History Series / ThePriceIsRight

23rd Sep '16 11:31:17 AM palmer7
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** "Lottery," the theme to ''Series/TheMatchGameHollywoodSquaresHour'' became a prize cue not long after that show ended, most notably as the intro cue for [=SuperBall!!=] It's now used as a new-car cue.

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** "Lottery," the theme to ''Series/TheMatchGameHollywoodSquaresHour'' became a prize cue not long after that show ended, most notably as the intro cue for [=SuperBall!!=] It's now It was also used as a new-car cue.cue, but left when Mike Richards became showrunner.



** A more deliberate version came with Season 44's opening "Decades Week", which was themed around each decade of ''Price'''s current run (70's, 80's, 90's, 2000's, and 2010's). Each day featured games premiering in that decade (or in the 2010's, refurbished for a few, and the brand new game Vend-O-Price), the audience dressing the part (although stereotypically, given that as mentioned, early ''Price'' was a more sterile affair), themed Showcases, showing a door design from that decade on the screen in the back of the audience, and changing the color of the new turntable walls to match said era. The 70's and 80's days had the most nods to the era, including classic music, Drew dressing like Bob Barker and performing his opening speech from the first episode of ''The New Price is Right'', playing Squeeze Play out on stage instead of on the turntable, prize manufacturer logos on cards instead of graphics, and so on. Even better? George Gray even got the closing plugs correctly on the 70's and 80's, correctly crediting them as "Goodson-Todman" and "Mark Goodson" productions. Then on the 90's day, the Cover Up wrong numbers RunningGag used logos of retired games.

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** A more deliberate version came with Season 44's opening "Decades Week", which was themed around each decade of ''Price'''s current run (70's, 80's, 90's, 2000's, and 2010's). Each day featured games premiering in that decade (or in the 2010's, refurbished for a few, and the brand new game Vend-O-Price), the audience dressing the part (although stereotypically, given that as mentioned, early ''Price'' was a more sterile affair), themed Showcases, showing a door design from that decade on the screen in the back of the audience, and changing the color of the new turntable walls to match said era. The 70's and 80's days had the most nods to the era, including classic music, Drew dressing like Bob Barker and performing his opening speech from the first episode of ''The New Price is Right'', playing Squeeze Play out on stage instead of on the turntable, prize manufacturer logos on cards instead of graphics, and so on. Even better? George Gray even got the closing plugs correctly on the 70's and 70's, 80's, and 90's days, correctly crediting them as "Goodson-Todman" "Mark Goodson- Bill Todman" and "Mark Goodson" productions. Then on the 90's day, the Cover Up wrong numbers RunningGag used logos of retired games.
23rd Sep '16 8:39:41 AM Lirodon
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** Range game has always had the "Find the price in a $600 spread" rule, but when it premiered, the range finder only had a $50 spread, which made it NintendoHard to get the price, naturally. This range was doubled to $100 after a few playings, and then shortly was converted to the $150 spread, which is the standard and gives (technically) a 1 in 4 shot at winning.
** Check-Out started off NintendoHard as well; the contestant's final total for the first decade could only be up to 50 cents away from the correct total. This was doubled to a single dollar, but it only marginally helped and the game remained NintendoHard. In the 2000's, the range was doubled a second time to $2, which is where it is at now.

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** Range game Game has always had the "Find the price in a $600 spread" rule, but when it premiered, the range finder only had a $50 spread, which made it NintendoHard to get the price, naturally. This range was doubled to $100 after a few playings, and then shortly was converted to the $150 spread, which is the standard and gives (technically) a 1 in 4 shot at winning.
** Check-Out started off NintendoHard as well; the contestant's final total for the first decade could only be up to 50 cents away from the correct total. This was doubled to a single dollar, but it only marginally helped and the game remained NintendoHard. In the 2000's, the range was doubled a second time to $2, which $2 (which is where it is at now.now), although Drew still claims whenever it's played that Check-Out is a hard game.



** The main theme has gotten quite a few remixes for prize plugs. [[note]](A "wood" remix for cuckoo clocks, a "dreamy" remix for beds, and another remix for small prizes that was always used for Plinko's fourth prize until Drew became host.)[[/note]]

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** The main theme has gotten quite a few remixes for prize plugs. cues. [[note]](A "wood" remix for cuckoo clocks, a "dreamy" remix for beds, and another remix for small prizes that was always used for Plinko's fourth prize until Drew became host.)[[/note]]host, and a techno version used on electronics)[[/note]]



** When contestants have shirts that imply a desire to play specific pricing games (most frequently Plinko), Drew will often point out the unlikelihood.

