History Series / WalkerTexasRanger

23rd Jun '16 4:32:14 PM CelPrevXXVI
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Subject to much MemeticMutation in the 2000s. This is thanks, at least partially, to Conan O'Brien, who used to play [[{{Narm}} unintentionally humorous]] clips from the series on his show by way of the "Walker Texas Ranger Lever". As well as the general {{Memetic Badass}}ness of Creator/ChuckNorris.

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Subject to much MemeticMutation in the 2000s. This is thanks, at least partially, to Conan O'Brien, who used to play [[{{Narm}} unintentionally humorous]] clips from the series on his show by way of the "Walker Texas Ranger Lever". As well as the general {{Memetic Badass}}ness Badass}}ery of Creator/ChuckNorris.
16th Jun '16 5:14:41 AM NekoHybrid
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* CatchAndReturn: In the crossover with ''Martial Law'', while Sammo Law was fighting a mook, another mook throws a metal thermos at him. Sammo turns and catches the thermos one-handed, then proceeds to beat the mook he was fighting with it before throwing him into the throwing mook. Then, Sammo flings the thermos back at the thrower, nailing him in the head.
19th May '16 9:52:48 AM HeroGal2347
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* MadAtADream: In the episode "Silk Dreams", assistant district attorney Alex Cahill keeps having nightmares of Walker getting shot, eventually working up to his partner, Trivette, shooting him. At the end, when everything has been worked out, Walker makes a comment which Alex interprets to mean she looks terrible. She begins saying it was all his fault for getting shot in her dreams and worrying her, and when he points out it was Trivette who shot him in her dreams, she turns her irritation on him. Then Walker puts an end to it by pulling her onto the dance floor.
17th May '16 6:57:28 PM NekoHybrid
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* InsigniaRipOffRitual: Walker fights and beats up a corrupt racist sheriff who ruled a small town with an iron fist and FantasticRacism. After Walker kicks the shit out of him, he rips the sheriff badge off his chest, signifying the bastard doesn't deserve to wear it.
15th May '16 8:00:17 PM Jokubas
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* CrapsackWorld: With how many criminals with the mindset that it's perfectly ok to assault law enforcement at a moments notice it's clearly not a good place. The fact that the Rangers (and sometimes even just Walker himself) tend to be the only ones who can stand up to the villains and not end up either dead or otherwise taken out of the game, make it look like a world that survives only by the presence of Walker. This also helps to make many of the messages in the series feel like BrokenAesops.

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* CrapsackWorld: With how many criminals with the mindset that it's perfectly ok to assault law enforcement at a moments notice it's clearly not a good place. The fact that the Rangers (and sometimes even just Walker himself) tend to be the only ones who can stand up to the villains and not end up either dead or otherwise taken out of the game, make it look like a world that survives only by the presence of Walker. This also helps to make many of the messages in the series feel like BrokenAesops.[[BrokenAesop Broken Aesops]].
15th May '16 7:59:50 PM Jokubas
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* CrapsackWorld: With how many criminals with the mindset that it's perfectly ok to assault law enforcement at a moments notice its clearly not a good place.

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* CrapsackWorld: With how many criminals with the mindset that it's perfectly ok to assault law enforcement at a moments notice its it's clearly not a good place.place. The fact that the Rangers (and sometimes even just Walker himself) tend to be the only ones who can stand up to the villains and not end up either dead or otherwise taken out of the game, make it look like a world that survives only by the presence of Walker. This also helps to make many of the messages in the series feel like BrokenAesops.
15th May '16 7:52:05 PM Jokubas
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* BrokenAesop: How many characters stood up to bullies and thugs, only to get cut down by said thugs a scene or two later? Sometimes, it's because they themselves have been guilty of being in the wrong and are having a change of heart, or they aren't wise enough to deal with their oppressor in an manipulative or calm, controlled manner.
** Not so broken: Stand up to evil, even if it means making the ultimate sacrifice.

