History SoYouWantTo / BeABooker

16th Aug '17 2:50:20 PM Gimere
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** Wrestlers who have charisma and other talents, but only FiveMovesOfDoom should be booked in matches where this lack of working ability should be obfuscated. For example, Wrestling/JohnCena should not be booked to throw punches. Wrestling/TheBigShow should not be booked against a high-flyer, unless the point of the match is for Big Show to throw the high-flyer around and nothing else.

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** Wrestlers who have charisma and other talents, but only FiveMovesOfDoom should be booked in matches where this lack of working ability should be obfuscated. For example, Wrestling/JohnCena should not be booked to throw punches. punches, and Wrestling/TheBigShow should not be booked against a high-flyer, unless high-flyer (unless the point of the match is for Big Show to throw the high-flyer around and nothing else.else).
16th Aug '17 2:47:17 PM Gimere
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*** Second, if your fans truly hate the heel, seeing him victorious and celebrating will make them unhappy. Don't let them stay unhappy for long; as soon as the heel gets his hard-fought victory, have another face show up and let everybody know his intentions to take down the heel. Preferably a face who is perceived to be tougher than the one the heel has been feuding with all this time. This will give your fans something to look forward to. Just make sure that their patience is eventually rewarded.

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*** Second, if your fans truly hate the heel, seeing him victorious and celebrating will make them unhappy. Don't let them stay unhappy for long; as soon as the heel gets his hard-fought victory, have another face [[note]]preferably one who is perceived to be tougher than the one the heel was feuding with previously[[/note]] show up and let everybody know his intentions to take down the heel. Preferably a face who is perceived to be tougher than the one the heel has been feuding with all this time.heel. This will give your fans something to look forward to. Just make sure that their patience is eventually rewarded.
25th Jul '17 2:57:28 AM SomeoneElse17
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** Now, having given you ''that'' caveat, it is also worth remembering [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wisdom_of_Crowds the Wisdom Of Crowds]] -- many fans want to contribute to your business being successful (that's part and parcel of being a fan!), so do not ignore them entirely. Instead, if you can afford it, have an office they can contact (preferably via email) with suggestions and feedback. Legally speaking, soliciting creative ideas from people outside the organization is a bad idea, and you should never actually use a fan's idea wholesale as part of your show (unless you like courtrooms and being forced to pay royalties, anyway), but keeping up on this, and noticing general trends in the messages received, can help you determine which angles are working and which wrestlers are getting over. Plus, having a point of contact for fans to write to goes a long way to improving public relations, and helps you avoid looking like RealLife {{Heel}}s in the process.

to:

** Now, having given you ''that'' caveat, it is also worth remembering [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wisdom_of_Crowds the Wisdom Of of Crowds]] -- many fans want to contribute to your business being successful (that's part and parcel of being a fan!), so do not ignore them entirely. Instead, if you can afford it, have an office they can contact (preferably via email) with suggestions and feedback. Legally speaking, soliciting creative ideas from people outside the organization is a bad idea, and you should never actually use a fan's idea wholesale as part of your show (unless you like courtrooms and being forced to pay royalties, anyway), but keeping up on this, and noticing general trends in the messages received, can help you determine which angles are working and which wrestlers are getting over. Plus, having a point of contact for fans to write to goes a long way to improving public relations, and helps you avoid looking like RealLife {{Heel}}s in the process.



# [[AmazonBrigade Women can wrestle]], so take advantage of this. And those who can't, can still be interesting in other ways not exclusive to their bodies. [[{{Fanservice}} Lingerie matches and their ilk]] should be used sparingly; they're fine as a once-in-a-blue-moon BreatherEpisode type segment, but making them a staple of your product insults 51% of the population, and can therefore hurt 51% of your potential sales. [[ThereAreNoGirlsOnTheInternet Don't make the mistake of thinking your demographic is entirely either men or thirsty fangirls who only care about the men.]] Remember rule one -- you're here to sell a product to the ''fans''. If you hire good female wrestlers, and then book them like proper wrestlers, the fans will treat them like proper wrestlers. If you hire ''great'' female wrestlers and give them the green light, they may even steal the show and get a standing ovation. If you hire anyone who looks great but ''can't'' wrestle well, rather than throwing them in the ring and booking them to win matches, try hiding their weakness, possibly with a bodyguard, valet or manager roles that fit their personality and range. You'll find that opens them up more to fan support as well. Wrestling/SashaBanks and [[Wrestling/RusevAndLana Lana]] can exist favorably in the same world, just as Wrestling/{{Lita}} and Wrestling/TerriRunnels did, or Wrestling/AJStyles and Wrestling/PaulHeyman do. If a non-wrestling woman decides she'd like to become a wrestler, allow her plenty of time to train and actually get good before fully transitioning her. (Much of this is the difference between Wrestling/TrishStratus, who went from a model with a gift of gab and a scandalous talent scout gimmick to one of the most legendary women in WWE history, and most of WWE's manufactured attempts to reproduce Trish in later model-turned-wrestlers whose results varied from barely memorable to utterly disastrous, the most infamous example being Wrestling/EvaMarie's debacle of a career. Heck, even good wrestlers can sometimes benefit from being introduced in a non wrestling role and transitioning into an in-ring one after getting over. Just ask Wrestling/{{Rosemary}}.) Most fans ''want'' to see good female wrestlers and support them, and are also pretty good about interesting female non-wrestlers as well. Play to the strengths of those you book and things should workout, male or female.
** In either case, don't be afraid to let the women be sexy or romantic. If they're not interested, don't try to force it(refer to Employee Relations rule 2). Some are better at just kicking ass, with guile and wit, some as innocent maidens, some in a pompous bitch role, and yes, some are better as the sexy one. Know the what works for your talent, as well as the lower and upper limits of your content rating and target audience. (Wrestling tends to court a big 18-to-49-year-old demographic, so there will be room for everything. The question, of course, is how much of what.) And for God's sake, while it is important to put your talent over, do not have your [[Wrestling/{{Paige}} bab]][[Wrestling/{{Charlotte}} yfa]][[Wrestling/BeckyLynch ces]], or worse, [[Wrestling/StephanieMcMahon an untouchable female authority figure]], lecture the audience about your women's division being some sort of revolution — especially if the same arena you're in [[Wrestling/SashaBanks gave a women's match]] [[Wrestling/{{Bayley}} a standing ovation]] [[Wrestling/{{WWE NXT}} within the past three days]]. People in 2017 are very much aware that female athletes are a thing, both inside and outside the wrestling business. Sexism and misogyny limits your audience, but so does preachy corporate {{straw feminis|t}}m (which, on top of throwing unnecessary shade at those of your fans who ''are'' men, often becomes the same thing anyway via "bigotry of low expectations").

to:

# [[AmazonBrigade Women can wrestle]], so take advantage of this. And those who can't, can still be interesting in other ways not exclusive to their bodies. [[{{Fanservice}} Lingerie matches and their ilk]] should be used sparingly; they're fine as a once-in-a-blue-moon BreatherEpisode type segment, but making them a staple of your product insults 51% of the population, and can therefore hurt 51% of your potential sales. [[ThereAreNoGirlsOnTheInternet Don't make the mistake of thinking your demographic is entirely either men or thirsty fangirls who only care about the men.]] Remember rule one -- you're here to sell a product to the ''fans''. If you hire good female wrestlers, and then book them like proper wrestlers, the fans will treat them like proper wrestlers. If you hire ''great'' female wrestlers and give them the green light, they may even steal the show and get a standing ovation. If you hire anyone who looks great but ''can't'' wrestle well, rather than throwing them in the ring and booking them to win matches, try hiding their weakness, possibly with a bodyguard, valet or manager roles that fit their personality and range. You'll find that opens them up more to fan support as well. Wrestling/SashaBanks and [[Wrestling/RusevAndLana Lana]] can exist favorably in the same world, just as Wrestling/{{Lita}} and Wrestling/TerriRunnels did, or Wrestling/AJStyles and Wrestling/PaulHeyman do. If a non-wrestling woman decides she'd like to become a wrestler, allow her plenty of time to train and actually get good before fully transitioning her. (Much of this is the difference between Wrestling/TrishStratus, who went from a model with a gift of gab and a scandalous talent scout gimmick to one of the most legendary women in WWE history, and most of WWE's manufactured attempts to reproduce Trish in later model-turned-wrestlers whose results varied from barely memorable to utterly disastrous, the most infamous example being Wrestling/EvaMarie's debacle of a career. Heck, even good wrestlers can sometimes benefit from being introduced in a non wrestling non-wrestling role and transitioning into an in-ring one after getting over. Just ask Wrestling/{{Rosemary}}.) Most fans ''want'' to see good female wrestlers and support them, and are also pretty good about interesting female non-wrestlers as well. Play to the strengths of those you book and things should workout, male or female.
** In either case, don't be afraid to let the women be sexy or romantic. If they're not interested, don't try to force it(refer it (refer to Employee Relations Relations, rule 2). #2). Some are better at just kicking ass, some with guile and wit, some as innocent maidens, some in a pompous bitch role, and yes, some are better as the sexy one. Know the what works for your talent, as well as the lower and upper limits of your content rating and target audience. (Wrestling tends to court a big 18-to-49-year-old demographic, so there will be room for everything. The question, of course, is how much of what.) And for God's sake, while it is important to put your talent over, do not have your [[Wrestling/{{Paige}} bab]][[Wrestling/{{Charlotte}} yfa]][[Wrestling/BeckyLynch ces]], or worse, [[Wrestling/StephanieMcMahon an untouchable female authority figure]], lecture the audience about your women's division being some sort of revolution — especially if the same arena you're in [[Wrestling/SashaBanks gave a women's match]] [[Wrestling/{{Bayley}} a standing ovation]] [[Wrestling/{{WWE NXT}} within the past three days]]. People in 2017 are very much aware that female athletes are a thing, both inside and outside the wrestling business. Sexism and misogyny limits your audience, but so does preachy corporate {{straw feminis|t}}m (which, on top of throwing unnecessary shade at those of your fans who ''are'' men, often becomes the same thing anyway via "bigotry of low expectations").



