History SoYouWantTo / WriteAnUrbanFantasy

10th Dec '16 9:39:18 PM Bagpiper
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* ''Literature/NightWatch''. The epic battle of Good and Evil set in post-soviet russia, mostly Moscow.

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* ''Literature/NightWatch''. The epic battle of Good and Evil set in post-soviet russia, the modern-day Russian Federation, mostly Moscow.
10th Dec '16 9:38:02 PM Bagpiper
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* ''Series/{{Being|Human UK}} [[Series/BeingHumanUS Human]]'', both versions of which revolve around supernatural monsters trying to reclaim their old human lives. Magic exists in both settings, but aside from the curses the protagonists are afflicted with it is very much in the background. The UK version notably has a suburban setting.

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* ''Series/{{Being|Human UK}} [[Series/BeingHumanUS Human]]'', both versions of which revolve around supernatural monsters trying to [[IJustWantToBeNormal reclaim their old human lives.lives]]. Magic exists in both settings, but aside from the curses the protagonists are afflicted with it is very much in the background. The UK version notably has a suburban setting.
10th Dec '16 9:36:19 PM Bagpiper
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* ''Series/{{Being|Human UK}} [[Series/BeingHumanUS Human]]'', both versions of which revolve around supernatural monsters trying to reclaim their old human lives. Magic exists in both settings, but aside from the curses the protagonists are afflicted with it is very much in the background. The UK version notably has a suburban setting, whereas the US version takes place in a Boston surrounded on all sides by LovecraftCountry.

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* ''Series/{{Being|Human UK}} [[Series/BeingHumanUS Human]]'', both versions of which revolve around supernatural monsters trying to reclaim their old human lives. Magic exists in both settings, but aside from the curses the protagonists are afflicted with it is very much in the background. The UK version notably has a suburban setting, whereas the US version takes place in a Boston surrounded on all sides by LovecraftCountry.setting.
10th Dec '16 9:33:46 PM Bagpiper
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* ''Series/{{Being|Human UK}} [[Series/BeingHumanUS Human]]''

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* ''Series/{{Being|Human UK}} [[Series/BeingHumanUS Human]]''Human]]'', both versions of which revolve around supernatural monsters trying to reclaim their old human lives. Magic exists in both settings, but aside from the curses the protagonists are afflicted with it is very much in the background. The UK version notably has a suburban setting, whereas the US version takes place in a Boston surrounded on all sides by LovecraftCountry.
16th Nov '16 6:49:17 AM jake38
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* ''LeaveItToChance''
16th Nov '16 6:48:36 AM jake38
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* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}''
* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}''

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* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}''
*
3}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}''4}}'', which tell the stories of [[OrdinaryHighSchoolStudent High School Student's]] with the ability to summon a ''[[AnthropomorphicPersonification Persona]],'' which allows them to use magic.
22nd Oct '16 4:47:39 AM Morgenthaler
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* Throwing magic into the mix sometimes has the effect of turning everyone Good or Evil. Can you think of a RealLife war or conflict where [[BlackAndWhiteMorality one side was unequivocably good and the other was utterly, irredeemably evil]]? Even in WorldWarII, America and Britain were allied with JosefStalin, while Mussolini's Italy, while still not an incredibly nice place to live, was very much a lighter shade of dark gray compared to the Nazis. Why would magical conflict be any different? Having an [[AlwaysChaoticEvil entire species of evil bastards]] as some kind of DesignatedVillain crew is a cheap way of securing a non-stop supply of enemies for your protagonists to fight, but will your audience really care when one of them is defeated? If BlackMagic and WhiteMagic have the effects of ''turning'' their users good or evil respectively, why don't more people know about these side effects and avoid the evil? Is it because it's more powerful, has wider applications, or [[ThisIsYourBrainOnEvil is addictive]]? Is it simple ignorance, cynical disbelief of "old wives' tales" warning of the effects, or deliberate misinformation being spread by someone for their own purposes? Or do ''both'' forms of magic have consequences? White magic turning the user into a KnightTemplar is a popular choice.

