaiden'' makes fun of Banpresto's own mistake by having the boss of ''R'', Duminuss finds Duminuss, find out that her name is actually Dynamis (greek ''Dynamis'' (Greek for power), "power"); Banpresto has had simply mispelled it while making ''R''.



** The newest and probably most ridiculous one would be the new Loli protagonist of ''VideoGame/SuperRobotWars Z''. Most formal people call her 'Mel Peter', but some just go on ahead and call her ''Male Beater''...

to:

** The newest and probably most ridiculous one would be the new Loli protagonist of ''VideoGame/SuperRobotWars Z''. Most formal people call her 'Mel Peter', "Mel Peter," but some just go on ahead and call her ''Male Beater''...



* ''VideoGame/EarthBound'' features a villain named Pokey in the U.S. version, who threatens to come back for revenge in the ending. He makes good on his promise in ''VideoGame/{{Mother 3}}'', and this incarnation makes a cameo as a boss in ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Brawl''. Problem? His name was originally meant to be Porky, referring to his bloated belly and pig-like nose, and the pig theme continues with his army in ''Mother 3''. ''Brawl'' uses the name Porky, obscuring the connection to the ''[=EarthBound=]'' villain.
** [[YouCannotGraspTheTrueForm You cannot grasp]] [[MemeticMutation the true form]] of the name of the first two games' final boss. It has been transliterated as "Gyiyg" or "Geeg", but the localizers for ''Earthbound Zero'' used "Giegue". Early promotional material for ''Earthbound'' actually referred to him as "Geek" before it was modified/finalized into "Giygas".

to:

* ''VideoGame/EarthBound'' features a villain named Pokey in the U.S. version, who threatens to come back for revenge in the ending. He makes good on his promise in ''VideoGame/{{Mother ''VideoGame/{{MOTHER 3}}'', and this incarnation makes a cameo as a boss in ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Brawl''. Problem? His name was originally meant to be Porky, referring to his bloated belly and pig-like nose, and the pig theme continues with his army in ''Mother ''MOTHER 3''. ''Brawl'' uses the name Porky, obscuring the connection to the ''[=EarthBound=]'' villain.
** [[YouCannotGraspTheTrueForm You cannot grasp]] [[MemeticMutation the true form]] of the name of the first two games' final boss. It has been transliterated as "Gyiyg" or "Geeg", "Geeg," but the localizers for ''Earthbound Zero'' used "Giegue". "Giegue." Early promotional material for ''Earthbound'' ''[=EarthBound=]'' actually referred to him as "Geek" before it was modified/finalized into "Giygas"."Giygas."



** Nintendo can't even seem to make up its mind about the name of the ''VideoGame/{{Mother 3}}'' village - in the US ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBrosBrawl'', one of Lucas's trophies refers to it as "Tazumily". The PAL version changes it to the more common spelling of "Tazmily".
** Then there's the party member Lloyd/Loid/Roid from the first game in the series. An older official encyclopedia writes it as "Roid", while "Loid" relates to a potential Japanese pun on his NerdGlasses, and "Lloyd" seems the most natural for an American character. Brawl officially writes his name as "Lloyd". A less-debated example is Ana/Anna from the same game. It turns out to be "Ana" according to Brawl, though.
* Similar to above, protagonist Roid/Lloyd Clive in the first ''VideoGame/FrontMission'' game. Roid being the original Japanese spelling, Lloyd being the fan-translated version. Proponents of either version were surprised when his name was officially translated as ''Royd''.
* Clark Still, Ralf Jones' partner from the ''VideoGame/IkariWarriors'' and ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters'' games, has had his surname misromanized by fans as "Steel", even though the Japanese spelling of his surname[[note]]スティル, ''Sutiru''[[/note]] doesn't have a long vowel mark, which would be the case if his surname was truly "Steel"[[note]]スティール, ''Sutīru''[[/note]]. There's a [[UrbanLegendOfZelda popular misconception]] that his surname was originally "Steel" as a ShoutOut to Franchise/{{Superman}}, but was changed to "Still" to [[WritingAroundTrademarks avoid any potential copyright infringement]]. However, the "Still" surname has been used for the character since the Japanese version of the first ''Ikari'' game ([[http://www.interq.or.jp/sun/watohu/ura/s_ikari15.html see here]]). All of this didn't prevent Terminal Realities from misspelling his surname as "Steel" in ''The Orochi Saga Collection''.
* Kevin R'''i'''an from ''Garou: Mark of the Wolves'', is supposedly a distant relative of Blue Mary of ''VideoGame/FatalFury'' and ''KOF'' fame, even though Mary's surname is romanized differently in the ''KOF'' series (R'''y'''an).

to:

** Nintendo can't even seem to make up its mind about the name of the ''VideoGame/{{Mother ''VideoGame/{{MOTHER 3}}'' village - -- in the US ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBrosBrawl'', U.S. version of ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Brawl'', one of Lucas's trophies refers to it as "Tazumily". "Tazumily." The PAL version changes it to the more common spelling of "Tazmily".
"Tazmily."
** Then there's the party member Lloyd/Loid/Roid from the first game in the series. An older official encyclopedia writes it as "Roid", "Roid," while "Loid" relates to a potential Japanese pun on his NerdGlasses, and "Lloyd" seems the most natural for an American character. Brawl ''Brawl'' officially writes his name as "Lloyd". "Lloyd." A less-debated example is Ana/Anna from the same game. It turns out to be "Ana" according to Brawl, ''Brawl'', though.
* Similar to above, protagonist Roid/Lloyd Clive in the first ''VideoGame/FrontMission'' game. Roid being the original Japanese spelling, Lloyd being the fan-translated version. Proponents of either version were surprised when his name was officially translated as ''Royd''.
''[[TakeAThirdOption Royd]]''.
* Clark Still, Ralf Jones' partner from the ''VideoGame/IkariWarriors'' and ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters'' games, has had his surname misromanized by fans as "Steel", "Steel," even though the Japanese spelling of his surname[[note]]スティル, surname [[note]]スティル, ''Sutiru''[[/note]] doesn't have a long vowel mark, which would be the case if his surname was truly "Steel"[[note]]スティール, "Steel" [[note]]スティール, ''Sutīru''[[/note]]. There's a [[UrbanLegendOfZelda popular misconception]] that his surname was originally "Steel" as a ShoutOut to Franchise/{{Superman}}, but was changed to "Still" to [[WritingAroundTrademarks avoid any potential copyright infringement]]. However, the "Still" surname has been used for the character since the Japanese version of the first ''Ikari'' game ([[http://www.interq.or.jp/sun/watohu/ura/s_ikari15.html see here]]). All of this didn't prevent Terminal Realities from misspelling his surname as "Steel" in ''The Orochi Saga Collection''.
* Kevin R'''i'''an from ''Garou: Mark ** Rugal Bernstein has been infrequently rendered as "Luger" (as in the German pistol model). This was most prominent back in the early days of ''KOF '94'' and ''[='95=]'', where the announcer's roll call for Rugal [[GratuitousEnglish sounded very much like "Luger."]] Some fans believe this is what Rugal's name was supposed to be all along, as he and his family are presumably German (or at least of German descent).
** Though Kyo's father is named Saisyu, expect to see his name spelled as "Saishu" every now and then... despite the fact that his name has ''always'' been spelled on-screen as "Saisyu" in his scant amount of playable appearances. This is because both "syu" and "shu" are equally valid romanizations
of the Wolves'', is supposedly a distant relative of Blue Mary of ''VideoGame/FatalFury'' and ''KOF'' fame, even though Mary's surname is romanized differently in hiragana syllable しゅ; SNK decided to stick with the ''KOF'' series (R'''y'''an).former.
** ''KOF 2001'' mistakenly refers to "Chang" as "Chan."
** The eight strongest followers of {{Orochi}} are known as the Hakkeshu, which can alternatively be spelled as "Hakkesshu" or "Haketsu." However, the kanji used for the group (八傑集 or 八傑衆) suggests that a more "accurate" romanization would be ''[[TakeAThirdOption Haketsushu]]''.



