History Series / TheBill

20th Mar '16 3:30:07 PM aye_amber
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The series had been suffering a gradual decline in its viewing figures (especially after the timeslot change), and its long-term future was seen as uncertain, especially after it was dropped from terrestrial TV in Scotland as part of a broader problem with STV, the Scottish version of Creator/{{ITV}}. Its cancellation was announced on 26 March 2010, and the show ended in September of that year. In the same year, The BBC's equivalent LongRunner, the sitcom ''LastOfTheSummerWine'' (actually a decade older than ''The Bill'') was also announced to be ending, bringing the end of an era of British television to many (and, if you count in the end of the American {{Long Runner|s}} ''Series/LawAndOrder'', this gets global).

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The series had been suffering a gradual decline in its viewing figures (especially after the timeslot change), and its long-term future was seen as uncertain, especially after it was dropped from terrestrial TV in Scotland as part of a broader problem with STV, the Scottish version of Creator/{{ITV}}. Its cancellation was announced on 26 March 2010, and the show ended in September of that year. In the same year, The BBC's equivalent LongRunner, {{Long Runner|s}}, the sitcom ''LastOfTheSummerWine'' (actually a decade older than ''The Bill'') was also announced to be ending, bringing the end of an era of British television to many (and, if you count in the end of the American {{Long Runner|s}} ''Series/LawAndOrder'', this gets global).
22nd Jul '15 8:20:43 AM Temmere
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* Virtually every British TV actor having appeared in it at some point, before or after reaching the big time (this list includes a pre-fame Creator/KeiraKnightley, Creator/SeanBean, Creator/JamesMcAvoy, Creator/DavidTennant, and Creator/CatherineTate).

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* Virtually every British TV actor having appeared in it at some point, before or after reaching the big time (this list includes a pre-fame Creator/KeiraKnightley, Creator/SeanBean, Creator/JamesMcAvoy, Creator/DavidTennant, Creator/CatherineTate, and Creator/CatherineTate).Creator/IdrisElba).
27th Feb '15 7:42:12 PM Angeldeb82
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** It was played straight once or twice. Sergeant Cryer turned down promotion. His short tenure as a plain clothes officer ended with him deciding it wasn't where he wanted his career to go, and opting to go back to his old job in uniform where he felt more comfortable. Similarly, PC Tony Stamp remained a PC for his entire 26 year time on the series by choice, deliberately ''refusing'' any attempts to promote him because he ''prefered'' being near the sharp end of policing.

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** It was played straight once or twice. Sergeant Cryer turned down promotion. His short tenure as a plain clothes officer ended with him deciding it wasn't where he wanted his career to go, and opting to go back to his old job in uniform where he felt more comfortable. Similarly, PC Tony Stamp remained a PC for his entire 26 year time on the series by choice, deliberately ''refusing'' any attempts to promote him because he ''prefered'' ''preferred'' being near the sharp end of policing.
27th Feb '15 7:41:50 PM Angeldeb82
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Originally a PoliceProcedural whose strict aim was to show the dull minutiae of policing, its modus operandi was not unlike that of ''HillStreetBlues''. The use of [[LeaveTheCameraRunning long single camera takes]], shooting the series on raw videotape rather than glossy film, and the ubiquitous use of SteadiCam gave viewers a genuine insight into what it must be like to work inside a real police station. The series became widely seen as a CrimeTimeSoap as the years went on, however, especially after Paul Marquess took over as Executive Producer in 2002. Marquess left the series in 2005, after which the show moved considerably back towards being a PoliceProcedural.

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Originally a PoliceProcedural whose strict aim was to show the dull minutiae of policing, its modus operandi was not unlike that of ''HillStreetBlues''.''Series/HillStreetBlues''. The use of [[LeaveTheCameraRunning long single camera takes]], shooting the series on raw videotape rather than glossy film, and the ubiquitous use of SteadiCam gave viewers a genuine insight into what it must be like to work inside a real police station. The series became widely seen as a CrimeTimeSoap as the years went on, however, especially after Paul Marquess took over as Executive Producer in 2002. Marquess left the series in 2005, after which the show moved considerably back towards being a PoliceProcedural.



For most of its life the show went out at 8pm, before the {{Watershed}} - which had affected specific on-screen content. However, in 2009 it was moved to a once weekly 9pm slot, which meant a cut in episode numbers per year to about 50, and an increase in the amount of violence it may show on-screen. It also ditched the classic ThemeTune, added a "film effect" filter over the action (as part of a move to broadcast it in high definition for the first time), and acquired regular background incidental music, although {{Narm}}ish examples had occasionally appeared in some past episodes. The overall effect was described by some as making things feel a little too ''{{CSI}}''-like.