** Female authority figures are just like male authority figures. They can be face, or they can be heel, and either one can be done very well or very badly; see The Product #14. Here are a couple of suggestions to avoid going badly with it. First off, never [[Wrestling/AJLee put a woman using insanity as a gimmick]] in charge as a babyface authority figure. The gimmick, especially if popular to begin with, will take over the role and cause her to abuse her power just as badly as any heel boss would, only towards the heel side — which normally would be fine if that didn't include being their ''female boss'', emphasis on both terms. Unless the heels are trying to take over the company, you're creating a case of TheUnfairSex. Also, if a woman planned to appear in an authoritative role has a relationship to either you or the owner of the company both inside and outside the storylines, reconsider the idea now because it is a giant red flag. The combination of being of the fairer sex and of having that relationship may cause you to protect her to the point that she can be the hypocritical babyface or condescending tyrant heel who gets away with almost everything with little to no comeuppance (whether physical or simply professional) and can even cut down and weaken the wrestlers through dominating her promos with them and constantly mentioning her sex and family ties to shut them up. No matter how good the woman is with her promos and facial expressions, this will get the company itself side-eyed. In fact, if she's too good at it, it might make it worse and cause people to believe this is the way she is in real life, which ultimately hurts your company's image. Ask Wrestling/StephanieMcMahon, who now has to say in almost every interview that she is portraying a "villainous character". And even that may not necessarily help, because some people will see it as either protesting too much or taking dumps all over your product's {{kayfabe}} to the point of desperation.

to:

** Female authority figures are just like male authority figures. They can be face, or they can be heel, and either one can be done very well or very badly; see The Product Product, rule #14. Here are a couple of suggestions to avoid going badly with it. First off, never [[Wrestling/AJLee put a woman using insanity as a gimmick]] in charge as a babyface authority figure. The gimmick, especially if popular to begin with, will take over the role and cause her to abuse her power just as badly as any heel boss would, only towards the heel side — which normally would be fine if that didn't include being their ''female boss'', emphasis on both terms. Unless the heels are trying to take over the company, you're creating a case of TheUnfairSex. Also, if a woman planned to appear in an authoritative role has a relationship to either you or the owner of the company both inside and outside the storylines, reconsider the idea now because it is a giant red flag. The combination of being of the fairer sex and of having that relationship may cause you to protect her to the point that she can be the hypocritical babyface or condescending tyrant heel who gets away with almost everything with little to no comeuppance (whether physical or simply professional) and can even cut down and weaken the wrestlers through dominating her promos with them and constantly mentioning her sex and family ties to shut them up. No matter how good the woman is with her promos and facial expressions, this will get the company itself side-eyed. In fact, if she's too good at it, it might make it worse and cause people to believe this is the way she is in real life, which ultimately hurts your company's image. Ask Wrestling/StephanieMcMahon, who now has to say in almost every interview that she is portraying a "villainous character". And even that may not necessarily help, because some people will see it as either protesting too much or taking dumps all over your product's {{kayfabe}} to the point of desperation.



# Finally, a booker should cultivate interests outside of wrestling, specifically mainstream interests that have nothing to do with wrestling or other RatedMForManly pursuits. If you become too obsessive about wrestling, you will be unable to see the forest for the trees, and your booking skills will decline. [[Wrestling/VinceMcMahon You will become convinced that certain actions are completely the right ones to take, simply because you lack the perspective.]] In the same way that you must be ruthlessly honest about your workers' abilities, you must be honest with yourself about your own. Both arrogance and excessive humility lead to errors of judgment. Just try to see the truth (and don't rely on others to provide it; have trusted advisors -- preferably ones with no conflicts of interest regarding angles-- but always follow your own vision). It is your job to be enthusiastic, but not blinkered, and it's very easy to get lost in the minutiae of a thing. Ultimately, and as with so much in life, everything in moderation.

to:

# Finally, a booker should cultivate interests outside of wrestling, specifically mainstream interests that have nothing to do with wrestling or other RatedMForManly pursuits. If you become too obsessive about wrestling, you will be unable to see the forest for the trees, and your booking skills will decline. [[Wrestling/VinceMcMahon You will become convinced that certain actions are completely the right ones to take, simply because you lack the perspective.]] In the same way that you must be ruthlessly honest about your workers' abilities, you must be honest with yourself about your own. Both arrogance and excessive humility lead to errors of judgment. Just try to see the truth (and don't rely on others to provide it; have trusted advisors -- preferably ones with no conflicts of interest regarding angles-- angles -- but always follow your own vision). It is your job to be enthusiastic, but not blinkered, and it's very easy to get lost in the minutiae of a thing. Ultimately, and as with so much in life, everything in moderation.
9th Jul '17 8:20:33 PM IndirectActiveTransport
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** Wrestlers should have broad creative control of their appearance, moves they are allowed to do and performance. (unless you have something like a [[TheNoob Young Boy-Young Lion]] situation, in which case it should be communicated to fans in a way that allows this section of the locker room to save face). Note, this is ''not'' the same as letting them book their own matches. ''You'' are the one who should ultimately be deciding who goes over, not them. Take advantage of their knowledge and save yourself the work.

to:

** Wrestlers should have broad creative control of their appearance, moves they are allowed to do and performance. (unless you have something like a [[TheNoob [[YouGetMeCoffee Young Boy-Young Boy]]-[[{{jobber}} Young Lion]] situation, in which case it should be communicated to fans in a way that allows this section of the locker room to save face). Note, this is ''not'' the same as letting them book their own matches. ''You'' are the one who should ultimately be deciding who goes over, not them. Take advantage of their knowledge and save yourself the work.
9th Jul '17 7:22:30 PM IndirectActiveTransport
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** On a more positive note, 2 more names of popular wrestlers who weren't 'roid freaks: [[Wrestling/BryanDanielson Daniel Bryan]] and Wrestling/CMPunk. In fact, Punk got quite a lot of characterization mileage from TheGimmick of [[SmugStraightEdge pointedly NOT using drugs]].

to:

** On a more positive note, 2 more names of popular wrestlers who weren't 'roid freaks: [[Wrestling/BryanDanielson Daniel Bryan]] and Wrestling/CMPunk. In fact, Punk got quite a lot of characterization character mileage from TheGimmick of [[SmugStraightEdge pointedly NOT using drugs]].
9th Jul '17 7:22:09 PM IndirectActiveTransport
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** A notable example of this being done right is the Wrestling/HonkyTonkMan. He had an ElvisImpersonator gimmick that was originally supposed to get him over as a face but the fans hated it and booed him. Rather than keep booking him as a face and trying to force the fans to accept him as such, the [[Wrestling/{{WWE}} WWF]] turned Honky heel. Wrestling/TheHonkyTonkMan went on to become one of the greatest heels in the history of the promotion.

to:

** A notable example of this being done right is the Wrestling/HonkyTonkMan. He had an ElvisImpersonator gimmick that was originally supposed to get him over as a face but the fans hated it and booed him. Rather than keep booking him as a face and trying to force the fans to accept him as such, the [[Wrestling/{{WWE}} WWF]] turned Honky heel. Wrestling/TheHonkyTonkMan The Honky Tonk Man went on to become one of the greatest heels in the history of the promotion.



# [[AmazonBrigade Women can wrestle]], so take advantage of this. And those who can't, can still be interesting in other ways not exclusive to their bodies. [[{{Fanservice}} Lingerie matches and their ilk]] should be used sparingly; they're fine as a once-in-a-blue-moon BreatherEpisode type segment, but making them a staple of your product insults 51% of the population, and can therefore hurt 51% of your potential sales. [[ThereAreNoGirlsOnTheInternet Don't make the mistake of thinking your demographic is entirely either men or thirsty fangirls who only care about the men.]] Remember rule one -- you're here to sell a product to the ''fans''. If you hire good female wrestlers, and then book them like proper wrestlers, the fans will treat them like proper wrestlers. If you hire ''great'' female wrestlers and give them the green light, they may even steal the show and get a standing ovation. If you hire anyone who looks great but ''can't'' wrestle well, rather than throwing them in the ring and booking them to win matches, try hiding their weakness, possibly with a bodyguard, valet or manager roles that fit their personality and range. You'll find that opens them up more to fan support as well. Wrestling/SashaBanks and [[Wrestling/RusevAndLana Lana]] can exist favorably in the same world, just as Wrestling/{{Lita}} and Wrestling/TerriRunnels did, or Wrestling/AJStyles and Wrestling/PaulHeyman do. If a non-wrestling woman decides she'd like to become a wrestler, allow her plenty of time to train and actually get good before fully transitioning her. (Much of this is the difference between Wrestling/TrishStratus, who went from a model with a gift of gab and a scandalous talent scout gimmick to one of the most legendary women in WWE history, and most of WWE's manufactured attempts to reproduce Trish in later model-turned-wrestlers whose results varied from barely memorable to utterly disastrous, the most infamous example being Wrestling/EvaMarie's debacle of a career. Heck, even good wrestlers can sometimes benefit from being introduced in a non wrestling role and transitioning into an in-ring one after getting over. Just ask Wrestling/{{Rosemary}}.) Most fans ''want'' to see good female wrestlers and support them, and are also pretty good about interesting female non-wrestlers as well. Play to the strengths of your talents and things should workout, male or female.

to:

# [[AmazonBrigade Women can wrestle]], so take advantage of this. And those who can't, can still be interesting in other ways not exclusive to their bodies. [[{{Fanservice}} Lingerie matches and their ilk]] should be used sparingly; they're fine as a once-in-a-blue-moon BreatherEpisode type segment, but making them a staple of your product insults 51% of the population, and can therefore hurt 51% of your potential sales. [[ThereAreNoGirlsOnTheInternet Don't make the mistake of thinking your demographic is entirely either men or thirsty fangirls who only care about the men.]] Remember rule one -- you're here to sell a product to the ''fans''. If you hire good female wrestlers, and then book them like proper wrestlers, the fans will treat them like proper wrestlers. If you hire ''great'' female wrestlers and give them the green light, they may even steal the show and get a standing ovation. If you hire anyone who looks great but ''can't'' wrestle well, rather than throwing them in the ring and booking them to win matches, try hiding their weakness, possibly with a bodyguard, valet or manager roles that fit their personality and range. You'll find that opens them up more to fan support as well. Wrestling/SashaBanks and [[Wrestling/RusevAndLana Lana]] can exist favorably in the same world, just as Wrestling/{{Lita}} and Wrestling/TerriRunnels did, or Wrestling/AJStyles and Wrestling/PaulHeyman do. If a non-wrestling woman decides she'd like to become a wrestler, allow her plenty of time to train and actually get good before fully transitioning her. (Much of this is the difference between Wrestling/TrishStratus, who went from a model with a gift of gab and a scandalous talent scout gimmick to one of the most legendary women in WWE history, and most of WWE's manufactured attempts to reproduce Trish in later model-turned-wrestlers whose results varied from barely memorable to utterly disastrous, the most infamous example being Wrestling/EvaMarie's debacle of a career. Heck, even good wrestlers can sometimes benefit from being introduced in a non wrestling role and transitioning into an in-ring one after getting over. Just ask Wrestling/{{Rosemary}}.) Most fans ''want'' to see good female wrestlers and support them, and are also pretty good about interesting female non-wrestlers as well. Play to the strengths of your talents those you book and things should workout, male or female.
9th Jul '17 7:17:53 PM IndirectActiveTransport
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# '''Never''' punish wrestlers for RealLife misdemeanors by depushing, burying, or otherwise harming their {{Kayfabe}} talent. Again, this requires superhuman continence on the part of bookers considering how desperate for new material they must be (more characters have been reduced to laughingstocks due to [[RealLifeWritesThePlot writer's block]] than any other factor). Reminder: Your wrestlers '''are''' your business. If you damage their credibility through a series of protracted losses, you aren't harming them - you're harming your own business, because you have just told the fans that this wrestler cannot be taken seriously. To harm a wrestler's aura is to harm the business. Be a professional; do what '''actual''' businesses do; have a disciplinary process. Take the wrestler off-television, dock their pay. Have a legally airtight code of conduct that states in black and white what is expected of your employees so they know. Have a set of clearly defined boundaries that you will not allow to be crossed. You know, like a real business. Wrestling needs to leave its carnival days behind it, and march into the modern era.

to:

# '''Never''' punish wrestlers for RealLife misdemeanors by depushing, burying, or otherwise harming their {{Kayfabe}} talent. Again, this requires superhuman continence on the part of bookers considering how desperate for new material they must be (more characters wrestlers have been reduced to laughingstocks due to [[RealLifeWritesThePlot writer's block]] than any other factor). Reminder: Your wrestlers '''are''' your business. If you damage their credibility through a series of protracted losses, you aren't harming them - you're harming your own business, because you have just told the fans that this wrestler cannot be taken seriously. To harm a wrestler's aura is to harm the business. Be a professional; do what '''actual''' businesses do; have a disciplinary process. Take the wrestler off-television, dock their pay. Have a legally airtight code of conduct that states in black and white what is expected of your employees so they know. Have a set of clearly defined boundaries that you will not allow to be crossed. You know, like a real business. Wrestling needs to leave its carnival days behind it, and march into the modern era.



** On a more positive note, 2 more names of popular wrestlers who weren't 'roid freaks: [[Wrestling/BryanDanielson Daniel Bryan]] and Wrestling/CMPunk. In fact, Punk got quite a lot of character mileage out of [[SmugStraightEdge pointedly NOT using drugs]].

to:

** On a more positive note, 2 more names of popular wrestlers who weren't 'roid freaks: [[Wrestling/BryanDanielson Daniel Bryan]] and Wrestling/CMPunk. In fact, Punk got quite a lot of character characterization mileage out from TheGimmick of [[SmugStraightEdge pointedly NOT using drugs]].



# The majority of wrestling should be simple, one-on-one or tag-team matches with no interference; {{Face}} vs. {{Heel}}. This is the basic product you are selling, and it’s what the audience wants. One stipulation can be a good thing -- a steel cage match instead of a regular match can drum up business -- and the capper to a truly well-crafted feud. When you have a Contract-On-a-Pole, Two Out of Three Falls, lumberjack match contested in a steel cage under a time limit, it gets ridiculous. The more [[ShockingSwerve swerves]], [[GimmickMatches gimmicks]], run-ins, etc. you add to a match, [[GambitPileup the more confusing it becomes]]. Confused audiences are bored audiences, and bored audiences don't come back, costing you both fans and money.

to:

# The majority of wrestling should be simple, one-on-one or tag-team matches with no interference; {{Face}} vs. {{Heel}}. This is the basic product you are selling, and it’s what the audience wants. One stipulation can be a good thing -- a steel cage match instead of a regular match can drum up business -- and the capper to a truly well-crafted feud. When you have a Contract-On-a-Pole, Two Out of Three Falls, lumberjack match contested in a steel cage under a time limit, it gets ridiculous. The more [[ShockingSwerve swerves]], [[GimmickMatches gimmicks]], run-ins, etc. you add to a match, [[GambitPileup the more confusing it becomes]]. Confused audiences are bored audiences, and bored audiences don't come back, costing you both fans and money. "Angle" was the preferred terminology over "storyline" among bookers for decades specifically because it was a constant reminder to keep things simple. A match or build up to one rarely needs more than one "hook".



** A notable example of this being done right is the Wrestling/HonkyTonkMan. He had an ElvisImpersonator gimmick that was originally supposed to get him over as a face but the fans hated it and booed him. Rather than keep booking him as a face and trying to force the fans to accept him as such, the [[Wrestling/{{WWE}} WWF]] turned Honky heel. The Honky Tonk Man went on to become one of the greatest heels in the history of the promotion.

to:

** A notable example of this being done right is the Wrestling/HonkyTonkMan. He had an ElvisImpersonator gimmick that was originally supposed to get him over as a face but the fans hated it and booed him. Rather than keep booking him as a face and trying to force the fans to accept him as such, the [[Wrestling/{{WWE}} WWF]] turned Honky heel. The Honky Tonk Man Wrestling/TheHonkyTonkMan went on to become one of the greatest heels in the history of the promotion.



# All belts are equally valid. All belts are important. They are your main MacGuffin for angles and plots. As a result, a belt is as important as the champ who carries it says it is. Never forget this. Therefore, no wrestler should ever insult a belt; a belt brings characters prestige and respect. Insulting a belt insults your organization. Remember this if you choose to pursue stories where a heel insults a belt; that heel must be publicly destroyed — booked into oblivion — or else you have admitted that the belt (and by extension your company) is worthless.

to:

# All belts are equally valid. All belts are important. They are your main MacGuffin for angles and plots. As a result, a belt is as important as the champ who carries it says it is. Never forget this. Therefore, no wrestler should ever insult a belt; a belt brings characters the possessors prestige and respect. Insulting a belt insults your organization. Remember this if you choose to pursue stories where a heel insults a belt; that heel must be publicly destroyed — booked into oblivion — or else you have admitted that the belt (and by extension your company) is worthless.



** Grudges should be simple to understand, and related to either previous matches, a personality clash or another character (valet, manager, etc…)

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** Grudges should be simple to understand, and related to either previous matches, a personality clash or another character person (valet, manager, etc…)



# All inter-character relationships must be logical, and established inter-character relationships must be maintained. If characters are friends, they must stay friends, unless a story event witnessed by fans clearly denotes that the nature of the relationship has changed. Likewise for enemies. Unless there is a plot event that makes wrestlers friends, or turns them enemies, they remain simply indifferent rivals. The HeelFaceRevolvingDoor, in this business, is a disaster. It confuses casual fans and irritates long-time fans.

to:

# All inter-character relationships on your show must be logical, and established inter-character relationships must be maintained. If characters people are friends, they must stay friends, unless a story an event witnessed by fans during a show clearly denotes that the nature of the relationship has changed. Likewise for enemies. Unless there is a plot event that makes wrestlers friends, or turns them enemies, they remain simply indifferent rivals. The HeelFaceRevolvingDoor, in this business, is a disaster. It confuses casual fans and irritates long-time fans.



# Character relationships exist to further angles. Angles exist to give the fans emotional investment in matches. Matches exist to make the promotion money. Therefore, character relationships should never be ignored, and should always be logical. Illogical relationships and foolish stories drive fans and therefore business, away.

to:

# Character The relationships on your show exist to further angles. Angles exist to give the fans emotional investment in matches. Matches exist to make the promotion money. Therefore, character relationships on your show should never be ignored, and should always be logical. Illogical relationships and foolish stories drive fans and therefore business, away.



** [[WrestlingMonster Monster pushes]] (of either heels or faces) are perfectly acceptable. The monster character should be fed a steady diet of {{jobber}}s to destroy; avoid having the monster fight main-eventers anywhere except PPV main events. A monster should be fed mid-carders at PPV before main-eventers. Failure to do so will result in the angle hot-shotting. Mid-carders due to lose to the monster character should be pushed hard for a while before their loss to the monster, which will help the monster establish credibility. The monster’s loss must be used to elevate a character - it is a serious thing to take down a monster.