** Gantz / Guntz from ''VideoGame/{{Klonoa}} 2: Dream Champ Tournament'' and ''Klonoa: Beach Volleyball'' respectively. His name was romanized differently in each game.
** The character who is known as "Joka" in the [[VideoGame/{{Klonoa}}: Door to Phantomile original game]] is changed to "Joker" in the Wii remake.
* The ''VideoGame/{{Atelier}}'' series gets a whole helping of a ton of the above issues, featuring both a character with the katakana of "Norudisu" (leading our friends at Tokyopop to spell it as ''both'' "Nordith" and "Nordis" during the print run of the ''Atelier Marie & Elie'' spinoff manga) and the fact that the setting for the first three games (if not many of the others) is a variation on Renaissance Germany, with many words being pronounced in a kind of pseudo-GratuitousGerman fashion. Gust Inc., makers of the games, like to call the principality "Salburg" (and even [[http://www.salburg.com run a website]] with that name); several fan translators and Tokyopop go with "Zarlburg" due to the katakana used to represent the German pronunciation of "s". Latter games, especially those still unreleased in the West, have a host of other pronunciation issues.
* In the arcade version of ''VideoGame/RivalSchools''', Shoma has his name romanized as "Syoma", which is from a non-Hepburn romanization system used by the Japanese. It was changed to "Shoma" in the [=PlayStation=] version.
** The sequel, ''Project Justice'', cleverly uses this trope to diferentiate between similar characters. In the story, the hero Batsu is plauged by a look-a-like [[spoiler:who is actually by BigBad Kurow]] going around ruining his good reputation. The fake Batsu can be fought against and eventually can be a playable character, so to differentiate him from the real Batsu, Capcom took advantage of the ambigutity in B and V sounds in Japanese and named the fake hero "Vatsu".
* While not a mistranslation per se, Blizzard has recently decided that all names should be translated to the respective language in ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'', while the initial release, ''VideoGame/{{Warcraft}} 3'' and all novels simply used the English names. Thankfully, it's possible to download a language pack to play it in English altogether. If only the same could be said about the novels...
* The male lead of ''VideoGame/StarOceanTheSecondStory'' has the official name of "Claude" in the US, but his name is officially romanized as "Crawd" in Japanese. No English speakers actually use the name "Crawd", though, because it doesn't sound anything like an actual name -- it's generally accepted that tri-Ace really ''did'' mean for him to be named Claude, and just messed up the romanization.

to:

** Gantz / Guntz Gantz/Guntz from ''VideoGame/{{Klonoa}} ''Klonoa 2: Dream Champ Tournament'' and ''Klonoa: Beach Volleyball'' respectively. His name was romanized differently in each game.
** The character who is known as "Joka" in the [[VideoGame/{{Klonoa}}: Door to Phantomile original game]] game is changed to "Joker" in the Wii remake.
remake of ''Door to Phantomile''.
* The ''VideoGame/{{Atelier}}'' series gets a whole helping of a ton of the above issues, featuring both a character with the katakana of "Norudisu" (leading our friends at Tokyopop to spell it as ''both'' "Nordith" and "Nordis" during the print run of the ''Atelier Marie & Elie'' spinoff manga) and the fact that the setting for the first three games (if not many of the others) is a variation on Renaissance Germany, with many words being pronounced in a kind of pseudo-GratuitousGerman fashion. Gust Inc., makers of the games, like to call the principality "Salburg" (and even [[http://www.salburg.com run a website]] with that name); several fan translators and Tokyopop go with "Zarlburg" due to the katakana used to represent the German pronunciation of "s". "s." Latter games, especially those still unreleased in the West, have a host of other pronunciation issues.
* In the arcade version of ''VideoGame/RivalSchools''', Shoma has his name romanized as "Syoma", "Syoma," which is from a non-Hepburn romanization system used by the Japanese. It was changed to "Shoma" in the [=PlayStation=] version.
** The sequel, ''Project Justice'', cleverly uses this trope to diferentiate between similar characters. In the story, the hero Batsu is plauged plagued by a look-a-like [[spoiler:who is actually by BigBad Kurow]] going around ruining his good reputation. The fake Batsu can be fought against and eventually can be a playable character, so to differentiate him from the real Batsu, Capcom took advantage of the ambigutity ambiguity in B and V sounds in Japanese and named the fake hero "Vatsu".
"Vatsu."
* While not a mistranslation per se, ''per se'', Blizzard has recently decided that all names should be translated to the respective language in ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'', while the initial release, ''VideoGame/{{Warcraft}} 3'' and all novels simply used the English names. Thankfully, it's possible to download a language pack to play it in English altogether. If only the same could be said about the novels...
* The male lead of ''VideoGame/StarOceanTheSecondStory'' has the official name of "Claude" in the US, but his name is officially romanized as "Crawd" in Japanese. No English speakers actually use the name "Crawd", "Crawd," though, because it doesn't sound anything like an actual name -- it's generally accepted that tri-Ace Creator/TriAce really ''did'' mean for him to be named Claude, and just messed up the romanization.



** ''VideoGame/KirbysDreamLand'' had a blimp-like boss named Kaboola, which was absent in the ''Kirby Super Star'' sub-game Spring Breeze, which was mostly a remake of ''Kirby's Dream Land'' (some other features were also absent). The [[VideoGameRemake remake]] of ''Kirby Super Star'' for the Nintendo DS, ''Kirby Super Star Ultra'', added the sub-game Revenge of the King, which is basically a harder version of Spring Breeze. In it the formerly missing boss returned with an altered appearance, as well as an altered name: Kabula.
** The Combo Cannon (which recently had appeared in ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Brawl'') was renamed Main Cannon #2 in ''Super Star Ultra.'' Not too many fans were happy about that.

to:

** ''VideoGame/KirbysDreamLand'' had a blimp-like boss named Kaboola, which was absent in the ''Kirby Super Star'' ''VideoGame/KirbySuperStar'' sub-game Spring Breeze, which was mostly a remake of ''Kirby's Dream Land'' (some other features were also absent). The [[VideoGameRemake remake]] of ''Kirby Super Star'' for the Nintendo DS, ''Kirby Super Star Ultra'', added the sub-game Revenge of the King, which is basically a harder version of Spring Breeze. In it the formerly missing boss returned with an altered appearance, as well as an altered name: Kabula.
** The Combo Cannon (which recently had appeared in ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Brawl'') was renamed Main Cannon #2 in ''Super Star Ultra.'' Ultra''. Not too many fans were happy about that.



** Before the Kaboola/Kabula incident was the case of Mr. Frosty, who was inexplicably named "[[BlindIdiotTranslation Mr. Flosty]]" in ''Kirby and the Amazing Mirror.''

to:

** Before the Kaboola/Kabula incident was the case of Mr. Frosty, who was inexplicably named "[[BlindIdiotTranslation Mr. Flosty]]" in ''Kirby and the Amazing Mirror.''''VideoGame/KirbyAndTheAmazingMirror''.



