History SomeAnvilsNeedToBeDropped / LiveActionTV

11th Jan '18 2:23:36 PM TheSaddleman
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** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E11HeavenSent "Heaven Sent"]], once the sci-fi aspects are stripped away, is at its core a powerful examination of grief. Those who have lost spouses reported that the Doctor's eventual meltdown in the episode as he realized that no matter what he does his beloved Clara would not be there for him anymore, particularly resonated with them.
5th Jan '18 2:07:29 AM Buck
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** While not as emotional as the prior three, "Will Gets A Job" has a great anvil about independence. Will needs some money for homecoming, and Uncle Phil without complaint gives it to him. This along with a miscommunication between Aunt Vivian leads Will to fear he's becoming a spoiled rich kid so he gets a job to earn the money himself. When Uncle Phil finds out, he tells Will that getting help from someone who's willing to help is nothing to be ashamed of. Seeing as a common aesop in media is being independent and providing for yourself, this was a good reminder that being independent doesn't mean its wrong to seek help if you really need it

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** While not as emotional as the prior three, "Will Gets A Job" has a great anvil about independence. Will needs some money for homecoming, and Uncle Phil without complaint gives it to him. This along with a miscommunication between Aunt Vivian leads Will to fear he's becoming a spoiled rich kid so he gets a job to earn the money himself. When Uncle Phil finds out, he tells Will that getting help from someone who's willing to help is nothing to be ashamed of. Seeing as a common aesop in media is being independent and providing for yourself, this was a good reminder that being independent doesn't mean its it's wrong to seek help if you really need itit.
** "Papa's Got a brand New Excuse": [[spoiler:This episode is the most famous out of the entire series due to its realistic and harsh depiction of disappeared parents. When parents disappear, it's not always done out of maliciousness because parenthood will be one of the scariest things you can through and some people can't handle the responsibilities. Some parents however should just be cut out of your life, they selfishly cut you out of their lives without second thought. If they didn't care enough to stay with you then you shouldn't care about them either.]]
*** [[spoiler: Phil's analogy for Lou's abandonment cycle doesn't just apply to disappeared parents. You can't selfishly objectify people for your own benefit and you shouldn't expect people to easily forgive you or revolve their lives around you. If you've wasted an opportunity then you shouldn't expect it to randomly happen again or for people to immediately throw their lives away for your benefit.]]
2nd Jan '18 12:48:58 PM JJHIL325
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* ''Series/TheCosbyShow'' offered an important one in the episode "Denise's Friend." One of Denise's friends has a medical problem that could be an STD, and she refuses to tell her parents until she knows what she's dealing with. Cliff diagnoses the issue, and thankfully it turns out to be a minor bladder infection that can be easily cured with antibiotics. However, Cliff is upset by the girl's fear of her parents, so he and Clair sit their own children down and promise that they can always come to them with their problems, no matter what they are. To test the theory, the kids come up with some hypothetical situations that might upset Cliff and Clair (such as Theo borrowing Cliff's car without permission or Denise spending the night alone with a boy in his home). This is when the anvil drops: Cliff and Clair outright admit that in those situations, they'd be angry. In the sitcom genre, it's easy to slip into the [[EasilyForgiven "I'll love you no matter what" trope--but you know what?]] If you do really stupid, dangerous, or generally unsafe things, your parents are ''going'' to be mad at you, and will probably punish you with good reason. That doesn't mean they don't love you--it means that they're ''doing their job as parents.'' It's not subtle, but it makes the point (and bucks the sitcom trend) clear as day.