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** [[WrestlingMonster Monster pushes]] (of either heels or faces) are perfectly acceptable. The monster character wrestler should be fed a steady diet of {{jobber}}s to destroy; avoid having the monster fight main-eventers anywhere except PPV main events. A monster should be fed mid-carders at PPV before main-eventers. Failure to do so will result in the angle hot-shotting. Mid-carders due to lose to the monster character wrestler should be pushed hard for a while before their loss to the monster, which will help the monster establish credibility. The monster’s loss must be used to elevate a character - someone- it is a serious thing to take down a monster.



# Authority figures can be done well or badly, whether as heels or as faces. For example, A good face authority figure makes fair matches, stays out of the way, and handles stipulations and personnel decisions only when someone has clearly gotten out of hand. This usually benefits the faces by virtue of blocking some underhanded tactic by a heel, but as the character is not inherently biased towards the faces, it sometimes can go the other way around if the story involves a heel having a legitimate gripe. A bad face authority figure becomes the center of attention and seemingly goes out of their way to stick it to the heels to the point that fans start viewing the heels as sympathetic and the faces as advantaged and opportunistic, or is so utterly incompetent and commands so little respect that the heels get to walk all over them as if they weren't even there. A good heel authority figure and a bad heel authority figure both have in common that they abuse their power against faces and thus must be taken down a peg or two and, ultimately, either removed from power or have their schemes defeated in order to reel them back in line until the next EvilPlan. The difference between the two is that the good heel boss is be occasionally beaten down, humiliated, called on their garbage, or even strongly opposed enough to represent that the wrestlers they're kicking down actually have a spine, which makes people want to root for said wrestler. The bad heel boss, on the other hand, is one of two extremes: either the humiliation is too frequent and too childish for them to come off as anything more than sympathetic dealing with popular bullying "faces" who must be kept in line, or the opposite takes place and they get to freely condescend the roster without blowback, almost always have their way, never take any losses, and have some internal connections or demographic card they can deploy as a reason to shame their oppressed enemies into compliance and silence, to the point that the show ends up cast in ArcFatigue or even DarknessInducedAudienceApathy because they and their proxies can seemingly never lose.

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# Authority figures can be done well or badly, whether as heels or as faces. For example, A good face authority figure makes fair matches, stays out of the way, and handles stipulations and personnel decisions only when someone has clearly gotten out of hand. This usually benefits the faces by virtue of blocking some underhanded tactic by a heel, but as the character figure is not inherently biased towards the faces, it sometimes can go the other way around if the story involves a heel having a legitimate gripe. A bad face authority figure becomes the center of attention and seemingly goes out of their way to stick it to the heels to the point that fans start viewing the heels as sympathetic and the faces as advantaged and opportunistic, or alternatively is so utterly incompetent and commands so little respect that the heels get to walk all over them as if they weren't even there. A good heel authority figure and a bad heel authority figure both have in common that they abuse their power against faces and thus must be taken down a peg or two and, ultimately, either removed from power or have their schemes defeated in order to reel them back in line until the next EvilPlan. The difference between the two is that the good heel boss is be occasionally beaten down, humiliated, called on their garbage, or even strongly opposed enough to represent that the wrestlers they're kicking down actually have a spine, which makes people want to root for said wrestler. The bad heel boss, on the other hand, is one of two extremes: either the humiliation is too frequent and too childish for them to come off as anything more than sympathetic dealing with popular bullying "faces" who must be kept in line, or the opposite takes place and they get to freely condescend the roster without blowback, almost always have their way, never take any losses, and have some internal connections or demographic card cards they can deploy as a reason to shame their oppressed enemies into compliance and silence, to the point that the show ends up cast in ArcFatigue or even DarknessInducedAudienceApathy because they and their proxies can seemingly never lose.



** Regardless of how you book any kayfabe 'General Manager' character (BigBad 'Evil Owner', a BigGood face, a ReasonableAuthorityFigure, an ObstructiveBureaucrat or a simple MissionControl), keep an AuthorsSavingThrow in hand by setting up a character who has more kayfabe power than the day to day GM. This can range from the owner of the company, someone who represents the 'Network' if you are televised, or even yourself if you prefer to stay backstage. This should be used extremely rarely and for the most part only when RealLifeWritesThePlot. Example: If you book a long Women's title feud involving your best female wrestlers, your heel DarkActionGirl and the face CuteBruiser, and the women come to you and say they want to work a ladder match, you say fine, the GM announces it and promotes it, only for one of them to get legit injured bad enough that they can't do any of the ladder spots, but not badly enough to stop the match, you use the AuthorsSavingThrow to turn it into another type of match like a Hair vs. Hair match.

to:

** Regardless of how you book any kayfabe 'General Manager' character (BigBad 'Evil Owner', a BigGood face, a ReasonableAuthorityFigure, an ObstructiveBureaucrat or a simple MissionControl), keep an AuthorsSavingThrow in hand by setting up a character someone who has more kayfabe power than the day to day GM. This can range from the owner of the company, someone who represents the 'Network' if you are televised, or even yourself if you prefer to stay backstage. This should be used extremely rarely and for the most part only when RealLifeWritesThePlot. Example: If you book a long Women's title feud involving your best female wrestlers, your heel DarkActionGirl and the face CuteBruiser, and the women come to you and say they want to work a ladder match, you say fine, the GM announces it and promotes it, only for one of them to get legit injured bad enough that they can't do any of the ladder spots, but not badly enough to stop the match, you use the AuthorsSavingThrow to turn it into another type of match like a Hair vs. Hair match.



# Wrestling and circuses have a lot in common. Some people go to the circus to see the acrobats; some go to see the animal acts; some to see the freakshows; and some for the clowns. Similarly, some people watch wrestling for the high-flyers; some for the technical wrestlers; some for the giants and bodybuilders; some for the talkers; some for the comedy acts; and some for the storylines. Every single wrestler is somebody's favorite. Make sure that somebody gets their money's worth by making them seem as important as possible. Give them ample mic time to get their characters over, and storylines to rope people in. Stories outside the main event may need to be kept simple in the name of efficiency, but never let this be an excuse to neglect them completely.

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# Wrestling and circuses have a lot in common. Some people go to the circus to see the acrobats; some go to see the animal acts; some to see the freakshows; and some for the clowns. Similarly, some people watch wrestling for the high-flyers; some for the technical wrestlers; some for the giants and bodybuilders; some for the talkers; some for the comedy acts; and some for the storylines. Every single wrestler is somebody's favorite. Make sure that somebody gets their money's worth by making them seem as important as possible. Give them ample mic time with the mic to help them get their characters over, fans invested, and storylines angles to rope people in. Stories outside the main event may need to be kept simple in the name of efficiency, but never let this be an excuse to neglect them completely.



** Wrestlers should have broad creative control of their character’s look, moveset and performance, but note, this is ''not'' the same as letting them book their own matches. ''You'' are the one who should ultimately be deciding who goes over, not them. Take advantage of their knowledge and save yourself the work.

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** Wrestlers should have broad creative control of their character’s look, moveset appearance, moves they are allowed to do and performance, but note, performance. (unless you have something like a [[TheNoob Young Boy-Young Lion]] situation, in which case it should be communicated to fans in a way that allows this section of the locker room to save face). Note, this is ''not'' the same as letting them book their own matches. ''You'' are the one who should ultimately be deciding who goes over, not them. Take advantage of their knowledge and save yourself the work.



# Don't have wrestlers break {{kayfabe}} under any circumstances. The same goes for you; don't ever create a storyline based on [[InspiredBy real-life events]] if that story would contradict a previously established narrative. This is for the same reason that halfway through ''Film/{{Blade}}'', Wesley Snipes doesn't stop using his silly rusty voice. It breaks the WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief a story needs to work! {{Worked shoot}}s have almost never made big money. Nobody wants to see it; the casual fans will be horribly confused, and the {{smark}}s, the only guys who would actually be able to follow what is going on, would really rather you drop the nonsense and just put people in the ring anyway. It makes no money, and serves no purpose other than damaging your credibility with the fans. This is wrestling, not [[UsefulNotes/MixedMartialArts UFC]]. While there's no need to insist that wrestlers maintain kayfabe ''outside'' of the job, as was done for much of professional wrestling's history, the fact that almost everybody knows it's a work in no way means you should call attention to the fictional nature of your storylines. Everything that happens inside the arena and/or on camera should be treated as if it were completely real.

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# Don't have wrestlers break {{kayfabe}} under any circumstances. The same goes for you; don't ever create a storyline an angle based on [[InspiredBy real-life events]] if that story would contradict a previously established narrative. This is for the same reason that halfway through ''Film/{{Blade}}'', Wesley Snipes doesn't stop using his silly rusty voice. It breaks the WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief a story needs to work! {{Worked shoot}}s have almost never made big money. Even Wrestling/AndyKaufman's famous feud with Wrestling/JerryLawler initially drew less people to the arenas than usual. Nobody wants to see it; the casual fans will be horribly confused, and the {{smark}}s, the only guys who would actually be able to follow what is going on, would really rather you drop the nonsense and just put people in the ring anyway. It makes no money, and serves no purpose other than damaging your credibility with the fans. This is wrestling, not [[UsefulNotes/MixedMartialArts UFC]]. While there's no need to insist that wrestlers maintain kayfabe ''outside'' of the job, as was done for much of professional wrestling's history, the fact that almost everybody knows it's a work in no way means you should call attention to the fictional nature of your storylines. Everything that happens inside the arena and/or on camera should be treated as if it were completely real.



