History Series / WagonTrain

26th Oct '17 2:55:30 PM xcountryguy
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* AdventureTowns

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9th Oct '17 5:21:47 PM Temmere
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* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: Early on, Bill Hawks seemed to be merely travelling with the train, not employed by Adams (and also seemed to be a bit of a RabbleRouser).


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* KarmaHoudini: In "The Zeke Thomas Story," [[spoiler:the title character finds out that his first wife never died and his second wife, with whom he wants to spend the rest of his life, is pregnant. He refuses to let his child be born a bastard (if his second marriage wasn't legal) and resolves to kill his first wife if she won't give him a divorce. He doesn't even care if he's hanged or sent to prison for it. She won't grant the divorce, not wanting to give him up for good, but someone else conveniently kills her first. At episode's end he and his second wife happily ride on with the wagon train, and the fact that he had resolved to murder a woman and, as far as we can tell, would have done it if Flint hadn't interfered carries no consequences.]]


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* OopsIForgotIWasMarried: In "The Zeke Thomas Story," the title character and his new wife, Maggie, are travelling west with the train when Zeke encounters his first wife, Violet. He had thought she was dead, and spent some time trying to find out for sure, but admits to Maggie that once he fell in love with her he just stopped caring whether he ever found out what happened to Violet.
27th Sep '17 4:22:05 PM Temmere
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* ActorExistenceFailure: Series star Ward Bond unexpectedly died of a heart attack in 1961, necessitating a change to John [=McIntyre=] as the new lead. Interestingly, no episode actually deals with Maj. Adams' (Bond's character) leaving/retiring/dying, and so the next episode is [=McIntyre=]'s character taking over from a tyrannical replacement played by Creator/LeeMarvin.



* ActorExistenceFailure: Series star Ward Bond unexpectedly died of a heart attack in 1961, necessitating a change to John [=McIntyre=] as the new lead. Interestingly, no episode actually deals with Maj. Adams' (Bond's character) leaving/retiring/dying, and so the next episode is [=McIntyre=]'s character taking over from a tyrannical replacement played by Creator/LeeMarvin.

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* ActorExistenceFailure: Series star Ward Bond unexpectedly died of a heart attack in 1961, necessitating a change to John [=McIntyre=] as the new lead. Interestingly, no episode actually deals with Maj. Adams' (Bond's character) leaving/retiring/dying, and so the next episode is [=McIntyre=]'s TheAlcoholic: The title character taking over from of the very first episode, "The Willy Moran Story," is an old Army buddy of Adams's who has been a tyrannical replacement played by Creator/LeeMarvin.drunk for a long time. Adams warns him not to drink on the train, but it's hard for him to stop.



* AsTheGoodBookSays: The title character in "The Sam Garland Story" says, "'Wherever you go, I shall be with you.' That's what the Good Book says, Mr. Hale."



* ContinuitySnarl: In "The Captain Dan Brady Story" it's stated that Red Cloud was killed by the title character some years before. He then appears in the later episode "The Sam Darland Story." (He actually died peacefully at the age of 87 in 1909.)



* SiblingMurder: At the start of "The Estaban Zamora Story," Flint comes across a dying man. We find out he was killed by his brother, Bernabe (Creator/LeonardNimoy), but a third brother urges Bernabe not to tell their father, Estaban (Creator/ErnestBorgnine), because he will feel honor-bound to exact revenge.

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* SiblingMurder: SiblingMurder:
** In "The John Cameron Story," three outlaw brothers spend a night with the train, and the next morning a dissatisfied wife rides off with them. Her husband (the title character) and Flint go after them, and by the time they catch up, the brothers are killing each other over her.
**
At the start of "The Estaban Zamora Story," Flint comes across a dying man. We find out he was killed by his brother, Bernabe (Creator/LeonardNimoy), but a third brother urges Bernabe not to tell their father, Estaban (Creator/ErnestBorgnine), because he will feel honor-bound to exact revenge.
22nd Sep '17 4:03:19 PM Temmere
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* ADayInTheLimelight:
** "The Jonas Murdock Story" is one for Bill Hawks. Murdock, one of the wagon trainers, violates a Native chief's order not to hunt on his land. Adams confronts him about it and is accidentally seriously wounded. Murdock runs, forcing Charlie Wooster to take charge of the wagon train while Bill goes after Murdock.
** "The Frank Carter Story" is one for Duke Shannon. He goes to a town for supplies and gets confused for a man who used to live there.