** ''Kirby's Dream Land 2'' had a recurring enemy in the series referred to as Load Kibble, clearly meant to be Lord Kibble, but the enemy in question is typically known as Sir Kibble in English and not Lord Kibble.
* ''VideoGame/LeisureSuitLarry 7: Love For Sail'' includes a character named [[TheUnpronounceable Xqwzts]]. The writer of the game intended for it to be pronounced "X-squats," but the actor that plays Larry couldn't get it right. That gave the writer the idea to have every character intentionally mispronounce the name any crazy way they could think of. In fact, throughout the whole game, only one character (not Larry) says it "correctly".

to:

** ''Kirby's Dream Land 2'' ''VideoGame/KirbysDreamLand2'' had a recurring enemy in the series referred to as Load Kibble, clearly meant to be Lord Kibble, but the enemy in question is typically known as Sir Kibble in English and not Lord Kibble.
** The "Dream Land" in ''Kirby's Dream Land'', ''Kirby's Dream Land 2'', ''VideoGame/KirbysDreamLand3'', and ''VideoGame/KirbysReturnToDreamLand'' is two words, but some fans instead spell it as one word.
* ''VideoGame/LeisureSuitLarry 7: Love For Sail'' includes a character named [[TheUnpronounceable Xqwzts]]. The writer of the game intended for it to be pronounced "X-squats," but the actor that plays Larry couldn't get it right. That gave the writer the idea to have every character intentionally mispronounce the name any crazy way they could think of. In fact, throughout the whole game, only one character (not Larry) says it "correctly"."correctly."



* Mathematicians call a ''VideoGame/{{Tetris}}'' piece a [[http://mathworld.wolfram.com/Tetromino.html tetromino]], by parallel with "domino". The Tetris Company [[http://harddrop.com/wiki/index.php?title=Glossary#T once called it]] a "tetramino" before settling on "tetrimino".
* ''Bubble Symphony'' aka ''VideoGame/BubbleBobble [[NonLinearSequel II]]'': Its [[AllThereInTheManual flyer]] stated the name for the orange female bubble dragon as [[http://bubblebobblehq.110mb.com/bubblebobble/arcade/bs_jpn_flyer_back.jpg "Cururun"]]. The game itself says it's [[http://www.vazcomics.org/mamend/png/bubl0059.png "Kululun"]]. Chalk one up to C/K and R/L confusion.

to:

* Mathematicians call a ''VideoGame/{{Tetris}}'' piece a [[http://mathworld.wolfram.com/Tetromino.html tetromino]], by parallel with "domino". "domino." The Tetris Company [[http://harddrop.com/wiki/index.php?title=Glossary#T once called it]] a "tetramino" before settling on "tetrimino".
"tetrimino."
* ''Bubble Symphony'' aka ''VideoGame/BubbleBobble [[NonLinearSequel II]]'': Its [[AllThereInTheManual flyer]] stated the name for the orange female bubble dragon as [[http://bubblebobblehq.110mb.com/bubblebobble/arcade/bs_jpn_flyer_back.jpg "Cururun"]]. "Cururun."]] The game itself says it's [[http://www.vazcomics.org/mamend/png/bubl0059.png "Kululun"]]. "Kululun."]] Chalk one up to C/K and R/L confusion.



* In ''[[VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiSuperstarSaga Mario & Luigi: Superstar Saga]]'' and ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros. Brawl'', you might notice that the starfish character appearing in both goes by the name of "Stafy". Well, his game series is finally being brought overseas as... ''TheLegendaryStarfy'' (ie: Sta'''r'''fy). His cameo in ''Mario & Luigi'' called it ''The Legend of Stafy'', [[BlindIdiotTranslation mixing up]] the title of his series as well (the title of his English debut is a direct translation of the series's Japanese name, ''Densetsu no Starfy'', literally "Starfy of Legend"[[note]]Japanese word order for "X of Y" constructions work in a manner in which mistake would render ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' as "The Legendary Zelda"[[/note]]). Make of that what you will.
* Nobody can seem to decide whether the Amazon princess of ''VideoGame/SeikenDensetsu3'' is supposed to be called "Lise", "Riese", or "Riesz".
** Tetsuhiko Hara, official german translator for several Final Fantasy games, once translated the name as "Leace".
* Gray Fox from the ''Franchise/MetalGear'' series has had his real name[[note]]フランク・イェーガー, ''Furanku Yēgā''[[/note]] translated as "Frank Jaeger" or "Yeager", depending on the game. Incidentally, Yeager is an Americanized form of the German surname Jaeger. His codename also varies between "Gray Fox" and "Grey Fox".

to:

* In ''[[VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiSuperstarSaga Mario & Luigi: Superstar Saga]]'' ''VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiSuperstarSaga'' and ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros. ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Brawl'', you might notice that the starfish character appearing in both goes by the name of "Stafy". "Stafy." Well, his game series is finally being brought overseas as... ''TheLegendaryStarfy'' (ie: ''VideoGame/TheLegendaryStarfy'' (i.e: Sta'''r'''fy). His cameo in ''Mario & Luigi'' called it ''The Legend of Stafy'', [[BlindIdiotTranslation mixing up]] the title of his series as well (the title of his English debut is a direct translation of the series's Japanese name, ''Densetsu no Starfy'', literally "Starfy of Legend"[[note]]Japanese word order for "X of Y" constructions work in a manner in which mistake would render ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' as "The Legendary Zelda"[[/note]]). Make of that what you will.
* Nobody can seem to decide whether the Amazon princess of ''VideoGame/SeikenDensetsu3'' is supposed to be called "Lise", "Riese", "Lise," "Riese," or "Riesz".
"Riesz."
** Tetsuhiko Hara, official german German translator for several Final Fantasy ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' games, once translated the name as "Leace".
"Leace."
* Gray Fox from the ''Franchise/MetalGear'' series has had his real name[[note]]フランク・イェーガー, ''Furanku Yēgā''[[/note]] translated as "Frank Jaeger" or "Yeager", "Yeager," depending on the game. Incidentally, Yeager is an Americanized form of the German surname Jaeger. His codename also varies between "Gray Fox" and "Grey Fox".Fox."



** The [=MSX2=] versions of ''Metal Gear'' and ''Metal Gear 2: Solid Snake'' had a few romanizations for some of the characters' names that are different from the ones used in the later ''Metal Gear Solid'' games. Roy Campbell was originally called "Roy Kyanbel", Holly White was "Horry White", George Kasler in the [=PS2=] version is known as George Kesler. Gustava Heffner and Johan Jacobsen were originally called Natasha Marcova and Yozef Norden respectively, which were legitimate name changes to the characters and not different romanizations of the same name. Natasha was likely changed due to the introduction of a later character called Nastasha Romanenko, but Yozef's was unexplained
** The names of the bosses in the first two ''Metal Gear'' games for the [=MSX2=] were mostly [[WritingAroundTrademarks mangled]] pop-culture references: there's "Arnold" the cyborg (as in Schwarzenegger), "Coward Duck" (Comicbook/HowardTheDuck), "Black Color" (from Blackcollar, an obscure Timothy Zahn novel about space ninjas), "Ultra Box" (Music/{{Ultravox}}) and the "Franchise/{{Predator}}". Not surprisingly, almost all of them (with the exception of [[Film/TheRunningMan Running Man]]) were changed in the remade versions.

to:

** The [=MSX2=] versions of ''Metal Gear'' ''VideoGame/{{Metal Gear|1}}'' and ''Metal Gear 2: Solid Snake'' ''VideoGame/MetalGear2SolidSnake'' had a few romanizations for some of the characters' names that are different from the ones used in the later ''Metal Gear Solid'' ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' games. Roy Campbell was originally called "Roy Kyanbel", Kyanbel," Holly White was "Horry White", White," George Kasler in the [=PS2=] version is known as George Kesler. Gustava Heffner and Johan Jacobsen were originally called Natasha Marcova and Yozef Norden respectively, which were legitimate name changes to the characters and not different romanizations of the same name. Natasha was likely changed due to the introduction of a later character called Nastasha Romanenko, but Yozef's was unexplained
unexplained.
** The names of the bosses in the first two ''Metal Gear'' games for the [=MSX2=] were mostly [[WritingAroundTrademarks mangled]] pop-culture references: there's "Arnold" the cyborg (as in Schwarzenegger), "Coward Duck" (Comicbook/HowardTheDuck), (ComicBook/HowardTheDuck), "Black Color" (from Blackcollar, an obscure Timothy Zahn novel about space ninjas), "Ultra Box" (Music/{{Ultravox}}) and the "Franchise/{{Predator}}". "Franchise/{{Predator}}." Not surprisingly, almost all of them (with the exception of [[Film/TheRunningMan Running Man]]) were changed in the remade versions.