** Now, having given you ''that'' caveat, it is also worth remembering [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wisdom_of_Crowds the Wisdom Of Crowds]] -- many fans want to contribute to your business being successful (that's part and parcel of being a fan!), so do not ignore them entirely. Instead, if you can afford it, have an office they can contact (preferably via email) with suggestions and feedback. Legally speaking, soliciting creative ideas from people outside the organization is a bad idea, and you should never actually use a fan's idea wholesale as part of your show (unless you like courtrooms and being forced to pay royalties, anyway), but keeping up on this, and noticing general trends in the messages received, can help you determine which storylines are working and which wrestlers are getting over. Plus, having a point of contact for fans to write to goes a long way to improving public relations, and helps you avoid looking like RealLife {{Heel}}s in the process.

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** Now, having given you ''that'' caveat, it is also worth remembering [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wisdom_of_Crowds the Wisdom Of Crowds]] -- many fans want to contribute to your business being successful (that's part and parcel of being a fan!), so do not ignore them entirely. Instead, if you can afford it, have an office they can contact (preferably via email) with suggestions and feedback. Legally speaking, soliciting creative ideas from people outside the organization is a bad idea, and you should never actually use a fan's idea wholesale as part of your show (unless you like courtrooms and being forced to pay royalties, anyway), but keeping up on this, and noticing general trends in the messages received, can help you determine which storylines angles are working and which wrestlers are getting over. Plus, having a point of contact for fans to write to goes a long way to improving public relations, and helps you avoid looking like RealLife {{Heel}}s in the process.



# [[AmazonBrigade Women can wrestle]], so take advantage of this. And those who can't, can still be interesting in other ways not exclusive to their bodies. [[{{Fanservice}} Lingerie matches and their ilk]] should be used sparingly; they're fine as a once-in-a-blue-moon BreatherEpisode type segment, but making them a staple of your product insults 51% of the population, and can therefore hurt 51% of your potential sales. [[ThereAreNoGirlsOnTheInternet Don't make the mistake of thinking your demographic is entirely either men or thirsty fangirls who only care about the men.]] Remember rule one -- you're here to sell a product to the ''fans''. If you hire good female wrestlers, and then book them like proper wrestlers, the fans will treat them like proper wrestlers. If you hire ''great'' female wrestlers and give them the green light, they may even steal the show and get a standing ovation. If you also hire women who look great but ''can't'' wrestle well, rather than throwing them in the ring and booking them stronger than your actual quality wrestlers, try giving them valet or manager roles that fit their personality and range. You'll find that opens them up more to fan support as well. Wrestling/SashaBanks and [[Wrestling/RusevAndLana Lana]] can exist favorably in the same world, just as Wrestling/{{Lita}} and Wrestling/TerriRunnels did, or Wrestling/AJStyles and Wrestling/PaulHeyman do. If a non-wrestling woman decides she'd like to become a wrestler, allow her plenty of time to train and actually get good before fully transitioning her. (Much of this is the difference between Wrestling/TrishStratus, who went from a model with a gift of gab and a scandalous talent scout gimmick to one of the most legendary women in WWE history, and most of WWE's manufactured attempts to reproduce Trish in later model-turned-wrestlers whose results varied from barely memorable to utterly disastrous, the most infamously recent example being Wrestling/EvaMarie's debacle of a career. Heck, even good wrestlers can sometimes benefit from being introduced in a character role and transitioning into an in-ring role after getting over. Just ask Wrestling/{{Rosemary}}.) Most fans ''want'' to see good female wrestlers and support them, and are also pretty good about interesting female non-wrestlers as well; the only problem comes when those who can't wrestle that well are treated as superior wrestlers and those who can are not given the proper outlet for their skills.
** In either case, don't be afraid to let the women be sexy or romantic, but don't try to force it either if that's not their style. Some are better at just kicking ass, some are better with guile and wit, some are better as innocent maidens, some are better in a pompous bitch role, and yes, some are better as the sexy one. Know the personalities of your talent and what works for them, as well as the lower and upper limits of your content rating and target audience. (Wrestling tends to court a big 18-to-49-year-old demographic, so there will be room for everything. The question, of course, is how much of what.) And for God's sake, while it is important to put your talent over, do not have your [[Wrestling/{{Paige}} bab]][[Wrestling/{{Charlotte}} yfa]][[Wrestling/BeckyLynch ces]], or worse, [[Wrestling/StephanieMcMahon an untouchable female authority figure]], lecture the audience about your women's division being some sort of revolution — especially if the same arena you're in [[Wrestling/SashaBanks gave a women's match]] [[Wrestling/{{Bayley}} a standing ovation]] [[Wrestling/{{WWE NXT}} within the past three days]]. People in 2017 are very much aware that female athletes are a thing, both inside and outside the wrestling business. Sexism and misogyny limits your audience, but so does preachy corporate {{straw feminis|t}}m (which, on top of throwing unnecessary shade at those of your fans who ''are'' men, often becomes the same thing anyway via "bigotry of low expectations").
** On that note, if you're gonna let the women compete directly with the men, ''let them get hit — '''but don't overdo it'''.'' Contrary to what many fanfiction authors believe, the day a woman who's not a WrestlingMonster, even a powerfully built one like Wrestling/BethPhoenix, beats one of the most renowned male wrestlers and badasses in the world, Wrestling/ShinsukeNakamura for example, for a World Heavyweight Championship, the match is going to be scrutinized half to death. If the man brutalized the woman and she took his every blow but beat him with FiveMovesOfDoom Wrestling/JohnCena-style, or if he didn't touch her at all because the network won't allow man-on-woman violence, you will get torn asunder and accused of unrealistic pandering to identity politics. But let's say he did hit her with a few big blows which she kicked out of, showing uncanny toughness, but couldn't quite pull the trigger on hitting her with his FinishingMove, and she laid in more moves than he did as well as employed some feminine guile before sneaking in either a roll-up or her own finisher on him. You'll still have many detractors, but that match would be much better received as being grounded in realism, and would most likely win over nearly everyone that even could be won over.
** Female authority figures are just like male authority figures. They can be face, or they can be heel, and either one can be done very well or very badly; see The Product #14. Here are a couple of suggestions to avoid going badly with it. First off, never [[Wrestling/AJLee put a woman playing a crazy gimmick]] in charge as a babyface authority figure. The gimmick, especially if popular to begin with, will take over the role and cause her to abuse her power just as badly as any heel boss would, only towards the heel side — which normally would be fine if that didn't include being their ''female boss'', emphasis on both terms. Unless the heels are trying to take over the company, you're creating a case of TheUnfairSex. Also, if a woman planned to appear in an authoritative role has a relationship to either you or the owner of the company both inside and outside the storylines, reconsider the idea now because it is a giant red flag. The combination of being of the fairer sex and of having that relationship may cause you to protect her to the point that she can be the hypocritical babyface or condescending tyrant heel who gets away with almost everything with little to no comeuppance (whether physical or simply professional) and can even cut down and weaken the wrestlers through dominating her promos with them and constantly mentioning her sex and family ties to shut them up. No matter how good the woman is with her promos and facial expressions, this will get the company itself side-eyed. In fact, if she's too good at it, it might make it worse and cause people to believe this is the way she is in real life, which ultimately hurts your company's image and even helps magnify anything else you're doing wrong with the women. Ask Wrestling/StephanieMcMahon, who now has to say in almost every interview that she is portraying a villainous character. And even that may not necessarily help, because some people will see it as either protesting too much or taking dumps all over your product's {{kayfabe}} to the point of desperation.

to:

# [[AmazonBrigade Women can wrestle]], so take advantage of this. And those who can't, can still be interesting in other ways not exclusive to their bodies. [[{{Fanservice}} Lingerie matches and their ilk]] should be used sparingly; they're fine as a once-in-a-blue-moon BreatherEpisode type segment, but making them a staple of your product insults 51% of the population, and can therefore hurt 51% of your potential sales. [[ThereAreNoGirlsOnTheInternet Don't make the mistake of thinking your demographic is entirely either men or thirsty fangirls who only care about the men.]] Remember rule one -- you're here to sell a product to the ''fans''. If you hire good female wrestlers, and then book them like proper wrestlers, the fans will treat them like proper wrestlers. If you hire ''great'' female wrestlers and give them the green light, they may even steal the show and get a standing ovation. If you also hire women anyone who look looks great but ''can't'' wrestle well, rather than throwing them in the ring and booking them stronger than your actual quality wrestlers, to win matches, try giving them hiding their weakness, possibly with a bodyguard, valet or manager roles that fit their personality and range. You'll find that opens them up more to fan support as well. Wrestling/SashaBanks and [[Wrestling/RusevAndLana Lana]] can exist favorably in the same world, just as Wrestling/{{Lita}} and Wrestling/TerriRunnels did, or Wrestling/AJStyles and Wrestling/PaulHeyman do. If a non-wrestling woman decides she'd like to become a wrestler, allow her plenty of time to train and actually get good before fully transitioning her. (Much of this is the difference between Wrestling/TrishStratus, who went from a model with a gift of gab and a scandalous talent scout gimmick to one of the most legendary women in WWE history, and most of WWE's manufactured attempts to reproduce Trish in later model-turned-wrestlers whose results varied from barely memorable to utterly disastrous, the most infamously recent infamous example being Wrestling/EvaMarie's debacle of a career. Heck, even good wrestlers can sometimes benefit from being introduced in a character non wrestling role and transitioning into an in-ring role one after getting over. Just ask Wrestling/{{Rosemary}}.) Most fans ''want'' to see good female wrestlers and support them, and are also pretty good about interesting female non-wrestlers as well; well. Play to the only problem comes when those who can't wrestle that well are treated as superior wrestlers strengths of your talents and those who can are not given the proper outlet for their skills.
things should workout, male or female.
** In either case, don't be afraid to let the women be sexy or romantic, but romantic. If they're not interested, don't try to force it either if that's not their style. it(refer to Employee Relations rule 2). Some are better at just kicking ass, some are better with guile and wit, some are better as innocent maidens, some are better in a pompous bitch role, and yes, some are better as the sexy one. Know the personalities of your talent and what works for them, your talent, as well as the lower and upper limits of your content rating and target audience. (Wrestling tends to court a big 18-to-49-year-old demographic, so there will be room for everything. The question, of course, is how much of what.) And for God's sake, while it is important to put your talent over, do not have your [[Wrestling/{{Paige}} bab]][[Wrestling/{{Charlotte}} yfa]][[Wrestling/BeckyLynch ces]], or worse, [[Wrestling/StephanieMcMahon an untouchable female authority figure]], lecture the audience about your women's division being some sort of revolution — especially if the same arena you're in [[Wrestling/SashaBanks gave a women's match]] [[Wrestling/{{Bayley}} a standing ovation]] [[Wrestling/{{WWE NXT}} within the past three days]]. People in 2017 are very much aware that female athletes are a thing, both inside and outside the wrestling business. Sexism and misogyny limits your audience, but so does preachy corporate {{straw feminis|t}}m (which, on top of throwing unnecessary shade at those of your fans who ''are'' men, often becomes the same thing anyway via "bigotry of low expectations").
** On that note, if you're gonna you let the women compete directly with the men, ''let them get hit — '''but don't overdo it'''.'' Contrary to what many fanfiction authors believe, the day a woman who's not a WrestlingMonster, even a powerfully built one like Wrestling/BethPhoenix, beats one of the most renowned male wrestlers and badasses in the world, Wrestling/ShinsukeNakamura for example, for a World Heavyweight Championship, the match is going to be scrutinized half to death. If the man brutalized the woman and she took his every blow but beat him with FiveMovesOfDoom Wrestling/JohnCena-style, or if he didn't touch her at all because the network won't allow man-on-woman violence, you will get torn asunder and accused of unrealistic pandering to identity politics. But let's say he did hit her with a few big blows which she kicked out of, showing uncanny toughness, but couldn't quite pull the trigger on hitting her with his FinishingMove, and she laid in more moves than he did as well as employed some feminine guile before sneaking in either a roll-up or her own finisher on him. You'll still have many detractors, but that match would be much better received as being grounded in realism, and would most likely win over nearly everyone that even could be won over.
** Female authority figures are just like male authority figures. They can be face, or they can be heel, and either one can be done very well or very badly; see The Product #14. Here are a couple of suggestions to avoid going badly with it. First off, never [[Wrestling/AJLee put a woman playing using insanity as a crazy gimmick]] in charge as a babyface authority figure. The gimmick, especially if popular to begin with, will take over the role and cause her to abuse her power just as badly as any heel boss would, only towards the heel side — which normally would be fine if that didn't include being their ''female boss'', emphasis on both terms. Unless the heels are trying to take over the company, you're creating a case of TheUnfairSex. Also, if a woman planned to appear in an authoritative role has a relationship to either you or the owner of the company both inside and outside the storylines, reconsider the idea now because it is a giant red flag. The combination of being of the fairer sex and of having that relationship may cause you to protect her to the point that she can be the hypocritical babyface or condescending tyrant heel who gets away with almost everything with little to no comeuppance (whether physical or simply professional) and can even cut down and weaken the wrestlers through dominating her promos with them and constantly mentioning her sex and family ties to shut them up. No matter how good the woman is with her promos and facial expressions, this will get the company itself side-eyed. In fact, if she's too good at it, it might make it worse and cause people to believe this is the way she is in real life, which ultimately hurts your company's image and even helps magnify anything else you're doing wrong with the women. image. Ask Wrestling/StephanieMcMahon, who now has to say in almost every interview that she is portraying a villainous character."villainous character". And even that may not necessarily help, because some people will see it as either protesting too much or taking dumps all over your product's {{kayfabe}} to the point of desperation.



# Finally, a booker should cultivate interests outside of wrestling, specifically mainstream interests that have nothing to do with wrestling or other RatedMForManly pursuits. If you become too obsessive about wrestling, you will be unable to see the forest for the trees, and your booking skills will decline. [[Wrestling/VinceMcMahon You will become convinced that certain actions are completely the right ones to take, simply because you lack the perspective.]] In the same way that you must be ruthlessly honest about your workers' abilities, you must be honest with yourself about your own. Both arrogance and excessive humility lead to errors of judgment. Just try to see the truth (and don't rely on others to provide it; have trusted advisors -- preferably ones with no conflicts of interest regarding storylines -- but always follow your own vision). It is your job to be enthusiastic, but not blinkered, and it's very easy to get lost in the minutiae of a thing. Ultimately, and as with so much in life, everything in moderation.

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# Finally, a booker should cultivate interests outside of wrestling, specifically mainstream interests that have nothing to do with wrestling or other RatedMForManly pursuits. If you become too obsessive about wrestling, you will be unable to see the forest for the trees, and your booking skills will decline. [[Wrestling/VinceMcMahon You will become convinced that certain actions are completely the right ones to take, simply because you lack the perspective.]] In the same way that you must be ruthlessly honest about your workers' abilities, you must be honest with yourself about your own. Both arrogance and excessive humility lead to errors of judgment. Just try to see the truth (and don't rely on others to provide it; have trusted advisors -- preferably ones with no conflicts of interest regarding storylines -- angles-- but always follow your own vision). It is your job to be enthusiastic, but not blinkered, and it's very easy to get lost in the minutiae of a thing. Ultimately, and as with so much in life, everything in moderation.



** To add to this, try to keep up on what's popular with your target demographic at the moment. Use this as fodder for storylines and characters, and to determine which celebrities might draw attention to your product (but always make sure they will actually contribute to your core business; see Business Ethics, rule #3). For example, if pirates happen to be popular at the moment, try packaging a wrestler in a tongue-in-cheek pirate gimmick; if they can get the character over, it will draw attention immediately, and if they really make it their own, it will remain over long after the fad has passed (see Wrestling/TheUndertaker).

to:

** To add to this, try to keep up on what's popular with your target demographic at the moment. Use this as fodder for storylines angles and characters, gimmicks, and to determine which celebrities might draw attention to your product (but always make sure they will actually contribute to your core business; see Business Ethics, rule #3). For example, if pirates happen to be popular at the moment, try packaging a wrestler in a tongue-in-cheek pirate gimmick; if they can get the character gimmick over, it will draw attention immediately, and if they really make it their own, it will remain over long after the fad has passed (see Wrestling/TheUndertaker).
6th Jul '17 7:25:23 AM Gimere
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** On that note, if you're gonna let the women compete directly with the men, ''let them get hit — '''but DO NOT overdo it'''.'' Contrary to what many fanfiction authors believe, the day a woman who's not a WrestlingMonster, even a powerfully built one like Wrestling/BethPhoenix, beats one of the most renowned male wrestlers and badasses in the world, Wrestling/ShinsukeNakamura for example, for a World Heavyweight Championship, the match is going to be scrutinized half to death. If the man brutalized the woman and she took his every blow but beat him with FiveMovesOfDoom Wrestling/JohnCena-style, or if he didn't touch her at all because the network won't allow man-on-woman violence, you will get torn asunder and accused of unrealistic pandering to identity politics. But let's say he did hit her with a few big blows which she kicked out of, showing uncanny toughness, but couldn't quite pull the trigger on hitting her with his FinishingMove, and she laid in more moves than he did as well as employed some feminine guile before sneaking in either a roll-up or her own finisher on him. You'll still have many detractors, but that match would be much better received as being grounded in realism, and would most likely win over nearly everyone that even could be won over.

to:

** On that note, if you're gonna let the women compete directly with the men, ''let them get hit — '''but DO NOT don't overdo it'''.'' Contrary to what many fanfiction authors believe, the day a woman who's not a WrestlingMonster, even a powerfully built one like Wrestling/BethPhoenix, beats one of the most renowned male wrestlers and badasses in the world, Wrestling/ShinsukeNakamura for example, for a World Heavyweight Championship, the match is going to be scrutinized half to death. If the man brutalized the woman and she took his every blow but beat him with FiveMovesOfDoom Wrestling/JohnCena-style, or if he didn't touch her at all because the network won't allow man-on-woman violence, you will get torn asunder and accused of unrealistic pandering to identity politics. But let's say he did hit her with a few big blows which she kicked out of, showing uncanny toughness, but couldn't quite pull the trigger on hitting her with his FinishingMove, and she laid in more moves than he did as well as employed some feminine guile before sneaking in either a roll-up or her own finisher on him. You'll still have many detractors, but that match would be much better received as being grounded in realism, and would most likely win over nearly everyone that even could be won over.
6th Jul '17 7:23:30 AM Gimere
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# The majority of wrestling should be simple, one-on-one or tag-team matches with no interference; {{Face}} vs. {{Heel}}. This is the basic product you are selling, and it’s what the audience wants. One stipulation can be a good thing -- a steel cage match instead of a regular match can drum up business -- and the capper to a truly well-crafted feud. When you have a Contract-On-a-Pole, Two Out of Three Falls, lumberjack match contested in a steel cage under a time limit, it gets ridiculous. The more [[ShockingSwerve swerves]], [[GimmickMatches gimmicks]], run-ins, etc. you add to a match, [[GambitPileup the more confusing it becomes]]. A confused audience is a bored audience, and a bored audience does not come back. Therefore, you lose fans, and more than that, you lose money.
** As a side note, it may seem strange, but good taste should generally prevail when it comes to most storylines. The more [[HilarityEnsues "out-there"]] a storyline becomes, generally the less interest the fanbase has (because they're interested in wrestling), [[ValuesDissonance the more you make yourself look unpalatable to the mainstream]], and the less business in the long run. There are [[Website/{{WrestleCrap}} too many cases demonstrating this principle to go into detail]]. As a general rule, [[{{Squick}} necrophilia, incest]] and similar themes are the purview of 18 certificate {{Euroshlock}}, not a fight between two big angry men. There is a reason that even mentioning the [[OldShame Katie Vick]] saga will make those fans who remember it feel a little ashamed of their love for the "sport." Additionally, an individual wrestler who's tarred with a particularly distasteful gimmick can have his career permanently damaged by association with it. If your promotion gains a reputation for doing this, it becomes that much harder to hire new talent.
# "Protecting" your wrestlers ''(that is, to take your franchise players and keep them from losing or to lose via outside factors)'' is something that is a very fine line to walk. One the one hand, NewJapanProWrestling can be very much a crapshoot where even the top tier superstars on the roster can lose clean to a lowly midcard performer at any given event. On the other, WWE takes a lot of flack for booking several matches a card to end inconclusively or with a distraction leading to a quick pin in an effort to keep both sides looking equal in the eyes of the fans, with the end result being a kind of status quagmire where all wrestlers are made to look strong and therefore none of them do. There is no right answer as far as which direction to take things, but keep in mind that fans are very understanding of the "any given Sunday" aspect of matches wherein sometimes, even for a superior wrestler, it's just not their night. When fans can predict a winner of a match because of the wrestler's relative positions in the company hierarchy, it's too far. But if you have a position where Wrestling/JohnCena loses clean to a Wrestling/SantinoMarella without any shenanigans, that's also too far. Perhaps the lesson is to protect, but don't coddle.
# Clearly observe your wrestlers, and make a note of their strengths and weaknesses. Play to your wrestlers’ strengths, and hide their [[FiveMovesOfDoom weaknesses]]. Learn who you've got working for you and don't just throw opponents together. This was something that was done particularly well in ECW. Playing to your wrestlers' strengths can be the difference between [[Wrestling/DeanMalenko Malenko]] vs. [[Wrestling/EddieGuerrero Guerrero]] (a feud of two completely evenly-matched technical wrestlers, widely regarded as one of the best sets of matches ECW ever produced) and [[Wrestling/TheBigShow Big Show]] vs. Wrestling/{{Batista}} (a WCW giant and a WWE power-face, neither of which were known for their technical skill, booked as the "best" in ECW).
# Let the fans' reaction be your guide. The crowd decides who is a face or heel better than any booker. If they cheer a wrestler, he’s a face. If they boo him, he’s a heel. It is almost impossible to make a crowd cheer for a heel or boo a face (XPacHeat nonwithstanding). Bookings should be made according to crowd reactions.