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* ADayInTheLimelight:
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ADayInTheLimelight: "The Jonas Murdock Story" is one for Bill Hawks.Hawks (before he's promoted to the main cast when Ward Bond died). Murdock, one of the wagon trainers, violates a Native chief's order not to hunt on his land. Adams confronts him about it and is accidentally seriously wounded. Murdock runs, forcing Charlie Wooster to take charge of the wagon train while Bill goes after Murdock. \n** "The Frank Carter Story" is one for Duke Shannon. He goes to a town for supplies and gets confused for a man who used to live there.


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* PassedOverInheritance: In "The Naomi Kaylor Story," Bill Hawks comes to the ranch of John Kaylor to buy some horses, only to discover that he has just died, leaving behind his widow, Naomi (Creator/JoanFontaine), and daughter from his first marriage, Grace (Natalie Trundy). Naomi clearly does not mourn John, is carrying on with the ranch foreman, and expects to get the bulk of the estate (with a bit set aside for Grace's dowry). When the will is discovered, it turns out Grace gets everything except for a stipend for Naomi -- [[Literature/TheBible thirty silver dollars]] a month. (It seems John was well aware of his wifeís [[YourCheatingHeart infidelity]].)
4th Sep '17 5:03:05 PM Temmere
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* TheCameo: An old college football buddy of Ward Bond's showed up in "The Colter Craven Story": Creator/JohnWayne. (The episode was directed by Creator/JohnFord. The three of them went back decades.)
2nd Sep '17 4:38:41 PM Temmere
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* ADayInTheLimelight: "The Jonas Murdock Story" is one for Bill Hawks. Murdock, one of the wagon trainers, violates a Native chief's order not to hunt on his land. Adams confronts him about it and is accidentally seriously wounded. Murdock runs, forcing Charlie Wooster to take charge of the wagon train while Bill goes after Murdock.

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* ADayInTheLimelight: ADayInTheLimelight:
**
"The Jonas Murdock Story" is one for Bill Hawks. Murdock, one of the wagon trainers, violates a Native chief's order not to hunt on his land. Adams confronts him about it and is accidentally seriously wounded. Murdock runs, forcing Charlie Wooster to take charge of the wagon train while Bill goes after Murdock.
** "The Frank Carter Story" is one for Duke Shannon. He goes to a town for supplies and gets confused for a man who used to live there.


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* IdenticalStranger: In "The Frank Carter Story," Duke Shannon (a scout for the train) comes to a town where he learns he looks just like a former resident, Jason Carter. Only one man, a local attorney, knows Jason is dead, and he convinces Duke to pretend to be him in order to help Carter's mother.


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* ItsNotPornItsArt: In "The John Augustus Story," the title character's "indecent" relationship with a young Chinese woman is brought under further suspicion based on various paintings and statues he has in his wagon. We never get a look at them, but it's heavily implied that they fall under this trope.


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* MalignedMixedMarriage: In "The John Augustus Story," the title character wins a young Chinese woman, Mayleen, in a poker game shortly before joining the train. He doesn't see any reason they canít travel together, but many on the train are offended by the relationship, and it's eventually clear they won't find any peace unless they leave.


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* YamatoNadeshiko: "The John Augustus Story" has a Chinese woman, Mayleen, who is an excellent cook and submissive, but is also very caring and loyal. She is actually referred to, non-derisively, as a "China doll."
23rd Aug '17 8:13:11 PM Temmere
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* AbsenteeActor: A lot of episodes focused either on Major Adams (or, later, Chris Hale) managing the various problems of the train or on Flint, out scouting and dealing with situations that had little to do with the train. This often led to one or the other actor being entirely absent from the story.



* AllAnimalsAreDogs: Caesar Augustus, a lion owned by the title character of "The Shadrack Bennington Story," plays fetch.