* In ''VideoGame/SNKVsCapcomSVCChaos'', [[VideoGame/SamuraiShodown Genjuro Kibagami]] gets his name spelled as "Genjyuro Kibagami", while "[[StreetFighter Juli]]" becomes "Juri" (which would unknowingly make things a bit confusing when, [[VideoGame/StreetFighterIV years later]], there actually was a ''SF'' character named Juri).

to:

** Le Malta, Raptor's underling/companion, gets hit with this trope as well, occasionally being rendered as "Le Marta" or "La Malta." There's also some confusion as to whether or not there's a space in his name, though "Le Malta" is generally accepted as the correct spelling over "[=LeMalta=]."
** The kung fu werewolf of the ''Darkstalkers'' cast is named Jon Talbain. Not John Talbain, and certainly not Jon [[UsefulNotes/Afghanistan Tali]][[TheWarOnTerror ban]].
* In ''VideoGame/SNKVsCapcomSVCChaos'', [[VideoGame/SamuraiShodown Genjuro Kibagami]] gets his name spelled as "Genjyuro Kibagami", Kibagami," while "[[StreetFighter Juli]]" [[VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha Juli]] becomes "Juri" (which would unknowingly make things a bit confusing when, [[VideoGame/StreetFighterIV years later]], there actually was a ''SF'' character named Juri).Juri). Meanwhile, [[VideoGame/{{Darkstalkers}} Demitri Maximoff]] becomes "Demitri Maximov."



* ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters 2001'' mistakenly refers to "Chang" as "Chan".



** Rolento[[note]]ロレント, ''Rorento''[[/note]] from the original ''VideoGame/FinalFight'' had his name spelled "Rolent" in the SNES sequel, ''Final Fight 2''. "Rolent" spelling doesn't show up in any other game, except in his ending in ''Street Fighter Alpha 2''.

to:

** Rolento[[note]]ロレント, ''Rorento''[[/note]] from the original ''VideoGame/FinalFight'' had his name spelled "Rolent" in the SNES sequel, ''Final Fight 2''. "Rolent" spelling doesn't show up in any other game, except in his ending in ''Street Fighter Alpha 2''.''VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha 2''. Even stranger: his intended name, according to then-Capcom senior manager Seth Killian, was ''[[JapaneseRanguage Laurence/Laurent]]''.



** The intended spelling of Guy is actually ''Gai''[[note]]凱[[/note]] [[WordOfGod according to several sources]] [[note]]''All About Capcom Head-To-Head Fighting Games'', the ''Final Fight'' soundtrack album, the official ''Namco X Capcom'' website, just to name a few[[/note]]. "Guy" is actually an approximation of how his name is supposed to be pronounced (likely done to avoid the AccidentalInnuendo). Unfortunately, there are fans who end up mispronouncing Guy's name as "Gwee."
** Chun-Li's and Fei Long's names are sometimes spelled as one word. ("Chunli" or "Feilong")
** On the credits of the ''Anime/StreetFighterIITheAnimatedMovie'', Cammy's and Dee-Jay's names are spelled "Cammie" and "[=DJ=]".

to:

** The intended spelling of Guy is actually ''Gai''[[note]]凱[[/note]] ''Gai'' [[note]]凱[[/note]] [[WordOfGod according to several sources]] [[note]]''All About Capcom Head-To-Head Fighting Games'', the ''Final Fight'' soundtrack album, the official ''Namco X Capcom'' ''VideoGame/NamcoXCapcom'' website, just to name a few[[/note]]. "Guy" is actually an approximation of how his name is supposed to be pronounced (likely done to avoid the AccidentalInnuendo). Unfortunately, there are fans who end up mispronouncing Guy's name as "Gwee."
** Chun-Li's Chun-Li, Fei Long, and Fei Long's Dee Jay's names are sometimes spelled as one word. ("Chunli" word ("Chunli," "Feilong," "Deejay") or "Feilong")
with the addition/omission of hyphens ("Chun Li," "Fei-Long," "Dee-Jay").
** On the credits of the ''Anime/StreetFighterIITheAnimatedMovie'', Cammy's and Dee-Jay's Dee Jay's names are spelled "Cammie" and "[=DJ=]"."DJ."



** The name of Billy's girlfriend also seems to vary between "Marian" and "Marion" depending on the game. The manual for the UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem version actually calls her "Mary-Ann"

to:

** The name of Billy's girlfriend also seems to vary between "Marian" and "Marion" depending on the game. The manual for the UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem version actually calls her "Mary-Ann""Mary-Ann."



* In ''VideoGame/ThunderForce III'', the upgraded version of the Twin Shot has been spelled out as both "Sever" and "Saber." The latter spelling is a bit [[HilariousInHindsight funny]] because the upgraded Back Shot is called [[VisualNovel/FateStayNight "Lancer"]].
* In ''VideoGame/{{Valis}} II'' for the Turbografx CD, Valis is sometimes pronounced "Varis", thanks to BlindIdiotTranslation.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/ThunderForce III'', the upgraded version of the Twin Shot has been spelled out as both "Sever" and "Saber." The latter spelling is a bit [[HilariousInHindsight funny]] because the upgraded Back Shot is called [[VisualNovel/FateStayNight "Lancer"]].
"Lancer."]]
* In ''VideoGame/{{Valis}} II'' for the Turbografx CD, [[UsefulNotes/TurboGrafx16 TurboGrafx CD]], Valis is sometimes pronounced "Varis", "Varis," thanks to BlindIdiotTranslation.



* In the UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem version of the first ''VideoGame/{{Ghostbusters|1984}}'' game, Gozer is transliterated "Gorza".

to:

* In the UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem version of the first ''VideoGame/{{Ghostbusters|1984}}'' game, Gozer is transliterated "Gorza"."Gorza."



* Everyone who appears in the ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'' games have their names in Japanese, then a handy English Romanization next to it. This has helped quite a lot over time with names, even the ones that are actually Japanese. For example, the second kanji in [[TooKinkyToTorture Tenshi's]] name is more commonly read as "ko;" the Romanization cleared up quite a lot of confusion (although "Tenko" is still a popular FanNickname for her). There are exceptions occasionally though, when ZUN starts using foreign names. Is "Parsee" was pronounced "par-sii," or "par-seh-eh" (the former is the correct based on the katakana).

to:

* Everyone who appears in the ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'' games have their names in Japanese, then a handy English Romanization next to it. This has helped quite a lot over time with names, even the ones that are actually Japanese. For example, the second kanji in [[TooKinkyToTorture Tenshi's]] name is more commonly read as "ko;" the Romanization cleared up quite a lot of confusion (although "Tenko" is still a popular FanNickname for her). There are exceptions occasionally though, when ZUN starts using foreign names. Is "Parsee" was pronounced "par-sii," or "par-seh-eh" (the "par-seh-eh"? (The former is the correct based on the katakana).katakana.)



