History SeriousBusiness / RealLife

7th Oct '17 9:39:53 PM nombretomado
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** Getting diamonds out of the ground can also be SeriousBusiness. In certain parts of Africa (Rwanda, Uganda etc.) diamond miners work a buck a day to dig out bucket-loads of the stuff, and will be shot, point blank, no questions asked, on the mere suspicion that they pocketed a tiny piece. [[BloodDiamond Buy synthetic ones, or zircons, or just buy nicely cut glass. Please! People should not die for aesthetics. Vain aesthetics!]] In addition, the profits of diamonds exported from these countries often go to fund oppressive governments or guerrilla groups.

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** Getting diamonds out of the ground can also be SeriousBusiness. In certain parts of Africa (Rwanda, Uganda etc.) diamond miners work a buck a day to dig out bucket-loads of the stuff, and will be shot, point blank, no questions asked, on the mere suspicion that they pocketed a tiny piece. [[BloodDiamond [[Film/BloodDiamond Buy synthetic ones, or zircons, or just buy nicely cut glass. Please! People should not die for aesthetics. Vain aesthetics!]] In addition, the profits of diamonds exported from these countries often go to fund oppressive governments or guerrilla groups.
7th Oct '17 7:46:42 PM BlueXIII
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** See also: MusicIsPolitics
2nd Oct '17 8:54:33 PM BlueXIII
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* Forums or any other online discussion boards take the age of their users very seriously. Most forums require that the user be at least 13 years old to sign up for an account and their accounts are deleted quickly if the user is discovered to be underaged. Why is it a big deal? Because in April 2000, the US introduced a federal law requiring websites[[labelnote:Note]]It applies to sites that are run: 1. under U.S. jurisdiction; 2.hosted on servers in the U.S.; 3. owners headquartered in U.S. territory; or 4. available in U.S. market (the last one does not, however, apply to foreign customers on foreign websites.)[[/labelnote]] to require parent's permission for someone aged 12 or younger, but most websites blanket ban them because it would likely take too much cost and work to comply with. It's supposed to protect children from questionable content and the people running the web site can be held responsible if something happens to a child that signed up on the site.[[labelnote:Note]]The people running the website would be forced to pay $40,000 per violation.[[/labelnote]]

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* Forums or any other online discussion boards take the age of their users very seriously. Most forums require that the user be at least 13 years old to sign up for an account and their accounts are deleted quickly if the user is discovered to be underaged. Why is it a big deal? Because in April 2000, the US introduced a federal law requiring websites[[labelnote:Note]]It applies to sites that are run: 1. under U.S. jurisdiction; 2.hosted on servers in the U.S.; 3. owners headquartered in U.S. territory; or 4. available in U.S. market (the last one does not, however, apply to foreign customers users on foreign websites.)[[/labelnote]] to require parent's permission for someone aged 12 or younger, but most websites blanket ban them because it would likely take too much cost and work to comply with. It's supposed to protect children from questionable content and the people running the web site can be held responsible if something happens to a child that signed up on the site.[[labelnote:Note]]The people running the website would be forced to pay $40,000 per violation.[[/labelnote]]
2nd Oct '17 8:53:50 PM BlueXIII
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* Forums or any other online discussion boards take the age of their users very seriously. Most forums require that the user be at least 13 years old to sign up for an account and their accounts are deleted quickly if the user is discovered to be underaged. Why is it a big deal? Because many cities and countries in the world have laws in place that is supposed to protect children from questionable content and the people running the web site can be held responsible if something happens to a child that signed up on the site.

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* Forums or any other online discussion boards take the age of their users very seriously. Most forums require that the user be at least 13 years old to sign up for an account and their accounts are deleted quickly if the user is discovered to be underaged. Why is it a big deal? Because many cities and countries in April 2000, the US introduced a federal law requiring websites[[labelnote:Note]]It applies to sites that are run: 1. under U.S. jurisdiction; 2.hosted on servers in the world have laws U.S.; 3. owners headquartered in place that is U.S. territory; or 4. available in U.S. market (the last one does not, however, apply to foreign customers on foreign websites.)[[/labelnote]] to require parent's permission for someone aged 12 or younger, but most websites blanket ban them because it would likely take too much cost and work to comply with. It's supposed to protect children from questionable content and the people running the web site can be held responsible if something happens to a child that signed up on the site.[[labelnote:Note]]The people running the website would be forced to pay $40,000 per violation.[[/labelnote]]
19th Sep '17 6:37:29 PM Deadlock
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** There is also the question of quality. When a contract for cookies is fulfilled by the lowest bidder, you want to ensure they won't be making the dough from sawdust and ashes.
10th Sep '17 7:02:49 PM DustSnitch
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** One of the anecdotes of the life of a [[{{Jesus}} world-altering religious figure]] make this SeriousBusiness OlderThanFeudalism. Jesus attends a wedding at Cana and helpfully turns water into wine when the supply runs out, leading to one guest praising the groom for not serving inferior wine once everyone's too drunk to notice the difference, like they do at all those other weddings...