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* ''Series/TheCosbyShow'' offered an important one in the episode "Denise's Friend." One of Denise's friends has a medical problem that could be an STD, and she refuses to tell her parents until she knows what she's dealing with. Cliff diagnoses the issue, and thankfully it turns out to be a minor bladder infection that can be easily cured with antibiotics. However, Cliff is upset by the girl's fear of her parents, so he and Clair sit their own children down and promise that they can always come to them with their problems, no matter what they are. To test the theory, the kids come up with some hypothetical situations that might upset Cliff and Clair (such as Theo borrowing Cliff's car without permission or Denise spending the night alone with a boy in his home). This is when the anvil drops: Cliff and Clair outright admit that in those situations, [[RealityEnsues they'd be angry. angry]]. In the sitcom genre, it's easy to slip into the [[EasilyForgiven "I'll love you no matter what" trope--but trope]]--but you know what?]] what? If you do really stupid, dangerous, or generally unsafe things, your parents are ''going'' to be mad at you, and will probably punish you with good reason. That doesn't mean they don't love you--it means that they're ''doing their job as parents.'' It's not subtle, but it makes the point (and bucks the sitcom trend) clear as day.
2nd Jan '18 12:46:32 PM JJHIL325
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* ''Series/TheCosbyShow'' offered an important one in the episode "Denise's Friend." As the title suggests, one of Denise's friends has a medical problem that could be an STD, and refuses to tell her parents until she knows what she's dealing with. Cliff diagnoses the issue (it's a minor bladder infection that can be easily cured with antibiotics), but is upset by the girl's fear of her parents, so he and Clair sit their own children down and promise that they can always come to them with their problems, no matter what they are. To test the theory, the kids come up with some hypothetical situations that might upset Cliff and Clair (such as Theo borrowing Cliff's car or Denise spending the night alone with a boy in his home). This is when the anvil drops: Cliff and Clair outright admit that in those situations, they'd be angry. In the sitcom genre, it's easy to slip into the "I'll love you no matter what" trope--but you know what? If you do really stupid, dangerous, or generally unsafe things, your parents are ''going'' to be mad at you, and will probably punish you with good reason. That doesn't mean they don't love you--it means that they're ''doing their job as parents.'' It's not subtle, but it makes the point (and bucks the sitcom trend) clear as day.

to:

* ''Series/TheCosbyShow'' offered an important one in the episode "Denise's Friend." As the title suggests, one One of Denise's friends has a medical problem that could be an STD, and she refuses to tell her parents until she knows what she's dealing with. Cliff diagnoses the issue (it's issue, and thankfully it turns out to be a minor bladder infection that can be easily cured with antibiotics), but antibiotics. However, Cliff is upset by the girl's fear of her parents, so he and Clair sit their own children down and promise that they can always come to them with their problems, no matter what they are. To test the theory, the kids come up with some hypothetical situations that might upset Cliff and Clair (such as Theo borrowing Cliff's car without permission or Denise spending the night alone with a boy in his home). This is when the anvil drops: Cliff and Clair outright admit that in those situations, they'd be angry. In the sitcom genre, it's easy to slip into the [[EasilyForgiven "I'll love you no matter what" trope--but you know what? what?]] If you do really stupid, dangerous, or generally unsafe things, your parents are ''going'' to be mad at you, and will probably punish you with good reason. That doesn't mean they don't love you--it means that they're ''doing their job as parents.'' It's not subtle, but it makes the point (and bucks the sitcom trend) clear as day.



** "Blood Is Thicker Than Mud" has Carlton rejected from a black fraternity because the pledge leader considers him a "sellout" for being so rich and preppy. Carlton tells him that even if he doesn't display any stereotypically black traits, he's just as black as everyone else and the pledge leader is the real sellout for adhering to the belief that all blacks have to act a certain way and mistreating those who don't despite claiming they all have to stick together.

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** "Blood Is Thicker Than Mud" has speaks out against treating others who are a member of your ethnicity/race/religion as {{Category Traitor}}s simply because they don't act like you or share your beliefs. Carlton gets rejected from a black fraternity because "Top Dog", the pledge leader leader, considers him a "sellout" for being so rich and preppy. Carlton tells proceeds to call him out on his ignorance, pointing out that even if he doesn't display any stereotypically black traits, he's just as black as everyone else and in the pledge leader fraternity. Top Dog is the real sellout for adhering to the belief that all blacks have to act a certain way and [[{{Hypocrite}} mistreating those who don't despite claiming they all have to stick together.together]]. The aesop gets solidified when, after Carlton tells his father what happened, the latter laments, "When are we going to stop doing this to each other?"
4th Dec '17 8:51:33 AM Buck
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** "Happily Ever After": The episode takes place after Stella left Ted at the altar and it's about the gang trying to get Ted to unleash his anger at Stella whereas Ted tries to swallow his anger and talk it out with her. After seeing that Stella moved in with Tony, he finally gets enraged and storms out to shout at Stella but he immediately calms down when he see's that they are a happy family and decides to let go. The anvils are about expression, you have to confront people with your anger because it can be a healthy option but there are times where you need to understand the other person's side of the story. Sometimes however it's better to just forget about the incident and just move on with your life. You don't have to forgive them for what they did, just move on.