to:

# The majority of wrestling should be simple, one-on-one or tag-team matches with no interference; {{Face}} vs. {{Heel}}. This is the basic product you are selling, and it’s what the audience wants. One stipulation can be a good thing -- a steel cage match instead of a regular match can drum up business -- and the capper to a truly well-crafted feud. When you have a Contract-On-a-Pole, Two Out of Three Falls, lumberjack match contested in a steel cage under a time limit, it gets ridiculous. The more [[ShockingSwerve swerves]], [[GimmickMatches gimmicks]], run-ins, etc. you add to a match, [[GambitPileup the more confusing it becomes]]. A confused audience is a Confused audiences are bored audience, audiences, and a bored audience does not audiences don't come back. Therefore, back, costing you lose fans, both fans and more than that, you lose money.
** As a side note, it may seem strange, but good taste should generally prevail when it comes to most storylines. The more [[HilarityEnsues "out-there"]] a storyline becomes, generally the less interest the fanbase has (because they're interested in wrestling), [[ValuesDissonance the more you make yourself look unpalatable to the mainstream]], and the less business in the long run. There are [[Website/{{WrestleCrap}} too many cases demonstrating this principle to go into detail]]. As a general rule, [[{{Squick}} necrophilia, incest]] and similar themes are the purview of 18 certificate {{Euroshlock}}, not a fight between two big angry men.foes. There is a reason that even mentioning the [[OldShame Katie Vick]] saga will make those fans who remember it feel a little ashamed of their love for the "sport." Additionally, an individual wrestler who's tarred with a particularly distasteful gimmick can have his career permanently damaged by association with it. If your promotion gains a reputation for doing this, it becomes that much harder to hire new talent.
# "Protecting" your wrestlers ''(that is, to take your franchise players and keep them from losing or to lose via outside factors)'' is something that is a very fine line to walk. One the one hand, NewJapanProWrestling can be very much a crapshoot where even the top tier superstars on the roster can lose clean to a lowly midcard performer at any given event. On the other, WWE takes a lot of flack for booking several matches a card to end inconclusively or with a distraction leading to a quick pin in an effort to keep both sides looking equal in the eyes of the fans, with the end result being a kind of status quagmire where all wrestlers are made to look strong and therefore none of them do. There is no right answer as far as which direction to take things, but keep in mind that fans are very understanding of the "any given Sunday" aspect of matches wherein sometimes, even for a superior wrestler, it's just not their night. When fans can predict a winner of a match because of the wrestler's relative positions in the company hierarchy, it's you've gone too far. But if you have a position where Wrestling/JohnCena loses the Wrestling/{{John Cena}}s of the world lose clean to a Wrestling/SantinoMarella the Wrestling/{{Santino Marella}}s without any shenanigans, that's also you've ''also'' gone too far. Perhaps the The lesson is to protect, but don't not coddle.
# Clearly observe your wrestlers, and make a note of their strengths and weaknesses. Play to your wrestlers’ strengths, and hide their [[FiveMovesOfDoom weaknesses]]. Learn who you've got working for you and don't just throw opponents together. This was something that was done particularly well in ECW. Playing to your wrestlers' strengths can be the difference between [[Wrestling/DeanMalenko Malenko]] vs. [[Wrestling/EddieGuerrero Guerrero]] (a feud of two completely evenly-matched technical wrestlers, widely regarded as one of the best sets of matches ECW ever produced) and [[Wrestling/TheBigShow Big Show]] Wrestling/TheBigShow vs. Wrestling/{{Batista}} (a WCW giant and a WWE power-face, neither of which were known for their technical skill, booked as the "best" in ECW).
# Let the fans' reaction be your guide. The crowd decides who is a face or heel better than any booker. If they cheer for a wrestler, he’s they're a face. If they boo him, he’s boo, they're a heel. It is almost impossible to make a crowd cheer for a heel or boo a face (XPacHeat nonwithstanding). Bookings should be made according to crowd reactions.



** On the flip side, this is the mistake WWE is persistently making with Wrestling/RomanReigns. Hand-picked as the next big face by Wrestling/VinceMcMahon and given a monster push after Wrestling/TheShield broke up, crowds roundly rejected Roman when his shortcomings and limitations became apparent, constantly booing him at every opportunity. Rather than turn him heel to play off the crowd's hatred of him, WWE continued pushing Roman as a face harder and harder, giving him more main events, hanging more titles on him and positioning him as TheHero of the WWE even as the fans continued to boo. While Roman's abilities and performances have drastically improved since his solo career began to the point that all but his most ardent haters have to admit that he's a very competent wrestler, his constant face push is still receiving a terrible response. Countless people within the industry have all but ''begged'' Vince to turn Roman heel and let him work his way back into favour (which worked famously well when Rocky Maivia was rebranded as Wrestling/TheRock in the 90s) but Vince persists in insisting that ''he'' rather than the fans decides who is face and who is heel, resulting in Roman becoming possibly [[TheScrappy the most-hated face in wrestling history]]. Fortunes may be changing for him, however, as he's now playing a much more aggressive {{Tweener}}, though only time will tell if this will be enough for him to be RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap.

to:

** On the flip side, this is the mistake WWE is persistently making with Wrestling/RomanReigns. Hand-picked as the next big face by Wrestling/VinceMcMahon and given a monster push after Wrestling/TheShield broke up, crowds roundly rejected Roman when his shortcomings and limitations became apparent, constantly booing him at every opportunity. Rather than turn him heel to play off the crowd's hatred of him, WWE continued pushing Roman as a face harder and harder, giving him more main events, hanging more titles on him and positioning him as TheHero of the WWE even as the fans continued to boo. While Roman's abilities and performances have drastically improved since his solo career began to the point that all but his most ardent haters have to admit that he's a very competent wrestler, his constant face push is still receiving a terrible response. Countless people within the industry have all but ''begged'' Vince to turn Roman heel and let him work his way back into favour (which worked famously well when Rocky Maivia was rebranded as Wrestling/TheRock in the 90s) but Vince persists in insisting that ''he'' rather than the fans decides who is face and who is heel, resulting in Roman becoming possibly [[TheScrappy the most-hated face in wrestling history]]. Fortunes may be changing for him, however, as he's now playing a much more aggressive {{Tweener}}, [[WildCard Tweener]], though only time will tell if this will be enough for him to be RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap.



** Logical reasons are either over the belt, a believable [[{{Revenge}} grudge]], a test of excellence (TechnicianVsPerformer, or two of the best going at it), or a combination of any of the three. Logical reasons do not include behavior that doesn't occur in real life: e.g., fighting over the rights to the name “T,” as Wrestling/BookerT once did.

to:

** Logical reasons are either over the belt, a believable championships, [[{{Revenge}} grudge]], a test believable grudges]], tests of excellence (TechnicianVsPerformer, or two of the best going at it), or a combination of any of the three. Logical reasons do not ''do not'' include behavior behaviors that doesn't don't occur in real life: e.life (e.g., fighting over the rights to the name “T,” as Wrestling/BookerT once did.did).



