History SoYouWantTo / WriteATabletopRPG

16th Jan '16 1:36:26 PM Dravencour
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** Dungeons and Dragons was the first, and it decided to model its characters' broad physical and mental abilities (Strength, Dexterity, etc.) and ability to survive threats (hit points, saves, AC, etc.), as well as unique abilities divided by class. Later games added formal skill systems, feats, and other options for customization.
** Vampire: the Requiem has a full three stats for social interaction to emphasize the importance of backstabbing undead politics. They also have a power stat, Blood Potency, and special powers based on what kind of vampire you are. This is part of the New World of Darkness system, designed so that different types of supernaturals can interact seamlessly.
** Spirit of the Century rolls stats and skills into the same system, then makes the heart of a character short, descriptive phrases called "Aspects." Stunts add special abilities or new ways to use skills. Characters are much more self-sufficient, though implicit roles like "good at hitting things" or "stupendously rich" are around.
** Wushu characters are literally just three short phrases with numbers attached, all based around hurting people in creative ways.
** There Is No Spoon has ''one'' stat, as well as two or more broad Traits that are influenced by that stat.

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** Dungeons ''Dungeons and Dragons Dragons'' was the first, and it decided to model its characters' broad physical and mental abilities (Strength, Dexterity, etc.) and ability to survive threats (hit points, saves, AC, etc.), as well as unique abilities divided by class. Later games added formal skill systems, feats, and other options for customization.
** Vampire: ''Vampire: the Requiem Requiem'' has a full three stats for social interaction to emphasize the importance of backstabbing undead politics. They also have a power stat, Blood Potency, and special powers based on what kind of vampire you are. This is part of the New World of Darkness system, designed so that different types of supernaturals can interact seamlessly.
** Spirit ''Spirit of the Century Century'' rolls stats and skills into the same system, then makes the heart of a character short, descriptive phrases called "Aspects." Stunts add special abilities or new ways to use skills. Characters are much more self-sufficient, though implicit roles like "good at hitting things" or "stupendously rich" are around.
** Wushu ''Wushu'' characters are literally just three short phrases with numbers attached, all based around hurting people or otherwise getting things done in creative ways.
** There ''There Is No Spoon Spoon'' has ''one'' stat, as well as two or more broad Traits that are influenced by that stat.



** GURPS is rules-heavy. You can play the game with a minimum of rules (GURPS Lite), but if you want game mechanics to model virtually ''anything,'' they're there if you need them.
** HERO System is rules-heavy. There are ''lots'' of rules and character creation can take a long time, but they're predicated on a (hopefully) balanced point system so fine-tuned you can create characters that play exactly like they do in their native systems.
** Dungeons and Dragons is rules-medium. It errs on the heavy side in offering specialty rules, but the bulk of most rulebooks are all about ''stuff,'' which is optional and not essential to memorize.
** FATE is rules-medium. While the game is narratively-focused, there are a lot of rules for integrating abstract narrative concepts into mechanical solids, the flavor feeding into the rules.
** Wushu is rules lite. Characters can comfortably fit on three lines of a sheet of notebook paper, a simple "anything you say goes unless another player vetoes it" rule governs most routine interactions with the game world, and any challenge your group/GM considers actually worth resolving mechanically can be easily handled with the fairly lightweight combat rules (just treat the problem as another opponent, whether it's actually a ''character'' or not doesn't really matter).
** TabletopGame/StickGuy is so rules lite, it's compared to laying about eating pretzels and drinking beer. One stat, 3 traits that add or subtract one point, and a LuckManipulationMechanic.