** [[OurMermaidsAreDifferent Wakasagihime]] gives us a version based on translation, rather than transliteration, for once. Her name is officially romanized as Wakasagihime, but 'Wakasagi' is written in hiragana and 'hime' in kanji, which would normally indicate that they're seperate names. But 'hime' can be the title 'princess'. So she's either 'Wakasagihime', 'Hime Wakasagi', or 'Princess Wakasagi', and no one is quite sure which.

to:

** [[OurMermaidsAreDifferent Wakasagihime]] gives us a version based on translation, rather than transliteration, for once. Her name is officially romanized as Wakasagihime, but 'Wakasagi' "Wakasagi" is written in hiragana and 'hime' "hime" in kanji, which would normally indicate that they're seperate separate names. But 'hime' ''hime'' can be the title 'princess'. "princess." So she's either 'Wakasagihime', 'Hime Wakasagi', "Wakasagihime," "Hime Wakasagi," or 'Princess Wakasagi', "Princess Wakasagi," and no one is quite sure which.



* ''VideoGame/JakAndDaxter'''s [[MyNaymeIs Erol]] had his name's spelling changed to Errol in ''VideoGame/Jak3Wastelander'', then back to Erol in the {{Interquel}} ''Daxter''. Some fans have joked that the extra "R" stands for "robot", given his "enhancements" in the third game.
* ''VideoGame/DragonQuest'' itself was called Dragon Warrior in the 90's due to copyright issues. Once ''VideoGame/DragonQuestVIII'' resumed western releases with the proper title, the entire series went through an entire translation overhaul, a lot of which was meant to return the series to the lighthearted, punny feel that was largely removed from the western releases.

to:

* ''VideoGame/JakAndDaxter'''s [[MyNaymeIs Erol]] had his name's spelling changed to Errol in ''VideoGame/Jak3Wastelander'', then back to Erol in the {{Interquel}} ''Daxter''. Some fans have joked that the extra "R" stands for "robot", "robot," given his "enhancements" in the third game.
* ''VideoGame/DragonQuest'' itself was called Dragon Warrior ''Dragon Warrior'' in the 90's due to copyright issues. Once ''VideoGame/DragonQuestVIII'' resumed western releases with the proper title, the entire series went through an entire translation overhaul, a lot of which was meant to return the series to the lighthearted, punny feel that was largely removed from the western releases.



*** Notably, most of the town names were renamed in the NES Dragon Warrior to be more Arthurian sounding. They were restored for the GBC.
** In order to save text space on the GBC, Erdrick was renamed Loto and Dragon Lord was shorted to DracoLord.

to:

*** Notably, most of the town names were renamed in the NES Dragon Warrior ''Dragon Warrior'' to be more Arthurian sounding. They were restored for the GBC.
** In order to save text space on the GBC, Erdrick was renamed Loto and Dragon Lord was shorted to DracoLord.[=DracoLord=].



** Most spell families adhere to a mostly standardized formula. The mid-level spell start with "ka', the high level spell ends in "le'. Examples: Zap, Kazap, Kazapple. Sizz, Kasizz, Kasizzle. Crack, Kacrack, Kacrackle.
*** Even some buffs follow this formula. Buff, Kabuff. Oomph, Oomphle.

to:

** Most spell families adhere to a mostly standardized formula. The mid-level spell spells start with "ka', "ka," the high level spell ends high-level spells end in "le'. "le." Examples: Zap, Kazap, Kazapple. Sizz, Kasizz, Kasizzle. Crack, Kacrack, Kacrackle.
*** Even some buffs follow this formula. Buff, Buff > Kabuff. Oomph, Oomph > Oomphle.



** Ragnar McRyan and Torneko Taloon were only known by their last names in the NES release of ''VideoGame/DragonQuestIV''.
* In ''Tsukihime'', レン has had issues with her name. Until the release of ''Melty Blood'', she had no official romanization. But ''Melty Blood'' gives Len as her official romanization. There was a dispute about this, fans insisting that her actual name is spelled Ren, citing that Type-Moon sometimes "messes up". But considering that it's been Len throughout the series...

to:

** Ragnar McRyan [=McRyan=] and Torneko Taloon were only known by their last names in the NES release of ''VideoGame/DragonQuestIV''.
* In ''Tsukihime'', ''VisualNovel/{{Tsukihime}}'', レン has had issues with her name. Until the release of ''Melty Blood'', ''VideoGame/MeltyBlood'', she had no official romanization. But ''Melty Blood'' gives Len as her official romanization. There was a dispute about this, fans insisting that her actual name is spelled Ren, citing that Type-Moon TYPE-MOON sometimes "messes up". up." But considering that it's been Len throughout the series...



* Back when ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsBirthBySleep'' was announced, fans translated the name of the new heartless style monsters as Unbirths. This spelling spread wildly and no one thought anything of it until WordOfGod corrected fans that it was Unversed, meaning one "who is not enlightened" rather then the "opposite of human life". Many fans still insisted it was supposed to be "Unbirth", and that the English version was censoring it.

to:

* Back when ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsBirthBySleep'' was announced, fans translated the name of the new heartless style Heartless-style monsters as Unbirths. This spelling spread wildly and no one thought anything of it until WordOfGod corrected fans that it was Unversed, meaning one "who is not enlightened" rather then the "opposite of human life". life." Many fans still insisted it was supposed to be "Unbirth", "Unbirth," and that the English version was censoring it.



** The [[NoExportForYou Japan-only]] ''[[VideoGame/KingdomHeartsX Kingdom Hearts χ]]'' introduced a character, エフェメラ, ''Efemera'', who quickly became popular with the global fanbase under the name Ephemera. Then ''Kingdom Hearts Unchained χ'' came and formally introduced the non-Japanese-speaking world to...Ephemer. [[InternetBackdraft Fans weren't amused]].
* ''JourneyToSilius'' is supposed to be [[JapaneseRanguage "Sirius"]].
* The cover of the Japanese version of ''VideoGame/YoshisIsland'' actually spells the game's title as "Yossy Island".

to:

** The [[NoExportForYou Japan-only]] ''[[VideoGame/KingdomHeartsX Kingdom Hearts χ]]'' introduced a character, エフェメラ, ''Efemera'', who quickly became popular with the global fanbase under the name Ephemera. Then ''Kingdom Hearts Unchained χ'' came and formally introduced the non-Japanese-speaking world to... Ephemer. [[InternetBackdraft Fans weren't amused]].
amused.]]
* ''JourneyToSilius'' ''VideoGame/JourneyToSilius'' is supposed to be [[JapaneseRanguage "Sirius"]].
"Sirius."]]
* The cover of the Japanese version of ''VideoGame/YoshisIsland'' actually spells the game's title as "Yossy Island".Island."



*** Except in Canada, which uses the same box as the US version despite Colours being spelled without a U in the US and with one in Canada.

to:

*** Except in Canada, which uses the same box as the US version despite Colours "colours" being spelled without a U "u" in the US U.S. and with one in Canada.



