History SomeAnvilsNeedToBeDropped / LiveActionTV

23rd Jul '16 12:49:56 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Series/{{Extras}}'' took on the "celebrity is bad" Aesop as well, but in a different way. The finale special is pretty darn [[{{Anvilicious}} heavy-handed]] in telling us that being a celebrity isn't worth it, if you've betrayed the only people who cared about you, celebrity or not. Making fun of ''BigBrother'' and their ilk in the process? [[HilarityEnsues Just bonus.]]

to:

* ''Series/{{Extras}}'' took on the "celebrity is bad" Aesop as well, but in a different way. The finale special is pretty darn [[{{Anvilicious}} heavy-handed]] in telling us that being a celebrity isn't worth it, if you've betrayed the only people who cared about you, celebrity or not. Making fun of ''BigBrother'' ''Series/BigBrother'' and their ilk in the process? [[HilarityEnsues Just bonus.]]
27th Jun '16 9:59:37 AM ShorinBJ
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** To whit, Nichols had seriously considered quitting until she met a fan urging her to stay, saying she was a strong positive role model for African-Americans. Who was that fan? ''Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.''.

to:

*** To whit, wit, Nichols had seriously considered quitting until she met a fan urging her to stay, saying she was a strong positive role model for African-Americans. Who was that fan? ''Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.''.
27th Jun '16 9:56:52 AM ShorinBJ
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** "A Taste of Armageddon" drops three important anvils: First, WarIsHell, or more accurately, war is ''supposed'' to be hell, so that people will want to avoid it. Second, [[AssInAmbassador as annoying as diplomacy can be]], it is more preferable than waging war]]. And third, [[AMillionIsAStatistic handling war with detached intellectual coldness]] makes them easier to start and prolong, as [[ForeverWar the Vendikar-Eminiar "war" had lasted for]] ''[[ForeverWar 500 years]]'' before the ''Enterprise'' crew came along.

to:

** "A Taste of Armageddon" drops three important anvils: First, WarIsHell, or more accurately, war is ''supposed'' to be hell, so that people will want to avoid it. Second, [[AssInAmbassador as annoying as diplomacy can be]], it is more preferable than waging war]].war. And third, [[AMillionIsAStatistic handling war with detached intellectual coldness]] makes them easier to start and prolong, as [[ForeverWar the Vendikar-Eminiar "war" had lasted for]] ''[[ForeverWar 500 years]]'' before the ''Enterprise'' crew came along.
7th May '16 3:36:12 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The episode of ''Raising Dad'' where Sarah decides she wants a nose-job. Even TheBeautifulElite can have bad self-images and constant teasing and joking can push someone into trying to change themselves when it's not needed. Think of that stunningly beautiful popular girl who wanted her ears pinned back, her jawline altered and fuller lips (and this is after she'd already gotten a nose job) and remember how fragile someone's self-esteem can be. Emily constantly teases Sarah about having a big nose but she then hears exactly what happens during plastic surgery and is horrified that Sarah wants to do that to herself.
* ''TheGoldenGirls'', as one of the first shows to depict middle-aged (and one elderly) women living together, dropped a number of important and groundbreaking Anvils:

to:

* The episode of ''Raising Dad'' ''Series/RaisingDad'' where Sarah decides she wants a nose-job. Even TheBeautifulElite can have bad self-images and constant teasing and joking can push someone into trying to change themselves when it's not needed. Think of that stunningly beautiful popular girl who wanted her ears pinned back, her jawline altered and fuller lips (and this is after she'd already gotten a nose job) and remember how fragile someone's self-esteem can be. Emily constantly teases Sarah about having a big nose but she then hears exactly what happens during plastic surgery and is horrified that Sarah wants to do that to herself.
* ''TheGoldenGirls'', ''Series/TheGoldenGirls'', as one of the first shows to depict middle-aged (and one elderly) women living together, dropped a number of important and groundbreaking Anvils:
7th May '16 12:16:33 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In the episode "Girl Fight' of the ''{{The George Lopez Show}}'', deals with bullying. Carmen's ex-boyfriend calls her a slut, and she is being bullied by everybody. It would be Anvilicious, but by the end of the episode, Carmen is still being bullied, and has to be taken out of school. To this troper, it is a solid lesson on how damaging rumors can be, and how reputations can be easily broken. In the era of cyberbulling, it is especially important.

to:

* In the episode "Girl Fight' of the ''{{The George Lopez Show}}'', ''Series/TheGeorgeLopezShow'', deals with bullying. Carmen's ex-boyfriend calls her a slut, and she is being bullied by everybody. It would be Anvilicious, but by the end of the episode, Carmen is still being bullied, and has to be taken out of school. To this troper, it is a solid lesson on how damaging rumors can be, and how reputations can be easily broken. In the era of cyberbulling, it is especially important.
23rd Apr '16 5:20:08 PM comicwriter
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/TheFreshPrinceOfBelAir'' had "Mistaken Identity", where Will and Carlton get arrested by some cops who think the boys are driving a stolen car. The episode ends with the message that while most cops are good, upstanding people who just want to uphold the law, there are unfortunately many cops who are bullies and racists that will use their authority to pick on minorities. And no, being BlackAndNerdy isn't gonna help you when you're confronted by these types of people.
19th Mar '16 8:26:18 AM Hossmeister
Is there an issue? Send a Message
1st Mar '16 9:26:24 PM Gravidef
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/TheCosbyShow'' offered an important one in the episode "Denise's Friend." As the title suggests, one of Denise's friends has a medical problem that could be an STD, and refuses to tell her parents until she knows what she's dealing with. Cliff diagnoses the issue (it's a minor bladder infection that can be easily cured with antibiotics), but is upset by the girl's fear of her parents, so he and Clair sit their own children down and promise that they can always come to them with their problems, no matter what they are. To test the theory, the kids come up with some hypothetical situations that might upset Cliff and Clair (such as Theo borrowing Cliff's car or Denise spending the night alone with a boy in his home). This is when the anvil drops: Cliff and Clair outright admit that in those situations, they'd be angry. In the sitcom genre, it's easy to slip into the "I'll love you no matter what" trope--but you know what? If you do really stupid, dangerous, or generally unsafe things, your parents are ''going'' to be mad at you, and will probably punish you with good reason. That doesn't mean they don't love you--it means that they're ''doing their job as parents.'' It's not subtle, but it makes the point (and bucks the sitcom trend) clear as day.
27th Feb '16 8:06:15 PM jormis29
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Judge John Deed'''s episode "Popular Appeal" is very little other than [[TakeThat one giant middle finger]] aimed at ''BigBrother'' (and shows of its ilk) and the perennial media circus that surrounds it. Creator/TheBBC frequently airs repeats of it up against the ''Big Brother'' finale. The final summing up is what makes the episode, in which the producers of a reality show called ''Dungeon'' are made to face manslaughter charges after a contestant is killed on-screen (it's made fairly clear that [[RatingsStunt that was the the producers' hope]] - ''Dungeon'' seems to amount to a more calculated version of the Stanford Prison Experiment). They were found guilty.

to:

* ''Judge John Deed'''s ''Series/JudgeJohnDeed'''s episode "Popular Appeal" is very little other than [[TakeThat one giant middle finger]] aimed at ''BigBrother'' ''Series/BigBrother'' (and shows of its ilk) and the perennial media circus that surrounds it. Creator/TheBBC frequently airs repeats of it up against the ''Big Brother'' finale. The final summing up is what makes the episode, in which the producers of a reality show called ''Dungeon'' are made to face manslaughter charges after a contestant is killed on-screen (it's made fairly clear that [[RatingsStunt that was the the producers' hope]] - ''Dungeon'' seems to amount to a more calculated version of the Stanford Prison Experiment).StanfordPrisonExperiment). They were found guilty.



* ''FullHouse'' teaches us that ''any'' problem can be solved by talking it through, that your friends and family will be there for you no matter what, and that ''any'' situation can be improved by a hug.

to:

* ''FullHouse'' ''Series/FullHouse'' teaches us that ''any'' problem can be solved by talking it through, that your friends and family will be there for you no matter what, and that ''any'' situation can be improved by a hug.
8th Feb '16 3:42:12 PM Premonition45
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The TOS episode "The Omega Glory" is polarizing, [[AmericansHateTingle particularly with international fans]], but it pulls no punches about how dangerous blind patriotism and nationalism can be.

to:

** The TOS episode "The Omega Glory" is polarizing, [[BrokenBase polarizing]], [[AmericansHateTingle particularly with international fans]], but it pulls no punches about how dangerous blind patriotism and nationalism can be.
This list shows the last 10 events of 144. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=SomeAnvilsNeedToBeDropped.LiveActionTV