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* Throwing magic into the mix sometimes has the effect of turning everyone Good or Evil. Can you think of a RealLife war or conflict where [[BlackAndWhiteMorality one side was unequivocably good and the other was utterly, irredeemably evil]]? Even in WorldWarII, UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, America and Britain were allied with JosefStalin, UsefulNotes/JosefStalin, while Mussolini's Italy, while still not an incredibly nice place to live, was very much a lighter shade of dark gray compared to the Nazis. Why would magical conflict be any different? Having an [[AlwaysChaoticEvil entire species of evil bastards]] as some kind of DesignatedVillain crew is a cheap way of securing a non-stop supply of enemies for your protagonists to fight, but will your audience really care when one of them is defeated? If BlackMagic and WhiteMagic have the effects of ''turning'' their users good or evil respectively, why don't more people know about these side effects and avoid the evil? Is it because it's more powerful, has wider applications, or [[ThisIsYourBrainOnEvil is addictive]]? Is it simple ignorance, cynical disbelief of "old wives' tales" warning of the effects, or deliberate misinformation being spread by someone for their own purposes? Or do ''both'' forms of magic have consequences? White magic turning the user into a KnightTemplar is a popular choice.
6th Sep '16 2:37:45 PM StFan
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* ''The Coffee Achievers'' is an Urban Fantasy webcomic by Mitch Clem of NothingNiceToSay. It includes cool details such as a mixtape that allows the listener to fly.

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* ''The Coffee Achievers'' is an Urban Fantasy webcomic by Mitch Clem of NothingNiceToSay.''Webcomic/NothingNiceToSay''. It includes cool details such as a mixtape that allows the listener to fly.
19th May '16 5:14:07 PM erforce
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* ''Film/{{Ghostbusters}}'' does a very good job of mixing creepy paranormal and supernatural myth with off-the-wall comedy and MadScience

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* ''Film/{{Ghostbusters}}'' ''Film/{{Ghostbusters 1984}}'' does a very good job of mixing creepy paranormal and supernatural myth with off-the-wall comedy and MadScience
18th Feb '16 8:56:13 PM Mhazard
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* Remember that [[OurMonstersAreDifferent Your Monsters Can Be Different]]. Then again, it's extremely difficult to reinvent the [[OurVampiresAreDifferent vampire]] or the [[OurWerewolvesAreDifferent werewolf]] or some other classic monster, and inventing your own creatures can lack the archetypal significance of something more familiar, like, say, a [[OurZombiesAreDifferent zombie]]. The best approach is probably to look at what you need the monster to do, and add or take away weaknesses, strengths and other traits that we associate with those monsters to make them your own, based around where you want the plot to go. If you want your vampire to be a devout Christian, there's nothing stopping you from discarding the rule about them hating crucifixes. If you're writing a romance story and your werewolf has a silver wedding ring, you could drop the stuff as their KryptoniteFactor. If your protagonists are trying to escape a horde of evil [[OurGoblinsAreDifferent goblins]] and their regular meeting place is a coffee house, maybe the goblins could be [[WeaksauceWeakness allergic to coffee]]?

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* Remember that [[OurMonstersAreDifferent Your Monsters Can Be Different]]. Then again, it's extremely difficult to reinvent the [[OurVampiresAreDifferent vampire]] or the [[OurWerewolvesAreDifferent werewolf]] or some other classic monster, and inventing your own creatures can lack the archetypal significance of something more familiar, like, say, a [[OurZombiesAreDifferent zombie]]. The best approach is probably to look at what you need the monster to do, and add or take away weaknesses, strengths and other traits that we associate with those monsters to make them your own, based around where you want the plot to go. If you want your vampire to be a devout Christian, there's nothing stopping you from discarding the rule about them hating crucifixes. If you're writing a romance story and your werewolf has a silver wedding ring, you could drop the stuff as their KryptoniteFactor. If your protagonists are trying to escape a horde of evil [[OurGoblinsAreDifferent goblins]] and their regular meeting place is a coffee house, maybe the goblins could be [[WeaksauceWeakness allergic to coffee]]?
coffee]]? Another option is to [[StarfishAliens defy the standards]] and create a [[EldritchAbomination creature beyond comprehension, laws and physics]], if we understand the nature of the creatures, we do not fear them, but if we don't, the long-lasting sheer horrors can be invoked by how ''wrong'' they are.
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