The series had been suffering a gradual decline in its viewing figures (especially after the timeslot change), and its long-term future was seen as uncertain, especially after it was dropped from terrestrial TV in Scotland as part of a broader problem with STV, the Scottish version of {{ITV}}. Its cancellation was announced on 26 March 2010, and the show ended in September of that year. In the same year, The BBC's equivalent LongRunner, the sitcom ''LastOfTheSummerWine'' (actually a decade older than ''The Bill'') was also announced to be ending, bringing the end of an era of British television to many (and, if you count in the end of the American LongRunner ''LawAndOrder'', this gets global).

to:

For most of its life the show went out at 8pm, before the {{Watershed}} - which had affected specific on-screen content. However, in 2009 it was moved to a once weekly 9pm slot, which meant a cut in episode numbers per year to about 50, and an increase in the amount of violence it may show on-screen. It also ditched the classic ThemeTune, added a "film effect" filter over the action (as part of a move to broadcast it in high definition for the first time), and acquired regular background incidental music, although {{Narm}}ish examples had occasionally appeared in some past episodes. The overall effect was described by some as making things feel a little too ''{{CSI}}''-like.

''Series/{{CSI}}''-like.

The series had been suffering a gradual decline in its viewing figures (especially after the timeslot change), and its long-term future was seen as uncertain, especially after it was dropped from terrestrial TV in Scotland as part of a broader problem with STV, the Scottish version of {{ITV}}.Creator/{{ITV}}. Its cancellation was announced on 26 March 2010, and the show ended in September of that year. In the same year, The BBC's equivalent LongRunner, the sitcom ''LastOfTheSummerWine'' (actually a decade older than ''The Bill'') was also announced to be ending, bringing the end of an era of British television to many (and, if you count in the end of the American LongRunner ''LawAndOrder'', {{Long Runner|s}} ''Series/LawAndOrder'', this gets global).



* Predating ''TheWestWing'' in using the WalkAndTalk.

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* Predating ''TheWestWing'' ''Series/TheWestWing'' in using the WalkAndTalk.



* BringOutYourGayDead: Most of the gay regulars have left via death or serious injury. DC Jo Masters survives by not being prominently lesbian. On the other hand, many of the ''straight'' regulars have left via death or serious injury as well.



* BuryYourGays: Most of the gay regulars have left via death or serious injury. DC Jo Masters survives by not being prominently lesbian. On the other hand, many of the ''straight'' regulars have left via death or serious injury as well.



* CharacterDevelopment: Dale Smith probably gets more of this than any other character. Quite apart from rising up two ranks over the series, he goes from being something of a JerkAss fuelled by racism and homophobia to being a highly capable police officer dedicated to his job and the community he serves.
* ChaseScene: Given its supposed depiction of "genuine police work", the series often ''avoids'' doing over-the-top car chases, with officers often stopping a chase if things look dangerous. However, one notable episode from 1994 titled "Instant Response" is, effectively, a car chase which lasts for ''an entire episode'', shown mainly in one-take scenes shot from the back seat of the police vehicle. It remains to this day one of the series' [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome crowning moments of awesome]].
** That said, ''foot chases'' are ubiquitous in this show, as in OnceAnEpisode. Officer will walk towards suspect, who will then try to leg it, with varying results.

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* CharacterDevelopment: Dale Smith probably gets more of this than any other character. Quite apart from rising up two ranks over the series, he goes from being something of a JerkAss fuelled {{Jerkass}} fueled by racism and homophobia to being a highly capable police officer dedicated to his job and the community he serves.
* ChaseScene: Given its supposed depiction of "genuine police work", the series often ''avoids'' doing over-the-top car chases, with officers often stopping a chase if things look dangerous. However, one notable episode from 1994 titled "Instant Response" is, effectively, a car chase which lasts for ''an entire episode'', shown mainly in one-take scenes shot from the back seat of the police vehicle. It remains to this day one of the series' [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome [[SugarWiki/MomentOfAwesome crowning moments of awesome]].
** That said, ''foot chases'' are ubiquitous in this show, as in OnceAnEpisode.OncePerEpisode. Officer will walk towards suspect, who will then try to leg it, with varying results.