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** One of the anecdotes of the life of a [[{{Jesus}} world-altering religious figure]] [[UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}} certain Nazarene carpenter]] make this SeriousBusiness OlderThanFeudalism. Jesus attends a wedding at Cana and helpfully turns water into wine when the supply runs out, leading to one guest praising the groom for not serving inferior wine once everyone's too drunk to notice the difference, like they do at all those other weddings...
9th Sep '17 5:37:52 PM Malady
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* The act of ''Loading the Dishwasher'' is Serious Business. It destroys marriages. [[http://youtu.be/DFiCVGl_Hdc#t=1m35s Just ask Bill Engvall]]. On average, 4 Americans every year die due to improperly loaded dishwashers. There's also the consideration that getting it ''really'' badly wrong can damage the machine, leading to expensive repair bills. Actually becomes a minor plot point in Johnathan Demme's ''RachelGettingMarried'', leading to the father and groom having a dishwasher-loading competition.

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* The act of ''Loading the Dishwasher'' is Serious Business. It destroys marriages. [[http://youtu.be/DFiCVGl_Hdc#t=1m35s Just ask Bill Engvall]]. On average, 4 Americans every year die due to improperly loaded dishwashers. There's also the consideration that getting it ''really'' badly wrong can damage the machine, leading to expensive repair bills. Actually becomes a minor plot point in Johnathan Demme's ''RachelGettingMarried'', ''Film/RachelGettingMarried'', leading to the father and groom having a dishwasher-loading competition.
8th Sep '17 1:51:14 PM ZombieAladdin
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* [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pearson_v._Chung Pearson v. Chung]] is a case that made its way up the United States' court system, stopping one step short of the U.S. Supreme Court. The dispute was over Roy Pearson, Jr. receiving his pants late from the Chung family's dry-cleaning service. The courts kept siding with Chung, so Pearson, a real legal {{Determinator}}, kept appealing to higher courts until they started ignoring him as he was so annoying.
26th Aug '17 8:56:06 PM Steven
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** Banks also play a vital role with money. You're entrusting your money to an institution that loans money to other people or companies and said banks take their job ''very'' seriously in keeping track on where that money goes. Any screw up with paperwork or transactions by the bank can cost the bank money and customers and the higher ups will not hesitate to fire a bank employee for major mistakes or gross incompetence. If an employee even attempts to ''steal'' money from their own bank, they're effectively banned from working at ''any'' bank for the rest of their lives.
21st Aug '17 8:36:29 AM EDP
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* In Italy, selling food as something of higher quality or not respecting the strict laws about production and quality controls are crimes of jurisdiction of a special branch of the ''Carabinieri''. In case you don't know who the ''Carabinieri'' do, they are the Italian gendarmerie, and were ''part of the Italian Army'' until 2000, when they became ''their own branch of the armed forces'', and they still double as military police. That's right: food crimes in Italy mean dealing with military-trained police officers that may show up with assault rifles and ''machine guns''.
** Initially the Italians themselves felt it was exaggerated. After in 1986 a winemaker added [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methanol methanol]] to their product to increase alcoholic gradation while cutting costs and people suffered extreme damage to their health (plus 23 deaths), the Italians felt that not only it was {{Justified}}, but that ''[[UpToEleven they had to be increased in numbers and preparation]]''.

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* In Italy, selling food as something of higher quality or not respecting the strict laws about production and quality controls are crimes of jurisdiction of a special branch of the ''Carabinieri''. In case you don't know who the ''Carabinieri'' do, are, they are the Italian gendarmerie, and were ''part of the Italian Army'' until 2000, when they became ''their own branch of the armed forces'', and they still double as military police. That's right: food crimes in Italy mean dealing with military-trained police officers that may show up with assault rifles and ''machine guns''.
** Initially the Italians themselves felt it was exaggerated. After in 1986 a winemaker added [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methanol methanol]] to their product to increase alcoholic gradation while cutting costs and people suffered extreme damage to their health (plus 23 deaths), the Italians felt that not only it was {{Justified}}, but that ''[[UpToEleven they had to be increased in numbers and preparation]]''. Seems to have paid off, as the next time someone tried it the ''Carabinieri'' got them before the wine could be actually sold.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=SeriousBusiness.RealLife