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** GURPS ''GURPS'' is rules-heavy. You can play the game with a minimum of rules (GURPS Lite), but if you want game mechanics to model virtually ''anything,'' they're there if you need them.
** HERO System ''HERO System'' is rules-heavy. There are ''lots'' of rules and character creation can take a long time, but they're predicated on a (hopefully) balanced point system so fine-tuned you can create characters that play exactly like they do in their native systems.
** Dungeons ''Dungeons and Dragons Dragons'' is rules-medium. It errs on the heavy side in offering specialty rules, but the bulk of most rulebooks are all about ''stuff,'' which is optional and not essential to memorize.
** FATE ''FATE'' is rules-medium. While the game is narratively-focused, there are a lot of rules for integrating abstract narrative concepts into mechanical solids, the flavor feeding into the rules.
** Wushu ''Wushu'' is rules lite. Characters can comfortably fit on three lines of a sheet of notebook paper, a simple "anything you say goes unless another player vetoes it" rule governs most routine interactions with the game world, and any challenge your group/GM considers actually worth resolving mechanically can be easily handled with the fairly lightweight combat rules (just treat the problem as another opponent, whether it's actually a ''character'' or not doesn't really matter).
** TabletopGame/StickGuy ''TabletopGame/StickGuy'' is so rules lite, it's compared to laying about eating pretzels and drinking beer. One stat, 3 traits that add or subtract one point, and a LuckManipulationMechanic.



*** Call of Cthulhu d20, other than bringing the game into the d20 rules system, uses its level system as a slider for mood. At level 1, characters are ''even more vulnerable'' than starting characters in the original game. At higher level, while still fragile, characters are pulpy action heroes able to withstand some of the horrors of the Mythos. It also has a much larger art budget and makes the most of it.
*** NEMESIS takes place in the modern day, and is particularly designed with an eye toward Delta Green. Combat is more visceral than in Call of Cthulhu, it has a much more specific and brutal sanity system, and it introduces the option to play supernatural monster-fighters a la ComicBook/{{Hellboy}} or the Wiki/SCPFoundation.
*** Trail of Cthulhu is Lovecraftian horror as a detective story. Characters automatically find clues if they have the right skills, but they must then assemble the mystery on their own. Rather than having static stats and skills, players have dwindling resources of skill points and Stability that they have to marshal carefully if they wish to survive.

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*** Call ''Call of Cthulhu d20, d20'', other than bringing the game into the d20 rules system, uses its level system as a slider for mood. At level 1, characters are ''even more vulnerable'' than starting characters in the original game. At higher level, while still fragile, characters are pulpy action heroes able to withstand some of the horrors of the Mythos. It also has a much larger art budget and makes the most of it.
*** NEMESIS ''NEMESIS'' takes place in the modern day, and is particularly designed with an eye toward Delta Green. Combat is more visceral than in Call of Cthulhu, it has a much more specific and brutal sanity system, and it introduces the option to play supernatural monster-fighters a la ComicBook/{{Hellboy}} or the Wiki/SCPFoundation.
*** Trail ''Trail of Cthulhu Cthulhu'' is Lovecraftian horror as a detective story. Characters automatically find clues if they have the right skills, but they must then assemble the mystery on their own. Rather than having static stats and skills, players have dwindling resources of skill points and Stability that they have to marshal carefully if they wish to survive.
4th Jul '15 2:12:49 PM thunderfree
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** Note that this does not include deliberate genre throwbacks to 1st or 2nd edition Dungeons and Dragons. These are games designed with ignorance of all but perhaps a handful of games outside the player's personal experience.

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** Note that this does not include deliberate genre throwbacks to 1st or 2nd edition Dungeons and Dragons. These Heartbreakers are games designed with ignorance of all but perhaps a handful of games outside the player's personal experience.
12th Apr '15 6:20:05 PM nombretomado
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** An "interesting" example is the new edition of Nobilis, which supplements the previous edition's eerie and amusing microfiction with, uh, DeviantArt chibis. These have been controversial in the fandom.

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** An "interesting" example is the new edition of Nobilis, which supplements the previous edition's eerie and amusing microfiction with, uh, DeviantArt Website/DeviantArt chibis. These have been controversial in the fandom.
18th Oct '14 12:56:16 AM Underachiever
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** Wushu is rules lite. Characters can comfortably fit on three lines of a sheet of notebook paper, but the system is entirely predicated on beating the snot out of people in vivid ways.

to:

** Wushu is rules lite. Characters can comfortably fit on three lines of a sheet of notebook paper, but a simple "anything you say goes unless another player vetoes it" rule governs most routine interactions with the system is entirely predicated on beating game world, and any challenge your group/GM considers actually worth resolving mechanically can be easily handled with the snot out of people in vivid ways.fairly lightweight combat rules (just treat the problem as another opponent, whether it's actually a ''character'' or not doesn't really matter).
2nd Feb '14 9:10:15 PM dvorak
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** TabletopGame/StickGuy is so rules lite, it's compared to eating pretzels and rinking beer. One stat and a LuckManipulationMechanic.