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** When contestants have shirts that imply a desire to play specific pricing games reference their favorite game (most frequently Plinko), Drew will often point out the unlikelihood.unlikelihood that they will actually play that game.



** There have been two major spin-offs of the current CBS version; first there was Doug Davidson's infamous syndicated flop ''The New Price is Right'', which had a somewhat more modern and glitzy set (complete with a video wall), used a half-hour format with just three contestants per episode (who also went straight to their pricing game), the Showcase Showdown being a One Bid-style game which involved guessing the price of a product from an old commercial (although some episodes used the Big Wheel due to not having enough old clips), and a single-player Showcase which was essentially played like Range Game (the player chose the required range at random).

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** There have been two major spin-offs of the current CBS version; first there was Doug Davidson's infamous syndicated flop ''The New Price is Right'', which had a somewhat more modern and glitzy set (complete with a video wall), used a half-hour format with just three contestants per episode (who also went straight to their pricing game), the Showcase Showdown being replaced by a One Bid-style Bid-styled game called "The Price ''was'' Right", which involved guessing the price of a product from an old commercial (although some episodes used the Big Wheel due to not having enough old clips), and a single-player Showcase which was essentially played like Range Game (the player chose the required range at random).



* ThemeTuneCameo: The show's theme song has made appearances as a prize cue once in a while, most recently in a piano-based arrangement for certain prizes, and an electronic version for video game and technology-related prizes. Notes from it also showed up as part of the aforementioned Cover Up running gag.

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* ThemeTuneCameo: The Remixes of the show's theme song has have made appearances as a prize cue once in a while, most recently in a piano-based arrangement for certain prizes, and an electronic a techno-ish version for used on electronics such as video game and technology-related prizes. Notes from it also showed up as part of the aforementioned consoles.
** The
Cover Up wrong numbers running gag.gag had a literal example one day, by putting sheet music of the first five notes on the cards.



** Bonkers, Clock Game, Race Game, Split Decision, Switcheroo, and Time Is Money have time limits for making attempts to win, often overlapping with TrialAndErrorGameplay.

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** Bonkers, Clock Game, Hot Seat, Race Game, Split Decision, Switcheroo, and Time Is Money have time limits for making attempts to win, often overlapping with TrialAndErrorGameplay.
23rd Sep '16 8:21:47 AM Lirodon
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* AprilFoolsDay: Several times, the show has held April Fools' Day showcases with gag prizes (which then often led into a Showcase with a major prize, such as a luxury or sports car); including one offering such prizes as a Stato-Intellicator and a trip to Boguslovania (the actual prize was a Corvette).

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* AprilFoolsDay: Several times, the show has held April Fools' Day showcases that begin with gag prizes (which prizes, but then often led into become a Showcase with a major prize, high-value prize such as a luxury or sports car); car after the contestant is let off the hook; including one offering such prizes as a Stato-Intellicator and a trip to Boguslovania (the Boguslovania, until it was revealed that the actual prize was a Corvette).Corvette.
22nd Sep '16 8:30:10 PM Gimere
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** Zig-zagged with "I'm an idiot" bids, wherein the contestant bids $1 more than a bid that is not the highest. In theory, this is a very smart way to bid: if you believe the price falls between two other bids, the safest bid would be exactly one dollar higher than the lower of the two. However, in practice, it's usually done to announce to the audience "I have no idea how this game works!"

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** Zig-zagged with "I'm "[[IdiotBall I'm an idiot" idiot]]" bids, wherein the contestant bids $1 more than a bid that is not the highest. In theory, this is a very smart way to bid: if you believe the price falls between two other bids, the safest bid would be exactly one dollar higher than the lower of the two. However, in practice, it's usually done to announce to the audience "I have no idea how this game works!"



* The mere existence of Plinko, which is arguably the show's most popular pricing game [[note]](The game's popularity (at least amongst contestants) is partially explained in that it's the one pricing game where, statistically, the contestant is almost guaranteed to walk away with ''something''...and that said something is cash rather than an odd or expensive prize that they'd never be able to use or pay taxes on.)[[/note]].

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* The mere existence of Plinko, which is arguably the show's most popular pricing game [[note]](The [[note]]The game's popularity (at least amongst contestants) is partially explained in that it's the one pricing game where, statistically, the contestant is almost guaranteed to walk away with ''something''...and that said something is cash rather than an odd or expensive prize that they'd never be able to use or pay taxes on.)[[/note]].[[/note]].



* AllOrNothing: Two different versions are in play for most of the pricing games.