** Of special consideration are Retirement Matches. Retirement stipulations have been broken so often that fans have now been conditioned to regard it as a DiscreditedTrope. [[RunningGag Terry Funk's "retirement"]] is a joke that was old in 1999, and Wrestling/RicFlair's return after his "retirement" clearly demonstrated that [[CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming no matter how perfect the send-off]], no matter how appropriate, [[TearJerker no matter how emotional]], [[TenMinuteRetirement it won't stick]]. [[WrestlingDoesntPay Why not?]] [[MoneyDearBoy Unless you're prepared to support them afterwards, wrestlers have to earn money somehow]]. We'll say it again: no wrestling promoter has yet invested in a sound retirement plan for their workers, and it's the exception rather than the rule for a wrestler to wisely invest his own income. Unless you're 100% certain that your wrestler isn't going to be performing ''anywhere'' afterward, don't use the retirement angle; it's always a lie.

to:

** Of special consideration are Retirement Matches. Retirement stipulations have been broken so often that fans have now been conditioned to regard it as a DiscreditedTrope. [[RunningGag Terry Funk's "retirement"]] is a joke that was old in 1999, and Wrestling/RicFlair's return after his "retirement" clearly demonstrated that [[CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming no matter how perfect the send-off]], no matter how appropriate, [[TearJerker no matter how emotional]], [[TenMinuteRetirement it won't stick]]. [[WrestlingDoesntPay Why not?]] not]]? [[MoneyDearBoy Unless you're prepared to support them afterwards, wrestlers have to earn money somehow]]. We'll say it again: no wrestling promoter has yet invested in a sound retirement plan for their workers, and it's the exception rather than the rule for a wrestler to wisely invest his own income. Unless you're 100% certain that your wrestler isn't going to be performing ''anywhere'' afterward, don't use the retirement angle; it's always a lie.



# [[GarbageWrestler Hardcore matches]] should be used sparingly. Beyond overplaying a gimmick, hardcore matches can destroy the bodies of those involved; just ask Wrestling/MickFoley, or look at the gravestones of Wrestling/ChrisBenoit and his wife and son. Another danger is the [[LensmanArmsRace increasingly dangerous stunts]] people will pull to get reactions out of a desensitized crowd. Use them as a blow-off to a bloody feud and promote the hell out of them so your wrestlers won't feel like they're sacrificing a lot for nothing. More harmless stunts like table bumps or blading can be used more frequently. Unprotected hits to the head and Wrestling/NewJack-esque falls should never, ever be used, fans care about the wrestlers, and watching them get crippled will shock and scare away all but the most [[strike: bloodthirsty]] extreme fans.

to:

# [[GarbageWrestler Hardcore matches]] should be used sparingly. Beyond overplaying a gimmick, hardcore matches can destroy the bodies of those involved; just ask Wrestling/MickFoley, or look at the gravestones of Wrestling/ChrisBenoit and his wife and son. Another danger is the [[LensmanArmsRace increasingly dangerous stunts]] people will pull to get reactions out of a desensitized crowd. Use them as a blow-off to a bloody feud and promote the hell out of them so your wrestlers won't feel like they're sacrificing a lot for nothing. More harmless stunts like table bumps or blading can be used more frequently. Unprotected hits to the head and Wrestling/NewJack-esque falls should never, ever be used, fans care about the wrestlers, and watching them get crippled will shock and scare away all but the most [[strike: bloodthirsty]] extreme fans.



** Wrestlers who routinely stink up the ring and draw XPacHeat without making any effort to improve should be dropped without consideration. No matter ''who'' they are, or who they are friends with. Your business will be better for it.

to:

** Wrestlers who routinely stink up the ring and and/or draw XPacHeat without making any effort to improve should be dropped without consideration. No matter ''who'' they are, or who they are friends with. Your business will be better for it.



# [[AmazonBrigade Women can wrestle]], so take advantage of this. And those who can't, can still be interesting in other ways not exclusive to their bodies. Lingerie matches and their ilk should be used sparingly; they're fine as a once-in-a-blue-moon BreatherEpisode type segment, but making them a staple of your product may insult 51% of the population, which are also 51% of your potential sales. [[ThereAreNoGirlsOnTheInternet Don't make the mistake of thinking your demographic is entirely either men or thirsty fangirls who only care about the men.]] Remember rule one -- you're here to sell a product to the ''fans''. If you hire good female wrestlers, and then book them like proper wrestlers, the fans will treat them like proper wrestlers. If you hire ''great'' female wrestlers and give them the green light, they may even steal the show and get a standing ovation. If you also hire eye candy that ''can't'' wrestle well, rather than throwing them in the ring and booking them stronger than your actual quality wrestlers, try giving them valet or character roles that fit their personality and range. You'll find that opens them up more to fan support as well. Wrestling/SashaBanks and [[Wrestling/RusevAndLana Lana]] can exist favorably in the same world, just as Wrestling/{{Lita}} and Wrestling/TerriRunnels could, or Wrestling/AJStyles and Wrestling/PaulHeyman can. If a non-wrestling female decides she'd like to become a wrestler, allow her plenty of time to train and actually get good before fully transitioning her. (Much of this is the difference between Wrestling/TrishStratus, who went from a model with a gift of gab and a scandalous talent scout gimmick to one of the most legendary women in WWE history, and most of WWE's manufactured attempts to reproduce Trish in later model-turned-wrestlers whose results varied from barely memorable to utterly disastrous, the most infamously recent example being Wrestling/EvaMarie's debacle of a career. Heck, even good wrestlers can sometimes benefit from being introduced in a character role and transitioning into an in-ring role after getting over. Just ask Wrestling/{{Rosemary}}.) Most fans ''want'' to see good female wrestlers and support them, and are also pretty good about interesting female non-wrestlers as well; the only problem comes when those who can't wrestle that well are treated as superior wrestlers and those who can are not given the proper outlet for their skills.

to:

# [[AmazonBrigade Women can wrestle]], so take advantage of this. And those who can't, can still be interesting in other ways not exclusive to their bodies. [[{{Fanservice}} Lingerie matches and their ilk ilk]] should be used sparingly; they're fine as a once-in-a-blue-moon BreatherEpisode type segment, but making them a staple of your product may insult insults 51% of the population, which are also and can therefore hurt 51% of your potential sales. [[ThereAreNoGirlsOnTheInternet Don't make the mistake of thinking your demographic is entirely either men or thirsty fangirls who only care about the men.]] Remember rule one -- you're here to sell a product to the ''fans''. If you hire good female wrestlers, and then book them like proper wrestlers, the fans will treat them like proper wrestlers. If you hire ''great'' female wrestlers and give them the green light, they may even steal the show and get a standing ovation. If you also hire eye candy that women who look great but ''can't'' wrestle well, rather than throwing them in the ring and booking them stronger than your actual quality wrestlers, try giving them valet or character manager roles that fit their personality and range. You'll find that opens them up more to fan support as well. Wrestling/SashaBanks and [[Wrestling/RusevAndLana Lana]] can exist favorably in the same world, just as Wrestling/{{Lita}} and Wrestling/TerriRunnels could, did, or Wrestling/AJStyles and Wrestling/PaulHeyman can. do. If a non-wrestling female woman decides she'd like to become a wrestler, allow her plenty of time to train and actually get good before fully transitioning her. (Much of this is the difference between Wrestling/TrishStratus, who went from a model with a gift of gab and a scandalous talent scout gimmick to one of the most legendary women in WWE history, and most of WWE's manufactured attempts to reproduce Trish in later model-turned-wrestlers whose results varied from barely memorable to utterly disastrous, the most infamously recent example being Wrestling/EvaMarie's debacle of a career. Heck, even good wrestlers can sometimes benefit from being introduced in a character role and transitioning into an in-ring role after getting over. Just ask Wrestling/{{Rosemary}}.) Most fans ''want'' to see good female wrestlers and support them, and are also pretty good about interesting female non-wrestlers as well; the only problem comes when those who can't wrestle that well are treated as superior wrestlers and those who can are not given the proper outlet for their skills.
21st Jun '17 12:30:16 AM MoPete
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** On the flip side, this is the mistake WWE is persistently making with Wrestling/RomanReigns. Hand-picked as the next big face by Wrestling/VinceMcMahon and given a monster push after Wrestling/TheShield broke up, crowds roundly rejected Roman when his shortcomings and limitations became apparent, constantly booing him at every opportunity. Rather than turn him heel to play off the crowd's hatred of him, WWE continued pushing Roman as a face harder and harder, giving him more main events, hanging more titles on him and positioning him as TheHero of the WWE even as the fans continued to boo. While Roman's abilities and performances have drastically improved since his solo career began to the point that all but his most ardent haters have to admit that he's a very competent wrestler, his constant face push is still receiving a terrible response. Countless people within the industry have all but ''begged'' Vince to turn Roman heel and let him work his way back into favour (which worked famously well when Rocky Maivia was rebranded as Wrestling/TheRock in the 90s) but Vince persists in insisting that ''he'' rather than the fans decides who is face and who is heel, resulting in Roman becoming possibly [[TheScrappy the most-hated face in wrestling history]].

to:

** On the flip side, this is the mistake WWE is persistently making with Wrestling/RomanReigns. Hand-picked as the next big face by Wrestling/VinceMcMahon and given a monster push after Wrestling/TheShield broke up, crowds roundly rejected Roman when his shortcomings and limitations became apparent, constantly booing him at every opportunity. Rather than turn him heel to play off the crowd's hatred of him, WWE continued pushing Roman as a face harder and harder, giving him more main events, hanging more titles on him and positioning him as TheHero of the WWE even as the fans continued to boo. While Roman's abilities and performances have drastically improved since his solo career began to the point that all but his most ardent haters have to admit that he's a very competent wrestler, his constant face push is still receiving a terrible response. Countless people within the industry have all but ''begged'' Vince to turn Roman heel and let him work his way back into favour (which worked famously well when Rocky Maivia was rebranded as Wrestling/TheRock in the 90s) but Vince persists in insisting that ''he'' rather than the fans decides who is face and who is heel, resulting in Roman becoming possibly [[TheScrappy the most-hated face in wrestling history]]. Fortunes may be changing for him, however, as he's now playing a much more aggressive {{Tweener}}, though only time will tell if this will be enough for him to be RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap.
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