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** "Happily Ever After": The episode takes place after Stella left Ted at the altar and it's about the gang trying to get Ted to unleash his anger at Stella whereas Ted tries to swallow his anger and talk it out with her. After seeing that Stella moved in with Tony, he finally gets enraged and storms out to shout at Stella but he immediately calms down when he see's sees that they are a happy family and decides to let go. The anvils are about expression, you have to confront people with your anger because it can be a healthy option but there are times where you need to understand the other person's side of the story. Sometimes however it's better to just forget about the incident and just move on with your life. You don't have to forgive them for what they did, just move on.
4th Dec '17 8:50:04 AM Buck
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** "Happily Ever After": The episode takes place after Stella left Ted at the altar and it's about the gang trying to get Ted to unleash his anger at Stella whereas Ted tries to swallow his anger and talk it out with her. After seeing that Stella moved in with Tony, he finally gets enraged and storms out to shout at Stella but he immediately calms down when he see's that they are a happy family and decides to let go. The anvils are about expression, you have to confront people with your anger because it can be a healthy option but there are times where you need to understand the other person's side of the story. Sometimes however it's better to just forget about the incident and just move on with your life. You don't have to forgive them for what they did, just move on.
5th Nov '17 3:42:13 PM Ea4g
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* Fox's ''Series/TheGifted'', like its [[Comics/XMen source material]], is never shy about laying on [[AnAesop the Aesops]] while making heavy handed references to everything from homophobia to racism.
18th Oct '17 4:27:20 AM ClintEastwood
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* The 1977 ABC mini-series ''{{Roots}}''. The biggest dropped anvil in the history of television.

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* The 1977 ABC mini-series ''{{Roots}}''.''Series/Roots1977''. The biggest dropped anvil in the history of television.



** Rod Serling was especially worried about Nazism, and history's gone on to show that he had good reason. ''Series/TheTwilightZone'' episode "Deaths-Head Revisited" not only gives a former concentration camp captain his just reward, but also ends with what seems like an {{anvilicious}} closing statement -- but the surge of Holocaust denials since then has proven that this anvil can't possibly be dropped too hard.

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** Rod Serling Creator/RodSerling was especially worried about Nazism, and history's gone on to show that he had good reason. ''Series/TheTwilightZone'' episode "Deaths-Head Revisited" not only gives a former concentration camp captain his just reward, but also ends with what seems like an {{anvilicious}} closing statement -- but the surge of Holocaust denials since then has proven that this anvil can't possibly be dropped too hard.
9th Oct '17 5:56:25 PM JJHIL325
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** It also deconstructs the idea that easy money actually exists. Walter's plan to get quick money went wrong in many ways, and even when things begin to look good economically for him, FailureIsTheOnlyOption.
** Another theme of the show is that [[KarmaHoudiniWarranty no matter how long it takes, all evil deeds WILL be punished at the hands of either Fate or other people]]. This is why [[spoiler:at the end of the series several of the drug dealers, Neo-Nazis, and other gang members end up [[KarmicDeath dead]] (including [[VillainProtagonist Walter White]] himself). If they did survive the series, those involved either had [[CruelMercy nothing to look forward to]] (such as Saul) or [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone have to suffer from guilt for the rest of their lives]] (such as Jesse).]]

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** It also deconstructs the idea that easy money actually exists. Walter's plan to get quick money by getting involved in the meth trade went wrong in many ways, and even when things begin to look good economically for him, FailureIsTheOnlyOption.
** Another theme of the show is that [[KarmaHoudiniWarranty no matter how long it takes, all evil deeds WILL be punished at the hands of either Fate or other people]]. This is why [[spoiler:at the end of the series several of the drug dealers, Neo-Nazis, and other gang members end up [[KarmicDeath dead]] (including [[VillainProtagonist Walter White]] himself). If they did survive the series, those involved they either had [[CruelMercy nothing to look forward to]] (such as Saul) or [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone have to suffer from the guilt from what they were involved in for the rest of their lives]] (such as Jesse).]]
9th Oct '17 5:51:12 PM JJHIL325
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** In "Mistaken Identity", Will and Carlton get arrested by a racist cop who think the boys are driving a stolen car. The episode ends with the message that while most cops are good and honest people who just want to uphold the law and protect others, there are unfortunately several {{Dirty Cop}}s who use their authority to pick on minorities. And no, being BlackAndNerdy isn't gonna help you when you cross paths with those types of people.

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** In "Mistaken Identity", Will and Carlton get arrested by a racist cop who think thinks the boys are driving a stolen car. The episode ends with the message that while most cops police officers are good and honest people who just want to uphold the law and protect others, people, there are unfortunately several {{Dirty Cop}}s who use their authority to pick on minorities. And no, being BlackAndNerdy isn't gonna won't help you when you cross paths with those types of people.
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