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* AllOrNothing: Two different versions are in play for most of the pricing games.games:



** GameShowHost: Creator/BillCullen on the 1956-65 versions, with occasional substitutes (as was the case back in the day when TV shows aired live). Bob Barker helmed the show for an amazing 35 years before Drew Carey took over in 2007. Dennis James hosted a nighttime version from 1972-77 (replaced by Barker from 1977-80), Tom Kennedy hosted a revival for the 1985-86 season, and Doug Davidson hosted a short-lived one in the 1994-95 season.
*** Dick Van Dyke was asked to try out as host for the original show in 1956. He replied by saying [[ItWillNeverCatchOn he didn't see any entertainment value in watching four people guess prices for a half-hour]].

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** GameShowHost: Creator/BillCullen on the 1956-65 versions, with occasional substitutes (as was the case back in the day when TV shows aired live). Bob Barker helmed the show for an amazing 35 years before Drew Carey took over in 2007. Dennis James hosted a nighttime version from 1972-77 (replaced by Barker from 1977-80), Tom Kennedy hosted a revival for the 1985-86 season, and Doug Davidson hosted a short-lived one in the 1994-95 season.
*** Dick
season. [[note]]Dick Van Dyke was asked to try out as host for the original show in 1956. He replied by saying [[ItWillNeverCatchOn he didn't see any entertainment value in watching four people guess prices for a half-hour]].[[/note]]



* {{Whammy}}

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* {{Whammy}}{{Whammy}}:



** The "Lose Everything" spaces in "Pass the Buck". If picked, well... you [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin lose everything]].

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** The "Lose Everything" spaces in "Pass the Buck". If picked, well... you [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin lose everything]].



** The large checks with "VOID" stamped on them after a losing round of Check Game. See "Consolation prize" above.

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** The large checks with "VOID" stamped on them after a losing round of Check Game. See "Consolation prize" above.



* AudienceParticipation: Contestants were chosen from the audience since the beginning, but the 1972 return made this part of the show as aired. Much like today, the audience yelled out bid suggestions, "Higher!" and "Freeze!" during the original series (with Bill sometimes commenting that ''Price'' was a modern-day version of the Roman circuses).

to:

* AudienceParticipation: AudienceParticipation:
**
Contestants were chosen from the audience since the beginning, but the 1972 return made this part of the show as aired. Much like today, the audience yelled out bid suggestions, "Higher!" and "Freeze!" during the original series (with Bill sometimes commenting that ''Price'' was a modern-day version of the Roman circuses).



* TheCameo: Several Goodson-Todman hosts made walk-ons to promote the debuts of their new shows, including Bert Convy (for both versions of ''Series/{{Tattletales}}''), Bob Eubanks (for the revival of ''Series/CardSharks'') and Ray Combs (for the revival of ''Series/FamilyFeud''). Eubanks was even called down as a "contestant". Sometimes, they would also come on for other reasons, such as [[Series/MatchGame Charles Nelson Reilly]] congratulating Bob on the show's 3rd Anniversary.

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* TheCameo: TheCameo:
**
Several Goodson-Todman hosts made walk-ons to promote the debuts of their new shows, including Bert Convy (for both versions of ''Series/{{Tattletales}}''), Bob Eubanks (for the revival of ''Series/CardSharks'') and Ray Combs (for the revival of ''Series/FamilyFeud''). Eubanks was even called down as a "contestant". Sometimes, they would also come on for other reasons, such as [[Series/MatchGame Charles Nelson Reilly]] congratulating Bob on the show's 3rd Anniversary.



* {{Crossover}}: Bob, Rod, and some of the models appeared on ''Series/FamilyFeud'' (which at the time preceded ''Price'' on CBS and even taped in the same studio), competing against the cast of ''Series/TheYoungAndTheRestless'' and beating them senseless. The first ''Feud'' episode that week even copied the ''Price'' intro, and had Bob and his team "come on down" out of the studio audience while ''Feud'' announcer Gene Wood called their names. Said ''Y&R'' team was led by Doug Davidson, who later helmed a version of ''Price'' which got beaten senseless.

to:

* {{Crossover}}: {{Crossover}}:
**
Bob, Rod, and some of the models appeared on ''Series/FamilyFeud'' (which at the time preceded ''Price'' on CBS and even taped in the same studio), competing against the cast of ''Series/TheYoungAndTheRestless'' and beating them senseless. The first ''Feud'' episode that week even copied the ''Price'' intro, and had Bob and his team "come on down" out of the studio audience while ''Feud'' announcer Gene Wood called their names. Said ''Y&R'' team was led by Doug Davidson, who later helmed a version of ''Price'' which got beaten senseless.