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* BrokenAesop: How many characters stood up to bullies and thugs, only to get cut down by said thugs a scene or two later? Sometimes, it's because they themselves have been guilty of being in the wrong and are having a change of heart, or they aren't wise enough to deal with their oppressor in an manipulative or calm, controlled manner.
** Not so broken:
manner. The intention is probably: Stand up to evil, even if it means making the ultimate sacrifice.sacrifice.
** The worst part is what happens to characters ''around'' the person attempting to redeem themselves. In one episode, a kid is inspired to stand up against the corruption he's witnessed and tells an authority figure about it. All this ends up accomplishing is getting ''that'' person killed and solidifying the villain's control. The kid himself is only spared by the last second intervention by Walker. Ultimately, it makes the message feel more like "Only do the right thing if Chuck Norris is around, because otherwise you're just going to get people killed and make the bad guy stronger."
** Many episodes end with Walker sparing a dangerous mastermind because it's up to the law to handle them, but many villains break out of prison, or are otherwise ex-cons that manage to kill a few of the people who helped put them away before they're stopped. One recurring villain even managed to take the court hostage and killed the judge ([[spoiler:though at least Walker finally put him down after that]]). It's an aesop that generally works in real life, but in a series with villains who aren't generally stopped by anyone other than Walker, it tends to fall flat.
15th May '16 7:20:49 PM Jokubas
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* WhatMeasureIsAMook: Walker generally doesn't have a problem dispatching everyone on the way to the main villain, only to spare the main villain themselves with a speech about how [[BrokenAesop their fate is up to the law, not Walker]]. One episode has him grin as he intentionally causes a mook to trigger their own bomb, only to go out of his way to spare the mastermind, who was actually shown to be a monster. This is made all the worse by the fact that if a villain is ever shown doubting the mastermind or attempting to redeem themselves, they're usually killed, giving the impression that the average mook is only working for the episode's BigBad because they have no other choice.

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* WhatMeasureIsAMook: Walker generally doesn't have a problem dispatching everyone on the way to the main villain, only to spare the main villain themselves with a speech about how [[BrokenAesop their fate is up to the law, not Walker]]. One episode has him grin as he intentionally causes a mook to trigger their own bomb, only to go out of his way to spare the mastermind, who was actually shown to be a monster. This is made all the worse by the fact that if a villain is ever shown doubting the mastermind or attempting to redeem themselves, [[RedemptionEqualsDeath they're usually killed, killed]], giving the impression that the average mook is only working for the episode's BigBad because they have no other choice.
15th May '16 7:19:57 PM Jokubas
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* WhatMeasureIsAMook: Walker generally doesn't have a problem dispatching everyone on the way to the main villain, only to spare the main villain themselves with a speech about how their fate is up to the law, not Walker. One episode has him grin as he intentionally causes a mook to trigger their own bomb, only to go out of his way to spare the mastermind, who was actually shown to be a monster. This is made all the worse by the fact that if a villain is ever shown doubting the mastermind or attempting to redeem themselves, they're usually killed, giving the impression that the average mook is only working for the episode's BigBad because they have no other choice.

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* WhatMeasureIsAMook: Walker generally doesn't have a problem dispatching everyone on the way to the main villain, only to spare the main villain themselves with a speech about how [[BrokenAesop their fate is up to the law, not Walker.Walker]]. One episode has him grin as he intentionally causes a mook to trigger their own bomb, only to go out of his way to spare the mastermind, who was actually shown to be a monster. This is made all the worse by the fact that if a villain is ever shown doubting the mastermind or attempting to redeem themselves, they're usually killed, giving the impression that the average mook is only working for the episode's BigBad because they have no other choice.
15th May '16 7:19:01 PM Jokubas
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* EvenEvilHasStandards: After Trent and Carlos arrest a pedophile kidnapper, the inmates beat him to within an inch of his life once they found out why he was put in prison. In another episode, when a gang of criminals takes a group of nuns hostage, at least one of them is extremely uncomfortable with this. The leader tells him to shut up--and then two seconds later, himself displays this trope by smacking one of the other members who has started make sleazy advances to one of the postulates. One especially notable case is when a crook named Jackson learns his boss plans to sell a weapon they stole to some people who plan to use it for terrorism, he tries to stop it only to be killed.

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* EvenEvilHasStandards: After Trent and Carlos arrest a pedophile kidnapper, the inmates beat him to within an inch of his life once they found out why he was put in prison. In another episode, when a gang of criminals takes a group of nuns hostage, at least one of them is extremely uncomfortable with this. The leader tells him to shut up--and then two seconds later, himself displays this trope by smacking one of the other members who has started make sleazy advances to one of the postulates.
** It's typical for one member of the villain's group to have second thoughts, only to be killed for them.
One especially notable case is when a crook named Jackson learns his boss plans to sell a weapon they stole to some people who plan to use it for terrorism, he tries to stop it only to be killed.


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* WhatMeasureIsAMook: Walker generally doesn't have a problem dispatching everyone on the way to the main villain, only to spare the main villain themselves with a speech about how their fate is up to the law, not Walker. One episode has him grin as he intentionally causes a mook to trigger their own bomb, only to go out of his way to spare the mastermind, who was actually shown to be a monster. This is made all the worse by the fact that if a villain is ever shown doubting the mastermind or attempting to redeem themselves, they're usually killed, giving the impression that the average mook is only working for the episode's BigBad because they have no other choice.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.WalkerTexasRanger