* {{Cliffhanger}}: [[OnceAnEpisode At the end of every single episode]] broadcast between 2002 and 2007, the period in its history when [[CrimeTimeSoap it was very heavily serialised]].
* ClumsyCopyrightCensorship: Sadly, the Region 2 (UK) DVD releases of older episodes appear to suffer from this. The episode "Snout", for example, originally opened with DI Burnside listening to ''Every Breath You Take'' by ThePolice, on his car radio while driving to work. He even sings along (badly) to the chorus of the song. Both the licenced song, and the overlay of Burnside's singing it, are missing on the Region 2 DVD, redubbed with a cover version of same.

to:

* {{Cliffhanger}}: [[OnceAnEpisode [[OncePerEpisode At the end of every single episode]] broadcast between 2002 and 2007, the period in its history when [[CrimeTimeSoap it was very heavily serialised]].
* ClumsyCopyrightCensorship: Sadly, the Region 2 (UK) DVD releases of older episodes appear to suffer from this. The episode "Snout", for example, originally opened with DI Burnside listening to ''Every Breath You Take'' by ThePolice, Music/ThePolice, on his car radio while driving to work. He even sings along (badly) to the chorus of the song. Both the licenced licensed song, and the overlay of Burnside's singing it, are missing on the Region 2 DVD, redubbed with a cover version of same.



* DownerEnding: A particular trope that the series used to be fond of back when it started. The key thing was to show that the police ''don't'' always win, and more often than not an episode would end with two officers drowning their sorrows in the local pub, after a case they've been working on has gone belly-up. Later seasons still kept downer endings in play for certain storylines, but usually opted for slightly more uplifting [[BittersweetEnding bittersweet endings]] instead.

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* DownerEnding: A particular trope that the series used to be fond of back when it started. The key thing was to show that the police ''don't'' always win, and more often than not an episode would end with two officers drowning their sorrows in the local pub, after a case they've been working on has gone belly-up. Later seasons still kept downer endings in play for certain storylines, but usually opted for slightly more uplifting [[BittersweetEnding bittersweet endings]] {{bittersweet ending}}s instead.



* JerkAss: Supt. Tom Chandler, PC Gabriel Kent, PCSO Colin Fairfax, PC Cathy Bradford and Insp. Brian Kite (to name a few).

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* JerkAss: {{Jerkass}}: Supt. Tom Chandler, PC Gabriel Kent, PCSO Colin Fairfax, PC Cathy Bradford and Insp. Brian Kite (to name a few).



* LeaveTheCameraRunning: not so much these days, but in its earliest incarnation the series used cuts and inserts very sparingly indeed, and it wasn't uncommon for a single scene to last for upwards of three or four minutes without any kind of cutaway or edit.

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* LeaveTheCameraRunning: not Not so much these days, but in its earliest incarnation the series used cuts and inserts very sparingly indeed, and it wasn't uncommon for a single scene to last for upwards of three or four minutes without any kind of cutaway or edit.



** One of the most noteable TREV's was Karen England, who "played" the female set of feet in the iconic title sequence from 1984 onwards, and who was still being seen in the background of episodes as late as 2000.

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** One of the most noteable notable TREV's was Karen England, who "played" the female set of feet in the iconic title sequence from 1984 onwards, and who was still being seen in the background of episodes as late as 2000.



* LongRunner

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* LongRunner{{Long Runner|s}}



* OnTheNext / PreviouslyOn - Became a regular part of the format (as in OnceAnEpisode) in 1998. The 2009 revamp stopped doing recaps of previous episodes, but still kept the end-of-episode trailer for "next week".

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* OnTheNext / PreviouslyOn - Became a regular part of the format (as in OnceAnEpisode) OncePerEpisode) in 1998. The 2009 revamp stopped doing recaps of previous episodes, but still kept the end-of-episode trailer for "next week".



* RearrangeTheSong - Many times over the course of 27 years. In 2009 it was finally decided to ''replace'' it with a completely different piece of music, rather than once again rearranging the one which had served it so well in its first 25 seasons. [[spoiler: In the final episode, a new version of the old theme music, that was similar in tone and style to the new 2009 music played over the credits.]]
* RecycledTitle: several times. There were two different episodes titled "Whose Side Are You On?" for example, broadcast nearly a decade apart from each other, each with an entirely different plot to the other.

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* RearrangeTheSong - RearrangeTheSong: Many times over the course of 27 years. In 2009 it was finally decided to ''replace'' it with a completely different piece of music, rather than once again rearranging the one which had served it so well in its first 25 seasons. [[spoiler: In the final episode, a new version of the old theme music, that was similar in tone and style to the new 2009 music played over the credits.]]
* RecycledTitle: several Several times. There were two different episodes titled "Whose Side Are You On?" for example, broadcast nearly a decade apart from each other, each with an entirely different plot to the other.