* LongRunner: The CBS version has run nonstop since 1972, giving it the longest contiguous run by far for any American game show. It's also one of the longest-running game shows in the world. The nine years the original series ran was no small feat in itself, considering how critics considered it the end of civilization as we know it.
7th Sep '16 10:57:33 PM HarryLovesHermione
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Added DiffLines:

** Drew during a pricing game right-or-wrong reveal: "One, two, three, give it to [=him/her=]!"
6th Sep '16 10:34:01 PM jameygamer
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** Range game has always had the "Find the price in a $600 spread" rule, but when it premiered, the range finder only had a $50 spread, which made it NintendoHard to get the price, naturally. This range was doubled to $100 after a few playings, and then shortly was converted to the $150 spread, which is the standard and gives (technically) a 1 in 4 shot at winning.
** Check-Out started off NintendoHard as well; the contestant's final total for the first decade could only be up to 50 cents away from the correct total. This was doubled to a single dollar, but it only marginally helped and the game remained NintendoHard. In the 2000's, the range was doubled a second time to $2, which is where it is at now.



** On at least two occasions, the rules of Switcheroo were relaxed to accomodate a physically challenged contestant. A wheelchair-bound contestant was given 45 seconds instead of the usual 30, since he could not place the blocks himself and had to issue verbal instructions. When a 99-year-old man played, Barker made a big show out of saying the timer was "broken", and let him play an untimed game.

to:

** On at least two occasions, the rules of Switcheroo were relaxed to accomodate accommodate a physically challenged contestant. A wheelchair-bound contestant was given 45 seconds instead of the usual 30, since he could not place the blocks himself and had to issue verbal instructions. When a 99-year-old man played, Barker made a big show out of saying the timer was "broken", and let him play an untimed game.
4th Sep '16 10:23:29 PM erforce
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-->--OpeningNarration used from 1977-2009. The "Bob Barker Studio" bit was added in 1998 on "Show #5,001", and the current opening is an abridged version that notably omits "most exciting", "fantastic", and "fabulous".

to:

-->--OpeningNarration -->-- OpeningNarration used from 1977-2009. The "Bob Barker Studio" bit was added in 1998 on "Show #5,001", and the current opening is an abridged version that notably omits "most exciting", "fantastic", and "fabulous".



** The Cliff Hangers music is an actual yodeling song ("On the Franches Mountains") by a Swiss group called the Jura Orchestra, and the theme from ''Film/ThePinkPanther'' was formerly used in Safe Crackers.

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** The Cliff Hangers music is an actual yodeling song ("On the Franches Mountains") by a Swiss group called the Jura Orchestra, and the theme from ''Film/ThePinkPanther'' ''Franchise/ThePinkPanther'' was formerly used in Safe Crackers.
3rd Sep '16 3:54:45 PM KoopaKid17
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* {{Zonk}}: The piggy bank in "Any Number". Yes, the $3.72 (or whatever) actually counts toward a contestant's total winnings should s/he be unfortunate enough to win it (although strangely, it doesn't appear on the "$35,000+" Showcase winnings graphic used since the late 1990s).

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* {{Zonk}}: {{Whammy}}
** "Danger Price" has the one price you don't want to pick in order to win.
** The "Lose Everything" spaces in "Pass the Buck". If picked, well... you [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin lose everything]].
* {{Zonk}}:
**
The piggy bank in "Any Number". Yes, the $3.72 (or whatever) actually counts toward a contestant's total winnings should s/he be unfortunate enough to win it (although strangely, it doesn't appear on the "$35,000+" Showcase winnings graphic used since the late 1990s).



** Carey joked a few times that if the person won the money from the Piggy Bank, they could go out later and get a burger.

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** *** Carey joked a few times that if the person won the money from the Piggy Bank, they could go out later and get a burger.
1st Sep '16 7:47:54 PM Twentington
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* YouKeepUsingThatWord: For certain One-Bids, George Gray will announce that one of the models is coming down to Bidder's Row with the prize, rather than calling it ''Contestant's'' Row. This happens about once an episode, even though Contestant's Row is it's official name, and Drew Carey never refers to it as Bidder's Row himself.

to:

* YouKeepUsingThatWord: For certain One-Bids, George Gray will announce that one of the models is coming down to Bidder's Row with the prize, rather than calling it ''Contestant's'' Row. This happens about once an episode, even though Contestant's Row is it's its official name, and Drew Carey never refers to it as Bidder's Row himself.
30th Aug '16 7:24:39 AM RobFRules
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Added DiffLines:

* YouKeepUsingThatWord: For certain One-Bids, George Gray will announce that one of the models is coming down to Bidder's Row with the prize, rather than calling it ''Contestant's'' Row. This happens about once an episode, even though Contestant's Row is it's official name, and Drew Carey never refers to it as Bidder's Row himself.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.ThePriceIsRight