* NarrativeProfanityFilter: In "The Albert Farnsworth Story," the title character, feuding with an Irish family who is also travelling in the wagon train, chases away the family's daughter, then sends his orderly over to them, who says, "Colonel Farnsworth presents his compliments, sir, and requests you keep that dirty-nosed little Irish monster of yours in a suitable cage... I took the liberty of toning down the language."
* NobleBigot: The title character of "The Albert Farnsworth Story" (played by Creator/CharlesLaughton) is incredibly arrogant and racist towards just about everyone, including Irish and Native Americans, whom he calls "monkeys" to their faces. But he's also a military doctor who treats people who need him, and obviously deeply cares about his orderly, Jeremy.



* SawAWomanInHalf: The title character of "The Shadrack Bennington Story," in addition to being a SnakeOilSalesman, is also a StageMagician, and performs this trick.



* SnakeOilSalesman: Jethro Creech, the villain of "The Baylor Crowfoot Story," spends most of the episode talking about his personal philosophy of strength (which amounts to bullying everyone around him and calling anyone who won't stand up for himself a coward). Then he calls a big meeting of everyone in the train and expounds on his views, before taking out a bottle of his "special tonic." He says this is a key component in achieving the strength (and thus, success in life) he himself has, and can also cure "arthritis, rheumatism, headache, and consumption!" It seems that just about everyone who hadn't already dismissed his arguments realizes at this point that he's nothing more than a self-aggrandizing fraud.

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* SnakeOilSalesman: SnakeOilSalesman:
** The title character of "The Shadrack Bennington Story" sells "Dr. Bennington's Beneficent Balm," which supposedly cures the bends, dystrepsia, gout, and other ailments.
**
Jethro Creech, the villain of "The Baylor Crowfoot Story," spends most of the episode talking about his personal philosophy of strength (which amounts to bullying everyone around him and calling anyone who won't stand up for himself a coward). Then he calls a big meeting of everyone in the train and expounds on his views, before taking out a bottle of his "special tonic." He says this is a key component in achieving the strength (and thus, success in life) he himself has, and can also cure "arthritis, rheumatism, headache, and consumption!" It seems that just about everyone who hadn't already dismissed his arguments realizes at this point that he's nothing more than a self-aggrandizing fraud.
15th Aug '17 4:47:58 PM Temmere
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Added DiffLines:

* SnakeOilSalesman: Jethro Creech, the villain of "The Baylor Crowfoot Story," spends most of the episode talking about his personal philosophy of strength (which amounts to bullying everyone around him and calling anyone who won't stand up for himself a coward). Then he calls a big meeting of everyone in the train and expounds on his views, before taking out a bottle of his "special tonic." He says this is a key component in achieving the strength (and thus, success in life) he himself has, and can also cure "arthritis, rheumatism, headache, and consumption!" It seems that just about everyone who hadn't already dismissed his arguments realizes at this point that he's nothing more than a self-aggrandizing fraud.
11th Jul '17 3:38:18 PM Temmere
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* FakeUltimateHero: In "The Captain Dan Brady Story," the title character is a hero of the West and travels around with a "Wild West" show. His main claim to fame was defeating the Sioux chief Red Cloud in single combat. But it's ultimately revealed that he's not that capable; he gives bad, outdated advice to several of the wagon trainers, and even his great victory over Red Cloud wasn't as impressive as he makes it out to be. He's not a bad guy, really, he just got caught up in the fame and fortune and doesn't even remember himself how much truth there is in some of his stories.


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* LadyMacbeth: In "The Captain Dan Brady Story," John Grey Cloud functions as a non-married variant. He and the title character are HeterosexualLifePartners; Brady had killed John's father, the Sioux chief Red Cloud, and took care of him after that. John is constantly egging Brady on, encouraging him to commit underhanded deeds and stoking his ego. [[spoiler:It's actually a malevolent plan of John's. He knows Brady wasn't the great hero everyone thinks he is, and is well past his prime. He wants Brady to make a fool of himself because he hates Brady (and all white people, really).]]
19th Jun '17 7:28:46 PM Temmere
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* MyGreatestFailure: The title character of "The Colter Craven Story" (directed by Creator/JohnFord) is a doctor so haunted by his failure to save more men during the Civil War that he can no longer perform surgery.


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* TraumaticCSection: A pregnant woman in "The Colter Craven Story" needs one, but the title character has lost his nerve for surgery.
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