to:

** TabletopGame/StickGuy is so rules lite, it's compared to laying about eating pretzels and rinking drinking beer. One stat stat, 3 traits that add or subtract one point, and a LuckManipulationMechanic.
2nd Feb '14 9:09:13 PM dvorak
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Added DiffLines:

** TabletopGame/StickGuy is so rules lite, it's compared to eating pretzels and rinking beer. One stat and a LuckManipulationMechanic.
21st Oct '13 3:09:34 AM Wyvern76
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* Vampire: The Masquerade was the first breakout "narrative first" games, and remains popular even after the end of the game line. While the Old World of Darkness had more than its share of problems and inadvisable decisions, it is still widely beloved and able to be mined for plot points. A revised 20th edition of the rules has just been released in .pdf format, so you can enjoy the original for yourself without having to scour the web for used copies. Compare and contrast its successor Vampire: The Requiem.

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* Vampire: The Masquerade was the first breakout "narrative first" games, game, and remains popular even after the end of the game line. While the Old World of Darkness had more than its share of problems and inadvisable decisions, it is still widely beloved and able to be mined for plot points. A revised 20th edition of the rules has just been released in .pdf format, so you can enjoy the original for yourself without having to scour the web for used copies. Compare and contrast its successor Vampire: The Requiem.
21st Oct '13 3:05:22 AM Wyvern76
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* GURPS was one of the first point-based games and the first generic game. While the core rules aren't everyone's cup of tea, the unspeakably vast library of supplemental material is perhaps the strongest and most amazing body of supplements in any game line ever made. Designed to be easy to convert to and from, you can freely ransack GURPS books for ideas without ever having to use their (sometimes Byzantian and ruthlessly complex) rules.

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* GURPS was one of the first point-based games and the first generic game. While the core rules aren't everyone's cup of tea, the unspeakably vast library of supplemental material is perhaps the strongest and most amazing body of supplements in any game line ever made. Designed to be easy to convert to and from, you can freely ransack GURPS books for ideas without ever having to use their (sometimes Byzantian Byzantine and ruthlessly complex) rules.



* Throwback games seek to imitate the feel of older editions of Dungeons and Dragons. The most popular include OSRIC (1st edition), Castles and Crusades (2nd edition), and Pathfinder (3rd edition). They're more than worth your time to see how modern gamers interpret the rules and stylings of older systems of D'n'D.

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* Throwback games seek to imitate the feel of older editions of Dungeons and Dragons. The most popular include OSRIC (1st edition), Castles and Crusades (2nd edition), and Pathfinder (3rd edition). They're more than worth your time to see how modern gamers interpret the rules and stylings of older systems of D'n'D.D&D.
8th Oct '13 11:40:00 AM Larkmarn
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There are a ''ton'' of roleplaying game tropes, and you're going to have to choose which your game are going to use and which you aren't. The first and most important step is to decide what the "feel" of your game is. Is it going to be gritty, with an emphasis on fragility and the deadliness of weapons? Is it going to be highly narrative, built for razor tongues and barbed wit? What genre is it emulating? Will it be a generic game designed to handle anything, or at least anything in a particular genre? Once you have the feel of your game in mind--even a vague XMeetsY pitch--you can start thinking of the important questions.

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There are a ''ton'' of roleplaying game tropes, and you're going to have to choose which your game are going to use and which you aren't. The first and most important step is to decide what the "feel" of your game is. Is it going to be gritty, with an emphasis on fragility and the deadliness of weapons? Is it going to be highly narrative, built for razor tongues and barbed wit? What genre is it emulating? Will it be a generic game designed to handle anything, or at least anything in a particular genre? Once you have the feel of your game in mind--even a vague XMeetsY X Meets Y pitch--you can start thinking of the important questions.
2nd Oct '13 9:54:23 PM TheDocCC
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* You absolutely, positively, do not ''ever'' have to look at FATAL to know how ludicrously awful it is. Just take our word for it.

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* You absolutely, positively, do not ''ever'' have to look at FATAL or Racial Holy War to know how ludicrously awful it is.they are. Just take our word for it.
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