** When it doubt, [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Lord_British_Space_Fighter believe in the heart of the cards]]. And if you don't trust children's card games, ''Solar Assault'' also makes "Lord British" its name.
** ''Gradius'''s title is itself a Japanese misspelling of "gladius". Some material refers to the SpiderTank enemy as the "Club(Crab) Spider".

to:

** When it doubt, [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Lord_British_Space_Fighter believe in the heart of the cards]]. cards.]] And if you don't trust children's card games, ''Solar Assault'' also makes "Lord British" its name.
** ''Gradius'''s title is itself a Japanese misspelling of "gladius". "gladius." Some material refers to the SpiderTank enemy as the "Club(Crab) Spider".Spider."



** Put simply, StingEntertainment has a bad habit of choosing AsLongAsItSoundsForeign names and then not telling America how they're supposed to be spelled.
** Thankfully, in ''GloriaUnion'', whenever a character leads a Union, their name shows up on the attack confirmation screen. Unfortunately, Sting decided not to spell "Minnesota" correctly, as they did it with just one N. And seeing as the character with that name is an Franchise/IndianaJones {{Expy}}...

to:

** Put simply, StingEntertainment Creator/StingEntertainment has a bad habit of choosing AsLongAsItSoundsForeign names and then not telling America how they're supposed to be spelled.
** Thankfully, in ''GloriaUnion'', ''VideoGame/GloriaUnion'', whenever a character leads a Union, their name shows up on the attack confirmation screen. Unfortunately, Sting decided not to spell "Minnesota" correctly, as they did it with just one N. And seeing as the character with that name is an Franchise/IndianaJones {{Expy}}...



* In addition to the usual BlindIdiotTranslation, ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil2'' had many gross misspellings, including "dust shoot" and "mugnum parts".
* In the manual for ''VideoGame/SyphonFilter'', Girdeux is misspelled "Girdeaux".

to:

* In addition to the usual BlindIdiotTranslation, ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil2'' had many gross misspellings, including "dust shoot" and "mugnum parts".
parts."
** It is not uncommon for Oswell E. Spencer, the mastermind behind the Umbrella Corporation, to have his first name spelled as O'''z'''well, stemming from [[http://projectumbrella.net/forum/Ozwell-or-Oswell%3F a translation error]] in the English localization of ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil5''. Even [[Wiki/TVTropes This Very Wiki]] has a hard time keeping it straight. Before then, ''[[VideoGame/ResidentEvilTheUmbrellaChronicles The Umbrella Chronicles]]'' featured a news report during the credits sequence wherein the Russian Ministry has agreed to cooperate with the FBI to investigate the whereabouts of Spencer. While the subtitles clearly read "Oswell E. Spencer," the reporter pronounces his name as "Os''wald''."
* In the manual for ''VideoGame/SyphonFilter'', Girdeux is misspelled "Girdeaux"."Girdeaux."



* ''VideoGame/MetalSlug 3'''s Stage 4 boss is named ''ソル・デ・ロカ'' in official artwork. That name is often romanized as "Sol Dae Rokker", even though it's clearly "Sol de roca" (Spanish for "sun of rock"; that [[GiantSpaceFleaFromNowhere thing]] is made of rock and looks like a sun)

to:

* ''VideoGame/MetalSlug 3'''s Stage 4 boss is named ''ソル・デ・ロカ'' in official artwork. That name is often romanized as "Sol Dae Rokker", Rokker," even though it's clearly "Sol de roca" (Spanish for "sun of rock"; that [[GiantSpaceFleaFromNowhere thing]] is made of rock and looks like a sun)sun).



* ''VideoGame/ArmoredCore'' has had it bad, especially after changing hands from Agetec to Sega to Ubisoft. Last Raven brings us Zinaida [[labelnote:kana]]ジナイーダ[[/labelnote]] (a common Cyrillic name, although the kana spelling is nonstandard), which has been argued to be Schneider (totally missed it), and from Nexus onwards, we also have Genobee [[labelnote:kana]]ジノーヴィー[[/labelnote]] which has been suggested to be originally Shinobi (implausible) or Zinovi (another common Cyrillic name, very likely). Those are examples of pragmatic translations; Sega and Ubisoft were more...lax. Then again, who can really blame them for being divided between Abu Marche and Abe Marsh [[labelnote:kana]]アブ・マーシュ[[/labelnote]]?

to:

* ''VideoGame/ArmoredCore'' has had it bad, especially after changing hands from Agetec to Sega to Ubisoft. Last Raven brings us Zinaida [[labelnote:kana]]ジナイーダ[[/labelnote]] (a common Cyrillic name, although the kana spelling is nonstandard), which has been argued to be Schneider (totally missed it), and from Nexus onwards, we also have Genobee [[labelnote:kana]]ジノーヴィー[[/labelnote]] which has been suggested to be originally Shinobi (implausible) or Zinovi (another common Cyrillic name, very likely). Those are examples of pragmatic translations; Sega and Ubisoft were more... lax. Then again, who can really blame them for being divided between Abu Marche and Abe Marsh [[labelnote:kana]]アブ・マーシュ[[/labelnote]]?



* The UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem version of ''VideoGame/{{Hydlide}}'' [[AllThereInTheManual only describes the plot in the manual]], unlike the original UsefulNotes/PC88 version. The English manual renamed the BigBad Boralis, though his name is still displayed as Varalys in the game's status window.
* The ''VideoGame/LegacyOfTheWizard'' manual names the mother, son, grandmother and grandfather "Meyna", "Roas", "Jiela" and "Douel" respectively (though the mother is "Mayna Worzen" in the credits), whereas the intro screen for the {{MSX}}2 version (''Dragon Slayer IV: Drasle Family'') names them Maia, Royas, Geera and Dawel. The English version changed the name of the FinalBoss to Keela, but in Japan its name was either Dilgyos or Dilguios.
* ''[[VisualNovel/FateStayNight Fate/stay night]]'' does not really have official spellings for names like Ilyasviel Von Einzbern, leading to spelling her name both Ilya and Illya. FSN used Ilya while the translators for ''[[VisualNovel/FateHollowAtaraxia Fate/hollow ataraxia]]'' are using Illya. There is, however, an official Romanization for Saber's real name -- [[spoiler:Altria]], as opposed to the fan translation's [[spoiler:Arturia]].
* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}: [[UpdatedRerelease The Golden]]'' adds a new female character named マリー. There were fights over whether she'll be known as Marii, Mari, Mary, or Marie in the English edition, with the localisation settling with Marie
** In Persona3 we get Aigis, whose name is derived from an ancient greek word, which correctly would be spelled "Ægis". As the "Æ" symbol would be too hard to read for most players, the development team commonly romanizes the name as "Aegis" when necessary. The localization team didn't get the memo and went with the (equally correct) "Aigis" instead. [[{{Fandumb}} Fans are fighting over which is the "correct" spelling to this day.]]
* In the original Japanese {{MSX}}2 version of ''{{Aleste}}'', the name of the supercomputer gone wrong was romanized as "DIA 51." The supercomputer was written out of the translated UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem version, ''Power Strike'', but the [[AllThereInTheManual out-of-game material]] for ''M.U.S.H.A.'' refers to it as "Dire 51." (This was likely because the Japanese version of ''Musha Aleste'' wrote the name using ateji instead of romaji.)

to:

* The UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem version of ''VideoGame/{{Hydlide}}'' [[AllThereInTheManual only describes the plot in the manual]], unlike the original UsefulNotes/PC88 version. The English manual renamed the BigBad Boralis, though his name is still displayed as Varalys "Varalys" in the game's status window.
* The ''VideoGame/LegacyOfTheWizard'' manual names the mother, son, grandmother and grandfather "Meyna", "Roas", "Jiela" "Meyna," "Roas," "Jiela," and "Douel" respectively (though the mother is "Mayna Worzen" in the credits), whereas the intro screen for the {{MSX}}2 UsefulNotes/{{MSX}}2 version (''Dragon Slayer (''ideoGame/DragonSlayer IV: Drasle Family'') names them Maia, Royas, Geera and Dawel. The English version changed the name of the FinalBoss to Keela, but in Japan its name was either Dilgyos or Dilguios.
* ''[[VisualNovel/FateStayNight Fate/stay night]]'' ''VisualNovel/FateStayNight'' does not really have official spellings for names like Ilyasviel Von Einzbern, leading to spelling her name both Ilya and Illya. FSN ''FSN'' used Ilya while the translators for ''[[VisualNovel/FateHollowAtaraxia Fate/hollow ataraxia]]'' ''VisualNovel/FateHollowAtaraxia'' are using Illya. There is, however, an official Romanization for Saber's real name -- [[spoiler:Altria]], as opposed to the fan translation's [[spoiler:Arturia]].
* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}: [[UpdatedRerelease The Golden]]'' adds a new female character named マリー. There were fights over whether she'll be known as Marii, Mari, Mary, "Marii," "Mari," "Mary," or Marie "Marie" in the English edition, with the localisation settling with Marie
on Marie.
** In Persona3 we get ''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}'', there's Aigis, whose name is derived from an ancient greek Greek word, which correctly would be spelled "Ægis". "Ægis." As the "Æ" symbol would be too hard to read for most players, the development team commonly romanizes the name as "Aegis" when necessary. The localization team didn't get the memo and went with the (equally correct) "Aigis" instead. [[{{Fandumb}} [[FanDumb Fans are fighting over which is the "correct" spelling to this day.]]
* In the original Japanese {{MSX}}2 [=MSX2=] version of ''{{Aleste}}'', ''VideoGame/{{Aleste}}'', the name of the supercomputer gone wrong was romanized as "DIA 51." The supercomputer was written out of the translated UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem version, ''Power Strike'', but the [[AllThereInTheManual out-of-game material]] for ''M.''[[VideoGame/MUSHA M.U.S.H.A.'' ]]'' refers to it as "Dire 51." (This was likely because the Japanese version of ''Musha Aleste'' wrote the name using ateji instead of romaji.)



* In the PC88 version of ''[[VideoGame/{{Pitfall}} Super Pitfall]]'', Quickclaw is spelled "Quick Crow."

to:

* In the PC88 UsefulNotes/PC98 version of ''[[VideoGame/{{Pitfall}} Super Pitfall]]'', Quickclaw is spelled "Quick Crow."



* The spell "Cure", which appears in various RolePlayingGame series, mostly by Square Enix, is actually a mistranslation - the Japanese romanisation of the spell is "Kearu", which approximates to the English word "Care". Since "Cure" is so firmly ingrained in the Western consciousness by now, though, it's likely that changing it to "Care" would cause fan outcry, even though that was the original name for the spell all along (and also "Cure" arguably makes it clearer what the spell actually does than "Care"). And then there's the [=J2E=] FanTranslation of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIV'', which translates the spell as [[BlindIdiotTranslation "Keal"]].

to:

* The spell "Cure", "Cure," which appears in various RolePlayingGame series, mostly by Square Enix, Creator/SquareEnix, is actually a mistranslation - -- the Japanese romanisation of the spell is "Kearu", "Kearu," which approximates to the English word "Care". "Care." Since "Cure" is so firmly ingrained in the Western consciousness by now, though, it's likely that changing it to "Care" would cause fan outcry, even though that was the original name for the spell all along (and also "Cure" arguably makes it clearer what the spell actually does than "Care"). And then there's the [=J2E=] FanTranslation of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIV'', which translates the spell as [[BlindIdiotTranslation "Keal"]]."Keal."]]



* The North American version of ''VideoGame/ShiningWisdom'' had to do this. Sega (who had most Shining games) had the license to use the names but the game itself was licensed by Working Designs, Sega forced them to rename everything that appeared in Japanese/European versions; for instance, Parmecia became Palacia.

to:

* The North American version of ''VideoGame/ShiningWisdom'' had to do this. Sega (who had most Shining ''Shining'' games) had the license to use the names but the game itself was licensed by Working Designs, Creator/WorkingDesigns, Sega forced them to rename everything that appeared in Japanese/European versions; for instance, Parmecia became Palacia.



* The official romanizations of the ''VideoGame/PanelDePon'' characters シャーベット, セレン, サナトス, and コーディリア are "Sharbet", "Seren", "Sanatos", and "Corderia" respectively (even in English, Seren being used to refer to a sticker in ''Super Smash Bros. Brawl''); the FanTranslation translates their names as "Sherbet", "Selene", "Thanatos", and "Cordelia".
* One of the original bosses from ''VideoGame/KidIcarus'', Tanatos, returns in ''VideoGame/KidIcarusUprising'' as "Thanatos". According to the God of Death himself, "The extra H is for '''''[[LargeHam Hamazing]]'''''!"

to:

* The official romanizations of the ''VideoGame/PanelDePon'' characters シャーベット, セレン, サナトス, and コーディリア are "Sharbet", "Seren", "Sanatos", "Sharbet," "Seren," "Sanatos," and "Corderia" respectively (even in English, Seren being used to refer to a sticker in ''Super Smash Bros. Brawl''); the FanTranslation translates their names as "Sherbet", "Selene", "Thanatos", "Sherbet," "Selene," "Thanatos," and "Cordelia".
"Cordelia."
* One of the original bosses from ''VideoGame/KidIcarus'', Tanatos, returns in ''VideoGame/KidIcarusUprising'' as "Thanatos". "Thanatos." According to the God of Death himself, "The extra H is for '''''[[LargeHam Hamazing]]'''''!"



** Some arcade cabinets misspelled his name as 'Rowgun', despite the game itself sticking with Rogan.
** Very strangely, in ''House Of The Dead 4 Special'', if G gets a high score, he'll remark that he's probably 'better than Logan.' Since there is no other character named Logan in the series, he's probably referring to his old partner.

to:

** Some arcade cabinets misspelled his name as 'Rowgun', "Rowgun," despite the game itself sticking with Rogan.
** Very strangely, in ''House Of The of the Dead 4 4: Special'', if G gets a high score, he'll remark that he's probably 'better than Logan.' Since there is no other character named Logan in the series, he's probably referring to his old partner.



* The CuteEmUp spinoff of ''VideoGame/PowerInstinct'' has this issue with its very title. The ST-V cartridge label calls it ''Purikura Daisakusen'', while the UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn CD jacket romanizes it as ''Prikura Daisakusen''. To aggravate the TitleConfusion, both of these use the OfficiallyShortenedTitle, and its namesake heroine, Kurara, later became "Clara" in ''Matrimelee''. Even the main series has its weird variant romanizations, e.g. ''Gouketuji Ichizoku 2'', ''Gogetsuji Legends''.
* ''VideoGame/LufiaIIRiseOfTheSinistrals'' has an odd example. Artea is always referred to in dialogue by his proper name, and was even named correctly in [[VideoGame/LufiaAndTheFortressOfDoom the prior game]]. But as a party member he's labelled "Arty", which is closer to the Japanese pronunciation of his name.

to:

* The CuteEmUp spinoff spin-off of ''VideoGame/PowerInstinct'' has this issue with its very title. The ST-V cartridge label calls it ''Purikura Daisakusen'', while the UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn CD jacket romanizes it as ''Prikura Daisakusen''. To aggravate the TitleConfusion, both of these use the OfficiallyShortenedTitle, and its namesake heroine, Kurara, later became "Clara" in ''Matrimelee''. Even the main series has its weird variant romanizations, e.g. ''Gouketuji Ichizoku 2'', ''Gogetsuji Legends''.
* ''VideoGame/LufiaIIRiseOfTheSinistrals'' has an odd example. Artea is always referred to in dialogue by his proper name, and was even named correctly in [[VideoGame/LufiaAndTheFortressOfDoom the prior game]]. But as a party member he's labelled "Arty", "Arty," which is closer to the Japanese pronunciation of his name.