* {{Retool}}: Again, many times over the course of its [[LongRunner long lifespan]]. The most recent retool was in 2009, begining with the episode "Live By The Sword".
* RevolvingDoorCasting - It has been revealed by one of the actors that they are only ever given six-month contracts at any one time before having those contracts renewed, so (in theory) major cast turnarounds could happen as regularly as half way through each broadcast year.

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* {{Retool}}: Again, many times over the course of its [[LongRunner [[LongRunners long lifespan]]. The most recent retool was in 2009, begining with the episode "Live By The Sword".
* RevolvingDoorCasting - RevolvingDoorCasting: It has been revealed by one of the actors that they are only ever given six-month contracts at any one time before having those contracts renewed, so (in theory) major cast turnarounds could happen as regularly as half way through each broadcast year.



* UnfunnyAneurysmMoment: Kevin Lloyd's character, DC Tosh Lines, was written out (Lloyd had been sacked for drinking problems) as having accepted a job at the coroner's office. The actor died a week later.



** The CID branch usually prefered the more concise ''"[[StockBritishPhrases You're nicked, you slag!]]"''.

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** The CID branch usually prefered the more concise ''"[[StockBritishPhrases You're nicked, you slag!]]"''.slag!]]"''



!!Tropes that ''Series/TheBill'' averts:

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!!Tropes that ''Series/TheBill'' ''The Bill'' averts:
22nd Feb '15 1:27:36 AM tenryufan
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* BillingDisplacement: For the first three seasons, Eric Richard (as Sgt Cryer) and John Salthouse (Inspector Galloway) were always given top billing in the end credits. Not entirely surprising, as those two characters could probably very legitimately be seen as the central stars in the early years. After Salthouse left the series in its fourth season and the format changed to half hour episodes, the tradition continued for another few years with Eric Richard always recieving top billing, regardless of whether Cryer was actually the central character of that given episode or not.



* ExecutiveMeddling: The format has been gradually fiddled about with ever since the decision to move to half-hour episodes in 1988, eventually getting to the point where it (arguably) [[NothingIsTheSameAnymore no longer resembled its previous self]].



* OutlivedItsCreator: Geoff Mcqueen, who wrote the original PilotEpisode and created the series, died in 1995. The series he created kept going until 2010.



* ScrewedByTheNetwork
31st Dec '14 10:27:06 PM nombretomado
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* Virtually every British TV actor having appeared in it at some point, before or after reaching the big time (this list includes a pre-fame KeiraKnightley, Creator/SeanBean, Creator/JamesMcAvoy, Creator/DavidTennant, and Creator/CatherineTate).

to:

* Virtually every British TV actor having appeared in it at some point, before or after reaching the big time (this list includes a pre-fame KeiraKnightley, Creator/KeiraKnightley, Creator/SeanBean, Creator/JamesMcAvoy, Creator/DavidTennant, and Creator/CatherineTate).
30th Dec '14 9:54:41 PM nombretomado
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* Virtually every British TV actor having appeared in it at some point, before or after reaching the big time (this list includes a pre-fame KeiraKnightley, Creator/SeanBean, JamesMcAvoy, Creator/DavidTennant, and Creator/CatherineTate).

to:

* Virtually every British TV actor having appeared in it at some point, before or after reaching the big time (this list includes a pre-fame KeiraKnightley, Creator/SeanBean, JamesMcAvoy, Creator/JamesMcAvoy, Creator/DavidTennant, and Creator/CatherineTate).
30th Aug '14 11:36:37 AM Aurelian
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Added DiffLines:

* YouOweMe: DCI Meadows calls in a favour from someone at Scotland Yard to save himself from the cull of CID after the Don Beech scandal.
5th Aug '14 11:58:02 AM FerryMan12
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* JerkAss: Supt. Tom Chandler, PC Gabriel Kent, PC Colin Fairfax, PC Cathy Bradford and Insp. Brian Kite (to name a few).

to:

* JerkAss: Supt. Tom Chandler, PC Gabriel Kent, PC PCSO Colin Fairfax, PC Cathy Bradford and Insp. Brian Kite (to name a few).
5th Aug '14 11:57:11 AM FerryMan12
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Added DiffLines:

* CharacterDevelopment: Dale Smith probably gets more of this than any other character. Quite apart from rising up two ranks over the series, he goes from being something of a JerkAss fuelled by racism and homophobia to being a highly capable police officer dedicated to his job and the community he serves.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.TheBill