** The blind guy [[LivingShadow whose shadow makes for a lethal weapon]]? His name is Zato-1, but you can also call him "Zato-One" or "Zato-ONE." (In fact, the kanji used for Zato's name spells out the latter: ザトー=ONE.) The temperamental witch with [[MusicalAssassin literal killer guitar riffs]]? That's I-No, otherwise known as "Ino" or "I-NO."
** For some odd reason, ''Guilty Gear XX'' inserted hyphens for characters with known surnames on their lifebars and during the VersusCharacterSplash (ex. Sol-Badguy, Ky-Kiske, Anji-Mito, etc.), which influenced the fandom for a time. ''GG''[='s=] SpiritualSuccessor, ''VideoGame/BlazBlue'' also did this for ''[[VideoGame/BlazBlueCalamityTrigger Calamity Trigger]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/BlazBlueContinuumShift Continuum Shift]]'', which led to people calling Hakumen "Haku-men."



* ''VideoGame/YokaiWatch'': Is it "Youkai Watch", "Yo-Kai Watch", or "Yokai Watch"? The localization uses the middle spelling, but some still aren't sure. Then is it Yo-Kai or Yo-kai? Hasbro and Level-5 seem insistent on having "[=YO-KAI=]" in every press release to confuse things even more.
* ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto2'': The Yakuza boss likes to address you as "kosai", when possibly the correct Japanese spelling is "Kohai".

to:

* ''VideoGame/YokaiWatch'': Is it "Youkai Watch", Watch," "Yo-Kai Watch", Watch," or "Yokai Watch"? The localization uses the middle spelling, but some still aren't sure. Then is it Yo-Kai or Yo-kai? Hasbro and Level-5 seem insistent on having "[=YO-KAI=]" in every press release to confuse things even more.
* ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto2'': The Yakuza boss likes to address you as "kosai", "kosai," when possibly the correct Japanese spelling is "Kohai".



** His LoveInterest is named モルテ・アシェラ. All official translations agree her name is Morte, though this doesn't stop a couple of fans from insisting on spelling it Morute instead. The game spells her last name Asherah (some fans drop the final H), while the anime dub spells it Urshella.

to:

** His LoveInterest {{love interest|s}} is named モルテ・アシェラ. All official translations agree her name is Morte, though this doesn't stop a couple of fans from insisting on spelling it Morute instead. The game spells her last name Asherah (some fans drop the final H), while the anime dub spells it Urshella.



* When ''[[VideoGame/MushihimeSama Mushihime-sama Futari Black Label]]'' was released as {{DLC}} for the UsefulNotes/{{Xbox 360}} version, its title was bizarrely romanized as "Mushihimesama-hutari-Black-Lavel."
* Phillipe Loren, the Belgian leader of the Syndicate in ''[[VideoGame/SaintsRowTheThird]]'', has a first name that is both common in Belgium (in fact, he shares it with the current king of Belgium) and spelled in an uncommon way : the correct way to write it would be ''Philippe'', with one L and a double P.

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* When ''[[VideoGame/MushihimeSama Mushihime-sama Futari Black Label]]'' was released as {{DLC}} [[DownloadableContent DLC[[ for the UsefulNotes/{{Xbox 360}} version, its title was bizarrely romanized as "Mushihimesama-hutari-Black-Lavel."
* Phillipe Loren, the Belgian leader of the Syndicate in ''[[VideoGame/SaintsRowTheThird]]'', ''VideoGame/SaintsRowTheThird'', has a first name that is both common in Belgium (in fact, he shares it with the current king of Belgium) and spelled in an uncommon way : the correct way to write it would be ''Philippe'', with one L and a double P.


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* ''Franchise/DevilMayCry'' fans have a habit of misspelling the name of Vergil, Dante's EvilTwin, as "Virgil." This probably has to do with how Vergil gets his name from Creator/{{Virgil}}, the famed Roman poet whose name was indeed spelled both ways.
** Nelo Angelo, a RecurringBoss in the original ''DMC'' (who happens to be [[spoiler:Vergil under the control of BigBad Mundus]]), should have been called Ne'''r'''o Angelo (Italian for "black angel"), but the oversight was left in since the character became popular among fans (despite the translation issue being something of a [[FandomBerserkButton touchy]] [[FlameWar subject]] in the early days of the ''DMC'' fandom). Then the fourth game introduced a character who actually goes by the name Nero, and things got weird... Funnily enough, [[spoiler:the kid is Vergil's son]].
** A similar event happened with the WakeUpCallBoss of ''DMC4''. His name is clearly meant to be Belial since he's a flame demon from Hell, but a BlindIdiotTranslation somehow ended up with "Berial." (Strange considering [[VideoGame/{{Darkstalkers}} this isn't the first time a Capcom character has gone by that name]].) And if that wasn't bad enough, Berial's VA [[ItIsPronouncedTroPAY pronounces it as "burial."]]
5th Jan '17 3:57:08 PM Prfnoff
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* ''VideoGame/TheFirstFunkyFighter'' mangles the name of the video game company Nakanihon Lease to "Nakanihon Wreath" on the title screen.
20th Dec '16 5:55:12 AM Morgenthaler
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* VideoGame/DragonQuest itself was called Dragon Warrior in the 90's due to copyright issues. Once DragonQuestVIII resumed western releases with the proper title, the entire series went through an entire translation overhaul, a lot of which was meant to return the series to the lighthearted, punny feel that was largely removed from the western releases.

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* VideoGame/DragonQuest ''VideoGame/DragonQuest'' itself was called Dragon Warrior in the 90's due to copyright issues. Once DragonQuestVIII ''VideoGame/DragonQuestVIII'' resumed western releases with the proper title, the entire series went through an entire translation overhaul, a lot of which was meant to return the series to the lighthearted, punny feel that was largely removed from the western releases.
20th Dec '16 5:44:13 AM Morgenthaler
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** All game subtitles were removed outside of Japan until DragonQuestVIII.
*** DragonQuestVIII was the first one in Europe, so they've even been ditching the numbers.

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** All game subtitles were removed outside of Japan until DragonQuestVIII.
''VideoGame/DragonQuestVIII''.
*** DragonQuestVIII ''VideoGame/DragonQuestVIII'' was the first one in Europe, so they've even been ditching the numbers.



** DragonQuestV wasn't released outside of Japan so fan translations gave the names Papas, Flora, and Prince Henry. In the official western DS remakes, Papas is named Pankraz, Flora is named Nera, and Henry is Prince Harry.
** Ragnar McRyan and Torneko Taloon were only known by their last names in the NES release of DragonQuestIV.

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** DragonQuestV ''VideoGame/DragonQuestV'' wasn't released outside of Japan so fan translations gave the names Papas, Flora, and Prince Henry. In the official western DS remakes, Papas is named Pankraz, Flora is named Nera, and Henry is Prince Harry.
** Ragnar McRyan and Torneko Taloon were only known by their last names in the NES release of DragonQuestIV.''VideoGame/DragonQuestIV''.
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